Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Healthy People Programs: Healthy People Programs are a set of health objectives to be used by governments, communities, professional organizations, and others to help develop programs to improve health. It builds on initiatives pursued over the past two decades beginning with the 1979 Surgeon General's Report, Healthy People, Healthy People 2000: National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives, and Healthy People 2010. These established national health objectives and served as the basis for the development of state and community plans. These are administered by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP). Similar programs are conducted by other national governments.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Great BritainCross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Geriatric Assessment: Evaluation of the level of physical, physiological, or mental functioning in the older population group.EnglandSocioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Accidental Falls: Falls due to slipping or tripping which may result in injury.Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Disabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.United StatesFrail Elderly: Older adults or aged individuals who are lacking in general strength and are unusually susceptible to disease or to other infirmity.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Dementia: An acquired organic mental disorder with loss of intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social or occupational functioning. The dysfunction is multifaceted and involves memory, behavior, personality, judgment, attention, spatial relations, language, abstract thought, and other executive functions. The intellectual decline is usually progressive, and initially spares the level of consciousness.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Oceanic Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the islands of the central and South Pacific, including Micronesia, Melanesia, Polynesia, and traditionally Australasia.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Homes for the Aged: Geriatric long-term care facilities which provide supervision and assistance in activities of daily living with medical and nursing services when required.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Stereotyping: An oversimplified perception or conception especially of persons, social groups, etc.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Prejudice: A preconceived judgment made without factual basis.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).LondonInstitutionalization: The caring for individuals in institutions and their adaptation to routines characteristic of the institutional environment, and/or their loss of adaptation to life outside the institution.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Residential Facilities: Long-term care facilities which provide supervision and assistance in activities of daily living with medical and nursing services when required.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Social Stigma: A perceived attribute that is deeply discrediting and is considered to be a violation of social norms.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Caregivers: Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Postural Balance: A POSTURE in which an ideal body mass distribution is achieved. Postural balance provides the body carriage stability and conditions for normal functions in stationary position or in movement, such as sitting, standing, or walking.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Indians, North American: Individual members of North American ethnic groups with ancient historic ancestral origins in Asia.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Public Opinion: The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.Population Groups: Individuals classified according to their sex, racial origin, religion, common place of living, financial or social status, or some other cultural or behavioral attribute. (UMLS, 2003)Homeless Persons: Persons who have no permanent residence. The concept excludes nomadic peoples.ScotlandHome Care Services: Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.New Zealand: A group of islands in the southwest Pacific. Its capital is Wellington. It was discovered by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman in 1642 and circumnavigated by Cook in 1769. Colonized in 1840 by the New Zealand Company, it became a British crown colony in 1840 until 1907 when colonial status was terminated. New Zealand is a partly anglicized form of the original Dutch name Nieuw Zeeland, new sea land, possibly with reference to the Dutch province of Zeeland. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p842 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p378)Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Self Care: Performance of activities or tasks traditionally performed by professional health care providers. The concept includes care of oneself or one's family and friends.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Ethnobotany: The study of plant lore and agricultural customs of a people. In the fields of ETHNOMEDICINE and ETHNOPHARMACOLOGY, the emphasis is on traditional medicine and the existence and medicinal uses of PLANTS and PLANT EXTRACTS and their constituents, both historically and in modern times.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Nursing Homes: Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.Health Services, Indigenous: Health care provided to specific cultural or tribal peoples which incorporates local customs, beliefs, and taboos.AlaskaHousing: Living facilities for humans.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Walking: An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Democratic People's Republic of Korea: A country located on the Korean Peninsula whose capital is Pyongyang. The country was established September 9, 1948.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Exercise Therapy: A regimen or plan of physical activities designed and prescribed for specific therapeutic goals. Its purpose is to restore normal musculoskeletal function or to reduce pain caused by diseases or injuries.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Schizophrenia: A severe emotional disorder of psychotic depth characteristically marked by a retreat from reality with delusion formation, HALLUCINATIONS, emotional disharmony, and regressive behavior.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Independent Living: A housing and community arrangement that maximizes independence and self-determination.Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Inuits: Inuktitut-speakers generally associated with the northern polar region.Social Perception: The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Geriatrics: The branch of medicine concerned with the physiological and pathological aspects of the aged, including the clinical problems of senescence and senility.Suicide: The act of killing oneself.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.IndiaSocial Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Epilepsy: A disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of paroxysmal brain dysfunction due to a sudden, disorderly, and excessive neuronal discharge. Epilepsy classification systems are generally based upon: (1) clinical features of the seizure episodes (e.g., motor seizure), (2) etiology (e.g., post-traumatic), (3) anatomic site of seizure origin (e.g., frontal lobe seizure), (4) tendency to spread to other structures in the brain, and (5) temporal patterns (e.g., nocturnal epilepsy). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p313)Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2: A subclass of DIABETES MELLITUS that is not INSULIN-responsive or dependent (NIDDM). It is characterized initially by INSULIN RESISTANCE and HYPERINSULINEMIA; and eventually by GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE; HYPERGLYCEMIA; and overt diabetes. Type II diabetes mellitus is no longer considered a disease exclusively found in adults. Patients seldom develop KETOSIS but often exhibit OBESITY.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Psychotic Disorders: Disorders in which there is a loss of ego boundaries or a gross impairment in reality testing with delusions or prominent hallucinations. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Life Style: Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Vulnerable Populations: Groups of persons whose range of options is severely limited, who are frequently subjected to COERCION in their DECISION MAKING, or who may be compromised in their ability to give INFORMED CONSENT.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Medicine, Traditional: Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.Mentally Disabled Persons: Persons diagnosed as having significantly lower than average intelligence and considerable problems in adapting to everyday life or lacking independence in regard to activities of daily living.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.JapanMotivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Anthropology, Cultural: It is the study of social phenomena which characterize the learned, shared, and transmitted social activities of particular ethnic groups with focus on the causes, consequences, and complexities of human social and cultural variability.Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.EuropeMental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: An acquired defect of cellular immunity associated with infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a CD4-positive T-lymphocyte count under 200 cells/microliter or less than 14% of total lymphocytes, and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and malignant neoplasms. Clinical manifestations also include emaciation (wasting) and dementia. These elements reflect criteria for AIDS as defined by the CDC in 1993.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Mobility Limitation: Difficulty in walking from place to place.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Emigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.New South Wales: A state in southeastern Australia. Its capital is Sydney. It was discovered by Captain Cook in 1770 and first settled at Botany Bay by marines and convicts in 1788. It was named by Captain Cook who thought its coastline resembled that of South Wales. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p840 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p377)Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Human Rights: The rights of the individual to cultural, social, economic, and educational opportunities as provided by society, e.g., right to work, right to education, and right to social security.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Blindness: The inability to see or the loss or absence of perception of visual stimuli. This condition may be the result of EYE DISEASES; OPTIC NERVE DISEASES; OPTIC CHIASM diseases; or BRAIN DISEASES affecting the VISUAL PATHWAYS or OCCIPITAL LOBE.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Dependency (Psychology): The tendency of an individual or individuals to rely on others for advice, guidance, or support.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Cardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Physical Therapy Modalities: Therapeutic modalities frequently used in PHYSICAL THERAPY SPECIALTY by PHYSICAL THERAPISTS or physiotherapists to promote, maintain, or restore the physical and physiological well-being of an individual.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Gait: Manner or style of walking.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Community Mental Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive mental health services provided for individuals in the community.West Indies: Islands lying between southeastern North America and northern South America, enclosing the Caribbean Sea. They comprise the Greater Antilles (CUBA; DOMINICAN REPUBLIC; HAITI; JAMAICA; and PUERTO RICO), the Lesser Antilles (ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA and the other Leeward Islands, BARBADOS; MARTINIQUE and the other Windward Islands, NETHERLANDS ANTILLES; VIRGIN ISLANDS OF THE UNITED STATES, BRITISH VIRGINI ISLANDS, and the islands north of Venezuela which include TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO), and the BAHAMAS. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1330)World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Income: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Choice Behavior: The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Visually Impaired Persons: Persons with loss of vision such that there is an impact on activities of daily living.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Life Expectancy: Based on known statistical data, the number of years which any person of a given age may reasonably expected to live.Sensory Aids: Devices that help people with impaired sensory responses.BrazilDisease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Schizophrenic Psychology: Study of mental processes and behavior of schizophrenics.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Home Nursing: Nursing care given to an individual in the home. The care may be provided by a family member or a friend. Home nursing as care by a non-professional is differentiated from HOME CARE SERVICES provided by professionals: visiting nurse, home health agencies, hospital, or other organized community group.Intellectual Disability: Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. This has multiple potential etiologies, including genetic defects and perinatal insults. Intelligence quotient (IQ) scores are commonly used to determine whether an individual has an intellectual disability. IQ scores between 70 and 79 are in the borderline range. Scores below 67 are in the disabled range. (from Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, p28)Northern Territory: Territory in north central Australia, between the states of Queensland and Western Australia. Its capital is Darwin.Learning Disorders: Conditions characterized by a significant discrepancy between an individual's perceived level of intellect and their ability to acquire new language and other cognitive skills. These disorders may result from organic or psychological conditions. Relatively common subtypes include DYSLEXIA, DYSCALCULIA, and DYSGRAPHIA.Judgment: The process of discovering or asserting an objective or intrinsic relation between two objects or concepts; a faculty or power that enables a person to make judgments; the process of bringing to light and asserting the implicit meaning of a concept; a critical evaluation of a person or situation.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Medicine, African Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the African peoples. It includes treatment by medicinal plants and other materia medica as well as by the ministrations of diviners, medicine men, witch doctors, and sorcerers.Employment, Supported: Paid work for mentally or physically disabled persons, taking place in regular or normal work settings. It may be competitive employment (work that pays minimum wage) or employment with subminimal wages in individualized or group placement situations. It is intended for persons with severe disabilities who require a range of support services to maintain employment. Supported employment differs from SHELTERED WORKSHOPS in that work in the latter takes place in a controlled working environment. Federal regulations are authorized and administered by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services.
Wealthier people tend to vote at higher rates. Harder and Krosnick (2008) contend that some of the reasons for this may be due ... Young people are typically "plagued" by political apathy and thus do not have strong political opinions (The Economist, 2014). ... Several programs to increase the rates of voting among young people-such as MTV's "Rock the Vote" (founded in 1990) and the " ... Another potential reason may be that wealthier people believe that they have more at stake if they don't vote than those with ...
... negative experiences tend to dominate. In other words, people tend to dwell on the negative more than the positive. Responses ... the theory explains that people tend to respond to media as they would either to another person (by being polite, cooperative, ... The Media Equation is a general communication theory that claims that people tend to treat computers and other media as if they ... When a person asks a question about themselves, most people will give a positive response, even if it may be a dishonest answer ...
Bureaucracies tend to generate oligarchy; which is where a few officials are the political and economic power. According to ... Bureaucracies concentrate large amounts of power in a small number of people and are generally unregulated. Weber believed that ... Bureaucracies were distinct from the feudal system and patrimonialism where people were promoted on the basis of personal ... In an advanced industrial-bureaucratic society, everything becomes part of the expanding machine, even people. [8] While ...
... conveying to people to "hurry up" and complete their work. Most people tend to obey. "Hurry Up", by Che'Nelle from Things ...
Depressed persons tend to careless. They may engage in drug abuse and other actions trying to bury the impacts or symptoms of ... However, IMT is most aligned with Integrated Psychotherapy, in which the inherent value of each person, as well as the person's ... depressed individuals lead less satisfying social lives than never depressed persons and in most cases such people lead a ... They may tend to break off from their social circles and join new circles which may grant a chance to become deviant. Social ...
In being an adult, you need to care about people's feelings and interact with others. They tend to disappoint me. I met two ... Many people have difficulty seeking treatment in China because receiving help from a therapist is personally looked down on as ... A common method for helping eating disordered persons is to involve the family. Researchers found that in Western places, like ... In China, many traditional people hold to a collectivistic cultural tradition (or Confucianism). They learn to conform as an ...
In addition, people of mixed race (pardo) often tended to marry white spouses, and their descendants became accepted as white. ... In the United Kingdom, "black" was historically equivalent with "person of color", a general term for non-European peoples. In ... This nationwide acceptance and recognition of Aboriginal people led to a significant increase in the number of people self- ... In 2015 United States, African Americans, including multiracial people, earned 76.8% as much as white people. By contrast, ...
... people tend to be agnostic; most people still use the ways of their ancestors. "Subprefectures of Guinea". Statoids. ... people in Bossou mainly speak Manon and one of the most popular people to come from Bossou is Jean-Marie Doré. ... Bossou is a very small city and therefore has a limited number of people, majority of people in Bossou are poor and there are ... Bossou is known to be very rich in agriculture as its people grow coffee beans, rice, fruits and corn. ...
Poor people in Germany are less likely to be healthy than well-off people. This correlates with statistics about the life style ... They tend to have lower IQs. Poor children are more likely to get involved in criminal activities and are more likely to take ... Poverty rates are high among people who did not graduate from school and did not learn a trade. 42% of poor people did not ... Poverty in Germany refers to people living in relative poverty in Germany. During the last decades the number of people living ...
... including the reasons why people tend to feel less worthy and why people become discouraged or unable to meet challenges by ... in that people with high self-esteem will be more forgiving than people with low self-esteem. High self-esteem does not prevent ... People with high self-esteem are more willing to act on their beliefs, to stand up for what they believe in, to approach others ... A person can have a high self-esteem and hold it confidently where they do not need reassurance from others to maintain their ...
It reflects people's culture or faith. We will use the field survey of Beiyue village's ritual as an example. And then we focus ... The images tend to complicate things. There are two major patterns to the changes of gods' images. For example, it is a ... The changes of gods show people's ideas and concepts. God's parade is the most important part of the years-cases' ritual. ... The time zone for Zhanjiang, as with all locations in the People's Republic of China, is Beijing time (GMT +8). Jianjiang ...
Wiley published several books during the course of his career, including Serenity, A Boxing Memoir; Why Black People Tend To ... Wiley wrote many articles in the third person, featuring discursive, jazz-inflected prose and dialogue conducted between ...
Tunnels also tend to be loud. Background noise may prevent an explorer from hearing another person in the tunnel - who might be ... Likewise, vadders were people who spent a lot of time playing the game. Thus, vadding and vadders began to refer to people who ... Tunnel access points tend to be in locked mechanical rooms where steam pipes and other utilities enter a building, and through ... so they tend to be small and often cramped. Sometimes, utilities are routed through much larger pedestrian access tunnels (MIT ...
HSV infections tend to recur periodically. Although many people get infected with the virus, only 10% actually develop the ... Some people have recurrences either in the same location or at a nearby site. Unless the individual has an impaired immune ... The disorder can affect anyone but tends to occur most often in middle aged women. BMS has been hypothesized to be linked to a ... system, e.g., owing to HIV or cancer-related immune suppression, recurrent infections tend to be mild in nature and may be ...
... the people who arrived the other day), and the Guidaigosode (those who live in villages). Ayoreo people in contact are ... The Ayoreo tend to be monogamous. There are records of infanticide where babies are buried alive for various reasons, such as ... and can displace the people living there. Seventeen Ayoreo-Totobiegosode people made contact in 2004 due to extensive ... However, the settlements tend to be slums with poor conditions, such as houses made of mud and cane. Discrimination is ...
The most successful companies tended to be those with a mix of different people, i.e. those with a range of different ... Shapers are people who challenge the team to improve. They are dynamic and usually extraverted people who enjoy stimulating ... which is a psychometric instrument used to sort people into one of 16 personality types, the Belbin Inventory scores people on ... Plants can tend to ignore incidentals. The Plant might be caricatured as the absent-minded professor/inventor, and often has a ...
In other words, people simply tend to befriend their neighbors. They also found that functional distance predicted social ties ... 8. If persons who are very divergent from one's own opinion or ability are perceived as different from oneself on attributes ... Among people who felt the shock but sustained no damage from the earthquake, rumors were widely circulated and accepted about ... Specifically, people will seek out others who are close to one's own opinions and abilities for comparison because accurate ...
I couldn't imagine that these people who had just claimed to have read everything I'd ever written had never looked at their ... he tends ... to minimize or ignore facts that might put [Swartz] in a more favorable light." In response to a piece by Larissa ... I am a retired journalist; during my working years, my salary depended, and today my pension relies, on people paying for ... "Our argument against it is that not only does it have an effect on the people involved in the case, but there's also sometimes ...
For centuries people have been adding things to poor soils to improve their ability to support healthy plant growth. Some of ... Soils tend to become compacted over time. Soil compaction impedes root growth, decreasing the ability of plants to take up ... Many soil conditioners come in the form of certified organic products, for people concerned with maintaining organic crops or ...
So people tend to hide their illness. However, the data obtained show that the danger is quite different. "According to the ... or breast milk-from an infected person to an uninfected person. The primary means of transmission worldwide is sexual contact ... In addition, the number of beds per 1000 people is 2.64. Life expectancy in Turkey is 71.1 years for males and 75.2 years for ... It is estimated that approximately 2,000 people have been treated with this disease in Turkey. Marmara region where the most ...
Christianity in China portal Hmong Churches are churches of the China-based Hmong people. Hmong Churches tend to be Renewal ... Hmong Americans Hmong people Hmong customs and culture Kingdom of Laos "Our Story (Hmong Christian & Missionary Alliance)". ...
People with spinal cord injuries in S1 tend to be tetraplegics with complete lesions below C5. These S1 swimmers have no hand ... People with a lesion at C5 or C6 have an impairment that effects the use of their hands and lower arm. People with C5 can ... People with C5 lesions have abduction of the arms, and flexion of the arm. People with C6 lesions have abduction and flexion of ... The location of lesions on different vertebrae tend to be associated with disability levels and functionality issues. People ...
They stumble upon a group of Jana'ata people in the N'Jarr Valley in the mountains and stay with them. Ha'anala later marries ... The minor characters tend to the stereotype. Finally she said "Russell's keen intelligence and scientific knowledge shine ... Misunderstandings between cultures and peoples are at the heart of her story". Reviewing the novel in National Catholic ... Shetri Laaks, one of these people, and has many children, although several of them die due to malnutrition; Ha'anala refuses to ...
Sheep tend to be comfortable around people. St. Croix have a good herding instinct and are often used to train herding dogs. St ...
"Assertive people ... are willing to compromise with others, rather than always wanting their own way ... and tend to have good ... Assertive people tend to have the following characteristics:[citation needed] They feel free to express their feelings, ... How people deal with personal boundaries, their own and those of other people, helps to distinguish between these three ... Assertive people are also willing to defend themselves against aggressive people. Assertive communication involves respect for ...
Notable people[edit]. *RaeLynn, country music star and competed on The Voice (TV series) in 2012. ... These faults tend to move at a smooth rate in what is termed "fault creep", which reduces the risk of an earthquake.[14] The ... As of the 2010 census,[4] 71,802 people, 28,998 households, and 17,025 families resided in the city. The population density was ... 2,025.7 people per square mile (785.6/km2). There were 26,203 housing units at an average density of 802.4 per square mile ( ...
Readers at conservative news sites tend to hold compassionate people in contempt; compassion is despised by them as a weakness ... and lower-class people to read the emotions of people in photos and of live strangers. Those [test-subjects] with a higher ... To the extent that a person wants his child to succeed (in the ordinary sense of that term), to rise or stay at the top in ... Finally, in this study, the reality was beginning to be examined and exposed, that the more successful a person is, the worse ...
... people with anxiety tend to worry greatly about issues such as health, money, or careers. other symptoms include upset stomach ... What do people with anxiety tend to worry about?. ANSWER Regardless of whether they have irritable bowel syndrome, people with ... anxiety tend to worry greatly about issues such as health, money, or careers. Other symptoms include upset stomach, trembling, ...
What guides the direction a person chooses to move? Learn about what habit and handedness have to do with it in this ... But do most people tend to walk in a clockwise direction in other situations? Or are the theme park overlords specifically ... Its incredibly simple advice, but experts say youll avoid the longest lines because most people tend to instinctively veer to ... People move in predictable patterns, and for the most part, this is a good thing. Take driving a car, for example. If ...
... might actually be signs that you are an intelligent person. ... Intelligent People Tend To Stay Awake Longer. When you have a ... Intelligent People Tend To Talk To Themselves. Call them crazy, but people who often talk to themselves might be on to ... Science Says Intelligent People Tend To Have These 4 Traits In Common. Kayla Blydenburgh. Freelance Copywriter, Ghostwriter, ... Science Says People Who Talk To Themselves Are Geniuses This Is Why You Should Sleep on Your Left Side (Backed by Science) 10 ...
How poverty tends to trap people into making poor decisions. Weighed down by a scarcity mindset and tunnel vision, the poor are ... As the margin of error for people living on the margins tends to be slim, sociology professor Sulfikar Amir believes that only ... But when people have financial woes, there is more to consider. Owing to what is called the scarcity mindset, ones attention ... Many people, when faced with stressful situations, may go on their mobile phones or watch Netflix, but when the poor are ...
North America and Australia which deal with the relationship between trust and an improved state of health in people undergoing ...
Why do older people tend to lose muscle mass and grow frail? One impor...Insulin is best known for its link to diabetes a ... Why do older people tend to lose muscle mass and grow frail? One impor...Insulin is best known for its link to diabetes a ... Why do older people tend to lose muscle mass and grow frail? One important factor identified by medical science is the reduced ... In elderly people, however, this process, known as "vasodilation," is much less pronounced. "We thought, lets see what happens ...
"By taking people in that 2006 baseline who were acquainted with gay and lesbian people and comparing them with other people who ... People with gay and lesbian acquaintances tend to support same-sex marriage. December 13, 2018 by Matt Swayne, Pennsylvania ... In a study, people who met and became acquainted with at least one gay person were more likely to later change their minds ... among gay and lesbian people impacts the general acceptance of gay and lesbian people. In the 1973 GSS, just 11 percent of ...
... exercise and drinking habits found that they tended to drink more on days when they exercised more. ... People who exercise more also tend to drink more (alcohol). Posted March 18, 2016, 9:00 am ... What is clear from the analysis is that people tend to drink more alcohol on days when they exercise more. This is true whether ... Home » Harvard Health Blog » People who exercise more also tend to drink more (alcohol) - Harvard Health Blog ...
... which hospitals people tend to leave dead a little more than average.The database shows rates of dying at hospitals around the ... State Health Department Stats Show Hospitals That More People Tend to Leave in a Body Bag. Matthew Hendley , June 4, 2013 , 11: ... The Arizona Department of Health Services has released a database showing, among other things, which hospitals people tend to ... State Health Department Stats Show Hospitals That More People Tend to Leave in a Body Bag ...
Thats the conclusion of a study that followed a random sample of 12,986 people from the three locations for about four years. ... People get angry easily tend to have more heart disease. ... Angry people and heart disease People who get angry easily tend ... Angry people and heart disease People who get angry easily tend to have more heart disease. Thats the conclusion of a study ... Home» Questions » Statistics » Statistics - Others » Statistics - Others - Others » People get angry easily tend to have more ...
Do people with pectus excavatum tend to be skinnier or marphanoid?. 3 doctors weighed in ...
Anxiety Disorders are a real and chronic problem for many people. However, the disorders are often misunderstood leaving ... I tend to overthink. Situations, actions, words - from myself or others - can be over-analyzed to the point of mental paralysis ... 10 Things People Who Live Their Dreams Dont Do 15 Ways to Lead a New Life You Love 5 Gut Instincts You Dont Want to Ignore 10 ... 14 Things Only People Living With Anxiety Can Understand Trending in Health. 1 10 Best Kombucha Brands To Improve Gut Health 2 ...
However, around 60 percent of all people are estimated to develop lactose intolerance, which is the inability to digest dairy ... People with lactose intolerance do not make enough lactase, an intestinal enzyme that breaks down the lactose sugar in milk. ... It is normal for people to make less lactase as they age, but certain races generate more lactase than others. According to a ... What Ethnic or Racial Groups Tend to Have More Incidence of Lactose Intolerance? Sharon Therien ...
Studies suggest that single people tend to have stronger social networks and develop more as individuals - and even be ... Singles also tend to be fitter Shutterstock There may be some truth to the idea that people who "settle down" ease into ... Single people tend to have stronger social networks In 2015, social scientists named Natalia Sarkisian and Naomi Gerstel set ... In a 2016 presentation for the American Psychological Association, DePaulo presented evidence that single people tended to have ...
CDCs Office on Smoking and Health offers information on the disparities in tobacco use among people of low socioeconomic ... People with low SES tend to smoke cigarettes more heavily.. *People living in poverty smoke cigarettes for a duration of nearly ... People with a high school education smoke cigarettes for a duration of more than twice as many years as people with at least a ... People living in rural, deprived areas have 18-20% higher rates of lung cancer than people living in urban areas.6 ...
People tend not to notice until its too late. Since the 1950s and 60s, electric guitars became synonomous with pop music, ... "Its a really slow, incremental process," Dr Beach says, "and people tend not to notice any permanent hearing loss until it is ... For people who go to a few shows a year, the risk is minimal. If you are going to shows more regularly than that, play in bands ... "For people who are going to gigs regularly, and particularly if they are loud bands in confined spaces, you are crazy not to ...
3 They Tend To Overindulge. It is a longstanding cliche that genius correlates to substance abuse. We revere artistic geniuses ... 10 Successful People Trapped In Their Parents Shadow. Humans 10 Uncomfortable Truths About Nikola Tesla. Humans Top 10 Richest ... Intelligent people are heathens . . . or, at least, theyre more likely to be atheists. This assertion has been studied, ... Children who tend to be nocturnal are more likely to grow up to have higher intelligence. ...
British people tend to put in fewer hours. Dedi Grigoroiu/Shutterstock.com ... "People in London - at least at the Business Insider offices - come in at 10:30 a.m. and go to the pub at 4:30 p.m. You could ... British people are entitled to their tea breaks, and they take them quite often - Americans, on the other hand, are lucky if ... Most people end up eating their midday meal while they continue to work, and others skip the meal entirely. ...
Why some people do not get this disease? Why someone is ... is an autoimmune disease and this disease can affect people of ... Why Some People Tend To Suffer From IgA Nephropathy. 2014-12-29 15:40 IgA Nephropathy is an autoimmune disease and this disease ... Why some people do not get this disease? Why someone is at a higher risk of getting IgA Nephropathy? Through reading the ... The above are the reasons why some people are more likely to suffer from IgA Nephropathy. If you still have any doubt, please ...
"People tend to take what other people say at face value," said Saul Kassin, a psychology professor at John Jay College of ... Tags believe Cohen informants like People says science tend to Post navigation. Öko-Test: These care products can cause ... The theory is that people tend to believe others-called "a truth bias"-unless they are given a reason not to, he said. ... Science Says: People tend to believe informants like Cohen. 01/03/2019. ...
Hypothyroidism tends to make people feel tired, sluggish, and depressed.. It is a condition in which the thyroid gland does not ... Although people sometimes use these terms interchangeably, from a medical perspective the symptoms are distinctly different. ...
... the University College London and Dartmouth College carried out a series of experiments to see if people made decisions to ... Many OCD Patients Tend to Use Poor Coping Strategies. *Brief Questionnaire Aids Autism Diagnosis ... Home » News » Looks Matter Most When Trusting People With Money. Looks Matter Most When Trusting People With Money. By Janice ... noting that people could make some potentially costly mistakes by just relying on whether the person looks trustworthy. ...
Overweight People Tend to Have Lower Vitamin D Levels. Studies show that a higher body mass index and body fat percentage are ... Some claim that obese people tend to consume fewer vitamin D-rich foods, thus explaining the association. ... Essential Gifts for People Who Are Always on the Go. Whats the perfect gift for someone whos constantly moving and traveling ... This indicates that your vitamin D needs depend on body size, meaning obese individuals need more than normal-weight people to ...
... which is linked to heart attacks and has killed more than 60,000 people. ... which is linked to heart attacks and has killed more than 60,000 people. ... these drugs tend to be focused on the treatment of symptoms-symptoms that many people tend to experience, and which may or may ... Blockbuster Drugs Tend to Be More Unnecessary than Others. Vioxx was a so-called blockbuster drug-a designation given to ...
  • Orbital ATK has unveiled a practical new proposal to build a near term man-tended outpost in lunar orbit that could launch by 2020 and be operational in time for a lunar link-up with NASA's Orion crew module during its maiden mission, when American astronauts finally return to the Moon's vicinity in 2021 - thus advancing America's next giant leap in human exploration of deep space. (universetoday.com)
  • The idea is to assemble an initial crew-tended habitat with pressurized work and living volume for the astronauts based on a Cygnus derived vehicle, and have it pre-positioned and functioning in lunar-orbit by 2020. (universetoday.com)
  • World Suicide Prevention Day 2020: If people communicate ideas revolving around death, others tend to trivialise it. (indianexpress.com)
  • Others point to behavioral differences, noting that obese individuals tend to expose less skin and may not be absorbing as much vitamin D from the sun. (healthline.com)
  • This indicates that your vitamin D needs depend on body size, meaning obese individuals need more than normal-weight people to reach the same blood levels. (healthline.com)
  • This could help explain why obese people are more likely to be deficient. (healthline.com)
  • There are more than 300 million obese persons in the world, and more than 750 million overweight persons. (faqs.org)
  • An obese person has a 50 to 100 percent increased risk of premature death compared to someone of normal weight. (faqs.org)
  • Weight loss in obese persons improves health. (faqs.org)
  • An obese person does not have to lose fifty or a hundred pounds to realize health benefits, however, for even modest losses of weight can lead to major health benefits. (faqs.org)
  • Then, on 20 December 2011, The Greater Good Blog, at berkeley.edu, bannered "Low-Income People Quicker to Show Compassion," and reported that, "Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have found that people in the lower socio-economic classes are more psychologically attuned to suffering, and quicker to express compassion than their more affluent counterparts. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • In surveying more than 13,000 people between 18 and 64, researchers found that those who were single and had never married worked out more frequently each week than their married and divorced peers. (businessinsider.com)
  • After researchers from Warwick Business School, the University College London and Dartmouth College carried out a series of experiments to see if people made decisions to trust others based on their faces, they found people are more likely to invest money in someone whose face is generally perceived as trustworthy, even when they are given negative information about the person. (psychcentral.com)
  • Researchers at New Zealand-based Massey University say that people have started to show more faith in soothsayers and faith healers than God. (medindia.net)
  • The researchers came to this conclusion after conducting a poll of 1027 people, which reflected an 11 per cent rise in the number of people having no religious affiliation as compared to a decade ago. (medindia.net)
  • According to the researchers, its existence in people skews sleep pattern even if the period also cover eight hours. (wikipedia.org)
  • Researchers have investigated many different substances to find out if they increase a person's risk of cancer. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • What I've observed in my practice is that significant changes in health-related behaviors travel in packs: people who adopt healthier drinking habits (for instance, reducing their intake to one drink per day if female or two per day if male, on average) also get off the couch, walk more, lose a pound or two, and generally pay more attention to their health. (harvard.edu)
  • In a 2016 presentation for the American Psychological Association , DePaulo presented evidence that single people tended to have stronger feelings of self-determination and were more likely to experience psychological growth and development than their married counterparts. (businessinsider.com)
  • When people invalidate your feelings and act as if you're overreacting, this upsets you further. (davidwolfe.com)
  • This study's main author, Michael Kraus, summarized: "We found that people from a lower-class background - in terms of occupation, status, education and income level - performed better in terms of emotional intelligence, the ability to read the emotions that others are feeling. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • They found that singles were not only more likely to frequently reach out to their social networks , but also tended to provide and receive help from these people more than their married peers. (businessinsider.com)
  • In a pair of studies involving nearly 280,000 people , William Chopik, an assistant professor of psychology at Michigan State University, found that friendships become increasingly important as we age. (businessinsider.com)
  • A 2015 study in the journal Social Science and Medicine compared the body mass indexes of about 4,500 people in nine European countries and found that single people had, on average, slightly lower BMIs than those who were married. (businessinsider.com)
  • A study of American football found that sports fans tended to remember rough play instigated by their opponent, rather than their own side. (innerself.com)
  • A 2007 survey of over 55,000 people found that chronotypes tend to follow a normal distribution , with extreme morning and evening types on the far ends. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another surprise they found was that people who were consistently too cheerful or too optimistic didn't live as long as their worrywart counterparts. (go.com)
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS) . Some research shows that taking high-dose biotin might improve disability and vision and reduce paralysis in some people with MS. But other research has found no improvement in these outcomes. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Finally, in this study, the reality was beginning to be examined and exposed, that the more successful a person is, the worse the given individual is likely to be. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • In a study, people who met and became acquainted with at least one gay person were more likely to later change their minds about same-sex marriage and become more accepting of gay and lesbian people in general, said Daniel DellaPosta, assistant professor of sociology and an affiliate of the Institute for CyberScience. (phys.org)
  • This is not a study of problem drinkers or risky drinkers, nor of people with alcohol use disorders (what we used to call alcohol abuse or alcohol dependence). (harvard.edu)
  • That's the conclusion of a study that followed a random sample of 12,986 people from the three locations for about four years. (transtutors.com)
  • A study instructed people to view films of car accidents and then asked them to judge the speed the cars were moving. (innerself.com)
  • According to the study, older people who take part in regular dance classes show a reduced incidence of dementia. (medindia.net)
  • Per one Australian study, certain types of spiders like Nephila plumipes are not only more abundant in urban spaces, but they also tend to grow bigger in highly populated areas with hard, concrete surfaces and little vegetation. (bestlifeonline.com)
  • What Ethnic or Racial Groups Tend to Have More Incidence of Lactose Intolerance? (livestrong.com)
  • Any given people, ethnic group or community may be described as "indigenous" in reference to some particular region or location that they see as their traditional indigenous land claim . (wikipedia.org)
  • But do most people tend to walk in a clockwise direction in other situations? (howstuffworks.com)
  • Many people, when faced with stressful situations, may go on their mobile phones or watch Netflix, but when the poor are distracted from what they need to do, they are seen as procrastinating or being lazy, said Ms Tan. (channelnewsasia.com)
  • Studies suggest that single people tend to have stronger social networks and develop more as individuals. (businessinsider.com)
  • Trustworthiness is one of the most important traits for social and economic interaction, he added, noting that people could make some potentially costly mistakes by just relying on whether the person looks trustworthy. (psychcentral.com)
  • As many people have had to find out the hard way, certain species-like Anelosimus eximius-are much more social, and they prefer to form giant colonies with giant communal webs. (bestlifeonline.com)
  • Their social ties tend to be good. (go.com)
  • As Reeves and Nass (1996) say, "social and natural responses come from people, not from media themselves," (p. 252). (wikipedia.org)
  • Yet despite the differences between Israel and rural life in Ethiopia, where she was tending cows and sheep, an illiterate Fanta-Vagenstein took on the challenge of school at age 14. (israel21c.org)
  • A few hundred people, or tens of thousands, all Ooohing and Aaahing at the same thing at the same time, people of all ages and races and classes and cultures and religions and political tribes, oblivious to those differences, joined together in the boom and glow of the rocket's red glare. (bigthink.com)
  • Her first impression remains vividly etched in her mind--70 or 80 people lying in the streets wrapped in newspaper, reeking of alcohol. (latimes.com)
  • To sum up the argument: because alcohol is recent, you'd expect high IQ people to be more at ease with it, and this is born out by statistical evidence. (madsen-pirie.com)
  • Other research has looked at whether the contact theory works for other intergroup relationships, such as how people feel about immigrants and their attitudes toward immigration. (phys.org)
  • People tend to feel pain in the thighs and arms, particularly the underarms, when walking and otherwise moving. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • People with the more common variety typically feel lethargic in the colder months, crave carbohydrates, gain weight and sleep excessively. (nytimes.com)
  • Human "larks" tend to feel most energetic just after they get up in the morning. (wikipedia.org)
  • A person called a night owl is someone who usually stays up late and may feel most awake in the evening and at night. (wikipedia.org)
  • Here are a data for the 8474 people in the sample who had normal blood pressure. (transtutors.com)
  • Weight losses of ten to twenty pounds have been shown to lower blood pressure , blood cholesterol, and blood glucose (in persons with type 2 diabetes), and to improve other health problems. (faqs.org)
  • Nuts are high in good kind of fat which helps the body cells to be more sensitive to the production of insulin and this effectively lower the blood sugar of the people with diabetes. (amazonaws.com)
  • Asking a more obscure question, like what blood type the person is, is just plain creepy because you have no need to know that information. (wikihow.com)
  • Some early research shows that taking biotin along with chromium might lower blood sugar in people with diabetes. (medlineplus.gov)
  • However, taking biotin alone doesn't seem to improve blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Research has shown that the following habits and/or traits can actually be signs that you are an intelligent person. (lifehack.org)
  • In almost nine out of 10 people, there will be some warning signs but unfortunately, they do not get recognised or are ignored, said the psychologist. (indianexpress.com)
  • Most cancers occur due to a combination of factors, including people's genes, environment, and lifestyle. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Specific itchy areas may occur if a person comes in contact with soap, detergents, and wool or other rough-textured, scratchy material. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Low biotin levels can occur in people who are pregnant, who have had long-term tube feeding, who are malnourished, who have undergone rapid weight loss, or who have a specific inherited condition. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The lark (bird) starts its day very early, which explains the choice of the word lark for people who may sleep from around 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. or earlier. (wikipedia.org)
  • Originally based on the research of Clifford Nass and Byron Reeves at Stanford University, the theory explains that people tend to respond to media as they would either to another person (by being polite, cooperative, attributing personality characteristics such as aggressiveness, humor, expertise, and even gender) - or to places and phenomena in the physical world - depending on the cues they receive from the media. (wikipedia.org)
  • But for billions of the world s people, business-driven globalization means uprooting old ways of life and threatening livelihoods and cultures. (flickr.com)
  • They tend to eschew policy, since that's about how legislation might affect the world. (techdirt.com)
  • We thought, let's see what happens if we use aerobic exercise, one of the interventions that has been shown in the past to improve vasodilation, to find out whether we can get insu lin to stimulate muscle synthesis in older people," said UTMB professor Elena Volpi, senior author of a paper on the experiments appearing in the June issue of the journal Diabetes. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Such Services Aren't Very Easy To Find As Most People Tend To Get Their Treatment At Private Clinics. (electrico.me)
  • Three people want to find him: an aspiring writer, an embittered scientist who wants to use him, and a policewoman who needs to put him in custody before the Selectors, a vigilante organization, get to him first. (audible.com)
  • People tend to find under-eye bags creepy. (wikihow.com)
  • While combing through 814 studies on singles, she discovered that most of them used singles only as a comparison group to learn about married people, not singledom. (businessinsider.com)
  • A person, group, or nation having great influence or control over others is defined as having power (dictionary.com). (flickr.com)
  • DellaPosta suggests that coming out may facilitate more contact with gay and lesbian people that then accelerates an attitude change about issues that affect the gay community. (phys.org)
  • IgA Nephropathy is an autoimmune disease and this disease can affect people of any age. (kidney-cares.org)