China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Patient Admission: The process of accepting patients. The concept includes patients accepted for medical and nursing care in a hospital or other health care institution.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Hospitals, Teaching: Hospitals engaged in educational and research programs, as well as providing medical care to the patients.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Hospitals, General: Large hospitals with a resident medical staff which provides continuous care to maternity, surgical and medical patients.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Hospital Costs: The expenses incurred by a hospital in providing care. The hospital costs attributed to a particular patient care episode include the direct costs plus an appropriate proportion of the overhead for administration, personnel, building maintenance, equipment, etc. Hospital costs are one of the factors which determine HOSPITAL CHARGES (the price the hospital sets for its services).Hospitals, University: Hospitals maintained by a university for the teaching of medical students, postgraduate training programs, and clinical research.EnglandPatient Readmission: Subsequent admissions of a patient to a hospital or other health care institution for treatment.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Hospitals, Urban: Hospitals located in metropolitan areas.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Hospitals, Psychiatric: Special hospitals which provide care to the mentally ill patient.Patient Discharge: The administrative process of discharging the patient, alive or dead, from hospitals or other health facilities.Hospitals, District: Government-controlled hospitals which represent the major health facility for a designated geographic area.Hospitals, Pediatric: Special hospitals which provide care for ill children.Emergencies: Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Hospital Bed Capacity: The number of beds which a hospital has been designed and constructed to contain. It may also refer to the number of beds set up and staffed for use.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Nursing Staff, Hospital: Personnel who provide nursing service to patients in a hospital.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Economics, Hospital: Economic aspects related to the management and operation of a hospital.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Respiratory Tract DiseasesIncidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Hospital Charges: The prices a hospital sets for its services. HOSPITAL COSTS (the direct and indirect expenses incurred by the hospital in providing the services) are one factor in the determination of hospital charges. Other factors may include, for example, profits, competition, and the necessity of recouping the costs of uncompensated care.Hospitals, Special: Hospitals which provide care for a single category of illness with facilities and staff directed toward a specific service.Air Pollutants: Any substance in the air which could, if present in high enough concentration, harm humans, animals, vegetation or material. Substances include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; and volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.ScotlandHospitals, Private: A class of hospitals that includes profit or not-for-profit hospitals that are controlled by a legal entity other than a government agency. (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed)United StatesAir Pollution: The presence of contaminants or pollutant substances in the air (AIR POLLUTANTS) that interfere with human health or welfare, or produce other harmful environmental effects. The substances may include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; or volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Hospital Departments: Major administrative divisions of the hospital.Hospital Records: Compilations of data on hospital activities and programs; excludes patient medical records.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Hospital Units: Those areas of the hospital organization not considered departments which provide specialized patient care. They include various hospital special care wards.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Inpatients: Persons admitted to health facilities which provide board and room, for the purpose of observation, care, diagnosis or treatment.Bed Occupancy: A measure of inpatient health facility use based upon the average number or proportion of beds occupied for a given period of time.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Intensive Care Units: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.Hospital Mortality: A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.Diagnosis-Related Groups: A system for classifying patient care by relating common characteristics such as diagnosis, treatment, and age to an expected consumption of hospital resources and length of stay. Its purpose is to provide a framework for specifying case mix and to reduce hospital costs and reimbursements and it forms the cornerstone of the prospective payment system.Great BritainLondonSulfur Dioxide: A highly toxic, colorless, nonflammable gas. It is used as a pharmaceutical aid and antioxidant. It is also an environmental air pollutant.Child, Hospitalized: Child hospitalized for short term care.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and overFinancial Management, Hospital: The obtaining and management of funds for hospital needs and responsibility for fiscal affairs.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Poisoning: A condition or physical state produced by the ingestion, injection, inhalation of or exposure to a deleterious agent.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Cross Infection: Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.Poisson Distribution: A distribution function used to describe the occurrence of rare events or to describe the sampling distribution of isolated counts in a continuum of time or space.Emergency Medical Services: Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.Hospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.Hospital Planning: Areawide planning for hospitals or planning of a particular hospital unit on the basis of projected consumer need. This does not include hospital design and construction or architectural plans.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Utilization Review: An organized procedure carried out through committees to review admissions, duration of stay, professional services furnished, and to evaluate the medical necessity of those services and promote their most efficient use.Admitting Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the flow of patients and the processing of admissions, discharges, transfers, and also most procedures to be carried out in the event of a patient's death.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Pneumonia: Infection of the lung often accompanied by inflammation.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Health Services Misuse: Excessive, under or unnecessary utilization of health services by patients or physicians.Western Australia: A state in western Australia. Its capital is Perth. It was first visited by the Dutch in 1616 but the English took possession in 1791 and permanent colonization began in 1829. It was a penal settlement 1850-1888, became part of the colonial government in 1886, and was granted self government in 1890. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1329)Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Emergency Treatment: First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.Medical Record Linkage: The creation and maintenance of medical and vital records in multiple institutions in a manner that will facilitate the combined use of the records of identified individuals.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Medical Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of medical care.Particulate Matter: Particles of any solid substance, generally under 30 microns in size, often noted as PM30. There is special concern with PM1 which can get down to PULMONARY ALVEOLI and induce MACROPHAGE ACTIVATION and PHAGOCYTOSIS leading to FOREIGN BODY REACTION and LUNG DISEASES.BrazilSocioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Medical Records: Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Hospital Information Systems: Integrated, computer-assisted systems designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information concerned with the administrative and clinical aspects of providing medical services within the hospital.Outpatient Clinics, Hospital: Organized services in a hospital which provide medical care on an outpatient basis.Patient Transfer: Interfacility or intrahospital transfer of patients. Intrahospital transfer is usually to obtain a specific kind of care and interfacility transfer is usually for economic reasons as well as for the type of care provided.Ozone: The unstable triatomic form of oxygen, O3. It is a powerful oxidant that is produced for various chemical and industrial uses. Its production is also catalyzed in the ATMOSPHERE by ULTRAVIOLET RAY irradiation of oxygen or other ozone precursors such as VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS and NITROGEN OXIDES. About 90% of the ozone in the atmosphere exists in the stratosphere (STRATOSPHERIC OZONE).Nitrogen Dioxide: Nitrogen oxide (NO2). A highly poisonous gas. Exposure produces inflammation of lungs that may only cause slight pain or pass unnoticed, but resulting edema several days later may cause death. (From Merck, 11th ed) It is a major atmospheric pollutant that is able to absorb UV light that does not reach the earth's surface.Surgery Department, Hospital: Hospital department which administers all departmental functions and the provision of surgical diagnostic and therapeutic services.Home Care Services: Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.Intensive Care: Advanced and highly specialized care provided to medical or surgical patients whose conditions are life-threatening and require comprehensive care and constant monitoring. It is usually administered in specially equipped units of a health care facility.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Spain: Parliamentary democracy located between France on the northeast and Portugual on the west and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions: Disorders that result from the intended use of PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS. Included in this heading are a broad variety of chemically-induced adverse conditions due to toxicity, DRUG INTERACTIONS, and metabolic effects of pharmaceuticals.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Respiration Disorders: Diseases of the respiratory system in general or unspecified or for a specific respiratory disease not available.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.School Admission Criteria: Requirements for the selection of students for admission to academic institutions.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.AccidentsEquipment and Supplies, Hospital: Any materials used in providing care specifically in the hospital.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Commitment of Mentally Ill: Legal process required for the institutionalization of a patient with severe mental problems.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Morbidity: The proportion of patients with a particular disease during a given year per given unit of population.Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)Cardiology Service, Hospital: The hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of diagnostic and therapeutic services for the cardiac patient.Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive: A disease of chronic diffuse irreversible airflow obstruction. Subcategories of COPD include CHRONIC BRONCHITIS and PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA.International Classification of Diseases: A system of categories to which morbid entries are assigned according to established criteria. Included is the entire range of conditions in a manageable number of categories, grouped to facilitate mortality reporting. It is produced by the World Health Organization (From ICD-10, p1). The Clinical Modifications, produced by the UNITED STATES DEPT. OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, are larger extensions used for morbidity and general epidemiological purposes, primarily in the U.S.Community-Acquired Infections: Any infection acquired in the community, that is, contrasted with those acquired in a health care facility (CROSS INFECTION). An infection would be classified as community-acquired if the patient had not recently been in a health care facility or been in contact with someone who had been recently in a health care facility.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Home Care Services, Hospital-Based: Hospital-sponsored provision of health services, such as nursing, therapy, and health-related homemaker or social services, in the patient's home. (Hospital Administration Terminology, 2d ed)Hospitals, Public: Hospitals controlled by various types of government, i.e., city, county, district, state or federal.Libraries, Hospital: Information centers primarily serving the needs of hospital medical staff and sometimes also providing patient education and other services.WalesAccidental Falls: Falls due to slipping or tripping which may result in injury.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)British Columbia: A province of Canada on the Pacific coast. Its capital is Victoria. The name given in 1858 derives from the Columbia River which was named by the American captain Robert Gray for his ship Columbia which in turn was named for Columbus. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p178 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p81-2)Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Hospitals, County: Hospitals controlled by the county government.Catchment Area (Health): A geographic area defined and served by a health program or institution.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Cost Savings: Reductions in all or any portion of the costs of providing goods or services. Savings may be incurred by the provider or the consumer.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Psychiatric Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the organization and administration of psychiatric services.Patient Credit and Collection: Accounting procedures for determining credit status and methods of obtaining payment.IrelandChi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Northern IrelandWeather: The state of the ATMOSPHERE over minutes to months.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Small-Area Analysis: A method of analyzing the variation in utilization of health care in small geographic or demographic areas. It often studies, for example, the usage rates for a given service or procedure in several small areas, documenting the variation among the areas. By comparing high- and low-use areas, the analysis attempts to determine whether there is a pattern to such use and to identify variables that are associated with and contribute to the variation.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Day Care: Institutional health care of patients during the day. The patients return home at night.Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and management of services provided for obstetric and gynecologic patients.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Medication Errors: Errors in prescribing, dispensing, or administering medication with the result that the patient fails to receive the correct drug or the indicated proper drug dosage.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Ambulatory Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on an outpatient basis. It may be hospital-based or performed in an office or surgicenter.Epidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.Tertiary Care Centers: A medical facility which provides a high degree of subspecialty expertise for patients from centers where they received SECONDARY CARE.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Geriatric Assessment: Evaluation of the level of physical, physiological, or mental functioning in the older population group.Hong Kong: The former British crown colony located off the southeast coast of China, comprised of Hong Kong Island, Kowloon Peninsula, and New Territories. The three sites were ceded to the British by the Chinese respectively in 1841, 1860, and 1898. Hong Kong reverted to China in July 1997. The name represents the Cantonese pronunciation of the Chinese xianggang, fragrant port, from xiang, perfume and gang, port or harbor, with reference to its currents sweetened by fresh water from a river west of it.Hospitals, Municipal: Hospitals controlled by the city government.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Intensive Care Units, Pediatric: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill infants and children. Neonates are excluded since INTENSIVE CARE UNITS, NEONATAL is available.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Injury Severity Score: An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Fiji: A republic consisting of an island group in Melanesia, in the southwest Pacific Ocean. Its capital is Suva. It was discovered by Abel Tasman in 1643 and was visited by Captain Cook in 1774. It was used by escaped convicts from Australia as early as 1804. It was annexed by Great Britain in 1874 but achieved independence in 1970. The name Fiji is of uncertain origin. In its present form it may represent that of Viti, the main island in the group. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p396 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p186)American Hospital Association: A professional society in the United States whose membership is composed of hospitals.Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Triage: The sorting out and classification of patients or casualties to determine priority of need and proper place of treatment.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.DenmarkDisease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Patient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.Nursing Homes: Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Critical Illness: A disease or state in which death is possible or imminent.Food Service, Hospital: Hospital department that manages and supervises the dietary program in accordance with the patients' requirements.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Homes for the Aged: Geriatric long-term care facilities which provide supervision and assistance in activities of daily living with medical and nursing services when required.Hospitals, Community: Institutions with permanent facilities and organized medical staff which provide the full range of hospital services primarily to a neighborhood area.New Zealand: A group of islands in the southwest Pacific. Its capital is Wellington. It was discovered by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman in 1642 and circumnavigated by Cook in 1769. Colonized in 1840 by the New Zealand Company, it became a British crown colony in 1840 until 1907 when colonial status was terminated. New Zealand is a partly anglicized form of the original Dutch name Nieuw Zeeland, new sea land, possibly with reference to the Dutch province of Zeeland. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p842 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p378)Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems: Systems developed for collecting reports from government agencies, manufacturers, hospitals, physicians, and other sources on adverse drug reactions.New South Wales: A state in southeastern Australia. Its capital is Sydney. It was discovered by Captain Cook in 1770 and first settled at Botany Bay by marines and convicts in 1788. It was named by Captain Cook who thought its coastline resembled that of South Wales. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p840 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p377)Oncology Service, Hospital: The hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of diagnostic and therapeutic services for the cancer patient.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Episode of Care: An interval of care by a health care facility or provider for a specific medical problem or condition. It may be continuous or it may consist of a series of intervals marked by one or more brief separations from care, and can also identify the sequence of care (e.g., emergency, inpatient, outpatient), thus serving as one measure of health care provided.Hospitals, Veterans: Hospitals providing medical care to veterans of wars.Malaysia: A parliamentary democracy with a constitutional monarch in southeast Asia, consisting of 11 states (West Malaysia) on the Malay Peninsula and two states (East Malaysia) on the island of BORNEO. It is also called the Federation of Malaysia. Its capital is Kuala Lumpur. Before 1963 it was the Union of Malaya. It reorganized in 1948 as the Federation of Malaya, becoming independent from British Malaya in 1957 and becoming Malaysia in 1963 as a federation of Malaya, Sabah, Sarawak, and Singapore (which seceded in 1965). The form Malay- probably derives from the Tamil malay, mountain, with reference to its geography. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p715 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p329)
Sometimes people require admission to hospital to restore weight.[7] Evidence for benefit from nasogastric tube feeding, ... Admission to hospital[edit]. AN has a high mortality[111] and patients admitted in a severely ill state to medical units are at ... Relapse occurs in approximately a third of people in hospital, and is greatest in the first six to eighteen months after ... Diet is the most essential factor to work on in people with anorexia nervosa, and must be tailored to each person's needs. Food ...
People with extensive burns may be wrapped in clean sheets until they arrive at a hospital. As burn wounds are prone to ... require hospital admission. With major burns, early feeding is important. Hyperbaric oxygenation may be useful in addition to ... and estimations based on a person's palm size. The rule of nines is easy to remember but only accurate in people over 16 years ... The first hospital to treat burns opened in 1843 in London, England and the development of modern burn care began in the late ...
The disease lasts for several days to a week and is usually mild enough that people do not have to go to a hospital. Due to ... Admission to hospital is rarely necessary. The virus that causes the disease was first isolated in Africa in 1947. The first ... Play media Most people who are infected have no or few symptoms. Otherwise the most common signs and symptoms of Zika fever are ... Diagnosis is by testing the blood, urine, or saliva for the presence of the virus's RNA when the person is sick, or the blood ...
Admission to hospital is generally not needed. In the United States about 3 per 10,000 people per year are affected. Young ... Admission to hospital is generally not needed. The infection is frequently penicillin resistant. There are a number of ... In a study in Northern Ireland, the number of new cases was 10 cases per 100,000 people per year. In Denmark, the new number of ... new cases is higher and reaches 41 cases per 100,000 people per year. Younger children who develop a peritonsillar abscess are ...
DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004408.pub4 Katsakou C, Priebe S (October 2006). "Outcomes of involuntary hospital admission-a review ... Under assisted outpatient commitment, people committed involuntarily can live outside the psychiatric hospital, sometimes under ... In Jackson v. Indiana the court ruled that a person adjudicated incompetent could not be indefinitely committed. In Perry v. ... The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, General comment No. 1 (2014) on Article 12: Equal recognition ...
Admission is free for people with disabilities, certain institutions and municipal employees. Admission for the general public ... Another is the display of the history of the hospital and a collection of items from a former doctor at the hospital. There is ... The museum chronicles the history of Quito, along with 400 years of the history of the hospital. The former hospital buildings ... City Museum (Quito) City Museum formerly San Juan de Dios Hospital City Museum formerly San Juan de Dios Hospital "Semiótica ...
Hospitals can prepare for the admission of victims of frostbite and hypothermia; schools and other public buildings can be ... People can stock up on food, water, and other necessities before a cold wave. Some may even choose to migrate to places of ... Globally, more people die during cold weather than hot weather, due to the rise in diseases like cold, flu, and pneumonia. ... Most people can dress appropriately and can even layer their clothing should they need to go outside or should their heating ...
... persons/year. Hospital admissions in the US for pulmonary embolism are 200,000 to 300,000 yearly. Thrombosis that develops into ... If the hospital stay exceeded three days, the person was reassessed for risk. Clinicians were then able to apply protocols for ... If the person is too weak to perform these preventative activities, hospital personnel will perform these movements ... There has been some success in preventing blood clots by an early assessment risk upon admission to the hospital. This strategy ...
Alternatively, a person may be referred by hospital medical staff, by court order, involuntary commitment, or, in the UK and ... In many countries including the USA and Canada, the criteria for involuntary admission vary with local jurisdiction. They may ... If a person receiving treatment in a psychiatric hospital is assessed as at particular risk of harming themselves or others, ... Psychiatric inpatients are people admitted to a hospital or clinic to receive psychiatric care. Some are admitted involuntarily ...
Preventing admissions of older people to hospital. We need evidence-based policy not policy based evidence". BMJ: g5538. doi: ... "Commission on Hospital Care for Frail Older People". He has campaigned on discrimination against older people in the British ... He challenges plans for large reductions in older people in acute hospitals, saying it is "absolute la la land to think we're ... Oliver, David (April 2008). "'Acopia' and 'social admission' are not diagnoses :why older people deserve better". Journal of ...
About half a million people require admission to hospital a year. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ... Other person-to-person modes of transmission have also been reported, but are very unusual. The genetic variation in dengue ... If a person is outside of the critical phase, a loop diuretic such as furosemide may be used to eliminate excess fluid from the ... In some people, the disease proceeds to a critical phase as fever resolves. During this period, there is leakage of plasma from ...
Later he would let his last breath in the hospital operating room Spiritus Santos. During the intense fighting injured 22 other ... people, both of them beaten by bullets. Blood transfusions are ongoing, while the neurosurgeon makes admission to surgery. The ...
"Predicting and preventing unplanned hospital admissions - Bradshaw Lecture". Royal College of Physicians. Retrieved 15 November ... http://www.ncl.ac.uk/icm/people/profile/paul.corris "Herman Waldmann". Cranfield University. Archived from the original on 22 ... Predicting and preventing unplanned hospital admissions 2010 Mark W. Elliot, Non-invasive ventilation - established and ... Caddy, A. (1931). "THE ROYAL WESTMINSTER OPHTHALMIC HOSPITAL AND ITS STAFF IN THE PAST". British Journal of Ophthalmology. 15 ( ...
... of admissions to a hospital.[5] ... and the person may have a fever and feel tired.[2] ... Cellulitis occurred in about 21.2 million people in 2015.[6] In the United States about two of every 1,000 people per year have ... Potential complications include abscess formation.[1] Around 95% of people are better after seven to ten days of treatment.[2] ... Cellulitis is most often a clinical diagnosis, readily identified in many people by history and physical examination alone, ...
About half a million people require hospital admission every year.[1] Paracetamol (acetaminophen) is recommended instead of ... Other person-to-person modes of transmission, including sexual transmission, have also been reported, but are very unusual.[28] ... In some people, the disease proceeds to a critical phase as fever resolves.[27] During this period, there is leakage of plasma ... Most people with dengue recover without any ongoing problems.[49] The risk of death among those with severe dengue is 0.8% to ...
There is a general admission lawn area where people may bring blankets. There are no outfield seats. There is a concourse that ... The ballpark's former name was "Silver Cross Field," with the naming rights belonging to Silver Cross Hospital. In November ... The stadium was built in 2002 and holds 6,016 people. It is the home of the Joliet Slammers. In December 2010, the Joliet ...
This also allowed for the admission of children. M.J. Kelly, director for the State Board of Hospitals and Special Schools, ... The center is home to 150 people who live in eight cottages and three 16-bed units. Located in the City of El Paso and serving ... May Corley, the hospital's first sociologist, said, "Everybody who lived and worked here had a job to do." In 1957, the name of ... In 1949, the hospital began accepting African-American patients. Medical treatment was considered state-of-the-art, and the ...
Layne Bagley took over as the primary admissions person. "city-data.com information". "State of Utah Rules for Treatment ... including deemed status accreditation for several other types of health care organizations in addition to hospitals Sorenson's ... The Joint Commission typically is a certification for hospitals; however, the Joint Commission provides accreditation, ...
"Response service preventing unnecessary hospital admissions shortlisted for awards". Get West London. 29 May 2015. Retrieved 23 ... "Huge funding boost to help people with reduced mobility sleep at night". Get West London. 31 July 2015. Retrieved 23 September ... Its is responsible for Teddington Memorial Hospital. It has plans to become a Foundation Trust but it is unclear when this may ... The Care Quality Commission rated it as requiring improvement in 2016, being critical of care at Teddington Memorial Hospital ...
DIC is observed in approximately 1% of academic hospital admissions.[18] DIC occurs at higher rates in people with bacterial ... 1% of people admitted to hospital[4]. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a condition in which blood clots form ... Heparin may be useful in the chronic form.[2] About 1% of people admitted to hospital are affected by the condition.[4] In ...
... of people seek re-admission within 6 months after treatment and the average duration of hospital stay is 6 days. ... Congestive heart failure is a leading cause of hospital readmissions in the U.S. In people aged 65 and older were readmitted at ... April 2008). "Factors Identified as Precipitating Hospital Admissions for Heart Failure and Clinical Outcomes: Findings From ... of emergency hospital admissions.[2] Heart failure has been known since ancient times with the Ebers papyrus commenting on it ...
... residential alternatives to hospital admission". The Psychiatrist. 31 (31): 262-264. doi:10.1192/pb.bp.106.011197. Video of ... They now know people are excited by the prospect of a Soteria House being in Brighton. A business plan is being prepared and ... Alternatives to the Hospital for Acute Psychiatric Treatment. Washington DC: American Psychiatric Pub. pp. 111-132. ISBN 978-0- ... Soteria is a community service that provides a space for people experiencing mental distress or crisis. Based on a recovery ...
Free admission cum provision of boarding & lodging with all facilities to Old Age People. Securing corneas from the deceased ... To eradicate Tuberculosis, TB patients recognised by the Government General Hospital, Yanam were also adopted by the service ... Supply of Ambulance free of charge to needy people. Supply of Mortuary Van free of charge to needy people. Supply of Body De- ... Malladi Krishna Rao have been elected as people's representative (MLA) by the people of Yanam from 1996. From 2011 he is ...
"Increased mortality associated with weekend hospital admission: a case for expanded seven day services?". The BMJ. Retrieved ... the study observed an increase in 30-day mortality for people admitted to hospital on Saturday and Sunday, compared to mid-week ... Other concerns have been raised regarding mortality following admission to hospital at a weekend. A research paper published in ... In 2009 research looking at emergency admissions to hospitals in England established that a small but statistically significant ...
Hospital-acquired pneumonia is acquired in a hospital, specifically, pneumonia that occurs 48 hours or more after admission, ... If the score is 0 or 1, people can typically be managed at home; if it is 2, a short hospital stay or close follow-up is needed ... In 2011, pneumonia was the most common reason for admission to the hospital after an emergency department visit in the U.S. for ... In those treated in hospital, more than 90% improve with the initial antibiotics. For people with ventilator-acquired pneumonia ...
Nalanda Medical College Hospital 1970 Patna Magadh University Government [12] Narayan Medical College and Hospital 2008 Sasaram ... Status of Medical Colleges in India for Admission for the Academic Year 2011-12 ... People's Medical College, Bhopal. *Ruxmaniben Deepchand Gardi Medical College, Ujjain. Manipur. *Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of ... Cooper Hospital and H.B.T. Medical College, Juhu. *King Edward Memorial Hospital and Seth Gordhandas Sunderdas Medical College ...
Consultation procedures are available at Gleneagles Hospital Kuala Lumpur from Price on request. Find out what other patients ... It still took me hours just to wait at the reception area when theres not even a single person during admission. All the ... The admission is one of the worst department compared to other hospitals. They are slow, and blur. And they dont care that the ... The hospital has a mission to be the global leader in value-based integrated healthcare, with a mission to transform peoples ...
Preventing admission of older people to hospital. BMJ 2013; 346 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.f3186 (Published 20 May 2013) ... the effectiveness of alternatives for people over the age of 65 who are at risk of potentially avoidable hospital admission ... Shaun DSouza specialist registrar, medicine for older people, Sunku Guptha consultant physician, medicine for older people ... NOTE: We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see ...
... an acute clinical team delivers patient-centred intermediate care to support people in their homes and reduce hospital ... Citation: Griffiths B, Davies A (2017) Reducing hospital admissions with person-centred intermediate care. Nursing Times [ ... The CRTs main goal is to assess and support people in their place of residence, avoiding unnecessary hospital admissions ... the team can request admission to hospital. Around 12% of all our patients were admitted to hospital. Of these, 9% were ...
Hospital admission with NAFLD is associated with an increased risk of developing and dying from cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) ... Hospital admission with common liver disease puts people with type 2 diabetes at much greater risk of cardiovascular disease ... Hospital admission with common liver disease puts people with type 2 diabetes at much greater risk of cardiovascular disease ... Hospital admission with NAFLD is associated with an increased risk of developing and dying from cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) ...
Exposure Admission to hospital (any hospital admission versus none, and post-admission versus pre-admission). ... "no hospital admission" before the date of the first admission and "hospital admission" after that date. All practices included ... no hospital admission versus any admission). Hospital admission was incorporated as a time dependent variable in the Cox model ... after hospital admission versus before). The post-admission period started on the day after hospital admission. For those ...
Risk of admission to hospital among people with type 2 diabetes who received influenza vaccination relative to people who did ... Hospital admissions were identified from Hospital Episode statistics as the principal diagnosis on admission using ... Across all study years, there were 5142 hospital admissions for acute MI, 4515 admissions for stroke, 14 154 admissions for ... hospital admission for heart failure; D, hospital admission for pneumonia or influenza; E, all-cause death) during the summer ...
OPtimising thERapy to Prevent Avoidable Hospital Admissions in the Multimorbid Older People (OPERAM). The safety and scientific ... OPERAM: OPtimising thERapy to Prevent Avoidable Hospital Admissions in the Multimorbid Older People: a Cluster Randomised ... Rationale and design of OPtimising thERapy to prevent Avoidable hospital admissions in Multimorbid older people (OPERAM): a ... Adverse drug reactions as cause of admission to hospital: definition of adverse drug reactions needs to include overdose. BMJ. ...
Coordinated care versus standard care in hospital admissions of people with chronic illness: a randomised controlled trial ... High-risk status for an unplanned admission was defined as i) three or more unplanned hospital admissions in 12 months for ... reducing hospital presentations or admissions, reducing the time patients spent in hospital or delaying readmission. CN had no ... CN during hospital admission with increased referrals for community health services after discharge was too small an ...
Children and young people (CYP) are encouraged to increase time spent being physically active, especially in moderate and ... Are active children and young people at increased risk of injuries resulting in hospital admission or accident and emergency ... children and young people at increased risk of injuries resulting in hospital admission or accident and emergency department ... Are active children and young people at increased risk of injuries resulting in hospital admission or accident and emergency ...
Hospital admissions. The Hospital Morbidity Data Collection lists all (public and private) hospital admissions for all causes. ... Hospital admission rates were defined as number of hospital admissions (including multiple admissions for the same individual) ... Tertiary paediatric hospital admissions in children and young people with cerebral palsy. Child Care Health Dev 2015;41:928-37. ... Correction: Predicting respiratory hospital admissions in young people with cerebral palsy BMJ Publishing Group Ltd and Royal ...
We were able to link data on 4.62 million people (91.8 % of the Scottish population), yielding over 38 million patient-years of ... There are very substantial ethnic variations in hospital admission/deaths from asthma in Scotland, with Pakistanis having the ... Our previous meta-analysis found that South Asians and Blacks in the UK were at a substantially increased risk of hospital ... admission from asthma. These estimates were, however, derived from pooling data from a limited number of now dated studies, ...
... and are associated with poor outcomes including increased rates of hospital admissions and death. In a pilot study of... ... Background Weight loss and under-nutrition are relatively common in older people, ... The effect of testosterone and a nutritional supplement on hospital admissions in under-nourished, older people. ... and reduced the number of people hospitalised and duration of hospital admissions in undernourished, community dwelling older ...
Respiratory hospital admissions and emergency department visits in young people with cerebral palsy: 5-year follow-up ... Respiratory hospital admissions and emergency department visits in young people with cerebral palsy: 5-year follow-up ... Respiratory disease accounts for a high proportion of hospital admissions in young people with cerebral palsy (CP),1 and re- ... These responses were linked prospectively to hospital admissions for 3 years to identify the following factors, which predicted ...
... but was associated with fewer hospital admissions. The authors hypothesise that stress management training may provide people ... Those in the stress management programme had fewer hospital admissions in the year following treatment (12% v 23% controls, ... a statistical analysis of behaviour therapy in a German state psychiatric hospital suggested that less than one third of people ... People were excluded if they were hospitalised or had medication increases in the past 3 months due to exacerbation of acute ...
... mental health inpatient care and general hospital inpatient care.Predictors of probability of care home or hospital admission ... and so major cuts in social care budgets increase the risk of high-cost admissions which older people do not want. Routinely ... sociodemographic factors and living circumstances on risk of admission to care home or hospital over 6 months and associated ... likelihood of care home or hospital admission, and associated costs.Observational data extracted from clinical records using ...
People. James Poterba, president. James Poterba is President of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He is also the Mitsui ... Hospital Utilization: An Analysis of SMSA Differences in Hospital Admission Rates, Occupancy Rates and Bed Rates. Barry R. ... Chiswick, Barry R. "Hospital Utilization: An Analysis of SMSA Differences in Hospital Admission Rates, Occupancy Rates and Bed ... "Hospital Utilization: An Analysis of SMSA Differences in Occupancy Rates, Admission Rates, and Bed Rates," NBER Chapters, in: ...
... case-control study was undertaken to establish the most important factors causing winter hospital admissions among older people ... UK hospitals experience a surge in resipiratory admissions. Social circumstance may be an important determinant. This ... Effect of social factors on winter hospital admission for respiratory disease: A case-control study of older people in the UK ... Effect of social factors on winter hospital admission for respiratory disease: A case-control study of older people in the UK ...
Hospital admission in older persons presenting with dizziness in the Emergency department. Forskningsoutput: Tidskriftsbidrag ... The aim of this study was to identify factors that differed between those who were admitted to hospital and those who were not ... Forty percent of the dizzy patients were admitted to the hospital, 50% among those arriving with ambulance and 24% of the walk- ... The sample consisted of persons (n. =166) aged 65+ presenting in the ED with dizziness. Factors that were more frequent among ...
Hospital admission data. There was a significant reduction in admissions for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), falling from 10 to 2 ... Gibb FW, Teoh WL, Graham J, Lockman KA (2016) Risk of death following admission to a UK hospital with diabetic ketoacidosis. ... The number of individuals presenting with DKA was also small, but we did observe a significant reduction in hospital admissions ... Overall, we were unable to detect any significant difference in total hospital admissions and emergency department attendances ...
Smoking-related hospital admissions cost every person in Manchester £62.90 in 2010-2011, while the Integrated Housing Survey ( ... Manchester smoking death rates highest in England - with hospital admissions costing EVERY person £60. ... Manchester smoking death rates highest in England - with hospital admissions costing EVERY person £60. ... with hospital admissions costing each person around £47.. Although national figures show the death rate is decreasing, ...
Are antidementia drugs associated with reduced mortality after a hospital emergency admission in the population with dementia ... Introduction: People with dementia experience poor outcomes after hospital admission, with mortality being particularly high. ... Are antidementia drugs associated with reduced mortality after a hospital emergency admission in the population with dementia ... with a diagnosis of dementia and an emergency hospital admission between 01/01/2010 and 31/12/2016. Two classes of antidementia ...
Korea, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People's Democratic Republic Latvia ... Proportion of all-cause hospital admissions with dementia captured in the hospital record, where dementia was recorded in ... Proportion of all-cause hospital admissions with dementia captured in the hospital record, where dementia was recorded in ... China, Peoples Republic Chinese Taipei Colombia Comoros Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Congo Cook Islands Costa Rica ...
Im really getting sick and tired of how helpless people become/act/think they are just because they are in the hospital. ... Im really getting sick and tired of how helpless people become/act/think they are just because they are in the hospital. Call ... Dx: Paralysis secondary to hospital admission May the Nurses Force Be With You ... Research shows that people really do act sick once admitted. One thing I liked about working in Pedi - kids dont have same ...
... Aim: Hemoglobin A1c is a known ... Our aim was to assess admission effects on Hemoglobin A1c levels as well as short- and long-term mortality risk following ... Hemoglobin A1c levels before and after admission, demographic, clinical and biochemical data were recorded. Total follow-up ... Mortality among patient with poorly controlled Hemoglobin A1c prior admission was 57% higher than the reference group. ...
Together, these datasets will identify people most at risk of death or hospital admission during cold weather, and how much ... we will develop a tool to help primary care teams identify people at risk of death or emergency admission to hospital during or ... Impact of hospital admission upon patterns of primary care prescribing * Identifying the most appropriate treatment for IAPT ... Deaths and hospital admissions during cold weather: derivation and validation of a tool to help primary care identify ...
  • Additionally, the hospital also receives numerous awards, including Most Innovative Health Care Brand by Global Brands Magazine in 2016, Elite Member of Malaysia Healthcare Tourism in 2016, as well as the winner of the Global Health & Travel Awards as well as International Hospital of the Year 2018 by IMTJ Medical Travel Awards. (thethaiger.com)
  • The hospital has developed from being an effective and prominent healthcare provider to a medical center that provides complete solutions from every aspect. (thethaiger.com)
  • This hospital is also dedicated to gaining the highest standards of quality in the delivery of care by identifying, minimalizing, or removing risks through its established quality systems. (thethaiger.com)
  • Main outcome measures Prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing assessed using 45 criteria from the Screening Tool for Older Persons' Prescription (STOPP) version 2, analysed both as rate of distinct potentially inappropriate prescribing criteria met (stratified Cox regression) and binary presence of potentially inappropriate prescribing (logistic regression) and adjusted for patients' characteristics. (bmj.com)
  • Prevalence data for children and young people are limited. (nice.org.uk)
  • To assess the prevalence of malnutrition according to the new ESPEN definition in a population of geriatric hospital patients and to determine how malnutrition affects the length of hospital stay (LOS) and hospital mortality. (frontiersin.org)
  • South Korea's longest spell of monsoon rain in seven years caused floods that have forced more than 1,000 people to leave their homes, killing at least 13, with another 13 missing, authorities said on Tuesday. (cyprus-mail.com)
  • Previous research has shown that there is a link between NAFLD and CVD, but until now it was unclear if the same was true in people with type 2 diabetes. (eurekalert.org)
  • Using hospital and death record data, Professor Sarah Wild from the University of Edinburgh, UK, and Professor Christopher Byrne from the University of Southampton, UK, explored the connection between NAFLD and CVD or death in over 133,300 adults diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in Scotland between 2004 and 2013 who had at least one hospital admission. (eurekalert.org)
  • The authors conclude: "Because non-alcoholic fatty liver independently raises the risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality in people with type 2 diabetes, preventing the condition by avoiding unhealthy lifestyles in people with diabetes is vital. (eurekalert.org)
  • We sought to examine the effectiveness of influenza vaccination against admission to hospital for acute cardiovascular and respiratory conditions and all-cause death in people with type 2 diabetes. (cmaj.ca)
  • In this cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes, influenza vaccination was associated with reductions in rates of admission to hospital for specific cardiovascular events. (cmaj.ca)
  • A range of psychological interventions are also offered to children and young people with bipolar depression, psychosis or schizophrenia, including individual therapies and family interventions. (nice.org.uk)
  • There was high quality evidence for number of people who fell, which is consistent with no effect or a small effect, but there was no evidence that these interventions increased independent living. (scie.org.uk)
  • 3 - 5 In hospital settings, single interventions have not been proven successful in preventing or reducing falls, whereas multisystem or multistrategy approaches have shown to be more effective. (mja.com.au)
  • Objective To assess the longer term effects of multifactorial interventions for preventing falls in older people living in the community, and to explore whether prespecific trial-level characteristics are associated with greater fall prevention effects. (bmj.com)
  • Study selection We included randomised controlled trials (≥12 months' follow-up) evaluating the effects of multifactorial interventions on falls in older people aged 65 years and over, living in the community, compared with either usual care or usual care plus advice. (bmj.com)
  • Conclusion Multifactorial interventions (most of which include exercise prescription) may reduce the rate of falls and slightly reduce risk of older people sustaining one or more falls and recurrent falls (defined as two or more falls within a specified time period). (bmj.com)
  • We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group register which includes papers identified from CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and PSYCINFO in January 2007, and CINAHL in August 2006 for studies of interventions for smoking cessation in hospitalised patients, using terms including (hospital and patient*) or hospitali* or inpatient* or admission* or admitted. (nih.gov)
  • Randomized and quasi-randomized trials of behavioural, pharmacological or multicomponent interventions to help patients stop smoking, conducted with hospitalised patients who were current smokers or recent quitters (defined as having quit more than one month before hospital admission). (nih.gov)
  • Seven of the NDM-1 with a bleomycin resistance pro- ill persons in British Columbia had laboratory are isolated from urine tein in Enterobacteriaceae and Acineto- attended the same wedding on May (British Columbia Centre for Disease bacter baumannii . (cdc.gov)
  • Ms Paton added: "Manchester Stop Smoking Service offers support with stopping smoking including free or reduced cost nicotine replacement therapy at many venues across the city including several health centres & clinics and all the main hospitals. (mancunianmatters.co.uk)
  • Those receiving outpatient care at large centres had a 16.1% (IRR 0.839, (95% CI 0.709 to 0.990), p=0.0189) reduction in hospital admissions compared with those treated at small centres. (bristol.ac.uk)
  • Factors influencing higher admission rates in smaller centres (eg, "out of hours resources") need to be explored with the aim of targeting modifiable influences on admission rates. (bristol.ac.uk)
  • Co-production that genuinely shapes decisions and understands impacts on people who need care and support, and on carers. (scie.org.uk)
  • It was associated with increased frequency of hospital admission (incidence rate ratio 1.50, 95% CI 1.25 to 1.80), increased likelihood of compulsory admission (OR 1.55, 1.16 to 2.08) and greater number of days spent in hospital (β coefficient 35.1 days, 12.1 to 58.1). (bmj.com)