A genus of gram-positive, anaerobic, coccoid bacteria that is part of the normal flora of humans. Its organisms are opportunistic pathogens causing bacteremias and soft tissue infections.
'Anaerobic Bacteria' are types of bacteria that do not require oxygen for growth and can often cause diseases in humans, including dental caries, gas gangrene, and tetanus, among others.
Acute or chronic inflammation of tissues surrounding the apical portion of a tooth, associated with the collection of pus, resulting from infection following pulp infection through a carious lesion or as a result of an injury causing pulp necrosis. (Dorland, 27th ed)
A genus of gram-positive, anaerobic, coccoid bacteria that is part of the normal flora of the mouth, upper respiratory tract, and large intestine in humans. Its organisms cause infections of soft tissues and bacteremias.
Aerobic bacteria are types of microbes that require oxygen to grow and reproduce, and use it in the process of respiration to break down organic matter and produce energy, often found in environments where oxygen is readily available such as the human body's skin, mouth, and intestines.
A genus of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria found in cavities of man and animals, animal and plant products, infections of soft tissue, and soil. Some species may be pathogenic. No endospores are produced. The genus Eubacterium should not be confused with EUBACTERIA, one of the three domains of life.
A pathologic process consisting in the formation of pus.
A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria found in cavities of humans and other animals. No endospores are formed. Some species are pathogenic and occur in various purulent or gangrenous infections.
A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, nonsporeforming, nonmotile rods. Organisms of this genus had originally been classified as members of the BACTEROIDES genus but overwhelming biochemical and chemical findings in 1990 indicated the need to separate them from other Bacteroides species, and hence, this new genus was established.
A family of bacteria found in the mouth and intestinal and respiratory tracts of man and other animals as well as in the human female urogenital tract. Its organisms are also found in soil and on cereal grains.
The complete absence, or (loosely) the paucity, of gaseous or dissolved elemental oxygen in a given place or environment. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
Coccus-shaped bacteria that retain the crystal violet stain when treated by Gram's method.
A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, nonsporeforming, nonmotile rods or coccobacilli. Organisms in this genus had originally been classified as members of the BACTEROIDES genus but overwhelming biochemical and chemical findings indicated the need to separate them from other Bacteroides species, and hence, this new genus was created.
Infections caused by bacteria that retain the crystal violet stain (positive) when treated by the gram-staining method.
A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria. Its organisms are normal inhabitants of the oral, respiratory, intestinal, and urogenital cavities of humans, animals, and insects. Some species may be pathogenic.
Derivatives of BUTYRIC ACID that include a double bond between carbon 2 and 3 of the aliphatic structure. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that include the aminobutryrate structure.
A species of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria originally classified within the BACTEROIDES genus. This bacterium is a common commensal in the gingival crevice and is often isolated from cases of gingivitis and other purulent lesions related to the mouth.
Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.
A genus of motile or nonmotile gram-positive bacteria of the family Clostridiaceae. Many species have been identified with some being pathogenic. They occur in water, soil, and in the intestinal tract of humans and lower animals.
A compound originally developed as an anticoagulant, but possessing anticomplement action and lowering the bactericidal action of blood. It is used in vitro to inhibit blood coagulation and as a diagnostic reagent to encourage the growth of pathogens in the blood. It is also used to stabilize colloidal solutions such as milk and gelatin. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
A PYRIDOXAL-phosphate containing enzyme that catalyzes the dehydration and deamination of L-serine to form pyruvate. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 4.2.1.13.
Accumulation of purulent material in tissues, organs, or circumscribed spaces, usually associated with signs of infection.
Bacteria which retain the crystal violet stain when treated by Gram's method.
The oval-shaped oral cavity located at the apex of the digestive tract and consisting of two parts: the vestibule and the oral cavity proper.
One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.
Inflammation and loss of connective tissues supporting or surrounding the teeth. This may involve any part of the PERIODONTIUM. Periodontitis is currently classified by disease progression (CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS; AGGRESSIVE PERIODONTITIS) instead of age of onset. (From 1999 International Workshop for a Classification of Periodontal Diseases and Conditions, American Academy of Periodontology)
A film that attaches to teeth, often causing DENTAL CARIES and GINGIVITIS. It is composed of MUCINS, secreted from salivary glands, and microorganisms.
Solitary or multiple collections of PUS within the lung parenchyma as a result of infection by bacteria, protozoa, or other agents.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Infections of non-skeletal tissue, i.e., exclusive of bone, ligaments, cartilage, and fibrous tissue. The concept is usually referred to as skin and soft tissue infections and usually subcutaneous and muscle tissue are involved. The predisposing factors in anaerobic infections are trauma, ischemia, and surgery. The organisms often derive from the fecal or oral flora, particularly in wounds associated with intestinal surgery, decubitus ulcer, and human bites. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1688)
An epithelium-lined sac containing fluid; usually found at the apex of a pulp-involved tooth. The lateral type occurs less frequently along the side of the root.
A fulminating bacterial infection of the deep layers of the skin and FASCIA. It can be caused by many different organisms, with STREPTOCOCCUS PYOGENES being the most common.
A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic cocci parasitic in the mouth and in the intestinal and respiratory tracts of man and other animals.
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
Common foot problems in persons with DIABETES MELLITUS, caused by any combination of factors such as DIABETIC NEUROPATHIES; PERIPHERAL VASCULAR DISEASES; and INFECTION. With the loss of sensation and poor circulation, injuries and infections often lead to severe foot ulceration, GANGRENE and AMPUTATION.
Lesion on the surface of the skin of the foot, usually accompanied by inflammation. The lesion may become infected or necrotic and is frequently associated with diabetes or leprosy.
The distal extremity of the leg in vertebrates, consisting of the tarsus (ANKLE); METATARSUS; phalanges; and the soft tissues surrounding these bones.
Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.
The removal of a limb or other appendage or outgrowth of the body. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Maintenance of the hygienic state of the skin under optimal conditions of cleanliness and comfort. Effective in skin care are proper washing, bathing, cleansing, and the use of soaps, detergents, oils, etc. In various disease states, therapeutic and protective solutions and ointments are useful. The care of the skin is particularly important in various occupations, in exposure to sunlight, in neonates, and in PRESSURE ULCER.
The removal of foreign material and devitalized or contaminated tissue from or adjacent to a traumatic or infected lesion until surrounding healthy tissue is exposed. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Long-chain fatty acids of peptococci and peptostreptococci. (1/272)

The long-chain fatty acids extracted from the whole cells of 12 clinically significant species of peptococci and peptostreptococci were characterized by gas-liquid chromatography. The resulting methylated fatty acid profiles (and some unidentified compounds) of 82 strains allowed the 12 species to be separated into four groups. Fifteen strains of Peptostreptococcus anaerobius were placed in group I because they had a unique, prominent compound that occurred in the area where a C8 to C10 fatty acid would be expected. Group II, consisting of Peptostreptococcus intermedius, Peptostreptococcus micros, Peptostreptococcus parvulus, Peptococcus morbillorum, and Peptococcus constellatus, produced C14, C16:1, C18:1, and C18 fatty acids. Peptococcus prevotii, Peptococcus variabilus, Peptococcus magnus, Peptococcus asaccharolyticus, and Peptostreptococcus productus were placed in group III because they contained three to six additional, unidentified compounds that strikingly differentiated them from group II. Peptococcus saccharolyticus was the single species assigned to group IV because it yielded C14, C16, C18:1, C18, and C20 fatty acids and a prominent unidentified peak that occurred between C14 and C16 fatty acids. This study indicated that cellular long-chain fatty acids may be an important tool in clarifying the taxonomy of the peptococci and peptostreptococci.  (+info)

A new hydrolase specific for taurine-conjugates of bile acids. (2/272)

Through the investigation of the bile acid-deconjugation activities of human intestinal anaerobes, a new enzyme was discovered in Peptostreptococcus intermedius which hydrolyzed specifically the taurine-conjugates, but not the glycine-conjugates of bile acids. However, the enzymes in Streptococcus faecalis and Lactobacillus brevis hydrolyzed chiefly the glycine-conjugates.  (+info)

Cloning of fibA, encoding an immunogenic subunit of the fibril-like surface structure of Peptostreptococcus micros. (3/272)

Although we are currently unaware of its biological function, the fibril-like surface structure is a prominent characteristic of the rough (Rg) genotype of the gram-positive periodontal pathogen Peptostreptococcus micros. The smooth (Sm) type of this species as well as the smooth variant of the Rg type (RgSm) lack these structures on their surface. A fibril-specific serum, as determined by immunogold electron microscopy, was obtained through adsorption of a rabbit anti-Rg type serum with excess bacteria of the RgSm type. This serum recognized a 42-kDa protein, which was subjected to N-terminal sequencing. Both clones of a lambdaTriplEx expression library that were selected by immunoscreening with the fibril-specific serum contained an open reading frame, designated fibA, encoding a 393-amino-acid protein (FibA). The 15-residue N-terminal amino acid sequence of the 42-kDa antigen was present at positions 39 to 53 in FibA; from this we conclude that the mature FibA protein contains 355 amino acids, resulting in a predicted molecular mass of 41,368 Da. The putative 38-residue signal sequence of FibA strongly resembles other gram-positive secretion signal sequences. The C termini of FibA and two open reading frames directly upstream and downstream of fibA exhibited significant sequence homology to the C termini of a group of secreted and surface-located proteins of other gram-positive cocci that are all presumably involved in anchoring of the protein to carbohydrate structures. We conclude that FibA is a secreted and surface-located protein and as such is part of the fibril-like structures.  (+info)

Interactions between a single immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein L from Peptostreptococcus magnus and a human kappa light chain. (4/272)

The placement of a tryptophan residue into a single Ig-binding-domain of protein L from Peptostreptococcus magnus has been used to examine the binding interactions between the binding domain and kappa light chains (kappa-chains). The fluorescence intensity of the mutant domain increases on the formation of a complex with kappa-chains. This has been used to determine the Kd of the complex under a range of conditions by using both pre-equilibrium and equilibrium methods. The Kd values determined for the complex with kappa-chains at a number of different pH values are very close to those obtained with the wild-type domain, indicating that the mutation has not substantially affected its binding properties. Examination of the reaction between the mutant domain and kappa-chains by stopped-flow fluorescence shows that complex formation takes place by two discrete, sequential processes. A fast bimolecular reaction, with a rate constant of 8.3x10(5) M-1. s-1 (at pH8.0 and 25 degrees C), is followed by a slow unimolecular process with a rate (1.45 s-1) that is independent of the concentration of the reactants. This suggests that a conformational change occurs after the initial encounter complex is formed. The dissociation of the complex at equilibrium occurs in a single process of rate 0.095 s-1 at pH8.0 and 25 degrees C. Stopped-flow CD studies show that a slow decrease in ellipticity at 275 nm occurs with a rate of 1.3 s-1 when wild-type protein binds to kappa-chains, suggesting that the conformational transition might involve a change in environment around one or more tyrosine residues.  (+info)

The family Coriobacteriaceae: reclassification of Eubacterium exiguum (Poco et al. 1996) and Peptostreptococcus heliotrinreducens (Lanigan 1976) as Slackia exigua gen. nov., comb. nov. and Slackia heliotrinireducens gen. nov., comb. nov., and Eubacterium lentum (Prevot 1938) as Eggerthella lenta gen. nov., comb. nov. (5/272)

16S rRNA gene sequences were determined for Eubacterium exiguum and Peptostreptococcus heliotrinreducens. These species were found to be closely related and, together with Eubacterium lentum, to constitute a branch of the Coriobacteriaceae. Two new genera are proposed on the basis of phenotypic characteristics and 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons: Slackia to include the bile-sensitive species Eubacterium exiguum and P. heliotrinreducens, and Eggerthella to include the bile-resistant Eubacterium lentum. It is proposed that Eubacterium exiguum and Peptostreptococcus heliotrinreducens are transferred to the genus Slackia gen. nov. as Slackia exigua gen. nov., comb. nov. (type strain ATCC 700122T) and Slackia heliotrinireducens gen. nov., comb. nov. (type strain NTCC 11029T), respectively, and Eubacterium lentum is transferred to the genus Eggerthella gen. nov. as Eggerthella lenta gen. nov., comb. nov. with Eggerthella lenta as the type species.  (+info)

Prevalence of corynebacterial 16S rRNA sequences in patients with bacterial and "nonbacterial" prostatitis. (6/272)

The etiology of chronic prostatitis syndromes in men is controversial, particularly when positive cultures for established uropathogens are lacking. Although identification of bacteria in prostatic fluid has relied on cultivation and microscopy, most microorganisms in the environment, including some human pathogens, are resistant to cultivation. We report here on an rRNA-based molecular phylogenetic approach to the identification of bacteria in prostate fluid from prostatitis patients. Positive bacterial signals were seen for 65% of patients with chronic prostatitis overall. Seven of 11 patients with bacterial signals but none of 6 patients without bacterial signals were cured with antibiotic-based therapy. Results indicate the occurrence in the prostate fluid of a wide spectrum of bacterial species representing several genera. Most rRNA genes were closely related to those of species belonging to the genera Corynebacterium, Staphylococcus, Peptostreptococcus, Streptococcus, and Escherichia. Unexpectedly, a wide diversity of Corynebacterium species was found in high proportion compared to the proportions of other bacterial species found. A subset of these 16S rRNA sequences represent those of undescribed species on the basis of their positions in phylogenetic trees. These uncharacterized organisms were not detected in control samples, suggesting that the organisms have a role in the disease or are the consequence of the disease. These studies show that microorganisms associated with prostatitis generally occur as complex microbial communities that differ between patients. The results also indicate that microbial communities distinct from those associated with prostatitis may occur at low levels in normal prostatic fluid.  (+info)

Microbiology of retroperitoneal abscesses in children. (7/272)

Samples of pus from 41 children with retroperitoneal abscess treated between 1974 and 1994 yielded a total of 125 organisms (3.0 isolates/specimen); 58 isolates were aerobic and facultative species (1.4/specimen) and 67 were anaerobic (1.6/specimen). Aerobic bacteria only were isolated from 7 (17%) abscesses, anaerobic bacteria only from 3 (7%) and mixed aerobic and anaerobic bacteria from 31 (76%); 34 (83%) infections were polymicrobial. The predominant aerobic and facultative isolates were Escherichia coli (19 isolates) and Staphylococcus aureus (6), and the predominant anaerobes were Peptostreptococcus spp. (18 isolates), Bacteroides spp. (22) and Prevotella spp. (5).  (+info)

Destructive knee joint infection caused by Peptostreptococcus micros: importance of early microbiological diagnosis. (8/272)

Peptostreptococcus micros is a commensal of the oral cavity and the genitourinary tract that rarely causes serious infections. A case of a destructive knee joint infection with rapid progress caused by P. micros is presented. The significance of the microbiological findings was initially not acknowledged, which contributed to a nonsuccessful clinical outcome.  (+info)

Peptostreptococcus is a genus of Gram-positive, anaerobic, coccus-shaped bacteria that are commonly found as normal flora in the human mouth, gastrointestinal tract, and female genital tract. These organisms can become pathogenic and cause a variety of infections, particularly in individuals with compromised immune systems or following surgical procedures. Infections caused by Peptostreptococcus species can include abscesses, endocarditis, bacteremia, and joint infections. Proper identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing are essential for the effective treatment of these infections.

Anaerobic bacteria are a type of bacteria that do not require oxygen to grow and survive. Instead, they can grow in environments that have little or no oxygen. Some anaerobic bacteria can even be harmed or killed by exposure to oxygen. These bacteria play important roles in many natural processes, such as decomposition and the breakdown of organic matter in the digestive system. However, some anaerobic bacteria can also cause disease in humans and animals, particularly when they infect areas of the body that are normally oxygen-rich. Examples of anaerobic bacterial infections include tetanus, gas gangrene, and dental abscesses.

A periapical abscess is a localized infection that occurs at the tip of the tooth's root, specifically in the periapical tissue. This tissue surrounds the end of the tooth's root and helps anchor the tooth to the jawbone. The infection is usually caused by bacteria that enter the pulp chamber of the tooth as a result of dental caries (tooth decay), periodontal disease, or trauma that damages the tooth's protective enamel layer.

The infection leads to pus accumulation in the periapical tissue, forming an abscess. The symptoms of a periapical abscess may include:

1. Pain and tenderness in the affected tooth, which can be throbbing or continuous
2. Swelling in the gums surrounding the tooth
3. Sensitivity to hot, cold, or pressure on the tooth
4. Fever, general malaise, or difficulty swallowing (in severe cases)
5. A foul taste in the mouth or bad breath
6. Tooth mobility or loosening
7. Formation of a draining sinus tract (a small opening in the gums that allows pus to drain out)

Periapical abscesses require dental treatment, which typically involves removing the infected pulp tissue through root canal therapy and cleaning, shaping, and sealing the root canals. In some cases, antibiotics may be prescribed to help control the infection, but they do not replace the necessary dental treatment. If left untreated, a periapical abscess can lead to severe complications, such as the spread of infection to other parts of the body or tooth loss.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Peptococcus" is not a currently recognized or valid genus of bacteria in modern medical or scientific classification. It seems there might be some confusion here, as the correct name for the bacterial group you may be referring to is "Peptostreptococcus."

Peptostreptococcus is a genus of Gram-positive, anaerobic, coccus-shaped bacteria. These bacteria are commonly found in the human mouth, gastrointestinal tract, and female genital tract. They can sometimes cause opportunistic infections in humans, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems or when they enter areas where they shouldn't be, such as deep tissue or the bloodstream.

I hope this clarification helps! If you have any further questions, please let me know.

Aerobic bacteria are a type of bacteria that require oxygen to live and grow. These bacteria use oxygen as the final electron acceptor in their respiratory chain to generate energy in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate). Aerobic bacteria can be found in various environments, including soil, water, and the air, as well as on the surfaces of living things. Some examples of aerobic bacteria include species of Pseudomonas, Bacillus, and Staphylococcus.

It's worth noting that some bacteria can switch between aerobic and anaerobic metabolism depending on the availability of oxygen. These bacteria are called facultative anaerobes. In contrast, obligate anaerobes are bacteria that cannot tolerate oxygen and will die in its presence.

"Eubacterium" is a genus of Gram-positive, obligately anaerobic, non-sporeforming bacteria that are commonly found in the human gastrointestinal tract. These bacteria are typically rod-shaped and can be either straight or curved. They play an important role in the breakdown of complex carbohydrates and the production of short-chain fatty acids in the gut, which are beneficial for host health. Some species of Eubacterium have also been shown to have probiotic properties and may provide health benefits when consumed in appropriate quantities. However, other species can be opportunistic pathogens and cause infections under certain circumstances.

Suppuration is the process of forming or discharging pus. It is a condition that results from infection, tissue death (necrosis), or injury, where white blood cells (leukocytes) accumulate to combat the infection and subsequently die, forming pus. The pus consists of dead leukocytes, dead tissue, debris, and microbes (bacteria, fungi, or protozoa). Suppuration can occur in various body parts such as the lungs (empyema), brain (abscess), or skin (carbuncle, furuncle). Treatment typically involves draining the pus and administering appropriate antibiotics to eliminate the infection.

Fusobacterium is a genus of obligate anaerobic, gram-negative, non-spore forming bacilli that are commonly found as normal flora in the human oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, and female genital tract. Some species of Fusobacterium have been associated with various clinical infections and diseases, such as periodontal disease, abscesses, bacteremia, endocarditis, and inflammatory bowel disease.

Fusobacterium nucleatum is the most well-known species in this genus and has been extensively studied for its role in various diseases. It is a opportunistic pathogen that can cause severe infections in immunocompromised individuals or when it invades damaged tissues. Fusobacterium necrophorum, another important species, is a leading cause of Lemierre's syndrome, a rare but serious condition characterized by septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and metastatic infections.

Fusobacteria are known to have a complex relationship with other microorganisms and host cells, and they can form biofilms that contribute to their virulence and persistence in the host. Further research is needed to fully understand the pathogenic mechanisms of Fusobacterium species and to develop effective strategies for prevention and treatment of Fusobacterium-associated diseases.

Preventella is a genus of Gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that are commonly found in the human oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, and urogenital tract. They are part of the normal microbiota but can also be associated with various infections, particularly in individuals with compromised immune systems or underlying medical conditions.

Prevotella species have been implicated in a variety of diseases, including periodontal disease, dental caries, respiratory tract infections, bacteremia, soft tissue infections, and joint infections. They can also be found in association with abscesses, wound infections, and other types of infections, particularly in the head and neck region.

Prevotella species are generally resistant to antibiotics commonly used to treat anaerobic infections, such as clindamycin and metronidazole, making them difficult to eradicate. Therefore, accurate identification and susceptibility testing of Prevotella isolates is important for the appropriate management of infections caused by these organisms.

Peptococcaceae is a family of obligately anaerobic, non-spore forming, gram-positive cocci that are found as normal flora in the human gastrointestinal tract. These bacteria are commonly isolated from feces and are known to be associated with various human infections, particularly intra-abdominal abscesses, bacteremia, and brain abscesses. The genus Peptococcus includes several species, such as Peptococcus niger and Peptococcus saccharolyticus, which are known to be associated with human infections. However, it is important to note that the taxonomy of this group of bacteria has undergone significant revisions in recent years, and some species previously classified as Peptococcaceae have been reassigned to other families.

Anaerobiosis is a state in which an organism or a portion of an organism is able to live and grow in the absence of molecular oxygen (O2). In biological contexts, "anaerobe" refers to any organism that does not require oxygen for growth, and "aerobe" refers to an organism that does require oxygen for growth.

There are two types of anaerobes: obligate anaerobes, which cannot tolerate the presence of oxygen and will die if exposed to it; and facultative anaerobes, which can grow with or without oxygen but prefer to grow in its absence. Some organisms are able to switch between aerobic and anaerobic metabolism depending on the availability of oxygen, a process known as "facultative anaerobiosis."

Anaerobic respiration is a type of metabolic process that occurs in the absence of molecular oxygen. In this process, organisms use alternative electron acceptors other than oxygen to generate energy through the transfer of electrons during cellular respiration. Examples of alternative electron acceptors include nitrate, sulfate, and carbon dioxide.

Anaerobic metabolism is less efficient than aerobic metabolism in terms of energy production, but it allows organisms to survive in environments where oxygen is not available or is toxic. Anaerobic bacteria are important decomposers in many ecosystems, breaking down organic matter and releasing nutrients back into the environment. In the human body, anaerobic bacteria can cause infections and other health problems if they proliferate in areas with low oxygen levels, such as the mouth, intestines, or deep tissue wounds.

"Gram-Positive Cocci" is a term used in microbiology, which refers to a specific type of bacteria that appear round (cocci) in shape and stain purple when subjected to the Gram staining method. The Gram staining technique is a fundamental laboratory method used to differentiate bacterial species based on their cell wall composition.

Gram-positive bacteria have a thick peptidoglycan layer in their cell walls, which retains the crystal violet stain used in the Gram staining process, resulting in a purple color. Some common examples of Gram-Positive Cocci include Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. These bacteria can cause various infections, ranging from skin and soft tissue infections to severe systemic illnesses. It is essential to identify the type and nature of bacterial pathogens accurately for appropriate antimicrobial therapy and effective patient management.

"Porphyromonas" is a genus of gram-negative, anaerobic bacteria that are commonly found in the human oral cavity and other areas of the body. One species, "Porphyromonas gingivalis," is a major contributor to chronic periodontitis, a severe form of gum disease. These bacteria are also associated with various systemic diseases, including atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and aspiration pneumonia. The name "Porphyromonas" comes from the Greek words "porphyra," meaning purple, and "monas," meaning unit, referring to the bacteria's ability to produce porphyrins, which are pigments that can give a purple color to their colonies.

Gram-positive bacterial infections refer to illnesses or diseases caused by Gram-positive bacteria, which are a group of bacteria that turn purple when stained using the Gram stain method. This staining technique is used in microbiology to differentiate between two main types of bacteria based on their cell wall composition.

Gram-positive bacteria have a thick layer of peptidoglycan in their cell walls, which retains the crystal violet stain used in the Gram staining process. Some common examples of Gram-positive bacteria include Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Enterococcus faecalis.

Gram-positive bacterial infections can range from mild skin infections to severe and life-threatening conditions such as pneumonia, meningitis, and sepsis. The symptoms of these infections depend on the type of bacteria involved and the location of the infection in the body. Treatment typically involves the use of antibiotics that are effective against Gram-positive bacteria, such as penicillin, vancomycin, or clindamycin. However, the emergence of antibiotic resistance among Gram-positive bacteria is a growing concern and can complicate treatment in some cases.

Bacteroides are a genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that are normally present in the human gastrointestinal tract. They are part of the normal gut microbiota and play an important role in breaking down complex carbohydrates and other substances in the gut. However, some species of Bacteroides can cause opportunistic infections, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems or when they spread to other parts of the body. They are resistant to many commonly used antibiotics, making infections caused by these bacteria difficult to treat.

Crotonates are a group of organic compounds that contain a carboxylic acid functional group (-COOH) attached to a crotyl group, which is a type of alkyl group with the structure -CH=CH-CH\_{2}-. Crotyl groups are derived from crotonic acid or its derivatives.

Crotonates can be found in various natural and synthetic compounds, including some pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and other industrial chemicals. They can exist as salts, esters, or other derivatives of crotonic acid.

In medical contexts, crotonates may refer to certain medications or chemical compounds used for research purposes. For example, sodium crotylate is a salt of crotonic acid that has been studied for its potential anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. However, it is not widely used in clinical practice.

It's worth noting that the term "crotonates" may not have a specific medical definition on its own, as it refers to a broad class of compounds with varying properties and uses.

Prevotella intermedia is a gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that is commonly found in the oral cavity, upper respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal tract. It is a normal resident of the human microbiota but can also be an opportunistic pathogen, causing various types of infections such as periodontitis, endocarditis, and brain abscesses. P. intermedia has been associated with several diseases, including respiratory tract infections, bacteremia, and joint infections. It is often found in mixed infections with other anaerobic bacteria. Proper identification of this organism is important for the selection of appropriate antimicrobial therapy.

Bacterial infections are caused by the invasion and multiplication of bacteria in or on tissues of the body. These infections can range from mild, like a common cold, to severe, such as pneumonia, meningitis, or sepsis. The symptoms of a bacterial infection depend on the type of bacteria invading the body and the area of the body that is affected.

Bacteria are single-celled microorganisms that can live in many different environments, including in the human body. While some bacteria are beneficial to humans and help with digestion or protect against harmful pathogens, others can cause illness and disease. When bacteria invade the body, they can release toxins and other harmful substances that damage tissues and trigger an immune response.

Bacterial infections can be treated with antibiotics, which work by killing or inhibiting the growth of bacteria. However, it is important to note that misuse or overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, making treatment more difficult. It is also essential to complete the full course of antibiotics as prescribed, even if symptoms improve, to ensure that all bacteria are eliminated and reduce the risk of recurrence or development of antibiotic resistance.

'Clostridium' is a genus of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria that are widely distributed in nature, including in soil, water, and the gastrointestinal tracts of animals and humans. Many species of Clostridium are anaerobic, meaning they can grow and reproduce in environments with little or no oxygen. Some species of Clostridium are capable of producing toxins that can cause serious and sometimes life-threatening illnesses in humans and animals.

Some notable species of Clostridium include:

* Clostridium tetani, which causes tetanus (also known as lockjaw)
* Clostridium botulinum, which produces botulinum toxin, the most potent neurotoxin known and the cause of botulism
* Clostridium difficile, which can cause severe diarrhea and colitis, particularly in people who have recently taken antibiotics
* Clostridium perfringens, which can cause food poisoning and gas gangrene.

It is important to note that not all species of Clostridium are harmful, and some are even beneficial, such as those used in the production of certain fermented foods like sauerkraut and natto. However, due to their ability to produce toxins and cause illness, it is important to handle and dispose of materials contaminated with Clostridium species carefully, especially in healthcare settings.

Polyanetholesulfonate (PAS) is not a medical term itself, but it is a chemical compound that has been used in medical applications. It's a type of anionic surfactant and a polyelectrolyte, which means it has a high number of negative charges along its polymer chain.

In the medical field, PAS has been used as a component in some types of heparinized dialysis solutions to prevent the formation of blood clots during extracorporeal circulation, such as in hemodialysis or heart-lung bypass machines. It works by binding to positively charged proteins and cell surfaces, which can help to reduce the risk of clotting.

However, it's important to note that the use of PAS in medical applications has declined over time due to concerns about its potential toxicity and the availability of safer alternatives.

L-serine dehydratase is an enzyme that plays a role in the metabolism of certain amino acids. Specifically, it catalyzes the conversion of L-serine to pyruvate and ammonia. This reaction is part of the pathway that breaks down L-serine to produce energy and intermediates for other biochemical processes in the body.

The systematic name for this enzyme is L-serine deaminase (pyruvate-forming). It is classified as a member of the lyase family of enzymes, which are characterized by their ability to catalyze the breaking of various chemical bonds using a cofactor to provide the energy needed for the reaction. In the case of L-serine dehydratase, the cofactor is a derivative of vitamin B6 called pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP).

Deficiencies or mutations in the gene that encodes L-serine dehydratase can lead to various metabolic disorders, including hypermethioninemia and homocystinuria. These conditions are characterized by abnormal levels of certain amino acids in the blood and urine, which can have serious health consequences if left untreated.

An abscess is a localized collection of pus caused by an infection. It is typically characterized by inflammation, redness, warmth, pain, and swelling in the affected area. Abscesses can form in various parts of the body, including the skin, teeth, lungs, brain, and abdominal organs. They are usually treated with antibiotics to eliminate the infection and may require drainage if they are large or located in a critical area. If left untreated, an abscess can lead to serious complications such as sepsis or organ failure.

Gram-positive bacteria are a type of bacteria that stain dark purple or blue when subjected to the Gram staining method, which is a common technique used in microbiology to classify and identify different types of bacteria based on their structural differences. This staining method was developed by Hans Christian Gram in 1884.

The key characteristic that distinguishes Gram-positive bacteria from other types, such as Gram-negative bacteria, is the presence of a thick layer of peptidoglycan in their cell walls, which retains the crystal violet stain used in the Gram staining process. Additionally, Gram-positive bacteria lack an outer membrane found in Gram-negative bacteria.

Examples of Gram-positive bacteria include Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Bacillus subtilis. Some Gram-positive bacteria can cause various human diseases, while others are beneficial or harmless.

In medical terms, the mouth is officially referred to as the oral cavity. It is the first part of the digestive tract and includes several structures: the lips, vestibule (the space enclosed by the lips and teeth), teeth, gingiva (gums), hard and soft palate, tongue, floor of the mouth, and salivary glands. The mouth is responsible for several functions including speaking, swallowing, breathing, and eating, as it is the initial point of ingestion where food is broken down through mechanical and chemical processes, beginning the digestive process.

Bacteria are single-celled microorganisms that are among the earliest known life forms on Earth. They are typically characterized as having a cell wall and no membrane-bound organelles. The majority of bacteria have a prokaryotic organization, meaning they lack a nucleus and other membrane-bound organelles.

Bacteria exist in diverse environments and can be found in every habitat on Earth, including soil, water, and the bodies of plants and animals. Some bacteria are beneficial to their hosts, while others can cause disease. Beneficial bacteria play important roles in processes such as digestion, nitrogen fixation, and biogeochemical cycling.

Bacteria reproduce asexually through binary fission or budding, and some species can also exchange genetic material through conjugation. They have a wide range of metabolic capabilities, with many using organic compounds as their source of energy, while others are capable of photosynthesis or chemosynthesis.

Bacteria are highly adaptable and can evolve rapidly in response to environmental changes. This has led to the development of antibiotic resistance in some species, which poses a significant public health challenge. Understanding the biology and behavior of bacteria is essential for developing strategies to prevent and treat bacterial infections and diseases.

Periodontitis is a severe form of gum disease that damages the soft tissue and destroys the bone supporting your teeth. If left untreated, it can lead to tooth loss. It is caused by the buildup of plaque, a sticky film of bacteria that constantly forms on our teeth. The body's immune system fights the bacterial infection, which causes an inflammatory response. If the inflammation continues for a long time, it can damage the tissues and bones that support the teeth.

The early stage of periodontitis is called gingivitis, which is characterized by red, swollen gums that bleed easily when brushed or flossed. When gingivitis is not treated, it can advance to periodontitis. In addition to plaque, other factors that increase the risk of developing periodontitis include smoking or using tobacco products, poor oral hygiene, diabetes, a weakened immune system, and genetic factors.

Regular dental checkups and good oral hygiene practices, such as brushing twice a day, flossing daily, and using an antimicrobial mouth rinse, can help prevent periodontitis. Treatment for periodontitis may include deep cleaning procedures, medications, or surgery in severe cases.

Dental plaque is a biofilm or mass of bacteria that accumulates on the surface of the teeth, restorative materials, and prosthetic devices such as dentures. It is initiated when bacterial colonizers attach to the smooth surfaces of teeth through van der Waals forces and specific molecular adhesion mechanisms.

The microorganisms within the dental plaque produce extracellular polysaccharides that help to stabilize and strengthen the biofilm, making it resistant to removal by simple brushing or rinsing. Over time, if not regularly removed through oral hygiene practices such as brushing and flossing, dental plaque can mineralize and harden into tartar or calculus.

The bacteria in dental plaque can cause tooth decay (dental caries) by metabolizing sugars and producing acid that demineralizes the tooth enamel. Additionally, certain types of bacteria in dental plaque can cause periodontal disease, an inflammation of the gums that can lead to tissue damage and bone loss around the teeth. Regular professional dental cleanings and good oral hygiene practices are essential for preventing the buildup of dental plaque and maintaining good oral health.

A lung abscess is a localized collection of pus in the lung parenchyma caused by an infectious process, often due to bacterial infection. It's characterized by necrosis and liquefaction of pulmonary tissue, resulting in a cavity filled with purulent material. The condition can develop as a complication of community-acquired or nosocomial pneumonia, aspiration of oral secretions containing anaerobic bacteria, septic embolism, or contiguous spread from a nearby infected site.

Symptoms may include cough with foul-smelling sputum, chest pain, fever, weight loss, and fatigue. Diagnosis typically involves imaging techniques such as chest X-ray or CT scan, along with microbiological examination of the sputum to identify the causative organism(s). Treatment often includes antibiotic therapy tailored to the identified pathogen(s), as well as supportive care such as bronchoscopy, drainage, or surgery in severe cases.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

Soft tissue infections are medical conditions that involve infection of the soft tissues of the body, which include the skin, muscles, fascia (the connective tissue that surrounds muscles), and tendons. These infections can be caused by various types of bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites.

Soft tissue infections can range from mild to severe, depending on the type of organism causing the infection, the extent of tissue involvement, and the patient's overall health status. Some common types of soft tissue infections include:

1. Cellulitis: This is a bacterial infection that affects the skin and underlying tissues. It typically presents as a red, swollen, warm, and painful area on the skin, often accompanied by fever and chills.
2. Abscess: An abscess is a localized collection of pus in the soft tissues, caused by an infection. It can appear as a swollen, tender, and warm lump under the skin, which may be filled with pus.
3. Necrotizing fasciitis: This is a rare but severe soft tissue infection that involves the rapid destruction of fascia and surrounding tissues. It is often caused by a mixture of bacteria and can progress rapidly, leading to shock, organ failure, and even death if not treated promptly.
4. Myositis: This is an inflammation of the muscle tissue, which can be caused by a bacterial or viral infection. Symptoms may include muscle pain, swelling, weakness, and fever.
5. Erysipelas: This is a superficial skin infection that affects the upper layers of the skin and the lymphatic vessels. It typically presents as a raised, red, and painful rash with clear borders.

Treatment for soft tissue infections depends on the type and severity of the infection but may include antibiotics, drainage of pus or abscesses, and surgery in severe cases. Preventive measures such as good hygiene, wound care, and prompt treatment of injuries can help reduce the risk of developing soft tissue infections.

A periodontal cyst, also known as a radicular cyst or dental cyst, is a type of odontogenic cyst that forms from the tissue of the periodontium, which surrounds and supports the teeth. It typically develops at the apex (tip) of a dead or non-vital tooth root and is filled with fluid. The cyst can grow slowly and painlessly, often going unnoticed until it becomes quite large or causes symptoms such as swelling, tenderness, or tooth mobility.

Periodontal cysts are usually asymptomatic and are often discovered during routine dental x-rays. If left untreated, they can eventually lead to the destruction of surrounding bone and tissue, potentially causing teeth to become loose or even fall out. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the cyst along with the affected tooth, followed by careful monitoring to ensure that the cyst does not recur.

Necrotizing fasciitis is a serious bacterial infection that affects the fascia, which is the tissue that surrounds muscles, nerves, and blood vessels. The infection can also spread to the muscle and skin. It is often caused by a combination of different types of bacteria, including group A Streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus.

The infection causes extensive tissue damage and necrosis (death) of the fascia and surrounding tissues. It can progress rapidly and can be fatal if not treated promptly with aggressive surgical debridement (removal of dead tissue) and antibiotics.

Symptoms of necrotizing fasciitis include severe pain, swelling, redness, and warmth in the affected area; fever; chills; and general weakness. It is important to seek medical attention immediately if these symptoms occur, as early diagnosis and treatment can significantly improve outcomes.

Veillonella is a genus of Gram-negative, anaerobic, non-spore-forming, coccoid or rod-shaped bacteria. These bacteria are commonly found as normal flora in the human mouth, intestines, and female genital tract. They are known to be obligate parasites, meaning they rely on other organisms for nutrients and energy. Veillonella species are often associated with dental caries and have been implicated in various infections such as bacteremia, endocarditis, pneumonia, and wound infections, particularly in immunocompromised individuals or those with underlying medical conditions. Proper identification of Veillonella species is important for the diagnosis and treatment of these infections.

Species specificity is a term used in the field of biology, including medicine, to refer to the characteristic of a biological entity (such as a virus, bacterium, or other microorganism) that allows it to interact exclusively or preferentially with a particular species. This means that the biological entity has a strong affinity for, or is only able to infect, a specific host species.

For example, HIV is specifically adapted to infect human cells and does not typically infect other animal species. Similarly, some bacterial toxins are species-specific and can only affect certain types of animals or humans. This concept is important in understanding the transmission dynamics and host range of various pathogens, as well as in developing targeted therapies and vaccines.

The term "diabetic foot" refers to a condition that affects the feet of people with diabetes, particularly when the disease is not well-controlled. It is characterized by a combination of nerve damage (neuropathy) and poor circulation (peripheral artery disease) in the feet and lower legs.

Neuropathy can cause numbness, tingling, or pain in the feet, making it difficult for people with diabetes to feel injuries, cuts, blisters, or other foot problems. Poor circulation makes it harder for wounds to heal and increases the risk of infection.

Diabetic foot ulcers are a common complication of diabetic neuropathy and can lead to serious infections, hospitalization, and even amputation if not treated promptly and effectively. Preventive care, including regular foot exams, proper footwear, and good blood glucose control, is essential for people with diabetes to prevent or manage diabetic foot problems.

A foot ulcer is a wound or sore on the foot that occurs most commonly in people with diabetes, but can also affect other individuals with poor circulation or nerve damage. These ulcers can be challenging to heal and are prone to infection, making it essential for individuals with foot ulcers to seek medical attention promptly.

Foot ulcers typically develop due to prolonged pressure on bony prominences of the foot, leading to breakdown of the skin and underlying tissues. The development of foot ulcers can be attributed to several factors, including:

1. Neuropathy (nerve damage): This condition causes a loss of sensation in the feet, making it difficult for individuals to feel pain or discomfort associated with pressure points, leading to the formation of ulcers.
2. Peripheral artery disease (PAD): Reduced blood flow to the lower extremities can impair wound healing and make the body more susceptible to infection.
3. Deformities: Structural foot abnormalities, such as bunions or hammertoes, can cause increased pressure on specific areas of the foot, increasing the risk of ulcer formation.
4. Poorly fitting shoes: Shoes that are too tight, narrow, or ill-fitting can create friction and pressure points, contributing to the development of foot ulcers.
5. Trauma: Injuries or trauma to the feet can lead to the formation of ulcers, particularly in individuals with neuropathy who may not feel the initial pain associated with the injury.
6. Foot care neglect: Failure to inspect and care for the feet regularly can result in undetected wounds or sores that progress into ulcers.

Foot ulcers are classified based on their depth, severity, and extent of tissue involvement. Proper assessment, treatment, and prevention strategies are crucial in managing foot ulcers and minimizing the risk of complications such as infection, gangrene, and amputation.

In medical terms, the foot is the part of the lower limb that is distal to the leg and below the ankle, extending from the tarsus to the toes. It is primarily responsible for supporting body weight and facilitating movement through push-off during walking or running. The foot is a complex structure made up of 26 bones, 33 joints, and numerous muscles, tendons, ligaments, and nerves that work together to provide stability, balance, and flexibility. It can be divided into three main parts: the hindfoot, which contains the talus and calcaneus (heel) bones; the midfoot, which includes the navicular, cuboid, and cuneiform bones; and the forefoot, which consists of the metatarsals and phalanges that form the toes.

Wound healing is a complex and dynamic process that occurs after tissue injury, aiming to restore the integrity and functionality of the damaged tissue. It involves a series of overlapping phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling.

1. Hemostasis: This initial phase begins immediately after injury and involves the activation of the coagulation cascade to form a clot, which stabilizes the wound and prevents excessive blood loss.
2. Inflammation: Activated inflammatory cells, such as neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages, infiltrate the wound site to eliminate pathogens, remove debris, and release growth factors that promote healing. This phase typically lasts for 2-5 days post-injury.
3. Proliferation: In this phase, various cell types, including fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and keratinocytes, proliferate and migrate to the wound site to synthesize extracellular matrix (ECM) components, form new blood vessels (angiogenesis), and re-epithelialize the wounded area. This phase can last up to several weeks depending on the size and severity of the wound.
4. Remodeling: The final phase of wound healing involves the maturation and realignment of collagen fibers, leading to the restoration of tensile strength in the healed tissue. This process can continue for months to years after injury, although the tissue may never fully regain its original structure and function.

It is important to note that wound healing can be compromised by several factors, including age, nutrition, comorbidities (e.g., diabetes, vascular disease), and infection, which can result in delayed healing or non-healing chronic wounds.

Amputation is defined as the surgical removal of all or part of a limb or extremity such as an arm, leg, foot, hand, toe, or finger. This procedure is typically performed to remove damaged or dead tissue due to various reasons like severe injury, infection, tumors, or chronic conditions that impair circulation, such as diabetes or peripheral arterial disease. The goal of amputation is to alleviate pain, prevent further complications, and improve the patient's quality of life. Following the surgery, patients may require rehabilitation and prosthetic devices to help them adapt to their new physical condition.

Skin care, in a medical context, refers to the practice of maintaining healthy skin through various hygienic, cosmetic, and therapeutic measures. This can include:

1. Cleansing: Using appropriate cleansers to remove dirt, sweat, and other impurities without stripping the skin of its natural oils.
2. Moisturizing: Applying creams or lotions to keep the skin hydrated and prevent dryness.
3. Sun Protection: Using sunscreens, hats, and protective clothing to shield the skin from harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays which can cause sunburn, premature aging, and skin cancer.
4. Skin Care Products: Using over-the-counter or prescription products to manage specific skin conditions like acne, eczema, psoriasis, or rosacea.
5. Regular Check-ups: Regularly examining the skin for any changes, growths, or abnormalities that may indicate a skin condition or disease.
6. Lifestyle Factors: Maintaining a healthy lifestyle, including a balanced diet, regular exercise, adequate sleep, and avoiding habits like smoking and excessive alcohol consumption, which can negatively impact skin health.

It's important to note that while some general skincare advice applies to most people, individual skincare needs can vary greatly depending on factors like age, skin type (oily, dry, combination, sensitive), and specific skin conditions or concerns. Therefore, it's often beneficial to seek personalized advice from a dermatologist or other healthcare provider.

Debridement is a medical procedure that involves the removal of dead, damaged, or infected tissue to improve the healing process or prevent further infection. This can be done through various methods such as surgical debridement (removal of tissue using scalpel or scissors), mechanical debridement (use of wound irrigation or high-pressure water jet), autolytic debridement (using the body's own enzymes to break down and reabsorb dead tissue), and enzymatic debridement (application of topical enzymes to dissolve necrotic tissue). The goal of debridement is to promote healthy tissue growth, reduce the risk of infection, and improve overall wound healing.

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Clostridium, Peptostreptococcus, Bacteroides, and Other Anaerobes. In Ryan K.J., Ray C (Eds), Sherris Medical Microbiology, 5th ...
... and Peptococcus magnus to the Genus Peptostreptococcus and Proposal of Peptostreptococcus tetradius sp. nov". International ... All others have been moved to Peptostreptococcus. List of human flora List of MeSH codes (B03) (bacteria) List of bacterial ...
Peptostreptococcus massiliae" Drancourt et al. 2004 "Ca. Phlomobacter fragariae" Zreik et al. 1998 "Ca. Photodesmus katoptron" ...
Peptostreptococcus are slow-growing bacteria sometimes resistant to antimicrobial drugs. Peptoniphilus asaccharolyticus is ... ISBN 0-8385-8529-9. Higaki S, Kitagawa T, Kagoura M, Morohashi M, Yamagishi T (2000). "Characterization of Peptostreptococcus ...
Bacterial vaginosis is associated with the presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Peptostreptococcus anaerobius and a decrease ... Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Prevotella bivia and Staphylococcus aureus. It is generally accepted that this is achieved ... Peptostreptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., and Bacteroides spp., Fusobacterium spp., Gardnerella ...
Six of the species were initially classified in the genus Peptostreptococcus but then based on their characteristics were re- ... for members of the genus Peptostreptococcus". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 51 (Pt 4): ... Song Y, Finegold SM (2011-01-01). "Peptostreptococcus, Finegoldia, Anaerococcus, Peptoniphilus, Veillonella, and Other ... Peptostreptococcus, Peptoniphilus, Parvimonas, Finegoldia, Murdochiella, and Anaerococcus) are found in the human body as part ...
The bacteria isolated from anal sac secretions have been identified as Peptococcus spp., Peptostreptococcus plagarumbelli, ...
... and Peptostreptococcus magnus (protein L). The mechanisms used to evade the adaptive immune system are more complicated. The ... Protein L from Peptostreptococcus magnus" (PDF). Biochemical Society Transactions. 31 (Pt 3): 716-18. doi:10.1042/BST0310716. ...
Proteins containing a GA module include PAB from Peptostreptococcus magnus. Lejon S, Frick IM, Bjorck L, Wikstrom M, Svensson S ...
BALDWIN RL, WOOD WA, EMERY RS (1965). "LACTATE METABOLISM BY PEPTOSTREPTOCOCCUS ELSDENII: EVIDENCE FOR LACTYL COENZYME A ...
The bacteria associated with infections include Peptostreptococcus, Fusobacterium, and Bacteroides bacteria. The next most ...
The main bacterial inhabitants of the stomach include: Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Lactobacillus, Peptostreptococcus.: 720 ... Peptostreptococcus, and Bifidobacterium. Other genera, such as Escherichia and Lactobacillus, are present to a lesser extent. ...
and Peptostreptococcus micros (Prevot 1933) Smith 1957 as Micromonas micros comb. nov". Anaerobe. 5 (5): 555-559. doi:10.1006/ ... F. magna was formerly known, along with several other Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPACs), as Peptostreptococcus magnus, but ... Murdoch, D. A; Shah, H. N (1999-10-01). "Reclassification of Peptostreptococcus magnus (Prevot 1933) Holdeman and Moore 1972 as ...
... and Peptostreptococcus micros. Tigecycline may be used for treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia caused by; ...
for members of the genus Peptostreptococcus". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 51 (Pt 4): ...
The most common anaerobic species include Fusobacterium necrophorum, Peptostreptococcus, Prevotella species, and Bacteroides. ...
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for members of the genus Peptostreptococcus". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 51 (Pt 4): ...
... and Peptostreptococcus spp.) are the most common isolates in chronic mastoiditis. Rarely, Mycobacterium species can also cause ...
Misoph, M.; Drake, H.L. (1996). "Effect of CO2 on the fermentation capacities of the acetogen Peptostreptococcus productus U-1 ... Peptostreptococcus productus, and Butyribacterium methylotrophicum. Most use the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. Syngas fermentation ...
"Characterization of NADP-dependent 7 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases from Peptostreptococcus productus and Eubacterium ...
"Phylogeny of the Ammonia-Producing Ruminal Bacteria Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Clostridium sticklandii, and Clostridium ...
Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Peptostreptococcus prevotii, and Peptostreptococcus micros ... Not validly published species Peptostreptococcus faecalis Peptostreptococcus glycinophilus Candidatus Peptostreptococcus ... Peptostreptococcus is a normal inhabitant of the healthy lower reproductive tract of women. Peptostreptococcus species are ... This contributes to the difficulty of isolating Peptostreptococcus organisms. Peptostreptococcus species that are found in ...
Anaerobic gram-positive cocci include various clinically significant species of the genus Peptostreptococcus. ... Clinically significant anaerobic cocci include Peptostreptococcus species, Veillonella species (gram-negative cocci), and ... 4] Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Peptostreptococcus prevotii, and Peptostreptococcus ... encoded search term (Peptostreptococcus Infection) and Peptostreptococcus Infection What to Read Next on Medscape ...
Genomic DNA isolated from Peptostreptococcus anaerobius strain MSHD. This bacterial strain is also available as ATCC® Catalog ... Peptostreptococcus anaerobius MSHD [BBL 326] (ATCC 49031). Organism. Peptostreptococcus anaerobius (Natvig) Kluyver and van ... To download a certificate of analysis for Genomic DNA from Peptostreptococcus anaerobius strain MSHD (49031D-5), enter the lot ... The certificate of analysis for that lot of Genomic DNA from Peptostreptococcus anaerobius strain MSHD (49031D-5) is not ...
View Peptostreptococcus anaerobius Z157, titered (1 mL) 0804012 from our online collection of viruses, microorganisms, and ...
Peptostreptococcus Nomenclatural type. Peptostreptococcus anaerobiusT Nomenclatural status. Validly published under the ICNP. ... Peptostreptococcus Citation. Formal styling. Peptostreptococcus Kluyver and van Niel 1936 (Approved Lists 1980) emend. Ezaki et ... Bacteria » Bacillota » Clostridia » Eubacteriales » Peptostreptococcaceae » Peptostreptococcus. Parent. Peptostreptococcaceae ... Peptostreptococcus vaginalis Taxonomic status. Correct name. Metadata. Outside links and data sources. * Global Biodiversity ...
Anaerobic gram-positive cocci include various clinically significant species of the genus Peptostreptococcus. ... Clinically significant anaerobic cocci include Peptostreptococcus species, Veillonella species (gram-negative cocci), and ... encoded search term (Peptostreptococcus Infection) and Peptostreptococcus Infection What to Read Next on Medscape ... Peptostreptococcus Infection Medication. Updated: Oct 07, 2015 * Author: Itzhak Brook, MD, MSc; Chief Editor: Mark R Wallace, ...
M.C. Roberts, "Tetracycline resistance in Peptostreptococcus species", Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, vol. 35, pp. 1682 ...
Topic: Peptostreptococcus Infections (See Anaerobic Bacteria). (Please note that the documents listed below are sorted by date ...
Peptostreptococcus Cefazolin 2 g iv. q 8 h. Or. Clindamycin 900 mg iv. q 8 h‡ (BI). 24 h (AI). Ampicillin/sulbactam 2 g iv. q 6 ...
Peptostreptococcus sp.. 99. 82. -. +. 29. +. 28. 5,3.103. Streptococcus genomosp. C4. 99. ...
Peptostreptococcus, Streptococcus, and Actinomyces. [8] ...
Peptostreptococcus spp.. Bacteroides spp. The following in vitro data are available, but their clinical significance is unknown ... Peptostreptococcus species, and Streptococcus agalactiae. MEFOXIN, like cephalosporins, has no activity against Chlamydia ...
Although bacterial tracheitis is an uncommon infectious cause of acute upper airway obstruction, it is currently more prevalent than acute epiglottitis. Patients may present with crouplike symptoms, such as barking cough, stridor, and fever; however, patients with bacterial tracheitis do not respond to standard croup therapy (racemic epinephr...
Peptostreptococcus species The following in vitro data are available, but their clinical significance is unknown. At least 90 ...
Peptostreptococcus spp.. The following in vitro data are available, but their clinical significance is unknown. At least 90% of ... and Peptostreptococcus spp.. Meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenzae. Cefizox has also been used successfully in the ... and Peptostreptococcus spp.. Septicemia caused by Streptococcus spp. including S. pneumoniae (but excluding enterococci); ... and Peptostreptococcus spp.. Bone and Joint Infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus (penicillinase‐ and nonpenicillinase‐ ...
This page includes the following topics and synonyms: Peritonsillar Abscess, Peritonsillitis, Peritonsillar Cellulitis, Quinsy Sore Throat.
Peptostreptococcus. Gram-positive bacilli. Actinomyces. Lactobacillus. Actinomyces. Lactobacillus. Proprionibacterium. ...
Peptostreptococcus species The following in vitro data are available but their clinical significance is unknown. At least 90 ...
Peptostreptococcus anaerobius promotes colorectal carcinogenesis and modulates tumor immunity (2019) Nature Microbiology. Long ...
Categories: Peptostreptococcus Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, CopyrightRestricted ...
The predominant anaerobic isolates were Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium and Peptostreptococcus species. The most ...
Indoleacrylic acid produced by commensal peptostreptococcus species suppresses inflammation. Cell Host Microbe. (2017) 22:25-37 ...
In cats the main culprits are: black pigmented Porphyromonas sp., Peptostreptococcus sp., Actinomyces sp.. In cats these ...
Den norske tannlegeforenings Tidende - Antibiotikaresistens hos orale bakterier
In cats, the main culprits are black pigmented Porphyromonas sp., Peptostreptococcus sp., Actinomyces sp. In cats, these ...
n = 52), Peptostreptococcus spp. (n = 2), and Ruminococcus spp. (n = 9) of which 200 isolates were identified to the species ... n = 52), Peptostreptococcus spp. (n = 2), and Ruminococcus spp. (n = 9) of which 200 isolates were identified to the species ...
Peptococcus and Peptostreptococcus. Superficial infections in diabetic foot ulcers are often caused by S. aureus or beta- ...
Peptostreptococcus anaerobicus. Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus. Peptostreptococcus prevotii. Polysporus sulfureus. ...
  • Organism-specific therapeutic regimens for dental abscess are provided below, including those for Fusobacterium , Bacteroides , Prevotella , Peptostreptococcus , Streptococcus , and Actinomyces . (medscape.com)
  • I en undersøkelse fra 2004 ble det påvist at opptil 42 % av Prevotella- species (n=303) utviklet resistens overfor amoksicillin (11). (tannlegetidende.no)
  • However, Peptostreptococcus and Prevotella have also been associated with these infections. (yeastinfectionadvisor.com)
  • Organisms usually involved in this infection are mouth and upper respiratory tract flora, most notably: group A Streptococcus , Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Viridans-group Streptococci, Haemophilus influenzae, and oral anaerobes ( Fusobacterium species, Prevotella species, Bacteroides species, Peptostreptococcus species). (logicalimages.com)
  • citation needed] Anaerobic gram-positive cocci that produce large amounts of lactic acid during the process of carbohydrate fermentation were reclassified as Streptococcus parvulus and Streptococcus morbillorum from Peptococcus or Peptostreptococcus. (wikipedia.org)
  • They are less effective against Fusobacterium and Peptostreptococcus species. (medscape.com)
  • Peptostreptococcus species are commensal organisms in humans, living predominantly in the mouth, skin, gastrointestinal, vagina and urinary tracts, and are members of the gut microbiota. (wikipedia.org)
  • Peptostreptococcus species are susceptible to beta-lactam antibiotics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Peptostreptococcus species that are found in clinical infections were once part of the genus formerly known as Peptococcus. (wikipedia.org)
  • As such, Peptostreptococcus species are viewed as being clinically significant anaerobic cocci. (wikipedia.org)
  • Anaerobic gram-positive cocci include various clinically significant species of the genus Peptostreptococcus. (wikipedia.org)
  • The species of anaerobic gram-positive cocci isolated most commonly include Peptostreptococcus magnus, Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Peptostreptococcus prevotii, and Peptostreptococcus micros. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clinically significant anaerobic cocci include Peptostreptococcus species, Veillonella species (gram-negative cocci), and microaerophilic streptococci (aerotolerant). (medscape.com)
  • Tetracycline Resistance in Peptostreptococcus species. (arkstonemedical.com)
  • Even still, it shows particular success against some anaerobic organisms including Bacteriodes fragilis , Peptostreptococcus species, and Propionibacterium acnes which for the most part are able to evade tetracycline. (kenyon.edu)
  • To download a certificate of analysis for Genomic DNA from Peptostreptococcus anaerobius strain MSHD ( 49031D-5 ), enter the lot number exactly as it appears on your product label or packing slip. (atcc.org)
  • The certificate of analysis for that lot of Genomic DNA from Peptostreptococcus anaerobius strain MSHD ( 49031D-5 ) is not currently available online. (atcc.org)
  • Peptostreptococcus anaerobius promotes colorectal carcinogenesis and modulates tumor immunity (2019) Nature Microbiology . (sfu.ca)
  • Anaerobic gram-positive cocci such as Peptostreptococcus are the second most frequently recovered anaerobes and account for approximately one quarter of anaerobic isolates found. (wikipedia.org)
  • Peptostreptococcus Kluyver and van Niel 1936 (Approved Lists 1980) emend. (uibk.ac.at)
  • Peptostreptococcus is a genus of anaerobic, Gram-positive, non-spore forming bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • Peptostreptococcus are slow-growing bacteria with increasing resistance to antimicrobial drugs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Peptostreptococcus is the only genus among anaerobic gram-positive cocci that is encountered in clinical infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • The exact frequency of Peptostreptococcus infections is difficult to calculate because of inappropriate methods of collection, transportation, and cultivation of specimens. (medscape.com)
  • Park et al reviewed 1070 anaerobic infections in several Hospital in Seoul, South Korea and reported that Peptostreptococcus accounted for 8.4% of these infections. (medscape.com)
  • This contributes to the difficulty of isolating Peptostreptococcus organisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Peptostreptococcus organisms are part of the normal florae of human mucocutaneous surfaces, including the mouth, intestinal tract, vagina, urethra, and skin. (medscape.com)
  • aeruginosa, Acinetobacter, Peptostreptococcus spp. (synevo.ro)
  • Peptostreptococcus is a normal inhabitant of the healthy lower reproductive tract of women. (wikipedia.org)
  • 4] In the colon, a low oxygen environment, you will find the anaerobic bacteria Peptostreptococcus, Bifidobacterium , Lactobacillus , and Clostridium . (harvard.edu)
  • Your search for PEPTOSTREPTOCOCCUS ANAEROBIUS DNA did not return any results. (nih.gov)
  • Peptostreptococcus is a normal inhabitant of the healthy lower reproductive tract of women. (wikipedia.org)
  • Higher long-term PDI was associated with the lower relative abundance of Peptostreptococcus , while this microbe was positively correlated with the high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and inversely associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. (biomedcentral.com)