Noise: Any sound which is unwanted or interferes with HEARING other sounds.Noise, Occupational: Noise present in occupational, industrial, and factory situations.Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced: Hearing loss due to exposure to explosive loud noise or chronic exposure to sound level greater than 85 dB. The hearing loss is often in the frequency range 4000-6000 hertz.Signal-To-Noise Ratio: The comparison of the quantity of meaningful data to the irrelevant or incorrect data.Ear Protective Devices: Personal devices for protection of the ears from loud or high intensity noise, water, or cold. These include earmuffs and earplugs.Auditory Threshold: The audibility limit of discriminating sound intensity and pitch.Aircraft: A weight-carrying structure for navigation of the air that is supported either by its own buoyancy or by the dynamic action of the air against its surfaces. (Webster, 1973)Perceptual Masking: The interference of one perceptual stimulus with another causing a decrease or lessening in perceptual effectiveness.Artifacts: Any visible result of a procedure which is caused by the procedure itself and not by the entity being analyzed. Common examples include histological structures introduced by tissue processing, radiographic images of structures that are not naturally present in living tissue, and products of chemical reactions that occur during analysis.Acoustic Stimulation: Use of sound to elicit a response in the nervous system.Sound Spectrography: The graphic registration of the frequency and intensity of sounds, such as speech, infant crying, and animal vocalizations.Stochastic Processes: Processes that incorporate some element of randomness, used particularly to refer to a time series of random variables.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Railroads: Permanent roads having a line of rails fixed to ties and laid to gage, usually on a leveled or graded ballasted roadbed and providing a track for freight cars, passenger cars, and other rolling stock. Cars are designed to be drawn by locomotives or sometimes propelled by self-contained motors. (From Webster's 3d) The concept includes the organizational and administrative aspects of railroads as well.Audiometry: The testing of the acuity of the sense of hearing to determine the thresholds of the lowest intensity levels at which an individual can hear a set of tones. The frequencies between 125 and 8000 Hz are used to test air conduction thresholds and the frequencies between 250 and 4000 Hz are used to test bone conduction thresholds.Psychoacoustics: The science pertaining to the interrelationship of psychologic phenomena and the individual's response to the physical properties of sound.Speech Perception: The process whereby an utterance is decoded into a representation in terms of linguistic units (sequences of phonetic segments which combine to form lexical and grammatical morphemes).Auditory Perception: The process whereby auditory stimuli are selected, organized, and interpreted by the organism.Audiometry, Pure-Tone: Measurement of hearing based on the use of pure tones of various frequencies and intensities as auditory stimuli.Hearing: The ability or act of sensing and transducing ACOUSTIC STIMULATION to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. It is also called audition.Signal Detection, Psychological: Psychophysical technique that permits the estimation of the bias of the observer as well as detectability of the signal (i.e., stimulus) in any sensory modality. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Sensory Thresholds: The minimum amount of stimulus energy necessary to elicit a sensory response.Loudness Perception: The perceived attribute of a sound which corresponds to the physical attribute of intensity.Motor Vehicles: AUTOMOBILES, trucks, buses, or similar engine-driven conveyances. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Speech Intelligibility: Ability to make speech sounds that are recognizable.Automobiles: A usually four-wheeled automotive vehicle designed for passenger transportation and commonly propelled by an internal-combustion engine using a volatile fuel. (Webster, 1973)Acoustics: The branch of physics that deals with sound and sound waves. In medicine it is often applied in procedures in speech and hearing studies. With regard to the environment, it refers to the characteristics of a room, auditorium, theatre, building, etc. that determines the audibility or fidelity of sounds in it. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Models, Neurological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the neurological system, processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Audiometry, Speech: Measurement of the ability to hear speech under various conditions of intensity and noise interference using sound-field as well as earphones and bone oscillators.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Normal Distribution: Continuous frequency distribution of infinite range. Its properties are as follows: 1, continuous, symmetrical distribution with both tails extending to infinity; 2, arithmetic mean, mode, and median identical; and 3, shape completely determined by the mean and standard deviation.Tinnitus: A nonspecific symptom of hearing disorder characterized by the sensation of buzzing, ringing, clicking, pulsations, and other noises in the ear. Objective tinnitus refers to noises generated from within the ear or adjacent structures that can be heard by other individuals. The term subjective tinnitus is used when the sound is audible only to the affected individual. Tinnitus may occur as a manifestation of COCHLEAR DISEASES; VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; and other conditions.Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem: Electrical waves in the CEREBRAL CORTEX generated by BRAIN STEM structures in response to auditory click stimuli. These are found to be abnormal in many patients with CEREBELLOPONTINE ANGLE lesions, MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, or other DEMYELINATING DISEASES.Speech Reception Threshold Test: A test to determine the lowest sound intensity level at which fifty percent or more of the spondaic test words (words of two syllables having equal stress) are repeated correctly.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Cochlea: The part of the inner ear (LABYRINTH) that is concerned with hearing. It forms the anterior part of the labyrinth, as a snail-like structure that is situated almost horizontally anterior to the VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Peak Expiratory Flow Rate: Measurement of the maximum rate of airflow attained during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination. Common abbreviations are PEFR and PFR.Psychophysics: The science dealing with the correlation of the physical characteristics of a stimulus, e.g., frequency or intensity, with the response to the stimulus, in order to assess the psychologic factors involved in the relationship.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Sound: A type of non-ionizing radiation in which energy is transmitted through solid, liquid, or gas as compression waves. Sound (acoustic or sonic) radiation with frequencies above the audible range is classified as ultrasonic. Sound radiation below the audible range is classified as infrasonic.Auditory Pathways: NEURAL PATHWAYS and connections within the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, beginning at the hair cells of the ORGAN OF CORTI, continuing along the eighth cranial nerve, and terminating at the AUDITORY CORTEX.Sound Localization: Ability to determine the specific location of a sound source.Hearing Loss: A general term for the complete or partial loss of the ability to hear from one or both ears.Evoked Potentials, Auditory: The electric response evoked in the CEREBRAL CORTEX by ACOUSTIC STIMULATION or stimulation of the AUDITORY PATHWAYS.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Speech Acoustics: The acoustic aspects of speech in terms of frequency, intensity, and time.Fourier Analysis: Analysis based on the mathematical function first formulated by Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier in 1807. The function, known as the Fourier transform, describes the sinusoidal pattern of any fluctuating pattern in the physical world in terms of its amplitude and its phase. It has broad applications in biomedicine, e.g., analysis of the x-ray crystallography data pivotal in identifying the double helical nature of DNA and in analysis of other molecules, including viruses, and the modified back-projection algorithm universally used in computerized tomography imaging, etc. (From Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Cochlear Implants: Electronic hearing devices typically used for patients with normal outer and middle ear function, but defective inner ear function. In the COCHLEA, the hair cells (HAIR CELLS, VESTIBULAR) may be absent or damaged but there are residual nerve fibers. The device electrically stimulates the COCHLEAR NERVE to create sound sensation.Discrimination (Psychology): Differential response to different stimuli.Dyssomnias: A broad category of sleep disorders characterized by either hypersomnolence or insomnia. The three major subcategories include intrinsic (i.e., arising from within the body) (SLEEP DISORDERS, INTRINSIC), extrinsic (secondary to environmental conditions or various pathologic conditions), and disturbances of circadian rhythm. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Music: Sound that expresses emotion through rhythm, melody, and harmony.Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted: Methods developed to aid in the interpretation of ultrasound, radiographic images, etc., for diagnosis of disease.Hearing Aids: Wearable sound-amplifying devices that are intended to compensate for impaired hearing. These generic devices include air-conduction hearing aids and bone-conduction hearing aids. (UMDNS, 1999)Auditory Fatigue: Loss of sensitivity to sounds as a result of auditory stimulation, manifesting as a temporary shift in auditory threshold. The temporary threshold shift, TTS, is expressed in decibels.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Pitch Perception: A dimension of auditory sensation varying with cycles per second of the sound stimulus.Speech Discrimination Tests: Tests of the ability to hear and understand speech as determined by scoring the number of words in a word list repeated correctly.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Electricity: The physical effects involving the presence of electric charges at rest and in motion.Otoacoustic Emissions, Spontaneous: Self-generated faint acoustic signals from the inner ear (COCHLEA) without external stimulation. These faint signals can be recorded in the EAR CANAL and are indications of active OUTER AUDITORY HAIR CELLS. Spontaneous otoacoustic emissions are found in all classes of land vertebrates.Pitch Discrimination: The ability to differentiate tones.Hearing Loss, High-Frequency: Hearing loss in frequencies above 1000 hertz.Cochlear Nerve: The cochlear part of the 8th cranial nerve (VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE). The cochlear nerve fibers originate from neurons of the SPIRAL GANGLION and project peripherally to cochlear hair cells and centrally to the cochlear nuclei (COCHLEAR NUCLEUS) of the BRAIN STEM. They mediate the sense of hearing.Vibration: A continuing periodic change in displacement with respect to a fixed reference. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Industry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Persons With Hearing Impairments: Persons with any degree of loss of hearing that has an impact on their activities of daily living or that requires special assistance or intervention.Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.Ships: Large vessels propelled by power or sail used for transportation on rivers, seas, oceans, or other navigable waters. Boats are smaller vessels propelled by oars, paddles, sail, or power; they may or may not have a deck.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Correction of Hearing Impairment: Procedures for correcting HEARING DISORDERS.Hearing Tests: Part of an ear examination that measures the ability of sound to reach the brain.Cochlear Implantation: Surgical insertion of an electronic hearing device (COCHLEAR IMPLANTS) with electrodes to the COCHLEAR NERVE in the inner ear to create sound sensation in patients with residual nerve fibers.Equipment Failure Analysis: The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.Vocalization, Animal: Sounds used in animal communication.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Mathematics: The deductive study of shape, quantity, and dependence. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Radiographic Image Enhancement: Improvement in the quality of an x-ray image by use of an intensifying screen, tube, or filter and by optimum exposure techniques. Digital processing methods are often employed.Pattern Recognition, Visual: Mental process to visually perceive a critical number of facts (the pattern), such as characters, shapes, displays, or designs.Cues: Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.Hearing Loss, Sensorineural: Hearing loss resulting from damage to the COCHLEA and the sensorineural elements which lie internally beyond the oval and round windows. These elements include the AUDITORY NERVE and its connections in the BRAINSTEM.Phonetics: The science or study of speech sounds and their production, transmission, and reception, and their analysis, classification, and transcription. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Irritable Mood: Abnormal or excessive excitability with easily triggered anger, annoyance, or impatience.Membrane Potentials: The voltage differences across a membrane. For cellular membranes they are computed by subtracting the voltage measured outside the membrane from the voltage measured inside the membrane. They result from differences of inside versus outside concentration of potassium, sodium, chloride, and other ions across cells' or ORGANELLES membranes. For excitable cells, the resting membrane potentials range between -30 and -100 millivolts. Physical, chemical, or electrical stimuli can make a membrane potential more negative (hyperpolarization), or less negative (depolarization).Health Facility Environment: Physical surroundings or conditions of a hospital or other health facility and influence of these factors on patients and staff.Photons: Discrete concentrations of energy, apparently massless elementary particles, that move at the speed of light. They are the unit or quantum of electromagnetic radiation. Photons are emitted when electrons move from one energy state to another. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)Presbycusis: Gradual bilateral hearing loss associated with aging that is due to progressive degeneration of cochlear structures and central auditory pathways. Hearing loss usually begins with the high frequencies then progresses to sounds of middle and low frequencies.Motion Perception: The real or apparent movement of objects through the visual field.Inferior Colliculi: The posterior pair of the quadrigeminal bodies which contain centers for auditory function.Electrophysiology: The study of the generation and behavior of electrical charges in living organisms particularly the nervous system and the effects of electricity on living organisms.Radiation Dosage: The amount of radiation energy that is deposited in a unit mass of material, such as tissues of plants or animal. In RADIOTHERAPY, radiation dosage is expressed in gray units (Gy). In RADIOLOGIC HEALTH, the dosage is expressed by the product of absorbed dose (Gy) and quality factor (a function of linear energy transfer), and is called radiation dose equivalent in sievert units (Sv).Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Chinchilla: A genus of the family Chinchillidae which consists of three species: C. brevicaudata, C. lanigera, and C. villidera. They are used extensively in biomedical research.Speech: Communication through a system of conventional vocal symbols.Hearing Disorders: Conditions that impair the transmission of auditory impulses and information from the level of the ear to the temporal cortices, including the sensorineural pathways.Dichotic Listening Tests: Tests for central hearing disorders based on the competing message technique (binaural separation).Electric Conductivity: The ability of a substrate to allow the passage of ELECTRONS.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.Data Interpretation, Statistical: Application of statistical procedures to analyze specific observed or assumed facts from a particular study.Lighting: The illumination of an environment and the arrangement of lights to achieve an effect or optimal visibility. Its application is in domestic or in public settings and in medical and non-medical environments.Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted: Computer systems or networks designed to provide radiographic interpretive information.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.
  • This phase 2a study will assess the exploratory efficacy, as well as the local and systemic safety of single and repeat intratympanic doses of FX-322 compared to placebo in approximately 96 subjects with stable mild to moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss, with a medical history consistent with either excessive noise exposure or idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • TEOAE data were analyzed in each hearing group in terms of the half-octave-averaged signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the coherence synchrony measure (CSM) at frequencies between 1 and 8 kHz. (elsevier.com)
  • The present study compared TEOAEs recorded using an unweighted stimulus presented at either ambient pressure or tympanometric peak pressure (TPP) in the ear canal and TEOAEs recorded using a power-weighted stimulus at ambient pressure. (elsevier.com)
  • This paper presents an empirical linear equation to predict peak pressure level of anthropogenic impulsive signals based on its correlation with the sound exposure level. (edu.au)
  • Part I presents the analysis for airgun arrays signals, and Part II considers the application of the empirical equation to offshore impact piling noise. (edu.au)
  • noise or unwanted signals) 2. (scribd.com)
  • Biomedical signals contain features that represent physiological events, and each of these events has peaks. (mdpi.com)
  • It is well-known that additive noise affects the stability of non-linear systems. (frontiersin.org)
  • Using a network composed of two interacting populations, detailed stochastic and non-linear analysis demonstrates that increasing the intensity of iid additive noise induces a phase transition from a spectrally broad-band state to a phase-coherent oscillatory state. (frontiersin.org)
  • Stochastic transitions and coherence resonance-like behavior were also found to occur for non-iid additive noise induced by increased heterogeneity, corresponding analytical results complement the analysis. (frontiersin.org)
  • Finally, the results are applied to burst suppression-like patterns observed in electroencephalographic data under anesthesia, providing strong evidence that these patterns reflect jumps between random and phase-coherent neural states induced by varying external additive noise levels. (frontiersin.org)
  • In contrast to multiplicative noise, which reflect parametric fluctuations that are known to transform the stability of numerous systems [ 7 , 8 ], additive noise describes fluctuations originating from unknown sources or external fluctuations from outside of the system. (frontiersin.org)
  • Previous studies of large-scale systems have provided multiple examples of additive noise-induced phase transitions [ 9 - 12 ]. (frontiersin.org)
  • To extend these results and explore how strong additive noise impacts a more realistic network and its oscillatory properties, the present work considers a generic non-linear activation-inhibition network model built of excitable systems. (frontiersin.org)
  • In contrast to previous studies, here the isolated excitable populations do not oscillate on their own, and oscillatory behavior results from collective interactions tuned by additive noise. (frontiersin.org)
  • In this paper, we adopted the methods of state-of-the-art voice conversions and speaker adaptation in speech recognition to the proposed speech recovery approach applied in different kinds of noisy environment, especially in adverse environments with joint compensation of additive and convolutive noises. (hindawi.com)
  • Quality and intelligibility of speech are degraded by different distortion sources such as background noises, commonly assumed as additive noises, channel noise, commonly assumed as convolutive noises, and distortion caused by speech disorders. (hindawi.com)
  • Moreover, quality and intelligibility of speech are greatly degraded in adverse environments with joint compensation of additive and convolutive noises, but there is still a lack of efficient methods to solve this problem. (hindawi.com)
  • Therefore, developing a method for speech recovery in both additive and convolutive noises environments, especially in joint compensation of additive and convolutive noises, when only one microphone source is provided, is a critical and interesting research topic. (hindawi.com)
  • This approach is adapted from the concept of voice conversion that can be applied for both additive and convolutive noises using only single microphone. (hindawi.com)
  • The algorithm aligns a target spectrum to the reference spectrum in a top-down fashion by building a hierarchical cluster tree from peak lists of reference and target spectra and then dividing the spectra into smaller segments based on the most distant clusters of the tree. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A crucial and often depreciated aspect in this process is peak alignment, which aims to compensate for small variations in the position of corresponding peaks between spectra. (biomedcentral.com)
  • B&H Photo-Video is offering the Apple Pro Display XDR 32-inch Retina 6K 6016x3384 1600 Peak Nit Monitor starting from $4999 Free Shipping . (techbargains.com)
  • Thorlabs' photodetectors are designed to meet a range of requirements, with offerings that include the 380 MHz PDA015A fixed-gain detector with an impulse response of 1 ns, the high-sensitivity PDF10A2 detector with a minimum noise equivalent power (NEP) of 3.0 fW/Hz 1/2 , and the switchable-gain PDA100A2 device with eight switchable maximum gain (bandwidth) combinations from 1.51 kV/A (11 MHz) to 4.75 MV/A (3 kHz). (thorlabs.com)
  • The purpose of the current study was to measure and analyze levels of subway interior noise at peak commuter times and to provide information about commuters' daily dose of noise exposure. (bvsalud.org)
  • Namely, we analyze strategies based on addition of correlated noise and on quantum non-demolition interaction. (slideshare.net)
  • Many researchers have difficulty detecting these peaks to investigate, interpret and analyze their corresponding events. (mdpi.com)
  • The authors have felt, for some time, the need to compile a glossary of technical terms commonly used in the field of noise control. (nonoise.org)
  • The presence of neuronal noise (or more specifically synaptic noise) confers to neurons more sensitivity to a broader range of inputs, it can equalize the efficacy of synaptic inputs located at different positions on the neuron, and it can also enable finer temporal discrimination. (wikipedia.org)
  • The presence or absence of peaks representing meropenem and its sodium salts was crucial. (asm.org)
  • Experimental analysis and mathematical modeling argue that both intercellular coupling and molecular noise are required for the stochastic rhythms, providing a novel biological example of noise-induced oscillations. (nih.gov)
  • Neuronal activity at the microscopic level has a stochastic character, with atomic collisions and agitation, that may be termed "noise. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another theory suggests that stochastic noise in a non-linear network shows a positive relationship between the interconnectivity and noise-like activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • For instance, channel noise has been shown to induce oscillations in the stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley model. (wikipedia.org)
  • The stochastic, or random, movements give rise to receptor noise produced by the constant bombardment of ions, as described by Brownian motion. (wikipedia.org)
  • The quality of a solvent is often decisive for the reliability of an HPLC analytical run, as the presence of trace contaminants during gradient elution can result in "ghost or phantom peaks. (sartorius.com)
  • 2018). S. 441 - 115th Congress: Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks Conservation Act. (govtrack.us)
  • When the trace or basecall is viewed in Sequencing Analysis or Sequence Scanner , the trimmed basecalls are still present, but the peaks and bases are now grey ( Figure 1 ). (nucleics.com)
  • Thorlabs' amplified photodetectors feature a built-in low-noise transimpedance amplifier (TIA) or a low-noise TIA followed by a voltage amplifier. (thorlabs.com)
  • This approach attempts to recover clean speech (undistorted speech) from noisy speech (distorted speech) by converting the statistical models of noisy speech into that of clean speech without the prior knowledge on characteristics and distributions of noise source. (hindawi.com)
  • LUC rhythmic expression patterns (left) and serial correlation coefficient ( r s , right) of successive inter-peak intervals. (nih.gov)
  • The sun is a source of noise on radio frequencies, caused by plasma oscillations and gyro-oscillations in the solar atmosphere, as well as noise originating in random collision of electrons. (rfcafe.com)
  • It remains poorly understood how strong noise impacts natural systems that are strongly connected and far from the stability threshold [ 8 , 17 , 18 ]. (frontiersin.org)
  • ii) calculating the threshold value as the location of a peak of the second order curve. (google.com)
  • 7. The method of claim 1 , wherein the step of calculating a derivative of the growth curve comprises determining the second derivative of the growth curve with respect to cycle number, and wherein the threshold value is calculated as the location, in cycles, of the positive peak of the second derivative. (google.com)
  • Their theory suggests that noise produced in the visual cortex helps linearize or smooth the threshold of action potentials. (wikipedia.org)
  • Emergence of noise-induced oscillations in the central circadian pacemaker. (nih.gov)
  • The MF oscillations in a CHEC unit ( A in figure below) were lower in amplitude than those in the PREP sessions ( B in figure below), and the waveforms recorded in the two areas differed in the shape of the individual peaks. (indiana.edu)
  • The noise was measured and recorded by a sound level meter for two-hour periods in the morning and evening. (bvsalud.org)
  • The original authors did an excellent job of defining terms associated with sound and noise, and we have inserted information in green where we felt there were new or useful words or terms, and where we felt a longer definition might improve communication. (nonoise.org)
  • A sound characterized by brief excursions of peak sound pressure which significantly exceed the ambient sound. (ecode360.com)
  • AHL) in groups of CBA/CaJ mice exposed identically (8-16 kHz noise band at 100 dB sound pressure level for 2 h) but at different ages (4-124 weeks) and held with unexposed cohorts for different postexposure times (2-96 weeks). (jneurosci.org)
  • Paww WaveSound 3 headphones: Big sound, noise cancellation, and lowest price. (androidguys.com)
  • This might sound strange, but the lack of noise actually seems to almost hurt my hears. (silentpcreview.com)
  • Impulse and impact noise are measured using the fast response setting on a sound level meter. (wa.gov)
  • Musicians were found to have a more robust subcortical representation of the acoustic stimulus in the presence of noise. (jneurosci.org)
  • Presently, this approach has still not attracted many researchers to apply in general noisy speech enhancement because of some major problems: those are the difficulties of noise adaptation and the lack of noise robust synthesizable features in different noisy environments. (hindawi.com)
  • There are many approaches to removing noise from digital images, however, most methods make use of spatial filtering techniques. (google.com)
  • Delivery times may vary, especially during peak periods. (ebay.com)
  • The amplitude of solar emission may remain relatively constant for long periods, and then will be greatly enhanced during a "noise storm. (rfcafe.com)