Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Healthy People Programs: Healthy People Programs are a set of health objectives to be used by governments, communities, professional organizations, and others to help develop programs to improve health. It builds on initiatives pursued over the past two decades beginning with the 1979 Surgeon General's Report, Healthy People, Healthy People 2000: National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives, and Healthy People 2010. These established national health objectives and served as the basis for the development of state and community plans. These are administered by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP). Similar programs are conducted by other national governments.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Great BritainCross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Geriatric Assessment: Evaluation of the level of physical, physiological, or mental functioning in the older population group.EnglandSocioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Accidental Falls: Falls due to slipping or tripping which may result in injury.Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Disabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.United StatesFrail Elderly: Older adults or aged individuals who are lacking in general strength and are unusually susceptible to disease or to other infirmity.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Dementia: An acquired organic mental disorder with loss of intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social or occupational functioning. The dysfunction is multifaceted and involves memory, behavior, personality, judgment, attention, spatial relations, language, abstract thought, and other executive functions. The intellectual decline is usually progressive, and initially spares the level of consciousness.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Oceanic Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the islands of the central and South Pacific, including Micronesia, Melanesia, Polynesia, and traditionally Australasia.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Homes for the Aged: Geriatric long-term care facilities which provide supervision and assistance in activities of daily living with medical and nursing services when required.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Stereotyping: An oversimplified perception or conception especially of persons, social groups, etc.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Prejudice: A preconceived judgment made without factual basis.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).LondonInstitutionalization: The caring for individuals in institutions and their adaptation to routines characteristic of the institutional environment, and/or their loss of adaptation to life outside the institution.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Residential Facilities: Long-term care facilities which provide supervision and assistance in activities of daily living with medical and nursing services when required.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Social Stigma: A perceived attribute that is deeply discrediting and is considered to be a violation of social norms.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Caregivers: Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Postural Balance: A POSTURE in which an ideal body mass distribution is achieved. Postural balance provides the body carriage stability and conditions for normal functions in stationary position or in movement, such as sitting, standing, or walking.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Indians, North American: Individual members of North American ethnic groups with ancient historic ancestral origins in Asia.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Public Opinion: The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.Population Groups: Individuals classified according to their sex, racial origin, religion, common place of living, financial or social status, or some other cultural or behavioral attribute. (UMLS, 2003)Homeless Persons: Persons who have no permanent residence. The concept excludes nomadic peoples.ScotlandHome Care Services: Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.New Zealand: A group of islands in the southwest Pacific. Its capital is Wellington. It was discovered by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman in 1642 and circumnavigated by Cook in 1769. Colonized in 1840 by the New Zealand Company, it became a British crown colony in 1840 until 1907 when colonial status was terminated. New Zealand is a partly anglicized form of the original Dutch name Nieuw Zeeland, new sea land, possibly with reference to the Dutch province of Zeeland. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p842 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p378)Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Self Care: Performance of activities or tasks traditionally performed by professional health care providers. The concept includes care of oneself or one's family and friends.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Ethnobotany: The study of plant lore and agricultural customs of a people. In the fields of ETHNOMEDICINE and ETHNOPHARMACOLOGY, the emphasis is on traditional medicine and the existence and medicinal uses of PLANTS and PLANT EXTRACTS and their constituents, both historically and in modern times.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Nursing Homes: Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.Health Services, Indigenous: Health care provided to specific cultural or tribal peoples which incorporates local customs, beliefs, and taboos.AlaskaHousing: Living facilities for humans.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Walking: An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Democratic People's Republic of Korea: A country located on the Korean Peninsula whose capital is Pyongyang. The country was established September 9, 1948.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Exercise Therapy: A regimen or plan of physical activities designed and prescribed for specific therapeutic goals. Its purpose is to restore normal musculoskeletal function or to reduce pain caused by diseases or injuries.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Schizophrenia: A severe emotional disorder of psychotic depth characteristically marked by a retreat from reality with delusion formation, HALLUCINATIONS, emotional disharmony, and regressive behavior.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Independent Living: A housing and community arrangement that maximizes independence and self-determination.Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Inuits: Inuktitut-speakers generally associated with the northern polar region.Social Perception: The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Geriatrics: The branch of medicine concerned with the physiological and pathological aspects of the aged, including the clinical problems of senescence and senility.Suicide: The act of killing oneself.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.IndiaSocial Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Epilepsy: A disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of paroxysmal brain dysfunction due to a sudden, disorderly, and excessive neuronal discharge. Epilepsy classification systems are generally based upon: (1) clinical features of the seizure episodes (e.g., motor seizure), (2) etiology (e.g., post-traumatic), (3) anatomic site of seizure origin (e.g., frontal lobe seizure), (4) tendency to spread to other structures in the brain, and (5) temporal patterns (e.g., nocturnal epilepsy). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p313)Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2: A subclass of DIABETES MELLITUS that is not INSULIN-responsive or dependent (NIDDM). It is characterized initially by INSULIN RESISTANCE and HYPERINSULINEMIA; and eventually by GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE; HYPERGLYCEMIA; and overt diabetes. Type II diabetes mellitus is no longer considered a disease exclusively found in adults. Patients seldom develop KETOSIS but often exhibit OBESITY.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Psychotic Disorders: Disorders in which there is a loss of ego boundaries or a gross impairment in reality testing with delusions or prominent hallucinations. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Life Style: Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Vulnerable Populations: Groups of persons whose range of options is severely limited, who are frequently subjected to COERCION in their DECISION MAKING, or who may be compromised in their ability to give INFORMED CONSENT.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Medicine, Traditional: Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.Mentally Disabled Persons: Persons diagnosed as having significantly lower than average intelligence and considerable problems in adapting to everyday life or lacking independence in regard to activities of daily living.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.JapanMotivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Anthropology, Cultural: It is the study of social phenomena which characterize the learned, shared, and transmitted social activities of particular ethnic groups with focus on the causes, consequences, and complexities of human social and cultural variability.Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.EuropeMental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: An acquired defect of cellular immunity associated with infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a CD4-positive T-lymphocyte count under 200 cells/microliter or less than 14% of total lymphocytes, and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and malignant neoplasms. Clinical manifestations also include emaciation (wasting) and dementia. These elements reflect criteria for AIDS as defined by the CDC in 1993.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Mobility Limitation: Difficulty in walking from place to place.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Emigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.New South Wales: A state in southeastern Australia. Its capital is Sydney. It was discovered by Captain Cook in 1770 and first settled at Botany Bay by marines and convicts in 1788. It was named by Captain Cook who thought its coastline resembled that of South Wales. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p840 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p377)Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Human Rights: The rights of the individual to cultural, social, economic, and educational opportunities as provided by society, e.g., right to work, right to education, and right to social security.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Blindness: The inability to see or the loss or absence of perception of visual stimuli. This condition may be the result of EYE DISEASES; OPTIC NERVE DISEASES; OPTIC CHIASM diseases; or BRAIN DISEASES affecting the VISUAL PATHWAYS or OCCIPITAL LOBE.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Dependency (Psychology): The tendency of an individual or individuals to rely on others for advice, guidance, or support.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Cardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Physical Therapy Modalities: Therapeutic modalities frequently used in PHYSICAL THERAPY SPECIALTY by PHYSICAL THERAPISTS or physiotherapists to promote, maintain, or restore the physical and physiological well-being of an individual.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Gait: Manner or style of walking.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Community Mental Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive mental health services provided for individuals in the community.West Indies: Islands lying between southeastern North America and northern South America, enclosing the Caribbean Sea. They comprise the Greater Antilles (CUBA; DOMINICAN REPUBLIC; HAITI; JAMAICA; and PUERTO RICO), the Lesser Antilles (ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA and the other Leeward Islands, BARBADOS; MARTINIQUE and the other Windward Islands, NETHERLANDS ANTILLES; VIRGIN ISLANDS OF THE UNITED STATES, BRITISH VIRGINI ISLANDS, and the islands north of Venezuela which include TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO), and the BAHAMAS. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1330)World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Income: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Choice Behavior: The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Visually Impaired Persons: Persons with loss of vision such that there is an impact on activities of daily living.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Life Expectancy: Based on known statistical data, the number of years which any person of a given age may reasonably expected to live.Sensory Aids: Devices that help people with impaired sensory responses.BrazilDisease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Schizophrenic Psychology: Study of mental processes and behavior of schizophrenics.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Home Nursing: Nursing care given to an individual in the home. The care may be provided by a family member or a friend. Home nursing as care by a non-professional is differentiated from HOME CARE SERVICES provided by professionals: visiting nurse, home health agencies, hospital, or other organized community group.Intellectual Disability: Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. This has multiple potential etiologies, including genetic defects and perinatal insults. Intelligence quotient (IQ) scores are commonly used to determine whether an individual has an intellectual disability. IQ scores between 70 and 79 are in the borderline range. Scores below 67 are in the disabled range. (from Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, p28)Northern Territory: Territory in north central Australia, between the states of Queensland and Western Australia. Its capital is Darwin.Learning Disorders: Conditions characterized by a significant discrepancy between an individual's perceived level of intellect and their ability to acquire new language and other cognitive skills. These disorders may result from organic or psychological conditions. Relatively common subtypes include DYSLEXIA, DYSCALCULIA, and DYSGRAPHIA.Judgment: The process of discovering or asserting an objective or intrinsic relation between two objects or concepts; a faculty or power that enables a person to make judgments; the process of bringing to light and asserting the implicit meaning of a concept; a critical evaluation of a person or situation.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Medicine, African Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the African peoples. It includes treatment by medicinal plants and other materia medica as well as by the ministrations of diviners, medicine men, witch doctors, and sorcerers.Employment, Supported: Paid work for mentally or physically disabled persons, taking place in regular or normal work settings. It may be competitive employment (work that pays minimum wage) or employment with subminimal wages in individualized or group placement situations. It is intended for persons with severe disabilities who require a range of support services to maintain employment. Supported employment differs from SHELTERED WORKSHOPS in that work in the latter takes place in a controlled working environment. Federal regulations are authorized and administered by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services.
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... Juice To Go - Juice drink marketed in plastic bottles to drink on the go.[10] *Apple, Apple Cranberry, Apple ... It employs over 1,900 people and has over $2 billion in sales (1997 est.).[3] ... Minute Maid Lemonades and Fruit Drinks - Fruit drink.[10] *Lemonade, Pink Lemonade, Raspberry Lemonade, Limeade, Fruit Punch, ... 100% Apple Juice - Apple Juice drink with 100% apple juice. *Red Sensation - 100% juice drink made with apple, raspberry, and ...
In 2015, still 886 thousand people lacked access to "improved" water. Drinking water. Despite clear improvements, the quality ... It indicates that 97% of the population had access to an improved source of drinking water and 99% had access to improved ... It is sufficient to supply a city with more than 100,000 inhabitants with drinking water. The country's mean annual surface ... Today about 50% of drinking water comes from desalination, 40% from the mining of non-renewable groundwater and only 10% from ...
... people can drink a great deal without necessarily being alcoholic, and alcoholics may drink minimally or infrequently. Disease ... Among people with low dependence levels at admission, the risk of relapse appears relatively low for those who later drank ... Davies' follow-up of 93 problem drinkers found that 7 of them were able to return to "controlled drinking" (less than 7 drinks ... renewed controversy over how people suffering a disease which reputedly leads to uncontrollable drinking could manage to drink ...
Give the People What They Want (1981) · State of Confusion (1983) · Word of Mouth (1984) · Think Visual (1986) · The Road (1988 ... "Have Another Drink". *"Underneath The Neon Sign". *"Holiday Romance". *"You Make It All Worthwhile" ...
pajilla: drinking straw. pegue: workplace or any job. pinche: stingy. pinolero/a: (noun, colloquial) a Nicaraguan person. pofi ... Vos is the predominant second person singular pronoun used by most speakers in familiar or informal contexts to address people ... For example, ¡Ven acá! or ¡Ven aquí! becomes ¡Vení! Usted is the formal second person singular pronoun in Nicaraguan Spanish, ... Usted is used in addressing elderly people, authorities, foreigners formally and in business settings. In contrast to ...
Alanzo: An average person; the only thing that makes Alanzo a part of the Cavalcade is his tendency to eat bizarre and ... They choose not to speak, and only occasionally communicate by saying "Eeeeeeeee." Prone to drinking. Mrs. X and Baby X: A ...
There was drinking. Not at the same time. Attendance was projected to be over 5,000 people. Treason, Jackie (2012-08-20). "My ...
Within hours the mob grew to 10,000 people. Many were drinking. When the reform mayor Edward P. Smith attempted to intervene, ... Problems with public schools were a factor in middle-class people moving to the suburbs, but the shift in population to suburbs ... Some groups have tried to manufacture political power out of immigration issues, but more people in the city and community have ... Within a month of the legislature's passing the law, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People brought a ...
"Craft Brew Alliance Inc (BREW.O) People". Reuters.com. Retrieved 2016-11-30. "Drinking is Believing , F.A.Q". Omission Beer. ... Key People in CBA Next CEO for CBA - Andy Thomas "Craft Brew Alliance Inc (BREW.O) Key Developments". Reuters.com. Retrieved ... That Craft Beer You're Drinking isn't Craft Beer - Do You Care?, Time Business & Money, August 13, 2013. Report: The Craft Beer ...
Alcohol is a psychoactive drug and some people[who?] say that the label non-alcoholic is misleading and is a threat to ... An alcohol-free or non-alcoholic drink, also known as a temperance drink, is a version of an alcoholic drink made without ... Low-alcoholic drink[edit]. Sparkling apple cider, soft drinks, and juice naturally contain trace amounts or no alcohol. Some ... However alcoholic drinks cannot be further purified to 0.00% alcohol by volume by distillation. In fact, most drinks labeled ...
The place has a strong or special association with a person, or group of persons, of importance of cultural or natural history ... 1826: Tank Stream disallowed for drinking by Governor Brisbane. Governor Darling arranged for seven wells to be dug in the city ... The stream is thought to have given the Aboriginal people fresh water, fish and other resources.[2][3] ... The Gadigal (or Cadigal) people were the Aboriginal group most commonly accepted to have lived around the Sydney Cove area ...
This will be prepared by the team with the help of people's participation. The will first interact with the GP and prepare a ... Drinking water and sanitation. Literacy, school education. Health and medical facilities. Poverty reduction and basic needs. ... However, the team will take some members like professionals or retired persons belonging to the area to assist the team in the ... Social justice - SC / ST, Persons with disability etc. To assist the DPC in preparing the vision document (and subsequently to ...
Twenty or more people crammed into a tiny house. Five sisters wedged into a minuscule kitchen; drinking gin and orange; wearing ... with the area mean that she tends to view Albert Square as her own and thinks that gives her an excuse to intrude into people's ...
In addition, the Telstra People's Choice Award, with a cash prize of $5,000, is made to the most popular of the nominees in ... Henschke, Ian (30 November 2007). "Beer Drinking Ballet Dancer". Stateline South Australia (broadcast transcript). ABC. ... Previous People's Choice winner Benedicte Bemet joined Ako Kondo in celebrating a second nomination, while Robyn Hendricks was ... Amy Harris, Jake Mangakahia and Danielle Rowe have each won the People's Choice Award twice. The nominees for these awards were ...
As a cocktail historian, McMillian is known for telling stories or reciting drink-themed poetry while making drinks. McMillian ... "Did New Orleans Invent the Cocktail?". "People - Tales of the Cocktail". Barry, Doug (29 October 2013). "Chris McMillian Gives ... Drink". "How to Make the Perfect Mint Julep - Imbibe Magazine". "And Now, a Sip of History: The Mint Julep, Personified". The ... Videos of McMillian making drinks 2011 interview 2009 interview with Imbibe an interview with McMillian on poetry and the mint ...
His mission now was to call his people to monotheism. He started with his father, the closest person to him and whom he loved ... He would take them to the river, push their faces into the water and command them, "Drink! Drink!" Once again, Ibrahim asked ... people), And the Thamud nor gave them a lease of perpetual life. And before them, the people of Noah, for that they were (all) ... I can bring a person from the street and have him executed, and I can grant my pardon to a person who was sentenced to death ...
The beliefs of these individuals were centered on the concept that people could understand the world through consideration of ... French physician and writer Rabelais celebrated "rabelaisian" freedom as well as good feasting and drinking (an expression and ... The person who is free in any respect is free from something; what is the free thinker free from? To be worthy of the name, he ... Drink! Enjoy the simple life, learn wisdom and knowledge, as a free human. Beyond puns, irony, and satire, Gargantua's prologue ...
... preparing a kettle of an unknown drink. As each person takes a sip, they begin convulsing. To simulate the drink's effects, the ... People are interested in those areas [to use] as a source of energy." Recording and mixing took place at Tico-Tico Studios in ... As the song finishes, Pekka pours himself a drink and is the only one immune to its effects. All lyrics written by Pekka Kokko ... drinking, failure, [and] pessimism". Several of the songs shared an environmental theme. "Hook the Monster" was about fishing ...
it employed 4,000 people at its war time peak, many of them women.) 60% of its war time metal came from Banbury, working in ... Marsh, Dr Peter; Fox, Kate (1992). "Drinking and Public Disorder". Social Issues Research Centre. "Thames Valley Police - ... it employed 4,000 people at its war time peak, many of them women.) 60% of its war time metal came from Banbury, working in ... In 1911 many people were living in houses unfit for human habitation. The Municipal Borough of Banbury set up a housing ...
Water fountain found in a small Swiss village; used as a drinking water source for people and cattle. ... One in eight people in the world do not have access to safe water.[24][25] Inappropriate use of water may contribute to this ... Fresh water is not always potable water, that is, water safe to drink. Much of the earth's fresh water (on the surface and ... Recommended basic water requirements for human needs (per person)[26] Activity. Minimum, litres / day. Range / day ...
No regular employed person in the family. *No access to safe drinking water ... For example, the people who put in manual work under Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act need not belong to ... This method is criticised to be exclusive of the people it is assessing, as it does not take their opinions into account.[6] ... In 1978, it was Rs.61.80 per person per month for rural areas and Rs.71.30 for urban areas. Since then the Planning Commission ...
The main occupation of the people of the village is farming. Hathigadh has a railway station on the Dhasa-Rajula line. "Yearly ... status report: Amreli". Department of Drinking Water Supply. Ministry of Rural development. Archived from the original on 21 ...
... many people - for example people with a life expectancy of less than nine years who will not benefit, are over-treated.[90] ... Consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks in excess is associated with an increased risk.[35][36] The type of fats in the diet are ... Injections of insulin may either be added to oral medication or used alone.[25] Most people do not initially need insulin.[13] ... Type 2 diabetes primarily occurs as a result of obesity and lack of exercise.[1] Some people are more genetically at risk than ...
... doctors know little about how such moderate drinking affects more fragile constitutions--of seniors, ... For all the evidence that a drink or two a day reduces heart disease risk in middle-aged adults, ... Generally speaking, doctors dont advise people to start drinking, because of the possible effects on such things as breast and ... doctors know little about how such moderate drinking affects more fragile constitutions--of seniors, for example, or of people ...
... the chances are may be drinking too much. Younger people are drinking less. Join us for a fascinating discussion a new ... Younger people are drinking less. Join us for a fascinating discussion a new generational divide. ... If youre an older Australian - in the baby boomer age group - the chances are may be drinking too much. ...
Improved , Rural: This entry is derived from People , Drinking water source , Improved, which provides information about access ... Improved , Total: This entry is derived from People , Drinking water source , Improved, which provides information about access ... Improved , Urban: This entry is derived from People , Drinking water source , Improved, which provides information about access ... Unimproved , Rural: This entry is derived from People , Drinking water source , Unimproved, which provides information about ...
How People Get Their Water - Reservoirs: "Holding Tanks" for Drinking Water (PDF)(1 pg, 115 K) ... How People Get Their Water. This youth activity illustrates how a reservoir works by creating a small model. ...
People who bought and drank raw milk from a company called Udder Milk may have been infected with a rare but potentially ... 11/21/2017: LOCS Notice: People in Four States May Be Drinking Contaminated Raw Milk. ... We wanted to share with you the CDC Press Release sent on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 regarding a warning to people who might ...
... man drinking red vine Author: Rosseforp Date: 2003-04-21 Maximum available size: 18.8 Mpix.(5315 x 3539 pix.) DOWNLOAD ... Relevant keywords for this picture: color, colors, colour, colours, cravat, drinking, drinks, food, format, glass, man, men, ... Photo Gallery: man drinking red vine. Author: Rosseforp. Date: 2003-04-21. Maximum available size: 18.8 Mpix.(5315 x 3539 pix.) ...
... make people look older than they actually are. ... A new study suggests that heavy drinking and smoking -- besides ... Heavy drinking and smoking were associated with visible signs of physical aging and people looking older than their age. ... Study: Heavy drinking, smoking make people look prematurely old. By HealthDay News ... A new study suggests that heavy drinking and smoking -- besides posing serious health risks -- make people look older than they ...
... drinking, marrying and being given in marriage up to the day Noah entered the ark. Then the flood came and destroyed them all. ... Luk 17:27 - People were eating, drinking, marrying and being given in marriage up to the day Noah entered the ark. Then the ... Luk 17:8 - Wont he rather say, Prepare my supper, get yourself ready and wait on me while I eat and drink; after that you may ... Luk 17:21 - nor will people say, Here it is, or There it is, because the kingdom of God is in your midst."[fn] ...
Conventional drinks are a much greater threat to health than designer drinks. *Paul Catterson, Third year medical studenta, ... Editor-Kirsty Hughes and colleagues report associations between young people, alcohol consumption, and designer drinks, but ... Young people, alcohol, and designer drinks. BMJ 1997; 314 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.314.7094.1622a (Published 31 May ... NOTE: We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see ...
Heres a study showing that smart children in the UK and the United States grow up to drink more alcohol than their dumber ... Drink a lot of alcohol? Thats because youre smart! ... Main Blog , Smart People Drink More Booze Smart People Drink ... Drink a lot of alcohol? Thats because youre smart! Heres a study showing that smart children in the UK and the United States ... So go ahead, drink up! Satoshi Kanazawa of Psychology Today has the post: Link - via Discovery News ...
People Who Drank Udder Milk Raw Milk Need Antibiotics. All people who consumed raw milk and raw milk products from Udder Milk ... People in Four States May Be Drinking Contaminated Raw Milk. CDC and partners urge families at risk to see their doctor for ... People who bought and drank raw milk from a company called Udder Milk may have been infected with a rare but potentially ... "Because health officials have no direct way to let people know they may have drunk contaminated milk, everyone who consumed ...
Drunk Birds Sing Just As Badly As You Do When Youre Drunk. Relax, theyve only had a few beers.. ... A new study has found that birds, when drunk, suffer the same fate as drunk humans: They unknowingly become awful singers. I ... "At first we were thinking that they wouldnt drink on their own because, you know, a lot of animals just wont touch the stuff ... A Man in Oklahoma Was Arrested for Riding a Horse Drunk with a Child He Did Not Know ...
People who dont get enough sleep drink more soda and energy drinks than those who get the recommended amount of sleep per ... People who dont get enough sleep drink more soda and energy drinks than those who get the recommended amount of sleep per ... they cant tell whether sugary caffeinated drinks actually cause people to sleep less or whether people who dont get enough ... People who said they generally slept 5 hours or less per night drank an average of 21 percent more sugar-sweetened beverages, ...
... three officers in the span of a week have drunkenly fired their weapons at people, in one case strikin... ... Jay Poggi, accidentally shot his partner in the wrist after a night of drinking in the Rockaways. The two officers had each ... Wanda Anthony allegedly fled the scene and was arrested three hours later for drunk driving. ... "We have not been able to find any link between the two persons." ... NYPD Cops Cant Stop Getting Drunk And Shooting At People. 1.5k ...
Its fine to drink these sorts of drinks, but if most of your drinks are strong tea or coffee or other drinks that contain a ... Healthy eating and drinking for older people. As you get older, its important you continue to eat well. There are certain ... What to drink. Its very important to make sure youre drinking enough. Your body needs plenty of fluid to work properly and to ... Foods and drinks rich in vitamin C. These might help the body absorb iron, so you could have some fruit or vegetables or a ...
College kids on both sides of the Atlantic are drinking much less than they did 30 years ago. But the true teetotalers here are ... More School, Less Spirit: Why Young People Are Drinking Less Alcohol. College kids on both sides of the Atlantic are drinking ... In other words, young people are drinking less, and college students are drinking relatively more. ... In fact, the only area in which non-students out-drink students, the study authors point out, is in daily drinking (although ...
When people know DUI laws are strictly enforced, "they think twice about drinking and driving." And when people see someone ... Traffic stops persuade people to avoid drinking and driving. Police officers check drivers at a sobriety checkpoint in ... He wanted to know exactly which laws worked best to persuade people to stop drinking and driving. ... Thats about four drinks for a 170-pound male within one hour on an empty stomach, he says, "so you can imagine thats quite a ...
... ... However, people communicate differently today and our goal is to enable people to interact anonymously to take the fear of ... All my friends drink socially and they are very social. While it seems I can hold my liquor, I find the quantities and ... "The Internet is the common way people communicate today and weve incorporated an interface and tools that make sense for those ...
Source for information on Indian Schoolgirl Urges People to Drink Natural Beverages: Environmental Issues: Essential Primary ... Indian Schoolgirl Urges People to Drink Natural BeveragesPhotograph By: Indranil MukherjeeDate: August 14, 2003Source: AFP/ ... Indian Schoolgirl Urges People to Drink Natural Beverages. Updated About encyclopedia.com content Print Article ... INDIAN SCHOOLGIRL URGES PEOPLE TO DRINK NATURAL BEVERAGES.. See primary source image. ...
Dangers of Drinking Listerine. Joe Graedon The Peoples Pharmacy February 11, 2008. Default 100 Comments ... of drinking Listerine. People find their way to the Listerine jug in a had variety of ways which are all quite common and ... How can one just drink their life away. I know when I say this people are going to hate me, but when she died it made our lives ... The truth is that most people who end up going this route are simply people whose progression in this disease finally has led ...
... binge drinking and hazardous drinking, according to a study by researchers at the Norris Cotton Cancer Center and Childrens ... Seeing and liking alcohol advertising on television among underage youths was associated with the onset of drinking, ... binge drinking and hazardous drinking in the future. The transition to binge drinking (participants were asked how often they ... Alcohol ads on TV associated with drinking behavior in young people. Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center ...
A new report from the World Health Organization finds that nearly 3 million people were killed by excessive alcohol consumption ... New report finds three million people died in 2016 from excessive drinking. The findings show men are at greater risk than ... Additionally, young people were at a greater risk than older people, and 7.2 percent of all premature deaths in 2016 were ... Drinking daily, even just a drink or two, linked to premature death ...
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... but nutrition doesnt have to take a backseat to your schedule thanks to these 7 quick and healthy drink recipes! ... 6 Quick And Healthy Drink Recipes For Busy People. Heather McClees. Read full profile ... Trending in Food and Drink. 1 15 Easy-to-Make Crockpot Freezer Meals for Busy Nights 2 5 Savory Ice-Cream Sandwiches Every ... Trending in Food and Drink. 1 15 Easy-to-Make Crockpot Freezer Meals for Busy Nights 2 5 Savory Ice-Cream Sandwiches Every ...
People are more likely to hit the bottle on days they exercise more, typically Thursday to Sunday, according to research ... "Perhaps people reward themselves for working out by having more to drink, or maybe being physically active leads them to ... The study did not look at what causes people to drink more on the days they exercises, but Conroy hopes to explore that topic ... People Drink More Alcohol on Workout Days. Thursday through Sunday is prime time for both activities. ...
  • We think there may be a positive feedback loop, where sugary drinks and [loss of sleep] reinforce one another, making it harder for people to eliminate their unhealthy sugar habit," study co-author Aric Prather, an assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco, said in a statement. (livescience.com)
  • In particular, those who slept less drank more caffeinated sugary drinks, the researchers found. (livescience.com)
  • The WHO wants countries to start taxing sugary drinks, and use the revenue to fight health problems sugar may worsen. (medicaldaily.com)
  • An article in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology showed that the consumption of punch and sugary drinks increased the risk of getting kidney stones. (beer100.com)
  • In the process, as with sugary drinks, they seem less concerned about both the cost (water is still less expensive than soda) and the health consequences of these habits. (peele.net)
  • Additionally, young people were at a greater risk than older people, and 7.2 percent of all premature deaths in 2016 were attributed to alcohol. (consumeraffairs.com)
  • Another 2016 study in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition on 494 people who were maintaining a weight loss and 2,129 people from the general population found that the people who were maintaining a weight loss consumed significantly more caffeine than those who had not lost weight. (livestrong.com)
  • As per present data from ministry of drinking water and sanitation, there are 14,035 habitations (as on 1 April, 2016) from 17 states which are yet to be provided with safe drinking water. (fluoridealert.org)
  • Editor's Note: The research is the result of a National Institutes of Health-funded collaboration between pediatric scientists at Geisel School of Medicine and social neuroscientists at Psychological and Brain Sciences at Dartmouth College, to better understand the mechanisms through which alcohol marketing affects underage drinking behaviors. (eurekalert.org)
  • Blackout drinking can put people at risk for accidents and risky behaviors, and may do long-term damage to the brain. (upi.com)
  • A 2015 study in Postgraduate Medicine shows that people who drink too many energy drinks are at increased risk of substance abuse and risky behaviors. (livestrong.com)
  • However, it is difficult to disentangle the causal connections between drinking problems and criminal behaviors. (jrank.org)
  • What I've observed in my practice is that significant changes in health-related behaviors travel in packs: people who adopt healthier drinking habits (for instance, reducing their intake to one drink per day if female or two per day if male, on average) also get off the couch, walk more, lose a pound or two, and generally pay more attention to their health. (harvard.edu)
  • It's good timing, since we recently celebrated the anniversary of the repeal of Prohibition, and it's good news: According to their results, people who never touch booze are statistically more likely to die. (dallasobserver.com)
  • We wanted to share with you the CDC Press Release sent on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 regarding a warning to people who might have consumed contaminated raw milk and milk products to visit their doctor. (cdc.gov)
  • A 2017 study published in the Journal of Basic and Clinical Physiology and Pharmacology notes that caffeine increases the amount of calories a person burns while decreasing the amount of calories a person intakes. (livestrong.com)
  • The study defined heavy drinking as five or more drinks at a time for men, and four or more drinks at a time for women at least once a month within a year. (inquisitr.com)
  • Moderate drinking tied to better health for women, study. (latimes.com)
  • However, they concluded that this "is the first prospective study to show that alcohol and smoking are associated with the development of visible age-related signs and thus generally looking older than one's actual age," which "may reflect that heavy drinking and smoking increases general aging of the body. (upi.com)
  • People who don't get enough sleep drink more soda and energy drinks than those who get the recommended amount of sleep per night, a new study finds. (livescience.com)
  • In fact, the only area in which non-students out-drink students, the study authors point out, is in daily drinking (although that accounts for a pretty small portion of respondents in both groups). (theatlantic.com)
  • Alcohol companies claim their advertising does not affect underage drinking - that instead it is parents and friends that are the culprits," said James D. Sargent, MD, senior author on the study and a CHaD pediatrician, the Scott M. and Lisa G. Stuart Professor of Pediatric Oncology at Geisel, and co-director of the NCCC Cancer Control Program. (eurekalert.org)
  • This study suggests otherwise - that underage youths are exposed to and engaged by alcohol marketing and this prompts initiation of drinking as well as transitions from trying to hazardous drinking. (eurekalert.org)
  • The study did not look at what causes people to drink more on the days they exercises, but Conroy hopes to explore that topic in future studies. (runnersworld.com)
  • Walking performance was measured at the beginning of the study and at six months, using a six-minute walking test that was carried out twice, 2.5 hours after drinking the beverage, and again at 24 hours after drinking the beverage. (genengnews.com)
  • In a study of 2,239 individuals with chronic widespread pain, the key feature of fibromyalgia, those who regularly consumed alcohol had lower levels of disability than those who never or rarely drank, the authors reported. (medindia.net)
  • study, not only were people totally unable to estimate their level of drunkenness, but they felt more drunk when in the presence of sober people and less drunk in a group that was more highly intoxicated . (sciencemag.org)
  • In a journal news release, they said the two main reasons for blackout drinking -- celebration and coping -- identified in the study suggest possible interventions. (upi.com)
  • The results of the study show that people who started drinking alcohol before age 15 are more likely to suffer from alcoholism. (emaxhealth.com)
  • The authors of the study suggest those that consume energy drinks may be prone to being at a heightened risk for substance use, and especially stimulants. (local12.com)
  • People who enroll in Dr. Morgenstern's study on reducing drinking do drink heavily on average-about 40 drinks a week, or eight or nine standard drinks in a day when they begin the study. (drugfree.org)
  • More than half of the 4.2 million Americans who misused prescription opioids between 2012 and 2014 also engaged in binge drinking, according to a new study released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine . (associationdatabase.com)
  • The proportion of pupils [aged 11-who have never had an alcoholic drink has increased gradually in recent years," the study by the Office of National Statistics and the NHS records. (theguardian.com)
  • In their study, published in the International Journal of Cardiology , they report that even small amounts of energy drinks can cause changes in the heart that can lead to life-threatening arrhythmias and recommend cautioning young patients, some of whom may still be unaware of an existing heart condition, about the danger. (news-medical.net)
  • This is the first study specifically designed to test the effects of these energy drinks in individuals who carry the gene faults (mutations) causing congenital LQTS. (news-medical.net)
  • The study was designed to assess the acute cardiovascular responses to energy drink consumption in patients with familial LQTS and to discover whether any identified cardiovascular effects correlate with changes in blood levels of the active ingredients - caffeine and taurine. (news-medical.net)
  • The results of the study show that three patients (12.5%) exhibited dangerous QT prolongation following energy drink consumption and two of the three had sharp increases in blood pressure. (news-medical.net)
  • In a recent study, people reported more mental distress when the days were shorter and there was less sunshine. (medicaldaily.com)
  • The study concluded that people who frequently visited a pub were more content and socially engaged. (beer100.com)
  • This study examined the lives of young people who drink little or no alcohol. (jrf.org.uk)
  • The findings of this study reflect that it is commonplace for young people to choose to drink little or no alcohol. (jrf.org.uk)
  • This study used in-depth interviews with young people aged 16-25 who drink little or no alcohol to further understanding of their choices, learn from them and identify ways to support their choices. (jrf.org.uk)
  • That is to say, this study does not tell me what happens if I advise a patient to exercise more or to drink less. (harvard.edu)
  • The study also does not suggest that if you decide to exercise more, it's likely you will drink more. (harvard.edu)
  • Given that more than a third of the study cohort reported at-risk drinking and remained at-risk, Macalino and her group conclude that targeted alcohol interventions should be directed toward Caucasians and younger individuals, even though, to date, at-risk drinking displays no adverse effect on CD4+ cell count and only a marginal effect on viral failure. (thebodypro.com)
  • Those included energy drink consumption and drug use. (local12.com)
  • there is no indication that the overall ER admission rate has increased along with energy drink consumption. (physicsforums.com)
  • Why do only some people get blackout drunk? (bbc.com)
  • Examples included: "I'm so stressed I need to get blackout drunk tonight," and "I want to get blackout drunk to forget all about this horrible year. (upi.com)
  • I recently ended a period in my life where I enguaged in CONSENTUAL blood drinking(cut one's self and allowing another to drink your blood and vice versa). (thebody.com)
  • Country music blog Taste of Country reviewed the single favorably, writing that "The idea of being drunk on one's love is hardly new to the format, but Eldredge's interpretation is no less sincere for it. (wikipedia.org)
  • For the second time in three months, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning people who might have consumed contaminated raw milk and milk products to visit their doctor. (cdc.gov)
  • If you saw just the "full-time college students" trend lines from those two graphs on their own, you might think that, just as British students are (allegedly) responding to a quick, dramatic jump in tuition with a quick, dramatic drop in drinking, American students are responding to rising tuition by gradually scaling back their alcohol intake. (theatlantic.com)
  • Every time she ended up in the hospital they always treated the physical ailment never the mental issues that caused the drinking in the first place. (peoplespharmacy.com)
  • Quick and healthy drink recipes can be great tools to help you consume more nutrients in less time-and who doesn't want that? (lifehack.org)
  • Due to lack of adequate time, people are becoming habituated to unhealthy diet plan. (sooperarticles.com)
  • Without an effective therapeutic intervention, people with PAD typically decline in walking performance over time," the authors wrote. (genengnews.com)
  • They suggest that the next time you drink, think about why you decided to do it. (emaxhealth.com)
  • In addition to wobbly walking, the 46 cameras in Osaka watch out for people who have stood on the platform for an extended period of time without boarding any trains. (rt.com)
  • By the time they're college seniors, most students moderate their drinking. (ahealthyme.com)
  • I'm pretty sure the profane amount of tequila I drank kept me from getting food poisoning the last time I was in Mexico. (fark.com)
  • people in New York City like to drink, sometimes multiple drinks at a time! (animalnewyork.com)
  • and health effects from drinking too much in a short period of time, such as violence, alcohol poisoning, and motor vehicle crashes. (healthcanal.com)
  • Why is it wrong to call someone a bad person because they drink alcohol or smoke weed all the time? (yahoo.com)
  • It's none of my business if they are drunk or stoned all the time, is it? (yahoo.com)
  • So if a person drinks a bit of alcohol everyday, but gives of their time and money to help the less fortunate and even their job is helping others. (yahoo.com)
  • A lot of people have been led to believe that drinking, and often drinking a large amount, is part of having a good time. (physiciansnews.com)
  • For many young people, current drinking (or non-drinking) represents a shift over time, with some having drunk more in the past. (jrf.org.uk)
  • When you pour an alcoholic drink at home, you're probably pouring different amounts every time. (alcohol.org.nz)
  • When it's time to go to bed, we're not physically tired, so we'll have a few more drinks. (harvard.edu)
  • Matt Bjorke of Roughstock complimented the song's production, saying that it "benefit[s] from Joyce's strong guitar solo and percussive production tendencies which only enhance the summery good time vibes of the lyrics of 'Day Drinking. (wikipedia.org)
  • The New York City Police Department has a problem: three officers in the span of a week have drunkenly fired their weapons at people, in one case striking a man six times as he sat in a car. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • The Pounds 500,000 scientific investigation into the Beaker People, involving the Universities of Aberdeen and Sheffield, began this week. (redorbit.com)
  • Despite a policy focus on drinking, one-fifth of young people aged 16-24 do not drink alcohol and 11 per cent drink less than one unit a week (NHS Information Centre for Health and Social Care, 2012). (jrf.org.uk)
  • Given an average pint of beer contains an estimated two units of alcohol, people living in Louth and Dublin are consuming approximately six pints of beer or cider or twelve glasses of wine per week. (dundalkdemocrat.ie)
  • Often drinking is used as a way to unwind after a busy week or to forget about the troubles of the day. (dundalkdemocrat.ie)
  • Day Drinking" debuted at number 32 on the U.S. Billboard Country Airplay chart and at number 22 on the U.S. Billboard Hot Country Songs chart for the week of June 21, 2014. (wikipedia.org)
  • People who bought and drank raw milk from a company called Udder Milk may have been infected with a rare but potentially serious germ called Brucella abortus RB51. (cdc.gov)
  • In late September, a New Jersey woman became ill after drinking raw milk from the company. (cdc.gov)
  • Until more information is available about which farms may be supplying contaminated milk or until officials can test milk from the farms, CDC recommends that anyone who drank raw milk or consumed raw milk products from Udder Milk in the past six months visit their doctor for antibiotics to prevent illness. (cdc.gov)
  • Because health officials have no direct way to let people know they may have drunk contaminated milk, everyone who consumed milk from Udder Milk in the past 6 months should receive antibiotics now to avoid having long-term health effects from the bacteria," said William Bower, M.D., team lead for the CDC group that investigates brucellosis, the illness caused by RB51. (cdc.gov)
  • Online information about Udder Milk points to members-only websites through which people purchase raw milk online and delivery sites that shift to avoid detection by public health officials. (cdc.gov)
  • All people who consumed raw milk and raw milk products from Udder Milk should seek medical care and start antibiotics to prevent future chronic disease from RB51. (cdc.gov)
  • Therefore, people who consumed raw milk from Udder Milk should tell their doctor that they may have been exposed to this particular Brucella strain. (cdc.gov)
  • People who have consumed the milk and other products made from Udder Milk raw milk should check themselves daily for fever for one month after they last drank the milk and watch for other brucellosis symptoms for six months. (cdc.gov)
  • Three elderly men have died and at least one pregnant woman has miscarried since last June after drinking listeria-contaminated pasteurized milk from Whittier Farms in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts. (marlerblog.com)
  • Regardless, the birds still sound better than (presumably drunk) Meat Loaf singing "God Bless America" alongside a very sober Mitt Romney . (esquire.com)
  • It may help to remember that all the problems you want to forget about when you drink will still be there when you are sober again. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Lockdown and other public health measures to halt the spread of COVID-19 haven't driven us all to drink (and other drugs), as many news stories would have us believe. (theconversation.com)
  • When police strictly enforce traffic laws, drunken driving decreases, according to Jim Fell , a senior research scientist at the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation who focuses on impaired driving and underage drinking. (scpr.org)
  • My research with people who have MS directly influenced the design of handSteady and the highly discrete lid accessory that comes with handSteady. (prweb.com)
  • Blackout drinking is never a wise idea, but new research pinpoints why people sometimes imbibe to the point where they pass out. (upi.com)
  • In his research, Dr. Morgenstern and his team meet with patients to review their drinking and their goals for cutting down alcohol use, so they get to a completely safe level of drinking. (drugfree.org)
  • Report co-author John Curtin Distinguished Professor Simone Pettigrew, from the School of Psychology at Curtin University, said the research confirmed young people are being exposed to a large variety and high volume of alcohol advertising. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Professor Pettigrew said the research recommended immediate advertising regulatory changes to protect young people from the pervasive nature of alcohol promotion across Australia and the rest of the globe. (medicalxpress.com)
  • The research team studied health data recorded from more than 14.7 million people in America, of which 1.8 per cent had been diagnosed with alcohol abuse. (diabetes.co.uk)
  • Research has revealed shame and stigma prevent a number of people from seeking help, so the charity is encouraging people to offer support to loved ones who may be struggling. (thewestonmercury.co.uk)
  • Research shows stigma and shame create significant barriers to people asking for help when it comes to alcohol. (thewestonmercury.co.uk)
  • Patrick is editor-in-chief at The Drinks Business and a specialist on Champagne, visiting the region regularly, chairing the Champagne Masters , editing the annual Champagne Report , and author of an original piece of research into the changing sugar levels in Brut NV Champagne over a 21-year period for his Master of Wine dissertation. (thedrinksbusiness.com)
  • Unfortunately the effects of alcohol are purely in the mind of the drinker, and other people do not find them any more appealing, according to new research. (medicaldaily.com)