Communicable Diseases, Emerging: Infectious diseases that are novel in their outbreak ranges (geographic and host) or transmission mode.Parasitic Diseases, Animal: Infections or infestations with parasitic organisms. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary.Veterinary Medicine: The medical science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases in animals.Disease Reservoirs: Animate or inanimate sources which normally harbor disease-causing organisms and thus serve as potential sources of disease outbreaks. Reservoirs are distinguished from vectors (DISEASE VECTORS) and carriers, which are agents of disease transmission rather than continuing sources of potential disease outbreaks.Leptospirosis: Infections with bacteria of the genus LEPTOSPIRA.Brucellosis: Infection caused by bacteria of the genus BRUCELLA mainly involving the MONONUCLEAR PHAGOCYTE SYSTEM. This condition is characterized by fever, weakness, malaise, and weight loss.Food Parasitology: The presence of parasites in food and food products. For the presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food, FOOD MICROBIOLOGY is available.Q Fever: An acute infectious disease caused by COXIELLA BURNETII. It is characterized by a sudden onset of FEVER; HEADACHE; malaise; and weakness. In humans, it is commonly contracted by inhalation of infected dusts derived from infected domestic animals (ANIMALS, DOMESTIC).Coxiella burnetii: A species of gram-negative bacteria that grows preferentially in the vacuoles of the host cell. It is the etiological agent of Q FEVER.Parasitic Diseases: Infections or infestations with parasitic organisms. They are often contracted through contact with an intermediate vector, but may occur as the result of direct exposure.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Tick-Borne Diseases: Bacterial, viral, or parasitic diseases transmitted to humans and animals by the bite of infected ticks. The families Ixodidae and Argasidae contain many bloodsucking species that are important pests of man and domestic birds and mammals and probably exceed all other arthropods in the number and variety of disease agents they transmit. Many of the tick-borne diseases are zoonotic.Echinococcosis: An infection caused by the infestation of the larval form of tapeworms of the genus Echinococcus. The liver, lungs, and kidney are the most common areas of infestation.Animals, Wild: Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.Rabies: Acute VIRAL CNS INFECTION affecting mammals, including humans. It is caused by RABIES VIRUS and usually spread by contamination with virus-laden saliva of bites inflicted by rabid animals. Important animal vectors include the dog, cat, bat, fox, raccoon, skunk, and wolf.Echinococcus granulosus: A species of hydatid tapeworm (class CESTODA) in the family Taeniidae, whose adult form infects the DIGESTIVE TRACT of DOGS, other canines, and CATS. The larval form infects SHEEP; PIGS; HORSES; and may infect humans, where it migrates to various organs and forms permanent HYDATID CYSTS.Animals, Domestic: Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with humans. They include animals domesticated by humans to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches for economic reasons, including LIVESTOCK (specifically CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; etc.), POULTRY; and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship, e.g., PETS; or specifically DOGS; CATS; etc.Leptospira: A genus of aerobic, helical spirochetes, some species of which are pathogenic, others free-living or saprophytic.Disease Vectors: Invertebrates or non-human vertebrates which transmit infective organisms from one host to another.Leptospira interrogans: A genus of question mark-shaped bacteria spirochetes which is found in fresh water that is contaminated by animal urine. It causes LEPTOSPIROSIS.Cestode Infections: Infections with true tapeworms of the helminth subclass CESTODA.Neglected Diseases: Diseases that are underfunded and have low name recognition but are major burdens in less developed countries. The World Health Organization has designated six tropical infectious diseases as being neglected in industrialized countries that are endemic in many developing countries (HELMINTHIASIS; LEPROSY; LYMPHATIC FILARIASIS; ONCHOCERCIASIS; SCHISTOSOMIASIS; and TRACHOMA).Pets: Animals kept by humans for companionship and enjoyment, as opposed to DOMESTIC ANIMALS such as livestock or farm animals, which are kept for economic reasons.Legislation, Veterinary: Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of veterinary medicine, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Cat Diseases: Diseases of the domestic cat (Felis catus or F. domesticus). This term does not include diseases of the so-called big cats such as CHEETAHS; LIONS; tigers, cougars, panthers, leopards, and other Felidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Echinococcus multilocularis: A north temperate species of tapeworm (CESTODA) whose adult form infects FOXES and wild RODENTS. The larval form can infect humans producing HEPATIC HYDATID CYSTS.Siphonaptera: An order of parasitic, blood-sucking, wingless INSECTS with the common name of fleas.Communicable Disease Control: Programs of surveillance designed to prevent the transmission of disease by any means from person to person or from animal to man.Brucella melitensis: A species of the genus BRUCELLA whose natural hosts are sheep and goats. Other mammals, including humans, may be infected. In general, these organisms tend to be more virulent for laboratory animals than BRUCELLA ABORTUS and may cause fatal infections.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Animal Husbandry: The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.Animal DiseasesHantavirus Infections: Infections with viruses of the genus HANTAVIRUS. This is associated with at least four clinical syndromes: HEMORRHAGIC FEVER WITH RENAL SYNDROME caused by viruses of the Hantaan group; a milder form of HFRS caused by SEOUL VIRUS; nephropathia epidemica caused by PUUMALA VIRUS; and HANTAVIRUS PULMONARY SYNDROME caused by SIN NOMBRE VIRUS.Skin Diseases, Parasitic: Skin diseases caused by ARTHROPODS; HELMINTHS; or other parasites.Endemic Diseases: The constant presence of diseases or infectious agents within a given geographic area or population group. It may also refer to the usual prevalence of a given disease with such area or group. It includes holoendemic and hyperendemic diseases. A holoendemic disease is one for which a high prevalent level of infection begins early in life and affects most of the child population, leading to a state of equilibrium such that the adult population shows evidence of the disease much less commonly than do children (malaria in many communities is a holoendemic disease). A hyperendemic disease is one that is constantly present at a high incidence and/or prevalence rate and affects all groups equally. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed, p53, 78, 80)Ectoparasitic Infestations: Infestations by PARASITES which live on, or burrow into, the surface of their host's EPIDERMIS. Most ectoparasites are ARTHROPODS.Livestock: Domesticated farm animals raised for home use or profit but excluding POULTRY. Typically livestock includes CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; SWINE; GOATS; and others.Legislation, Food: Laws and regulations concerned with industrial processing and marketing of foods.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Henipavirus Infections: Infections with viruses of the genus HENIPAVIRUS, family PARAMYXOVIRIDAE.Seroepidemiologic Studies: EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES based on the detection through serological testing of characteristic change in the serum level of specific ANTIBODIES. Latent subclinical infections and carrier states can thus be detected in addition to clinically overt cases.BrazilEhrlichiosis: A tick-borne disease characterized by FEVER; HEADACHE; myalgias; ANOREXIA; and occasionally RASH. It is caused by several bacterial species and can produce disease in DOGS; CATTLE; SHEEP; GOATS; HORSES; and humans. The primary species causing human disease are EHRLICHIA CHAFFEENSIS; ANAPLASMA PHAGOCYTOPHILUM; and Ehrlichia ewingii.Helminths: Commonly known as parasitic worms, this group includes the ACANTHOCEPHALA; NEMATODA; and PLATYHELMINTHS. Some authors consider certain species of LEECHES that can become temporarily parasitic as helminths.Communicable DiseasesChiroptera: Order of mammals whose members are adapted for flight. It includes bats, flying foxes, and fruit bats.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Veterinarians: Individuals with a degree in veterinary medicine that provides them with training and qualifications to treat diseases and injuries of animals.Gnathostoma: A genus of parasitic nematodes that occurs in mammals including man. Infection in humans is either by larvae penetrating the skin or by ingestion of uncooked fish.Epidemiological Monitoring: Collection, analysis, and interpretation of data about the frequency, distribution, and consequences of disease or health conditions, for use in the planning, implementing, and evaluating public health programs.Biological Warfare Agents: Living organisms or their toxic products that are used to cause disease or death of humans during WARFARE.Brucella: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that causes BRUCELLOSIS. Its cells are nonmotile coccobacilli and are animal parasites and pathogens. The bacterium is transmissible to humans through contact with infected dairy products or tissue.Pinnipedia: The suborder of aquatic CARNIVORA comprising the WALRUSES; FUR SEALS; SEA LIONS; and EARLESS SEALS. They have fusiform bodies with very short tails and are found on all sea coasts. The offspring are born on land.Foodborne Diseases: Acute illnesses, usually affecting the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, brought on by consuming contaminated food or beverages. Most of these diseases are infectious, caused by a variety of bacteria, viruses, or parasites that can be foodborne. Sometimes the diseases are caused by harmful toxins from the microbes or other chemicals present in the food. Especially in the latter case, the condition is often called food poisoning.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Duddingtonia: A genus of ascomycetous mitosporic fungi in the family Orbiliaceae. It is used for the biological control of nematodes in livestock.Rift Valley Fever: An acute infection caused by the RIFT VALLEY FEVER VIRUS, an RNA arthropod-borne virus, affecting domestic animals and humans. In animals, symptoms include HEPATITIS; abortion (ABORTION, VETERINARY); and DEATH. In humans, symptoms range from those of a flu-like disease to hemorrhagic fever, ENCEPHALITIS, or BLINDNESS.Echinococcus: A genus of very small TAPEWORMS, in the family Taeniidae. The adult form is found in various CARNIVORA but not humans. The larval form is seen in humans under certain epidemiologic circumstances.Lyssavirus: A genus of the family RHABDOVIRIDAE that includes RABIES VIRUS and other rabies-like viruses.Transferrins: A group of iron-binding proteins that tightly bind two ferrate ions along with two carbonate ions. They are found in the bodily fluids of vertebrates where they act as transport and storage molecules for iron.Erythrovirus: A genus of the family PARVOVIRIDAE, subfamily PARVOVIRINAE, and containing the type species PARVOVIRUS B19, HUMAN.Disease Transmission, Infectious: The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens. When transmission is within the same species, the mode can be horizontal or vertical (INFECTIOUS DISEASE TRANSMISSION, VERTICAL).History, Medieval: The period of history from the year 500 through 1450 of the common era.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Brucellosis, Bovine: A disease of cattle caused by bacteria of the genus BRUCELLA leading to abortion in late pregnancy. BRUCELLA ABORTUS is the primary infective agent.Trichinella: A genus of parasitic nematodes that causes TRICHINELLOSIS in man and other animal.Mediterranean Region: The MEDITERRANEAN SEA, the MEDITERRANEAN ISLANDS, and the countries bordering on the sea collectively.Rabies Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent and treat RABIES. The inactivated virus vaccine is used for preexposure immunization to persons at high risk of exposure, and in conjunction with rabies immunoglobulin, for postexposure prophylaxis.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Echinococcosis, Pulmonary: Helminth infection of the lung caused by Echinococcus granulosus or Echinococcus multilocularis.Trichinellosis: An infection with TRICHINELLA. It is caused by eating raw or undercooked meat that is infected with larvae of nematode worms TRICHINELLA genus. All members of the TRICHINELLA genus can infect human in addition to TRICHINELLA SPIRALIS, the traditional etiological agent. It is distributed throughout much of the world and is re-emerging in some parts as a public health hazard and a food safety problem.Anticestodal Agents: Agents used to treat tapeworm infestations in man or animals.Rodentia: A mammalian order which consists of 29 families and many genera.Anisakiasis: Infection with roundworms of the genus ANISAKIS. Human infection results from the consumption of fish harboring roundworm larvae. The worms may cause acute NAUSEA; VOMITING; or penetrate into the wall of the DIGESTIVE TRACT where they give rise to EOSINOPHILIC GRANULOMA in the STOMACH; INTESTINES; or the OMENTUM.Cattle Diseases: Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.Swine Diseases: Diseases of domestic swine and of the wild boar of the genus Sus.Sheep Diseases: Diseases of domestic and mountain sheep of the genus Ovis.Echinococcosis, Hepatic: Liver disease caused by infections with parasitic tapeworms of the genus ECHINOCOCCUS, such as Echinococcus granulosus or Echinococcus multilocularis. Ingested Echinococcus ova burrow into the intestinal mucosa. The larval migration to the liver via the PORTAL VEIN leads to watery vesicles (HYDATID CYST).EuropePopulation Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Lyme Disease: An infectious disease caused by a spirochete, BORRELIA BURGDORFERI, which is transmitted chiefly by Ixodes dammini (see IXODES) and pacificus ticks in the United States and Ixodes ricinis (see IXODES) in Europe. It is a disease with early and late cutaneous manifestations plus involvement of the nervous system, heart, eye, and joints in variable combinations. The disease was formerly known as Lyme arthritis and first discovered at Old Lyme, Connecticut.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Agricultural Workers' Diseases: Diseases in persons engaged in cultivating and tilling soil, growing plants, harvesting crops, raising livestock, or otherwise engaged in husbandry and farming. The diseases are not restricted to farmers in the sense of those who perform conventional farm chores: the heading applies also to those engaged in the individual activities named above, as in those only gathering harvest or in those only dusting crops.Rodent Diseases: Diseases of rodents of the order RODENTIA. This term includes diseases of Sciuridae (squirrels), Geomyidae (gophers), Heteromyidae (pouched mice), Castoridae (beavers), Cricetidae (rats and mice), Muridae (Old World rats and mice), Erethizontidae (porcupines), and Caviidae (guinea pigs).Goat Diseases: Diseases of the domestic or wild goat of the genus Capra.Hepatitis E virus: A positive-stranded RNA virus species in the genus HEPEVIRUS, causing enterically-transmitted non-A, non-B hepatitis (HEPATITIS E).Abattoirs: Places where animals are slaughtered and dressed for market.Bioterrorism: The use of biological agents in TERRORISM. This includes the malevolent use of BACTERIA; VIRUSES; or other BIOLOGICAL TOXINS against people, ANIMALS; or PLANTS.Ruminants: A suborder of the order ARTIODACTYLA whose members have the distinguishing feature of a four-chambered stomach, including the capacious RUMEN. Horns or antlers are usually present, at least in males.Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Bites and StingsDisease Notification: Notification or reporting by a physician or other health care provider of the occurrence of specified contagious diseases such as tuberculosis and HIV infections to designated public health agencies. The United States system of reporting notifiable diseases evolved from the Quarantine Act of 1878, which authorized the US Public Health Service to collect morbidity data on cholera, smallpox, and yellow fever; each state in the US has its own list of notifiable diseases and depends largely on reporting by the individual health care provider. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Virus Diseases: A general term for diseases produced by viruses.Ixodidae: A family of hardbacked TICKS, in the subclass ACARI. Genera include DERMACENTOR and IXODES among others.United StatesHepatitis E: Acute INFLAMMATION of the LIVER in humans; caused by HEPATITIS E VIRUS, a non-enveloped single-stranded RNA virus. Similar to HEPATITIS A, its incubation period is 15-60 days and is enterically transmitted, usually by fecal-oral transmission.ItalyPhylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Goats: Any of numerous agile, hollow-horned RUMINANTS of the genus Capra, in the family Bovidae, closely related to the SHEEP.Dirofilariasis: Infection with nematodes of the genus DIROFILARIA, usually in animals, especially dogs, but occasionally in man.Healthy People Programs: Healthy People Programs are a set of health objectives to be used by governments, communities, professional organizations, and others to help develop programs to improve health. It builds on initiatives pursued over the past two decades beginning with the 1979 Surgeon General's Report, Healthy People, Healthy People 2000: National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives, and Healthy People 2010. These established national health objectives and served as the basis for the development of state and community plans. These are administered by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP). Similar programs are conducted by other national governments.Babesiosis: A group of tick-borne diseases of mammals including ZOONOSES in humans. They are caused by protozoa of the genus BABESIA, which parasitize erythrocytes, producing hemolysis. In the U.S., the organism's natural host is mice and transmission is by the deer tick IXODES SCAPULARIS.Viruses: Minute infectious agents whose genomes are composed of DNA or RNA, but not both. They are characterized by a lack of independent metabolism and the inability to replicate outside living host cells.Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Tuberculosis, Bovine: An infection of cattle caused by MYCOBACTERIUM BOVIS. It is transmissible to man and other animals.Protozoan Infections, Animal: Infections with unicellular organisms formerly members of the subkingdom Protozoa. The infections may be experimental or veterinary.Antibodies, Bacterial: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.Great BritainCross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Rift Valley fever virus: A mosquito-borne species of the PHLEBOVIRUS genus found in eastern, central, and southern Africa, producing massive hepatitis, abortion, and death in sheep, goats, cattle, and other animals. It also has caused disease in humans.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Military Medicine: The practice of medicine as applied to special circumstances associated with military operations.Tularemia: A plague-like disease of rodents, transmissible to man. It is caused by FRANCISELLA TULARENSIS and is characterized by fever, chills, headache, backache, and weakness.Arachnid Vectors: Members of the class Arachnida, especially SPIDERS; SCORPIONS; MITES; and TICKS; which transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic: Infections of the INTESTINES with PARASITES, commonly involving PARASITIC WORMS. Infections with roundworms (NEMATODE INFECTIONS) and tapeworms (CESTODE INFECTIONS) are also known as HELMINTHIASIS.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome: Acute respiratory illness in humans caused by the Muerto Canyon virus whose primary rodent reservoir is the deer mouse Peromyscus maniculatus. First identified in the southwestern United States, this syndrome is characterized most commonly by fever, myalgias, headache, cough, and rapid respiratory failure.Brucella abortus: A species of the genus BRUCELLA whose natural hosts are cattle and other bovidae. Abortion and placentitis are frequently produced in the pregnant animal. Other mammals, including humans, may be infected.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Plague: An acute infectious disease caused by YERSINIA PESTIS that affects humans, wild rodents, and their ectoparasites. This condition persists due to its firm entrenchment in sylvatic rodent-flea ecosystems throughout the world. Bubonic plague is the most common form.Hantavirus: A genus of the family BUNYAVIRIDAE causing HANTAVIRUS INFECTIONS, first identified during the Korean war. Infection is found primarily in rodents and humans. Transmission does not appear to involve arthropods. HANTAAN VIRUS is the type species.Life Cycle Stages: The continuous sequence of changes undergone by living organisms during the post-embryonic developmental process, such as metamorphosis in insects and amphibians. This includes the developmental stages of apicomplexans such as the malarial parasite, PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM.Geriatric Assessment: Evaluation of the level of physical, physiological, or mental functioning in the older population group.Parasite Egg Count: Determination of parasite eggs in feces.EnglandColombiaIxodes: The largest genus of TICKS in the family IXODIDAE, containing over 200 species. Many infest humans and other mammals and several are vectors of diseases such as LYME DISEASE, tick-borne encephalitis (ENCEPHALITIS, TICK-BORNE), and KYASANUR FOREST DISEASE.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Clinical Laboratory Techniques: Techniques used to carry out clinical investigative procedures in the diagnosis and therapy of disease.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.IndiaAnaplasma phagocytophilum: A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus ANAPLASMA, family ANAPLASMATACEAE, formerly called Ehrlichia phagocytophila or Ehrlichia equi. This organism is tick-borne (IXODES) and causes disease in horses and sheep. In humans, it causes human granulocytic EHRLICHIOSIS.Anthelmintics: Agents destructive to parasitic worms. They are used therapeutically in the treatment of HELMINTHIASIS in man and animal.Antibodies, Helminth: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to HELMINTH ANTIGENS.Accidental Falls: Falls due to slipping or tripping which may result in injury.Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.DairyingInterviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Disabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Bacterial Infections: Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.Host-Pathogen Interactions: The interactions between a host and a pathogen, usually resulting in disease.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Leishmaniasis, Visceral: A chronic disease caused by LEISHMANIA DONOVANI and transmitted by the bite of several sandflies of the genera Phlebotomus and Lutzomyia. It is commonly characterized by fever, chills, vomiting, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, leukopenia, hypergammaglobulinemia, emaciation, and an earth-gray color of the skin. The disease is classified into three main types according to geographic distribution: Indian, Mediterranean (or infantile), and African.Frail Elderly: Older adults or aged individuals who are lacking in general strength and are unusually susceptible to disease or to other infirmity.Milk: The white liquid secreted by the mammary glands. It contains proteins, sugar, lipids, vitamins, and minerals.Francisella tularensis: The etiologic agent of TULAREMIA in man and other warm-blooded animals.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Dementia: An acquired organic mental disorder with loss of intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social or occupational functioning. The dysfunction is multifaceted and involves memory, behavior, personality, judgment, attention, spatial relations, language, abstract thought, and other executive functions. The intellectual decline is usually progressive, and initially spares the level of consciousness.Toxoplasmosis: The acquired form of infection by Toxoplasma gondii in animals and man.Meat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.Campylobacter Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus CAMPYLOBACTER.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Oceanic Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the islands of the central and South Pacific, including Micronesia, Melanesia, Polynesia, and traditionally Australasia.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Homes for the Aged: Geriatric long-term care facilities which provide supervision and assistance in activities of daily living with medical and nursing services when required.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Serologic Tests: Diagnostic procedures involving immunoglobulin reactions.Stereotyping: An oversimplified perception or conception especially of persons, social groups, etc.Insect Vectors: Insects that transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Prejudice: A preconceived judgment made without factual basis.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).LondonInstitutionalization: The caring for individuals in institutions and their adaptation to routines characteristic of the institutional environment, and/or their loss of adaptation to life outside the institution.Vaccination: Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Zoonoses: Diseases of non-human animals that may be transmitted to HUMANS or may be transmitted from humans to non-human animals.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Residential Facilities: Long-term care facilities which provide supervision and assistance in activities of daily living with medical and nursing services when required.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Molecular Epidemiology: The application of molecular biology to the answering of epidemiological questions. The examination of patterns of changes in DNA to implicate particular carcinogens and the use of molecular markers to predict which individuals are at highest risk for a disease are common examples.Social Stigma: A perceived attribute that is deeply discrediting and is considered to be a violation of social norms.
25 people in Bakaklion, Cameroon killed due to eating of ape Macpherson, C.N.L.; Craig, P.S. (1991). "Chapter 8: Animal ... Fomite Host (biology) Refuge (ecology) Vector (epidemiology) Zoonosis "Principles of Epidemiology , Lesson 1 - Section 10". CDC ... Direct contact transmission between two people can happen through the touching of skin, through kissing, and sexual contact. ... reservoirs of schistosomiasis". In Macpherson, C.N.L.; Craig, P.S. Parasitic helminths and zoonoses in Africa. Dordrecht: ...
Humans also may become infested by contagion from these domestic animals (a zoonosis). The term livestock is used in this ... However they are considered parasitic in people with weakened immune systems. Dermanyssid mites are much larger than most ... Such an infestation is called a zoonosis. However, the subspecies or strain of S. scabiei adapted to humans is transmitted ... article for all those domesticated mammals and birds that people rear for production of food, hides, wool, and draught power. ...
These diseases can also be transferred to Humans (zoonoses). There are two main diseases in bats that can transfer to humans ... Since the virus was discovered, three people have dies from contracting ABLV. ABVL is closely, but not identical, to the rabies ...
Microbes and people : an A-Z of microorganisms in our lives. Phoenix, Arizona: The Oryx Press. p. 72. ISBN 1-57356-217-3. "In ... Viral and Rickettsial Zoonoses Branch. 2003-02-13. Retrieved 2006-05-24. "The organisms are resistant to heat, drying, and many ...
Conlan JV, Sripa B, Attwood S, Newton PN (2001). "A review of parasitic zoonoses in a changing Southeast Asia". Vet Parasitol. ... and infect humans only opportunistically when its mammalian hosts are in close contact with people, A. ceylanicum is termed a ... Traub RJ (Nov 2013). "Ancylostoma ceylanicum, a re-emerging but neglected parasitic zoonosis". Int J Parasitol. 43 (12-13): ... "Genetic characterization of selected parasites from people with histories of gastrointestinal disorders using a mutation ...
The 2009 H1N1 virus is not zoonotic swine flu, as it is not transmitted from pigs to humans, but from person to person through ... The 1918 flu pandemic in humans was associated with H1N1 and influenza appearing in pigs; this may reflect a zoonosis either ... About one to two cases per 100,000 people of GBS occur every year, whether or not people have been vaccinated. The vaccination ... Also, studies have shown that people between the ages of 15 and 44 have the highest rate of infection. Although most people now ...
It is a zoonosis that can be transmitted from the cat to humans. Its symptoms in human can include dermatosis, extreme ' ... The symptoms in the person then subside Schuller, S.; Francey, T.; Hartmann, K.; Hugonnard, M.; Kohn, B.; Nally, J. E.; Sykes, ... itchiness'. Those who are most susceptible are people who have close contact with cats. Occurrences of he infection are low but ...
... and globally to help achieve optimal health for people, animals, and the environment. When the people, animals, and environment ... Zoonosis or zoonotic disease can be defined as an infectious disease that can be transmitted between animals and humans. One ... When this concept is used, and implied properly it can help protect and save the lives of both people, animals, and the ... Atlans, Ronald M. (2014). One Health: People, Animals, and the Environment. Washington, DC: ASM Press. pp. 185-197. ISBN 978-1- ...
Viral Zoonosis and Adaptation • Virus Genomics Junior Research Groups: • Dynamics of Viral Structures • HCV Replication The ... foundation in 1948 as the "Foundation For The Research Of Spinal Polio" was made possible by two people: the generous patron ...
As a result of this, researchers concluded that tanapox is most likely a zoonosis. However, neither the reservoir host nor the ... During the Kenyan epidemics of 1957 and 1962, cases of tanapox were reported more frequently among persons who worked or played ... The incubation period in human cases remains unknown, but in a person who underwent voluntary inoculation, erythema and central ...
However, some anatids are damaging agricultural pests, and have acted as vectors for zoonoses such as avian influenza. Since ... and several duck species have benefited from an association with people. ...
These weights are based not on a person's ability to work, but rather on the effects of the disability on the person's life in ... "Methodological choices for calculating the disease burden and cost-of-illness of foodborne zoonoses in European countries" (PDF ... It does not assign a monetary value to any person or condition, and it does not measure how much productive work or money is ... DALYs do have an age-weighting function that has been rationalized based on the economic productivity of persons at that age, ...
Risk of Person-to-Person Transmission of Pneumonic Plague. Clin Infect Dis. (2005) 40 (8): 1166-1172. "Risk of Person-to-Person ... Airborne transmission Bubonic plague Septicemic plague Super-spreader Outbreak Epidemic Zoonosis Black rat A.J. Viseltear. The ... Risk of Person to Person Transmission of Pneumonic Plague. Clin. Infect. Dis. (2005) 40 (8): 1166-1172. "CDC - Maps & ... Pneumonic plague is the only form of plague that has person-to-person transmission which occurs during droplet-respiration, and ...
This parasite is easily spread because it is able to infect other animals (zoonosis). An assortment of mammals and birds can be ... Desowitz, R. New Guinea Tapeworms and Jewish Grandmothers: Tales of Parasites and People. New York: WW Norton; 1987. ISBN 978-0 ... In preparation, live crabs are crushed and metacercariae may contaminate the fingers/utensils of the person preparing the meal ... Estimated to infect 22 million people worldwide. Transmission of the parasite P. westermani to humans and mammals primarily ...
Under the Zoonoses Order conditions that can be transmitted to humans, such as brucellosis or salmonella, must also be notified ... Agriculture employs 476,000 people, representing 1.5% of the workforce, down more than 32% since 1996. In terms of gross value ... The most common route of entry into farming is to succeed to a holding, whether as owner or tenant, so a person's ability to ... It has killed 166 people in Britain since 1994. A current issue is the control of bovine tuberculosis, which can also be ...
And most people have heard of myxomatosis, which is a fatal pox virus infection of rabbits: once infected they die within ... These are called viral zoonoses or zoonotic infections. Examples include, rabies, yellow fever and pappataci fever. The viruses ...
Some people argue dogs have thrived on leftovers and scraps from their human owners for thousands of years, and commercial dog ... The practice of feeding raw diets has raised some concerns due to the risk of food borne illnesses, zoonosis and nutritional ... People who feed their dogs raw food do so for a multitude of reasons, including but not limited to: culture, beliefs ... doi:10.2478/v10102-009-0012-4. PMC 2984110 . "People Foods to Avoid Feeding Your Pets". ASPCA. ASPCA. Retrieved 5 October 2016 ...
People who feed their dogs raw food do so for a multitude of reasons, including but not limited to: culture, beliefs ... The practice of feeding raw diets has raised some concerns due to the risk of food borne illnesses, zoonosis and nutritional ...
Possibly the people at border inspection posts were not aware and/or concerned about being part of a national and European ... There all goods of animal origin including live animals are checked in order to avoid outbreaks of zoonoses and epizooties. ... At the beginning of the 1990s, the internet and all other networks were not in common use; this may explain why people were so ... is the only supranational network in the world working at a continental scale of 28 countries and almost 500 million people. ...
Lehane L, Rawlin G (2000). "Topically acquired bacterial zoonoses from fish: a review". Med J Aust. 173 (5): 256-9. PMID ... Erythromycin or doxycycline may be given instead to people who are allergic to penicillin. E. rhusiopathiae is intrinsically ...
113,000 people were hospitalized (182 per 100,000 inhabitants); 460 people died (0.75 per 100,000 inhabitants). A study by the ... The World Health Organization Department of Food Safety and Zoonoses (FOS) provides scientific advice for organizations and the ... The death of 21 people in the 1996 Wishaw outbreak of E. coli O157 was a precursor to the establishment of the Food Standards ... "Healthy People 2010 Home Page". "Preliminary FoodNet data on the incidence of infection with pathogens transmitted commonly ...
These are people "with immature or weakened immune systems" (infants, the elderly, people undergoing cancer therapy, and ... Zoonosis[edit]. Researchers at the University of Cornell Feline Health Center believe that "most zoonotic diseases pose minimal ... "People Foods". Animal Poison Control Center. American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA). Archived from ... Certain infectious diseases are a concern from a public health standpoint because they are a Feline zoonosis and transmittable ...
Touching animals can result in the transmission of diseases (zoonoses) so it is recommended that people should thoroughly wash ... Zoonoses associated with petting farms and open zoos Beware The Fair (And Petting Zoos) Tests suggest E. coli spread through ...
If a person is convicted of being a hoarder under this ordinance, that person may not own, possess, or have on his premises in ... One zoonosis of special concern is toxoplasmosis, which can be transmitted to humans through cat feces or badly-prepared meat, ... In Banks County, Georgia, the number of dogs a person can own differs based on the zone in which the person's property is ... Hawaii's Penal Code now provides: (1) item A person commits the offense of animal hoarding if the person intentionally, ...
Jenner abstracted an infectious preparation of 'cowpox' and subsequently used it to inoculate persons against smallpox. As a ... Zoonoses have different modes of transmission. In direct zoonosis the disease is directly transmitted from animals to humans ... "Zoonosis". Medical Dictionary. Retrieved 30 January 2013.. *^ Messenger AM, Barnes AN, Gray GC (2014). "Reverse zoonotic ... "Zoonosis". Retrieved 18 December 2014.. *^ Coral-Almeida, Marco; Gabriël, Sarah; Abatih, Emmanuel Nji; Praet, Nicolas; Benitez ...
The infected person should be in barrier-isolation from other people.[109] All equipment, medical waste, patient waste and ... "Zoonoses Public Health. 59 (Supplement 2): 116-31. doi:10.1111/j.1863-2378.2012.01454.x. PMC 7165950. PMID 22958256.. ... encounter with a person showing symptoms; but not within three feet of the person with Ebola without wearing PPE; and no direct ... Four people died, and four people survived; five of these eight cases were laboratory-confirmed. A total of 583 contacts were ...
Zoonoses). Find specific details on this topic and related topics from the Merck Vet Manual. ... Learn about the veterinary topic of Introduction to Diseases Spread between Animals and People ( ... Introduction to Diseases Spread between Animals and People (Zoonoses) By Anna Rovid Spickler , DVM, PhD, Center for Food ... Diseases passed between animals and people (called zoonotic diseases or zoonoses) present an ongoing public health concern. ...
The objectives of this study were to determine if people with occupational contact with dogs were more likely to have ... compared to persons with no dog exposure. A seroepidemiological cohort study was completed, for which 306 canine-exposed and ... disease transmission among dogs and present a critical opportunity for zoonotic pathogens to emerge and threaten people who ... "A seroepidemiological study of canine zoonoses among persons occupationally exposed to dogs." PhD (Doctor of Philosophy) thesis ...
The genetic variation of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in the Peoples Republic of China The Peoples Republic of China (P.R. ... Lao Peoples Democratic Republic, Myanmar, Thailand, and Viet Nam. In GMS countries, helminth zoonoses are still imposing a ... Prevalence of Opisthorchis viverrini, Schistosoma mekongi and soil-transmitted helminths (STH) remains high in Lao Peoples ... Control and elimination of helminth zoonoses in Great Mekong Subregion. Guest edited by Somphou Sayasone, Robert Bergquist, ...
Zoonoses are diseases that can be spread from animals to humans, or vice versa. These diseases not only pose a major threat to ... in Germany is a Biosafety Level 4 facility where scientists conduct dangerous research on deadly viruses called zoonoses. ... and that sometimes people on your team can be mistaken just like people on the other side can be correct.,/p,,p,For anybody ... Zoonoses: A bigger threat to humans or animals?. Zoonoses pose a major threat to humans. From malaria to rabies, they account ...
Illness in people is usually self-limiting and lasts only 2-4 days, but can become severe in people with weakened immune ... MRSA can be transmitted back and forth between people and animals through direct contact. In people, MRSA most often causes ... One strategy for the prevention of infection transmission between cats and people is to better educate people on the behaviour ... Though transmission to people is possible, it is thought to be rare. In Europe, cats were identified as being hosts for West ...
Healthy Pets, Healthy People By wcraig on January 27, 2012 at 8:51 AM ...
Orf is transmitted to people by direct contact with lesions and exudates containing virus. Symptoms in people include solitary ... Zoonoses Zoonoses are diseases that are naturally transmitted between animals and humans. The following are major zoonoses that ... Infected people develop flat spreading, ring-shaped skin lesions which may or may not be itchy. This is not a serious disease ... People are infected by the bite or scratch of an infected animal or bacterial inoculation of a wound contaminated with soil or ...
Overall, there is a strong desire and commitment for multi-sectoral coordination in detection and response to zoonoses across ... in the event of emergence of one of the priority zoonoses studied, there is effective coordination across ... ... in the event of emergence of one of the priority zoonoses studied there is effective coordination across the Ministry of Health ... More than 50,000 people die annually from rabies worldwide, despite the fact that the tools to prevent and manage the disease ...
Because tularemia is a zoonosis, we also touch upon the situation in the animal reservoir and one-health aspects of this ... Because tularemia is a zoonosis, we also touch upon the situation in the animal reservoir and one-health aspects of this ... is a zoonosis caused by the facultative intracellular, gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis. Infection occurs through ... is a zoonosis caused by the facultative intracellular, gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis. Infection occurs through ...
Lao Peoples Democratic Republic, 16-18 October 2018 : meeting report. ... Meeting to Accelerate Prevention and Control of Neglected Foodborne Parasitic Zoonoses in Selected Asian Countries, Luang ... Meeting to Accelerate Prevention and Control of Neglected Foodborne Parasitic Zoonoses in Selected Asian Countries (2018 : ...
Study Bacterial Zoonoses flashcards from Kevin N ... People exposed to ticks 15 What states in the US have high ...
I was thinking it more likely that the (pneumonic) plague spread via person-to-person route. IIRC, rats dont move around ... is person to person, and that the catapulting the corpses, while horrific, wasnt the route for plague entering the city of ... What can be done is to educate people on how to more safely butcher and consume this type of meat, and as a long-term goal, to ... Emerging Disease and Zoonoses #16--the origins of HIV. It cant be said often enough that "nothing in biology makes sense ...
The parasites spread from person to person via the ingestion of eggs via food or water, or via hands contaminated with ... P. Chiodo and J. Basualdo, "Toxocariosis," de zoonosis IV, Asociación Argentina de Zoonosis, Buenos Aires, pp. 349-354, 2008. ... Currently, more than 200 pathogens are being regarded as zoonoses. Possible driving factors for the emergence of zoonoses are ... Probiotics for the Control of Helminth Zoonosis. Abadi Amare Reda. School of Veterinary Medicine, Wollo University, P.O. Box ...
Tag: aeromonas zoonosis. Can People Catch Aeromonas Infections?. March 5, 2018. DrErikJohnson ...
Zoonoses * West Nile fever characteristics among viremic persons identified through blood donor screeningExternal. Zou S, ... Saving Lives, Protecting People Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC twenty four seven. Saving Lives, Protecting ... Zoonoses * An outbreak of dengue fever in St. Croix (US Virgin Islands), 2005External. Mohammed H, Ramos M, Armstrong J, Munoz- ... Zoonoses - Malaria * Using serological measures to monitor changes in malaria transmission in VanuatuExternal. Cook J, Reid H, ...
People, Pets and Zoonosis. Posted by Southtowns Animal Hospital on July 6, 2018 Home » People, Pets and Zoonosis ... A person can touch a surface or an object that has been contaminated by an animals germs, such as a toy, brush, or food bowl. ... As people and animals travel, they can bring zoonotic diseases to new areas, and vectors, such as ticks, will seek new habitats ... By vaccinating our cats and dogs against rabies, we are protecting people from this always-fatal virus. Humans are not the ...
These diseases are prevalent in pastoral areas of Kenya and are among the countrys top 10 priority zoonoses. In people, the ... Cover of the new ILRI-UNEP zoonoses report and a graphic representation of the virus causing COVID-19-SARS-CoV-2-by ILRI ... One Health research at ILRI to address neglected tropical diseases, zoonoses and emerging infectious diseases in Southeast Asia ... One Health research at ILRI to address neglected tropical diseases, zoonoses and emerging infectious diseases in Southeast Asia ...
Zoonoses and Food Safety. Top of page Contagious pustular dermatitis virus is zoonotic, causing skin lesions in people. These ... Diagnosis in people is usually based on the presenting history since several poxviruses produce clinically and histologically ... Several studies have reported that between a third and half of those people working with sheep develop CPD lesions at some time ... The use of antiviral agents, in both sheep and people, has been proven to be effective against Orf virus infection, although ...
This land degradation affects some 3.2 billion people worldwide.. The failure to slow and reverse the process of land use ... Reverse land use change to prevent zoonoses like COVID-19: UNCCD. Land use degradation creates ground for zoonotic disease like ... The restoration of these areas as part of building back better to avoid future zoonosis would bring other crucial benefits, ... Land use change, which prepares the ground for zoonoses like the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), should be reversed ...
According to that last statistic, people seem to already know that their doctors dont know much about zoonosis. Heres more ... Zoonoses Public Health 2014;61(5):356-363.. 4. Kersting AL, Medeiros LC, LeJeune JT. Zoonoses and the physicians role in ... Ruple: Tennessee is a hot area for Rocky Mountain spotted fever in both people and pets, but in a 2009 survey about knowledge, ... In a survey conducted in 2009, only 54% of respondents said they knew they could get intestinal helminths from dogs.1 People ...
Human-Cat Disease Transmission (Zoonoses). Some diseases can be transmitted from cats to people (zoonoses). Most cannot. For ... Do arrange for the kitten to meet plenty of people; this will socialize your cat and it will not hide from people when adult. ... These are usually people who have kept up with new developments. 24 hour emergency care. A good vet will either be associated ... The humane society may know of lower-cost clinics or vets who are prepared to cut prices for people who are not particularly ...
Learn about the veterinary topic of Pathogens and Host Species in Zoonoses. Find specific details on this topic and related ... Reverse zoonoses are caused by human pathogens transmitted to animals. In some cases, these agents can later infect people. For ... People are incidental hosts for many zoonoses; however, some agents have both human and animal reservoirs. In some cases, ... The occurrence of a pathogen in both people and animals does not always mean it is a significant zoonosis. Some diseases are ...
Signs of zoonoses may include GI symptoms and flu-like symptoms. ... Zoonoses are infections that people can get from animals. ... Zoonoses (zoo NO seez) are infections that people can get from animals. Children with compromised immune systems are at higher ... When a person with a compromised immune system handles or cares for a pet the risk of infection is higher. Pets may have no ... Zoonoses can be prevented when simple precautions are followed. The information in this Helping Hand will help with safe animal ...
Published information on the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of people regarding pig zoonoses and their risk factors is also ... The disease burden imposed by these zoonoses is not only characterised by morbidity and mortality, but directly impacts on ... Despite the potentially significant health risks posed by pig production regarding pig-associated zoonoses, information on the ... This review summarises the existing sociocultural knowledge on eight pig-associated zoonoses suspected to be endemic in ...
Zoonosis. Say: zo-oh-no-sis. Zoonosis means a disease that people can get from animals. Some examples of zoonoses include ... You can prevent zoonoses by keeping your pet healthy, staying away from wild animals and always washing your hands after ... You probably saw the word "zoo" in "zoonosis" - and now you know why! ...
  • Presented at: Focused Meeting on Emerging Zoonoses and Antimicrobial Resistance, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK, 2 July 2018. (cardiff.ac.uk)
  • Presented at: Focused meeting 2018: Emerging zoonoses and AMR: A global threat, University of Surrey, 02-02 July 2018. (cardiff.ac.uk)
  • Geneva - Recent data published by the World Health Organization (WHO)1 confirm that in 2018, more than one billion people were again treated for at least. (who.int)
  • Presentation at a webinar by the One Health Collaborating Center Universitas Gadjah Mada, 'World Zoonoses Day 2020: Lessons learned and future directions', 7 July 2020. (ilri.org)
  • World Zoonoses Day is marked annually on 6 July to commemorate the day in 1885 when Louis Pasteur successfully administered the first vaccine against a zoonotic disease when he treated a young boy who had been mauled by a rabid dog. (ilri.org)
  • The effects of zoonoses on human health and economies have recently been underscored by notable outbreaks, such as the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus pandemic, which began in swine farms on the Mexico-US border. (frontiersin.org)
  • This is the period during which salmonella is excreted, regardless of whether the person is sick or not. (sva.se)
  • You can prevent zoonoses by keeping your pet healthy, staying away from wild animals and always washing your hands after touching animals. (akronchildrens.org)
  • Today, endemic zoonoses continue to inflict an enormous disease burden, particularly across tropical regions. (bmj.com)
  • Endemic zoonoses affect human health and wellbeing directly as common causes of human disease, and indirectly through impacts on livelihoods and food security as a result of livestock production losses. (bmj.com)
  • Despite these multiple impacts, endemic zoonoses are still rarely recognised and are poorly understood. (bmj.com)
  • As a consequence, the true burden of endemic zoonoses is largely underappreciated and awareness among clinicians and policymakers remains limited. (bmj.com)
  • We do hope with more cooperative efforts and sharing the social-ecosystem-packaged strategy in GMS through this special thematic issue, the elimination program on helminth zoonosis in GMS will be accelerated. (biomedcentral.com)
  • People also can acquire pet-associated zoonotic organisms through contact with animal saliva, urine and other body fluids or secretions, ingestion of animal fecal material, inhalation of infectious aerosols or droplets, and through arthropods and other invertebrate vectors. (gopetsamerica.com)
  • From the Greek epidemic , meaning "prevalent among the people," is most commonly used to describe an outbreak of an illness or disease in which the number of individual cases significantly exceeds the usual or expected number of cases in any given population. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Land use change, which prepares the ground for zoonoses like the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), should be reversed urgently, the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) has said. (org.in)
  • Led by Eric Fevre at the University of Liverpool, the goal of ZooLinK is to enable Kenya to develop an effective surveillance programme for zoonoses which is, by design, integrated across both human and animal health sectors. (gla.ac.uk)
  • Contact Person (responsible for Educational Programme): Pr. (infectiologie.com)
  • It is really unpredictable, however many viruses are successful because they do not kill their human hosts and therefore get better transmission from person to person. (bigthink.com)
  • There are also some organisms (eg, simian foamy viruses) that can be transmitted from animals to people, but with no currently known consequences. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • EFSA and ECDC issue 2008 report on zoonose. (europa.eu)
  • In 2008, 27 Member States and 4 non-EU countries submitted information on the occurrence of zoonoses and zoonotic agents to the European Commission (EC), EFSA and ECDC. (europa.eu)
  • Assisted by its Zoonoses Collaboration Centre, EFSA and ECDC jointly analysed all data and published the results in this annual Community Summary Report. (europa.eu)
  • The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) in collaboration with the European Centre for Disease Control (ECDC) recently released its latest report on trends and sources of zoonoses in the European Union. (eufic.org)
  • In addition, pneumonic plague can be spread from person-to-person through inhalation of infected secretions. (encyclopedia.com)
  • LONDON (Reuters) - A new and potentially fatal virus from the same family as SARS which was discovered in a patient in London last week appears not to spread easily from person to person, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Friday. (reuters.com)
  • Coronavirus is far from the only 'zoonosis', or disease spread by animals, and many millions are affected globally by others every year. (cgiar.org)
  • so as to prevent spread of the disease or contamination to a person or animal not so infected or contaminated. (gov.mb.ca)
  • In the case of the new coronavirus, researchers believe that the virus may have originated with horseshoe bats in China and then could have possibly spread to other animals - which people then ate. (npr.org)
  • Some agents, such as Candida spp, are widespread commensals in healthy people and animals and can cause disease when the host becomes debilitated. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • From developing new therapies that treat and prevent disease to helping people in need, we are committed to improving health and well-being around the world. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • Despite the potentially significant health risks posed by pig production regarding pig-associated zoonoses, information on the sociocultural drivers of these zoonoses is significantly lacking. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This approach would encourage the collaborative efforts of multiple disciplines working locally, nationally, and globally to attain optimal health for people, animals, and our environment. (cdc.gov)
  • These factors, and many others, are overseen in order to maintain conditions in which people can enjoy good health. (colorado.gov)
  • Zoonosis still represents a very real and public health hazard to the world. (medical-wiki.com)
  • He headed the Zoonoses group at the Institute for Animal Health, Compton Laboratory in 1991. (nottingham.ac.uk)
  • The Canadian Institutes of Health Research's Institute of Indigenous Peoples' Health has awarded a CAD$3.5 million operating grant to Dr. Treena Wasontí:io Delormier of McGill University's School of Human Nutrition. (news-medical.net)
  • The increasing recognition of the public health significance of these zoonoses, their complicated links to poverty, agricultural intensification, environmental degradation, and the lack of appropriate tools for their control was the inspiration behind this book. (springer.com)
  • "health professional" means a physician or a registered nurse, or a member of a class of persons designated as health professionals in the regulations. (gov.mb.ca)
  • "communicable disease" means an illness that is caused by the transmission of an infectious agent or its toxic products directly or indirectly from an infected person, animal or plant, an inanimate object or the environment. (gov.mb.ca)