Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Chronic, non-specific inflammation of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT. Etiology may be genetic or environmental. This term includes CROHN DISEASE and ULCERATIVE COLITIS.Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A disorder with chronic or recurrent colonic symptoms without a clearcut etiology. This condition is characterized by chronic or recurrent ABDOMINAL PAIN, bloating, MUCUS in FECES, and an erratic disturbance of DEFECATION.Short Bowel Syndrome: A malabsorption syndrome resulting from extensive operative resection of the SMALL INTESTINE, the absorptive region of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Crohn Disease: A chronic transmural inflammation that may involve any part of the DIGESTIVE TRACT from MOUTH to ANUS, mostly found in the ILEUM, the CECUM, and the COLON. In Crohn disease, the inflammation, extending through the intestinal wall from the MUCOSA to the serosa, is characteristically asymmetric and segmental. Epithelioid GRANULOMAS may be seen in some patients.Colitis, Ulcerative: Inflammation of the COLON that is predominantly confined to the MUCOSA. Its major symptoms include DIARRHEA, rectal BLEEDING, the passage of MUCUS, and ABDOMINAL PAIN.Colon: The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between the CECUM and the RECTUM. It includes the ASCENDING COLON; the TRANSVERSE COLON; the DESCENDING COLON; and the SIGMOID COLON.Constipation: Infrequent or difficult evacuation of FECES. These symptoms are associated with a variety of causes, including low DIETARY FIBER intake, emotional or nervous disturbances, systemic and structural disorders, drug-induced aggravation, and infections.Intestinal Diseases: Pathological processes in any segment of the INTESTINE from DUODENUM to RECTUM.Defecation: The normal process of elimination of fecal material from the RECTUM.Intestine, Large: A segment of the LOWER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT that includes the CECUM; the COLON; and the RECTUM.Intestinal Mucosa: Lining of the INTESTINES, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. In the SMALL INTESTINE, the mucosa is characterized by a series of folds and abundance of absorptive cells (ENTEROCYTES) with MICROVILLI.Neurogenic Bowel: Loss or absence of normal intestinal function due to nerve damage or birth defects. It is characterized by the inability to control the elimination of stool from the body.Gastrointestinal Agents: Drugs used for their effects on the gastrointestinal system, as to control gastric acidity, regulate gastrointestinal motility and water flow, and improve digestion.Colonic Diseases: Pathological processes in the COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Gastrointestinal Transit: Passage of food (sometimes in the form of a test meal) through the gastrointestinal tract as measured in minutes or hours. The rate of passage through the intestine is an indicator of small bowel function.Intestines: The section of the alimentary canal from the STOMACH to the ANAL CANAL. It includes the LARGE INTESTINE and SMALL INTESTINE.Colitis: Inflammation of the COLON section of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE), usually with symptoms such as DIARRHEA (often with blood and mucus), ABDOMINAL PAIN, and FEVER.Abdominal Pain: Sensation of discomfort, distress, or agony in the abdominal region.Capsule Endoscopy: Non-invasive, endoscopic imaging by use of VIDEO CAPSULE ENDOSCOPES to perform examination of the gastrointestinal tract, especially the small bowel.Intestinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the INTESTINES.Rectum: The distal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE, between the SIGMOID COLON and the ANAL CANAL.Gastrointestinal Motility: The motor activity of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Intestinal Perforation: Opening or penetration through the wall of the INTESTINES.Ileum: The distal and narrowest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between the JEJUNUM and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE.Colonoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the luminal surface of the colon.Bisacodyl: A diphenylmethane stimulant laxative used for the treatment of CONSTIPATION and for bowel evacuation. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p871)Echogenic Bowel: A PRENATAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY finding of excessively dense fetal bowel due to MECONIUM buildup.Enema: A solution or compound that is introduced into the RECTUM with the purpose of cleansing the COLON or for diagnostic procedures.Digestive System Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.Jejunum: The middle portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between DUODENUM and ILEUM. It represents about 2/5 of the remaining portion of the small intestine below duodenum.Intestinal Atresia: Congenital obliteration of the lumen of the intestine, with the ILEUM involved in 50% of the cases and the JEJUNUM and DUODENUM following in frequency. It is the most frequent cause of INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION in NEWBORNS. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Ileal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer in the ILEUM region of the small intestine (INTESTINE, SMALL).Colon, Sigmoid: A segment of the COLON between the RECTUM and the descending colon.Ileitis: Inflammation of any segment of the ILEUM and the ILEOCECAL VALVE.Barium Sulfate: A compound used as an x-ray contrast medium that occurs in nature as the mineral barite. It is also used in various manufacturing applications and mixed into heavy concrete to serve as a radiation shield.Ileus: A condition caused by the lack of intestinal PERISTALSIS or INTESTINAL MOTILITY without any mechanical obstruction. This interference of the flow of INTESTINAL CONTENTS often leads to INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION. Ileus may be classified into postoperative, inflammatory, metabolic, neurogenic, and drug-induced.Ileostomy: Surgical creation of an external opening into the ILEUM for fecal diversion or drainage. This replacement for the RECTUM is usually created in patients with severe INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES. Loop (continent) or tube (incontinent) procedures are most often employed.Gastrointestinal Diseases: Diseases in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the gastrointestinal tract.Colectomy: Excision of a portion of the colon or of the whole colon. (Dorland, 28th ed)Fecal Incontinence: Failure of voluntary control of the anal sphincters, with involuntary passage of feces and flatus.Laparotomy: Incision into the side of the abdomen between the ribs and pelvis.Intussusception: A form of intestinal obstruction caused by the PROLAPSE of a part of the intestine into the adjoining intestinal lumen. There are four types: colic, involving segments of the LARGE INTESTINE; enteric, involving only the SMALL INTESTINE; ileocecal, in which the ILEOCECAL VALVE prolapses into the CECUM, drawing the ILEUM along with it; and ileocolic, in which the ileum prolapses through the ileocecal valve into the COLON.Laxatives: Agents that produce a soft formed stool, and relax and loosen the bowels, typically used over a protracted period, to relieve CONSTIPATION.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Dextran Sulfate: Long-chain polymer of glucose containing 17-20% sulfur. It has been used as an anticoagulant and also has been shown to inhibit the binding of HIV-1 to CD4-POSITIVE T-LYMPHOCYTES. It is commonly used as both an experimental and clinical laboratory reagent and has been investigated for use as an antiviral agent, in the treatment of hypolipidemia, and for the prevention of free radical damage, among other applications.Rectal Diseases: Pathological developments in the RECTUM region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Intestinal Fistula: An abnormal anatomical passage between the INTESTINE, and another segment of the intestine or other organs. External intestinal fistula is connected to the SKIN (enterocutaneous fistula). Internal intestinal fistula can be connected to a number of organs, such as STOMACH (gastrocolic fistula), the BILIARY TRACT (cholecystoduodenal fistula), or the URINARY BLADDER of the URINARY TRACT (colovesical fistula). Risk factors include inflammatory processes, cancer, radiation treatment, and surgical misadventures (MEDICAL ERRORS).Trinitrobenzenesulfonic Acid: A reagent that is used to neutralize peptide terminal amino groups.Azathioprine: An immunosuppressive agent used in combination with cyclophosphamide and hydroxychloroquine in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), this substance has been listed as a known carcinogen. (Merck Index, 11th ed)Probiotics: Live microbial DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS which beneficially affect the host animal by improving its intestinal microbial balance. Antibiotics and other related compounds are not included in this definition. In humans, lactobacilli are commonly used as probiotics, either as single species or in mixed culture with other bacteria. Other genera that have been used are bifidobacteria and streptococci. (J. Nutr. 1995;125:1401-12)Flatulence: Production or presence of gas in the gastrointestinal tract which may be expelled through the anus.Malabsorption Syndromes: General term for a group of MALNUTRITION syndromes caused by failure of normal INTESTINAL ABSORPTION of nutrients.Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage: Bleeding in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.Colitis, Ischemic: Inflammation of the COLON due to colonic ISCHEMIA resulting from alterations in systemic circulation or local vasculature.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Gastrointestinal Tract: Generally refers to the digestive structures stretching from the MOUTH to ANUS, but does not include the accessory glandular organs (LIVER; BILIARY TRACT; PANCREAS).Aminosalicylic Acids: A group of 2-hydroxybenzoic acids that can be substituted by amino groups at any of the 3-, 4-, 5-, or 6-positions.Gastroenterology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of the physiology and diseases of the digestive system and related structures (esophagus, liver, gallbladder, and pancreas).Diatrizoate Meglumine: A versatile contrast medium used for DIAGNOSTIC X-RAY RADIOLOGY.Anastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.Enteritis: Inflammation of any segment of the SMALL INTESTINE.Cecal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the CECUM.Sulfasalazine: A drug that is used in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases. Its activity is generally considered to lie in its metabolic breakdown product, 5-aminosalicylic acid (see MESALAMINE) released in the colon. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p907)6-Mercaptopurine: An antimetabolite antineoplastic agent with immunosuppressant properties. It interferes with nucleic acid synthesis by inhibiting purine metabolism and is used, usually in combination with other drugs, in the treatment of or in remission maintenance programs for leukemia.Mesenteric Vascular Occlusion: Obstruction of the flow in the SPLANCHNIC CIRCULATION by ATHEROSCLEROSIS; EMBOLISM; THROMBOSIS; STENOSIS; TRAUMA; and compression or intrinsic pressure from adjacent tumors. Rare causes are drugs, intestinal parasites, and vascular immunoinflammatory diseases such as PERIARTERITIS NODOSA and THROMBOANGIITIS OBLITERANS. (From Juergens et al., Peripheral Vascular Diseases, 5th ed, pp295-6)Gastroschisis: A congenital defect with major fissure in the ABDOMINAL WALL lateral to, but not at, the UMBILICUS. This results in the extrusion of VISCERA. Unlike OMPHALOCELE, herniated structures in gastroschisis are not covered by a sac or PERITONEUM.Enteric Nervous System: Two ganglionated neural plexuses in the gut wall which form one of the three major divisions of the autonomic nervous system. The enteric nervous system innervates the gastrointestinal tract, the pancreas, and the gallbladder. It contains sensory neurons, interneurons, and motor neurons. Thus the circuitry can autonomously sense the tension and the chemical environment in the gut and regulate blood vessel tone, motility, secretions, and fluid transport. The system is itself governed by the central nervous system and receives both parasympathetic and sympathetic innervation. (From Kandel, Schwartz, and Jessel, Principles of Neural Science, 3d ed, p766)Double-Balloon Enteroscopy: Endoscopy of the small intestines accomplished while advancing the endoscope into the intestines from the stomach by alternating the inflation of two balloons, one on an innertube of the endoscope and the other on an overtube.Sigmoid Diseases: Pathological processes in the SIGMOID COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Therapeutic Irrigation: The washing of a body cavity or surface by flowing water or solution for therapy or diagnosis.Colonic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON.Rectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the RECTUM.Cecum: The blind sac or outpouching area of the LARGE INTESTINE that is below the entrance of the SMALL INTESTINE. It has a worm-like extension, the vermiform APPENDIX.Celiac Disease: A malabsorption syndrome that is precipitated by the ingestion of foods containing GLUTEN, such as wheat, rye, and barley. It is characterized by INFLAMMATION of the SMALL INTESTINE, loss of MICROVILLI structure, failed INTESTINAL ABSORPTION, and MALNUTRITION.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Antidiarrheals: Miscellaneous agents found useful in the symptomatic treatment of diarrhea. They have no effect on the agent(s) that cause diarrhea, but merely alleviate the condition.Intestinal Polyps: Discrete abnormal tissue masses that protrude into the lumen of the INTESTINE. A polyp is attached to the intestinal wall either by a stalk, pedunculus, or by a broad base.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Megacolon: Dilatation of the COLON, often to alarming dimensions. There are various types of megacolon including congenital megacolon in HIRSCHSPRUNG DISEASE, idiopathic megacolon in CONSTIPATION, and TOXIC MEGACOLON.Parenteral Nutrition: The administering of nutrients for assimilation and utilization by a patient who cannot maintain adequate nutrition by enteral feeding alone. Nutrients are administered by a route other than the alimentary canal (e.g., intravenously, subcutaneously).Ileocecal Valve: The valve, at the junction of the CECUM with the COLON, that guards the opening where the ILEUM enters the LARGE INTESTINE.Mesentery: A layer of the peritoneum which attaches the abdominal viscera to the ABDOMINAL WALL and conveys their blood vessels and nerves.Duodenum: The shortest and widest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE adjacent to the PYLORUS of the STOMACH. It is named for having the length equal to about the width of 12 fingers.Synovitis: Inflammation of a synovial membrane. It is usually painful, particularly on motion, and is characterized by a fluctuating swelling due to effusion within a synovial sac. (Dorland, 27th ed)Anal Canal: The terminal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE, beginning from the ampulla of the RECTUM and ending at the anus.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Intestinal Absorption: Uptake of substances through the lining of the INTESTINES.Hypnosis: A state of increased receptivity to suggestion and direction, initially induced by the influence of another person.Colorectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Proctocolectomy, Restorative: A surgical procedure involving the excision of the COLON and RECTUM and the formation of an ILEOANAL RESERVOIR (pouch). In patients with intestinal diseases, such as ulcerative colitis, this procedure avoids the need for an OSTOMY by allowing for transanal defecation.Hernia, Abdominal: A protrusion of abdominal structures through the retaining ABDOMINAL WALL. It involves two parts: an opening in the abdominal wall, and a hernia sac consisting of PERITONEUM and abdominal contents. Abdominal hernias include groin hernia (HERNIA, FEMORAL; HERNIA, INGUINAL) and VENTRAL HERNIA.Glucagon-Like Peptide 2: A 33-amino acid peptide derived from the C-terminal of PROGLUCAGON and mainly produced by the INTESTINAL L CELLS. It stimulates intestinal mucosal growth and decreased apoptosis of ENTEROCYTES. GLP-2 enhances gastrointestinal function and plays an important role in nutrient homeostasis.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Picolines: A group of compounds that are monomethyl derivatives of pyridines. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Senna Extract: Preparations of Cassia senna and C. angustifolia (see SENNA PLANT). They contain sennosides, which are anthraquinone type CATHARTICS and are used in many different preparations as laxatives.Diverticulosis, Colonic: A pathological condition characterized by the presence of a number of COLONIC DIVERTICULA in the COLON. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial, including colon aging, motor dysfunction, increases in intraluminal pressure, and lack of dietary fibers.Diverticulum: A pouch or sac developed from a tubular or saccular organ, such as the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Abdomen, Acute: A clinical syndrome with acute abdominal pain that is severe, localized, and rapid in onset. Acute abdomen may be caused by a variety of disorders, injuries, or diseases.Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction: A type of ILEUS, a functional not mechanical obstruction of the INTESTINES. This syndrome is caused by a large number of disorders involving the smooth muscles (MUSCLE, SMOOTH) or the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Enteral Nutrition: Nutritional support given via the alimentary canal or any route connected to the gastrointestinal system (i.e., the enteral route). This includes oral feeding, sip feeding, and tube feeding using nasogastric, gastrostomy, and jejunostomy tubes.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Intestinal Volvulus: A twisting in the intestine (INTESTINES) that can cause INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION.Enterocolitis: Inflammation of the MUCOSA of both the SMALL INTESTINE and the LARGE INTESTINE. Etiology includes ISCHEMIA, infections, allergic, and immune responses.Colonic Polyps: Discrete tissue masses that protrude into the lumen of the COLON. These POLYPS are connected to the wall of the colon either by a stalk, pedunculus, or by a broad base.Simethicone: A poly(dimethylsiloxane) which is a polymer of 200-350 units of dimethylsiloxane, along with added silica gel. It is used as an antiflatulent, surfactant, and ointment base.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Metagenome: A collective genome representative of the many organisms, primarily microorganisms, existing in a community.Ulcer: A lesion on the surface of the skin or a mucous surface, produced by the sloughing of inflammatory necrotic tissue.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Pyoderma Gangrenosum: An idiopathic, rapidly evolving, and severely debilitating disease occurring most commonly in association with chronic ulcerative colitis. It is characterized by the presence of boggy, purplish ulcers with undermined borders, appearing mostly on the legs. The majority of cases are in people between 40 and 60 years old. Its etiology is unknown.Pneumoperitoneum: A condition with trapped gas or air in the PERITONEAL CAVITY, usually secondary to perforation of the internal organs such as the LUNG and the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, or to recent surgery. Pneumoperitoneum may be purposely introduced to aid radiological examination.Diverticulum, Colon: A pouch or sac opening from the COLON.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Mesenteric Veins: Veins which return blood from the intestines; the inferior mesenteric vein empties into the splenic vein, the superior mesenteric vein joins the splenic vein to form the portal vein.Dietary Fiber: The remnants of plant cell walls that are resistant to digestion by the alimentary enzymes of man. It comprises various polysaccharides and lignins.Pneumatosis Cystoides Intestinalis: A condition characterized by the presence of multiple gas-filled cysts in the intestinal wall, the submucosa and/or subserosa of the INTESTINE. The majority of the cysts are found in the JEJUNUM and the ILEUM.Enterostomy: Creation of an artificial external opening or fistula in the intestines.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Gastric Emptying: The evacuation of food from the stomach into the duodenum.Jejunostomy: Surgical formation of an opening through the ABDOMINAL WALL into the JEJUNUM, usually for enteral hyperalimentation.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Immunosuppressive Agents: Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.Meckel Diverticulum: A congenital abnormality characterized by the outpouching or sac formation in the ILEUM. It is a remnant of the embryonic YOLK SAC in which the VITELLINE DUCT failed to close.Abdomen: That portion of the body that lies between the THORAX and the PELVIS.Colonography, Computed Tomographic: A non-invasive imaging method that uses computed tomographic data combined with specialized imaging software to examine the colon.Spondylarthropathies: Heterogeneous group of arthritic diseases sharing clinical and radiologic features. They are associated with the HLA-B27 ANTIGEN and some with a triggering infection. Most involve the axial joints in the SPINE, particularly the SACROILIAC JOINT, but can also involve asymmetric peripheral joints. Subsets include ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS; REACTIVE ARTHRITIS; PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS; and others.Diverticulitis: Inflammation of a DIVERTICULUM or diverticula.Colon, Descending: The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between TRANSVERSE COLON and the SIGMOID COLON.Duodenal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the DUODENUM.Intubation, Gastrointestinal: The insertion of a tube into the stomach, intestines, or other portion of the gastrointestinal tract to allow for the passage of food products, etc.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Digestive System: A group of organs stretching from the MOUTH to the ANUS, serving to breakdown foods, assimilate nutrients, and eliminate waste. In humans, the digestive system includes the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT and the accessory glands (LIVER; BILIARY TRACT; PANCREAS).Enterocytes: Absorptive cells in the lining of the INTESTINAL MUCOSA. They are differentiated EPITHELIAL CELLS with apical MICROVILLI facing the intestinal lumen. Enterocytes are more abundant in the SMALL INTESTINE than in the LARGE INTESTINE. Their microvilli greatly increase the luminal surface area of the cell by 14- to 40 fold.Hirschsprung Disease: Congenital MEGACOLON resulting from the absence of ganglion cells (aganglionosis) in a distal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE. The aganglionic segment is permanently contracted thus causing dilatation proximal to it. In most cases, the aganglionic segment is within the RECTUM and SIGMOID COLON.Sigmoidoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the sigmoid flexure.Manometry: Measurement of the pressure or tension of liquids or gases with a manometer.Electrical Equipment and Supplies: Apparatus and instruments that generate and operate with ELECTRICITY, and their electrical components.Inflammation: A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.Tuberculosis, Gastrointestinal: TUBERCULOSIS that involves any region of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, mostly in the distal ILEUM and the CECUM. In most cases, MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS is the pathogen. Clinical features include ABDOMINAL PAIN; FEVER; and palpable mass in the ileocecal area.Parenteral Nutrition, Total: The delivery of nutrients for assimilation and utilization by a patient whose sole source of nutrients is via solutions administered intravenously, subcutaneously, or by some other non-alimentary route. The basic components of TPN solutions are protein hydrolysates or free amino acid mixtures, monosaccharides, and electrolytes. Components are selected for their ability to reverse catabolism, promote anabolism, and build structural proteins.Duodenal Diseases: Pathological conditions in the DUODENUM region of the small intestine (INTESTINE, SMALL).Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Visceral Pain: Pain originating from internal organs (VISCERA) associated with autonomic phenomena (PALLOR; SWEATING; NAUSEA; and VOMITING). It often becomes a REFERRED PAIN.Carbolines: A group of pyrido-indole compounds. Included are any points of fusion of pyridine with the five-membered ring of indole and any derivatives of these compounds. These are similar to CARBAZOLES which are benzo-indoles.Endoscopes, Gastrointestinal: Instruments for the visual examination of the interior of the gastrointestinal tract.Pelvis: The space or compartment surrounded by the pelvic girdle (bony pelvis). It is subdivided into the greater pelvis and LESSER PELVIS. The pelvic girdle is formed by the PELVIC BONES and SACRUM.Visceral Afferents: The sensory fibers innervating the viscera.Ischemia: A hypoperfusion of the BLOOD through an organ or tissue caused by a PATHOLOGIC CONSTRICTION or obstruction of its BLOOD VESSELS, or an absence of BLOOD CIRCULATION.Dilatation: The act of dilating.Capsules: Hard or soft soluble containers used for the oral administration of medicine.Dyspepsia: Impaired digestion, especially after eating.ATP Binding Cassette Transporter 1: A superfamily of large integral ATP-binding cassette membrane proteins whose expression pattern is consistent with a role in lipid (cholesterol) efflux. It is implicated in TANGIER DISEASE characterized by accumulation of cholesteryl ester in various tissues.Herniorrhaphy: Surgical procedures undertaken to repair abnormal openings through which tissue or parts of organs can protrude or are already protruding.Colitis, Collagenous: A subtype of MICROSCOPIC COLITIS, characterized by chronic watery DIARRHEA of unknown origin, a normal COLONOSCOPY but abnormal histopathology on BIOPSY. Microscopic examination of biopsy samples taken from the COLON show larger-than-normal band of subepithelial COLLAGEN.Diagnostic Techniques, Digestive System: Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of diseases or dysfunction of the digestive system or its organs or demonstration of their physiological processes.Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha: Serum glycoprotein produced by activated MACROPHAGES and other mammalian MONONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. It has necrotizing activity against tumor cell lines and increases ability to reject tumor transplants. Also known as TNF-alpha, it is only 30% homologous to TNF-beta (LYMPHOTOXIN), but they share TNF RECEPTORS.Cholangitis, Sclerosing: Chronic inflammatory disease of the BILIARY TRACT. It is characterized by fibrosis and hardening of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic biliary ductal systems leading to bile duct strictures, CHOLESTASIS, and eventual BILIARY CIRRHOSIS.Colon, Transverse: The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between ASCENDING COLON and DESCENDING COLON. It passes from the RIGHT COLIC FLEXURE across the ABDOMEN, then turns sharply at the left colonic flexure into the descending colon.Loperamide: One of the long-acting synthetic ANTIDIARRHEALS; it is not significantly absorbed from the gut, and has no effect on the adrenergic system or central nervous system, but may antagonize histamine and interfere with acetylcholine release locally.Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Myoelectric Complex, Migrating: A pattern of gastrointestinal muscle contraction and depolarizing myoelectric activity that moves from the stomach to the ILEOCECAL VALVE at regular frequency during the interdigestive period. The complex and its accompanying motor activity periodically cleanse the bowel of interdigestive secretion and debris in preparation for the next meal.Vitelline Duct: The narrow tube connecting the YOLK SAC with the midgut of the EMBRYO; persistence of all or part of it in post-fetal life produces abnormalities, of which the commonest is MECKEL DIVERTICULUM.Dysbiosis: Changes in quantitative and qualitative composition of MICROBIOTA. The changes may lead to altered host microbial interaction or homeostatic imbalance that can contribute to a disease state often with inflammation.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Stomach: An organ of digestion situated in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen between the termination of the ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of the DUODENUM.Digestive System Abnormalities: Congenital structural abnormalities of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Dilatation, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being dilated beyond normal dimensions.Polyethylene Glycols: Polymers of ETHYLENE OXIDE and water, and their ethers. They vary in consistency from liquid to solid depending on the molecular weight indicated by a number following the name. They are used as SURFACTANTS, dispersing agents, solvents, ointment and suppository bases, vehicles, and tablet excipients. Some specific groups are NONOXYNOLS, OCTOXYNOLS, and POLOXAMERS.Stethoscopes: Instruments intended to detect and study sound produced by the heart, lungs, or other parts of the body. (from UMDNS, 1999)Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Pouchitis: Acute INFLAMMATION in the INTESTINAL MUCOSA of the continent ileal reservoir (or pouch) in patients who have undergone ILEOSTOMY and restorative proctocolectomy (PROCTOCOLECTOMY, RESTORATIVE).Mice, Inbred C57BLRecurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Occult Blood: Chemical, spectroscopic, or microscopic detection of extremely small amounts of blood.Diverticulitis, Colonic: Inflammation of the COLONIC DIVERTICULA, generally with abscess formation and subsequent perforation.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Genetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.Bacterial Translocation: The passage of viable bacteria from the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT to extra-intestinal sites, such as the mesenteric lymph node complex, liver, spleen, kidney, and blood. Factors that promote bacterial translocation include overgrowth with gram-negative enteric bacilli, impaired host immune defenses, and injury to the INTESTINAL MUCOSA resulting in increased intestinal permeability. Bacterial translocation from the lung to the circulation is also possible and sometimes accompanies MECHANICAL VENTILATION.Paneth Cells: Differentiated epithelial cells of the INTESTINAL MUCOSA, found in the basal part of the intestinal crypts of Lieberkuhn. Paneth cells secrete GROWTH FACTORS, digestive enzymes such as LYSOZYME and antimicrobial peptides such as cryptdins (ALPHA-DEFENSINS) into the crypt lumen.Glucagon-Like Peptides: Peptides derived from proglucagon which is also the precursor of pancreatic GLUCAGON. Despite expression of proglucagon in multiple tissues, the major production site of glucagon-like peptides (GLPs) is the INTESTINAL L CELLS. GLPs include glucagon-like peptide 1, glucagon-like peptide 2, and the various truncated forms.Viscera: Any of the large interior organs in any one of the three great cavities of the body, especially in the abdomen.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Mesenteric Artery, Superior: A large vessel supplying the whole length of the small intestine except the superior part of the duodenum. It also supplies the cecum and the ascending part of the colon and about half the transverse part of the colon. It arises from the anterior surface of the aorta below the celiac artery at the level of the first lumbar vertebra.Toilet Training: Conditioning to defecate and urinate in culturally acceptable places.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Enterocolitis, Necrotizing: ENTEROCOLITIS with extensive ulceration (ULCER) and NECROSIS. It is observed primarily in LOW BIRTH WEIGHT INFANT.Parasympatholytics: Agents that inhibit the actions of the parasympathetic nervous system. The major group of drugs used therapeutically for this purpose is the MUSCARINIC ANTAGONISTS.Ulva: A genus of GREEN ALGAE in the family Ulvaceae. Commonly know as sea lettuces, they grow attached to rocks and KELP in marine and estuarine waters.Gangrene: Death and putrefaction of tissue usually due to a loss of blood supply.Immunity, Mucosal: Nonsusceptibility to the pathogenic effects of foreign microorganisms or antigenic substances as a result of antibody secretions of the mucous membranes. Mucosal epithelia in the gastrointestinal, respiratory, and reproductive tracts produce a form of IgA (IMMUNOGLOBULIN A, SECRETORY) that serves to protect these ports of entry into the body.Cytokines: Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.Digestive System Diseases: Diseases in any part of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT or the accessory organs (LIVER; BILIARY TRACT; PANCREAS).Carcinoid Tumor: A usually small, slow-growing neoplasm composed of islands of rounded, oxyphilic, or spindle-shaped cells of medium size, with moderately small vesicular nuclei, and covered by intact mucosa with a yellow cut surface. The tumor can occur anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract (and in the lungs and other sites); approximately 90% arise in the appendix. It is now established that these tumors are of neuroendocrine origin and derive from a primitive stem cell. (From Stedman, 25th ed & Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1182)Indium: A metallic element, atomic number 49, atomic weight 114.82, symbol In. It is named from its blue line in the spectrum. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Permeability: Property of membranes and other structures to permit passage of light, heat, gases, liquids, metabolites, and mineral ions.Peroxidase: A hemeprotein from leukocytes. Deficiency of this enzyme leads to a hereditary disorder coupled with disseminated moniliasis. It catalyzes the conversion of a donor and peroxide to an oxidized donor and water. EC 1.11.1.7.
His main symptoms were fever; symmetric, ascending paralysis; facial paralysis; bowel and bladder dysfunction; numbness and ... hyperesthesia; and a descending pattern of recovery. Roosevelt was left permanently paralyzed from the waist down. He was ...
Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Springer. pp. 299-301. ISBN 9780387734804. Barry Bogin (1999). Patterns of human growth. ... Babette Zemel (2007). "Assessment of Growth and Nutritional Status in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease". In Petar Mamula; ...
His main symptoms were fever; symmetric, ascending paralysis; facial paralysis; bowel and bladder dysfunction; numbness and ... hyperesthesia; and a descending pattern of recovery. He was left permanently paralyzed from the waist down. FDR was diagnosed ...
"Abdominal X-ray - Abnormal bowel gas pattern". radiologymasterclass.co.uk. Retrieved 2017-02-07. Gazelle, G S; Goldberg, M A; ... "Efficacy of CT in distinguishing small-bowel obstruction from other causes of small-bowel dilatation". American Journal of ... The small intestine or small bowel is the part of the gastrointestinal tract between the stomach and the large intestine, and ... Taller people generally have a longer small intestine and measurements are generally longer after death and when the bowel is ...
2010). "Analysis of 39 Crohn's disease risk loci in Swedish inflammatory bowel disease patients". Inflamm. Bowel Dis. 16 (6): ... 2009). "Autophagy and pattern recognition receptors in innate immunity". Immunol. Rev. 227 (1): 189-202. doi:10.1111/j.1600- ... Bowel Dis. 16 (7): 1108-17. doi:10.1002/ibd.21176. PMID 20024904. Delgado M, Singh S, De Haro S, et al. ( ... 2009). "Association of ATG16L1 and IRGM genes polymorphisms with inflammatory bowel disease: a meta-analysis approach". Genes ...
... and toddlers have 2-3 bowel movements per day. At around age 4, children develop an adult-like pattern of bowel movements (1-2 ... Children have different bowel movement patterns than adults. In addition, there is a wide spectrum of normalcy when considering ... 2 or fewer bowel movements per week Passing large bowel movements On physical exam, a doctor may find large amounts of feces ... This causes the affected portion of the colon to be unable to contract and relax to help push out a bowel movement. The ...
"Personality traits and emotional patterns in irritable bowel syndrome". World Journal of Gastroenterology. 22 (28): 6402-15. ... Anticipatory Anxiety Patterns for Male and Female Public Speakers Archived March 3, 2016, at the Wayback Machine., Ralph Behnke ... The epigenetic signature of at least one of these genes BDNF has also been associated with anxiety and specific patterns of ... Other effects may include changes in sleeping patterns, changes in habits, increase or decrease in food intake, and increased ...
CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) Richard Gore and Robin Smithuis (2014-05-21). "Bowel wall thickening - CT- ... pattern - Type 4 - Fat target sign". Radiology Assistant. Retrieved 2017-09-27. Page 70 in: Dominik Weishaupt, Victor D. ... inflammatory bowel disease, but also obesity, chemotherapy and celiac disease. Techniques to suppress fat on MRI mainly include ...
Colon & rectal cancer Bleeding per rectum, alteration of bowel habits. Liver cancer Jaundice, pain and mass in right upper ... "Emerging patterns of somatic mutations in cancer". Nat Rev Genet. 14 (10): 703-718. doi:10.1038/nrg3539. PMC 4014352 . PMID ... Large multi-centric Phase III randomised controlled clinical trials by the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast & Bowel Project ( ... "National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP)". www.nsabp.pitt.edu. Retrieved 2016-01-17. Home - Medical Research ...
Specific modification patterns of RELA have also been observed in many cancer types. RELA may have a potential role as ... Mutations in RELA is found responsible for inflammatory bowel disease as well. NF-κB/RELA activation has been found to be ... "Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with a TNF polymorphism that affects an interaction between the OCT1 and NF(-kappa)B ...
... a distinctive clinical pattern of inflammatory bowel disease in children". Pediatrics. 122 (6): e1278-81. doi:10.1542/peds.2008 ... It can provide important information regarding the cause of the disease and the extent of bowel damage. There are many types of ... A very small piece of tissue (usually about 2mm) is removed from the bowel mucosa during endoscopy and examined under the ... Types of colitis include: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) - a group of chronic colitides. Ulcerative colitis - a chronic ...
Man, SM; Kaakoush, NO; Mitchell, HM (March 2011). "The role of bacteria and pattern-recognition receptors in Crohn's disease". ... Inflammatory bowel diseases. 17 (1): 185-92. doi:10.1002/ibd.21436. PMID 20722058. ...
Fixed fibrotic form- With imaging appears as omental mass, matted bowel loops and nodular / irregular thickening of bowel and ... A and B. Smudge pattern of greater omental involvement (star) with smooth peritoneal thickening and enhancement. Thickened ... The dry or plastic form causes a fibrous reaction in the peritoneum results in adhesion of bowel loops andcaseous lymph nodes. ... A. Marked ascites with centrally displaced bowel loops, mimicking peritoneal carcinomatosis. Splenic microabscesses (curved ...
... gravity and bowel peristalsis. This natural flow pattern determines the route of spread of disease processes within the ... Thickened serosal surface of small and large bowel loops (arrow heads) with ascites. Fig. 16. A 24 year old male patient with ... The pressure of gelatinous material prevents the bowel loops floating towards the anterior abdominal wall, which may be useful ... Morphology of peritoneal deposits patterns in peritoneal carcinomatosis. A. 59 year old male patient a case of hepatocellular ...
2002 Jul;68(7):624-7.Pattern of injury from personal watercraft. Haan JM, Kramer ME, Scalea TM; J Trauma. 2004 Dec;57(6):1308- ... she has no bowel control. ...
When enough cells have been damaged, the characteristic pigmentation of the bowel wall develops. The condition can develop ... Endoscopically, the mucosa may show a brownish discoloration in a moire pattern. On biopsy, melanosis coli shows characteristic ...
This is the first report of NOD2 acting as a pattern-recognition receptor for viruses. Mifamurtide, a NOD2 activator for the ... The NOD2 gene is linked to inflammatory diseases such as Inflammatory bowel disease/Crohn's Disease and Blau syndrome. NOD2 has ... NOD2 is an intracellular pattern recognition receptor, which is similar in structure to resistant proteins of plants and ... Satsangi J, Morecroft J, Shah NB, Nimmo E (Feb 2003). "Genetics of inflammatory bowel disease: scientific and clinical ...
In STEP, the bowel is dilated and then partially transected (cut) at certain points, creating a zigzag pattern to the bowel ... Five of the pigs underwent removal of 90 percent of the bowel followed by STEP. The other pigs underwent the bowel resection ... 47% had attained enteral autonomy (sufficient bowel function). Pre-STEP bowel length was found to be inversely proportional to ... by making cuts in the intestine and creating a zigzag pattern, surgeons lengthen the amount of bowel available to absorb ...
A vicious cycle can develop, where the child may avoid moving his/her bowels in order to avoid the "expected" painful toilet ... It is thought that creating a regular schedule of bathroom time will allow the child to achieve a proper elimination pattern. ... Following that, enemas and laxatives are used daily to keep the stools soft and allow the stretched bowel to return to its ... Failure to establish a normal bowel habit can result in permanent stretching of the colon. Certainly, allowing this problem to ...
Levine, MS; Rubesin, SE; Laufer, I (Nov 2008). "Pattern approach for diseases of mesenteric small bowel on barium studies". ... For small bowel examinations, in addition to fasting for 8 hours prior to examination, a laxative may also be necessary for ... The total time necessary for the test depends on the speed of bowel motility or transit time and may vary between 1 and 3 hours ... Murphy, KP; McLaughlin, PD; O'Connor, OJ; Maher, MM (Mar 2014). "Imaging the small bowel". Current Opinion in Gastroenterology ...
This is the pattern of instruction and construction of the Tabernacle and its furnishings: The Hebrew Bible refers to the Urim ... compassion resides in the bowels. The Tabernacle was associated with creation, and creation with fertility, implying that the ... The pattern is always there throughout creation, with God in the depths or on the heights of everything. Likening the ...
Impairment and distress patterns distinguishing the melancholic depression subtype: An iSPOT-D report. Journal of Affective ... Efficacy of a Chinese Herbal Medicine in Providing Adequate Relief of Constipation-predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A ...
Stricker S, Brieske N, Haupt J, Mundlos S (2006). "Comparative expression pattern of Odd-skipped related genes Osr1 and Osr2 in ... Wang L, Coulter DE (1996). "bowel, an odd-skipped homolog, functions in the terminal pathway during Drosophila embryogenesis". ... exhibits dynamic expression patterns during craniofacial, limb, and kidney development". Mechanisms of Development. 107 (1-2): ... a zinc finger encoding segmentation gene with a novel pair-rule expression pattern". The EMBO Journal. 9 (11): 3795-804. PMC ...
Sensitivity to pain increases post-exertionally, which is opposite to the normal pattern.[23] ... Irritable Bowel Syndrome, and Interstitial Cystitis". Journal of clinical rheumatology:. 20 (3): 146-150. doi:10.1097/RHU. ... irritable bowel syndrome, and interstitial cystitis. However, it is unknown if this relationship is causative.[56] Reviews of ... "Reduced complexity of activity patterns in patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: a case control study". Biopsychosoc Med. 3 ...
GISTs may displace loops of bowel and larger tumors may obstruct the bowel and films will show an obstructive pattern. If ... As the tumor grows it may project outside the bowel (exophytic growth) and/or inside the bowel (intraluminal growth), but they ... The ability of MRI to produce images in multiple planes is helpful in determining the bowel as the organ of origin (which is ... However, some GISTs may be located entirely outside the lumen of the bowel and will not be appreciated with a barium swallow. ...
... but there are numerous physical and psychological conditions that can affect appetite and disrupt normal eating patterns. These ...
Neurogenic bowel dysfunction (NBD) is a particularly common occurrence in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), spina bifida ... encompasses the manifestations of bowel dysfunction resulting from sensory and/or motor disturbances1 due to central ... Supraconal disorder - upper motor neuron bowel syndrome or hyperflexic bowel. This pattern is seen in patients who have ... Keywords: Neurogenic bowel dysfunction, bowel dysfunction, hypererflexic bowel, areflexic bowel, upper motor neuron bowel ...
In a sub-set of patients, when pseudo-obstruction is limited to an isolated segment of the bowel, surgical bypass may be ... Tests may include manometry, which measures patterns and pressure within the gastrointestinal tract. Manometry can help confirm ... small bowel transplantation may be considered. This procedure is challenging and has many associated risks. It should only be ... Both the gastrostomy and jejunostomy can act as an outlet if needed to decrease pressure and pain in the bowel. ...
To determine whether ethnic and sex-related differences in bowel patterns exist between... ... Survey questionnaires can be used to characterize normal bowel habits and the prevalence of bowel dysfunction. ... bowel habit bowel pattern constipation diarrhea epidemiology irritable bowel syndrome This is a preview of subscription content ... Bowel patterns among subjects not seeking health care. Use of a questionnaire to identify a population with bowel dysfunction. ...
... P. ... Periklis Vounotrypidis, and Georgios Kouklakis, "The soft collagen hypothesis in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory bowel ... 1Endoscopy Unit & Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Unit, University General Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Democritus University of ... "Joint Pain And Joint Hypermobility In Inflammatory Bowel Disease," Gut, vol. 60, pp. A144-A144, 2011. View at Publisher · View ...
Subtypes of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Based on Abdominal Pain/Discomfort Severity and Bowel Pattern Heather. 02/10/11 10:14 AM ... IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME Symptom patterns in functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome: relationship to disturbances in ... Symptom patterns in functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome 11/28/04 02:34 PM Edit Reply Quote ... Irritable Bowel Syndrome in the United States: Prevalence, Symptom Patterns and Impact Heather. 07/05/05 03:40 PM ...
Table 1: Scale for assessment of liver stagnation spleen deficiency pattern of diarrhea predominant irritable bowel syndrome. ... TCM pattern is defined as diagnostic summary of the pathological changes of a disease state equipping pattern with dynamic ... Quantifying Liver Stagnation Spleen Deficiency Pattern for Diarrhea Predominate Irritable Bowel Syndromes Using ... As far as TCM pattern is concerned, theoretical interactions between symptoms and pattern factor are complex with ...
Abnormal propagation pattern of duodenal pressure waves in the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) [correction of (IBD)].. Simrén M1 ... The propagation pattern of individual pressure waves in the gastroduodenal area in IBS is unexplored. We performed ... To conclude, an abnormal propagation pattern of individual duodenal pressure waves in IBS patients was demonstrated and found ...
Irritable bowel syndrome: relationship of disorders in the transit of a single solid meal to symptom patterns. ... Irritable bowel syndrome: relationship of disorders in the transit of a single solid meal to symptom patterns. ... Small bowel transit times were significantly shorter in patients who complained predominantly of diarrhoea (3.3 +/- 0.3 vs 4.2 ... Our results indicate that irritable bowel syndrome should be considered a disease of the small intestine as well as the colon. ...
... who had been invited to undertake breast and bowel cancer screening in the period 2000-2002. Breast and bowel cancer screening ... 2 and 5 were more likely to complete round 1 bowel cancer screening. However, the likelihood of completion of bowel cancer ... This paper compares breast and bowel cancer screening uptake for a cohort of South Asian women invited to undertake both, and ... 72,566 women were invited to breast and bowel cancer screening after exclusions. Of these, 3,539 were South Asian and 69,027 ...
... en. dc.type. Thesis or Dissertation. ... Mitochondrial damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) in inflammatory bowel disease. dc.contributor.advisor. Satsangi, ... Background The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohns disease (CD) are chronic relapsing ... Boyapati RK et al (2018). Mitochondrial DNA is a pro-inflammatory damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) released during ...
Picking Out Patterns. By Kelly Rae Chi , May 1, 2017 Machine-learning algorithms can automate the analysis of cell images and ...
... developed a process that enables the faster identification of different types of colorectal cancer based on genetic patterns. ... New biomarkers for bowel cancer treatment February 09, 2017 Medicine Personalised Medicine ... Mutation patterns reveal individual types of colorectal cancer. Max Planck researchers have developed a process that enables ... they can identify the mutation patterns behind a colorectal cancer case in a single step (PLoSONE, December 22th, 2010). ...
Irritable bowel syndrome is commonly diagnosed based on symptoms. Patients are often asked to maintain a symptom diary. Based ... Pattern of symptoms. Symptoms must be in a pattern before diagnosis is made. This includes - ... Spider venom peptide could help stop pain in irritable bowel syndrome. *Irritable bowel disease heightens the risk of dementia ... Specific parameters like duration, frequency and intensity of pain, triggers of bowel movement changes, specifics of bowel ...
Overview of enhancement pattern. The figure shows an overview of the CT-patterns of mural enhancement in patients with bowel ... The most concerning pattern is gas within the bowel wall.. Gas within the bowel wall is called pneumatosis intestinalis. ... We will discuss a pattern approach to patients with bowel wall thickening with special attention to the CT-enhancement patterns ... Small bowel feces sign. The yellow arrow indicates a small bowel feces sign in a patient with a small bowel obstruction. ...
Bowel movement patterns. When you have IBS, your pattern of bowel movements may be different over time. Two or more of the ... Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). Topic Overview. What is irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)?. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a ... 2006). Irritable bowel syndrome section of Functional bowel disorders. In DA Drossman et al., eds., Rome III: The Functional ... 2006). Irritable bowel syndrome section of Functional bowel disorders. In DA Drossman et al., eds., Rome III: The Functional ...
Patterns of anti-TNF use and associated treatment outcomes in inflammatory bowel disease patients: results from an analysis of ... Introduction: Real-life patterns of anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) use remain largely unknown. We aimed to investigate ... survival rates, clinical outcomes and costs of anti-TNF agents in a large population of patients with inflammatory bowel ...
RESULTS: No dietary pattern was associated with either UC or CD risks. However, when excluding cases occurring within the first ... Thus, we investigated associations between diet as a whole, as dietary patterns, and UC and CD risks. METHODS: Within the ... When considering the foods most associated with the pattern, high consumers of sugar and soft drinks were at higher UC risk ... we set up a nested matched case-control study among 366,351 participants with inflammatory bowel disease data, including 256 ...
... with parents and patients to identify and address common patterns and predisposing factors that transform transient bowel and ... If untreated, transient changes in bowel function associated with constipation can lead to bowel-control problems.5 Fecal ... very large bowel movements and regular (sometimes daily) soiling.6 By this age, failure to maintain social bowel continence is ... painful bowel movements, bowel-movement withholding, and/or toilet avoidance. However, knowledge still is uncertain regarding ...
They identify 27 new associations and highlight disease-specific association patterns at shared susceptibility loci. ... They identify 27 new associations and highlight disease-specific association patterns at shared susceptibility loci. ... Distinctive inflammatory bowel disease phenotype in primary sclerosing cholangitis. . World J. Gastroenterol. 21, 1956-1971 ( ... Aberrant homing of mucosal T cells and extra-intestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease. . Nat. Rev. Immunol. 6, ...
Scientists use AI to recognize patterns in breast cancer Scientists have used artificial intelligence to recognize patterns in ... Bowel Cancer News and Research. RSS Bowel Cancer or colorectal cancer is cancer that occurs in the colon or rectum. Sometimes ... Bowel cancer on the rise among younger Australians Bowel cancer screening often begins after the age of fifty. New statistics ... New approach to tumor analysis could improve prognosis for bowel cancer patients Bowel (colorectal) cancer is the third most ...
Understanding how microbial species and patterns alter disease risk. Size matters when it comes to epidemiological studies; ... Manipulating the microbiome to beat bowel cancer. A team of 14 investigators led by Professors Matthew Meyerson and Wendy ... Whilst the above work is ongoing, the team will capture the outputs and use them for two fresh strategies to tackle bowel ... Using samples from existing bowel cancer population studies that span decades, the team aim to find links between the ...
To date no study has prospectively assessed the early bowel patterns and gut symptoms prior to a diagnosis of ASD using a ... Stool patterns. Questions on stool patterns of the children were included in structured questionnaires sent to the mother or ... Bowel symptoms. The presence of abdominal pain was recorded at 18, 30 and 42 months. History of blood in stools was recorded at ... Bowel habits of healthy Australian children aged 0-2 years. J Paediatr Child Health 1996;32:504-7. ...
Tutorial on abnormalities of the bowel gas pattern on abdominal X-ray. Free gas - pneumoperitoneum - mimics of free intra- ... Abdominal X-ray - Abnormal bowel gas pattern. Free gas mimics. Key points. *Certain normal structures can mimic ... This space may be filled by bowel. If this bowel is air filled then it may mimic free gas. ... Gas seen on both sides of the bowel wall is contained within adjacent bowel ...
Irritable bowel syndrome. 0.03. 0.04. 0.11. 0.18. Overactive bladder or incontinence. 0.01. 0.11. 0.05. 0.32. ... Patterns of Chronic Conditions and Their Associations With Behaviors and Quality of Life, 2010. ...
Irritable bowel syndrome. 214 (5). Sciatica. 222 (5). Overactive bladder or incontinence. 329 (7). ... this study empirically derives patterns of co-occurring conditions and examines the association of those patterns with HRQOL ... This study assessed patterns of both singular and multiple chronic conditions, behavioral risk factors, and quality of life in ... Patterns of Chronic Conditions and Their Associations With Behaviors and Quality of Life, 2010. Prev Chronic Dis 2015;12:150179 ...
  • Because there are different molecular pathways to colorectal cancer, it has become increasingly clear in recent years that information about the type of cancer in question can be found in the patient's genetic pattern. (mpg.de)
  • Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics in Berlin have now developed an efficient analytical strategy: with the help of targeted DNA sequencing and bioinformatics, they can identify the mutation patterns behind a colorectal cancer case in a single step (PLoSONE, December 22th, 2010). (mpg.de)
  • (news-medical.net)
  • This study assessed patterns of both singular and multiple chronic conditions, behavioral risk factors, and quality of life in a population-based sample. (cdc.gov)
  • We used latent class analysis to identify patterns of chronic conditions and to explore associations of latent class membership with sociodemographic characteristics, behavioral risk factors, and health. (cdc.gov)
  • Subgroups with distinct patterns of chronic conditions can provide direction for screening and surveillance, guideline development, and the delivery of complex care services. (cdc.gov)
  • However, because these scores do not reflect the patterns of chronic conditions, substantial gaps remain in understanding interactions among chronic conditions and the effect these interactions have on treatment. (cdc.gov)
  • Knowledge of patterns of chronic conditions, their effects on HRQOL, and their association with health behaviors could inform interventions to prevent or preempt MCCs, reduce their burden (13,14), and optimize service delivery (15,16) for individuals with chronic conditions (13,17). (cdc.gov)
  • The objectives of this study were to use latent class analysis (LCA) to examine 1) co-occurrence patterns of 27 self-reported chronic health conditions in a large, nationally representative adult sample, and 2) whether these patterns were associated with sociodemographic factors, tobacco use, physical activity, body mass index (BMI), and differences in self-assessed health status and well-being. (cdc.gov)
  • Sandler RS, Drossman DA, Nathan HP, McKee DC: Symptom complaints and health care seeking behavior in subjects with bowel dysfunction. (springer.com)
  • This survey of a biethnic nonpatient population shows that, for both Hispanic as well as non-Hispanic whites, males have a greater stool frequency than females and there are sex differences in the prevalence of bowel dysfunction. (springer.com)
  • Eating two or more servings of yogurt (over 245g) per week can reduce the risk of men developing pre-cancerous growths that can lead to bowel cancer. (news-medical.net)
  • Thus, we investigated associations between diet as a whole, as dietary patterns, and UC and CD risks. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Incidence rate ratios of developing UC and CD were calculated for quintiles of the Mediterranean diet score and a posteriori dietary patterns produced by factor analysis. (ox.ac.uk)
  • When I do eat anything whether it is a snack cake or a hamburger patty I have severe bowel discomfort and usually refuse to eat for up to 4 days. (medhelp.org)
  • Specific parameters like duration, frequency and intensity of pain, triggers of bowel movement changes, specifics of bowel movement and stool appearance changes are looked at in details. (news-medical.net)
  • Information on children's stool patterns and gut symptoms collected by questionnaire at 4 weeks and at 6, 18, 30 and 42 months of age were available for 12 984 children from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). (bmj.com)
  • During the first 42 months of life, ASD children had a stool pattern that was very similar to that of other children, apart from a slight increase in stool frequency at 30 and 42 months. (bmj.com)
  • Children with ASD do not have symptoms suggestive of underlying enterocolitis and their stool pattern is very similar to that of typically developing children. (bmj.com)
  • This paper compares breast and bowel cancer screening uptake for a cohort of South Asian women invited to undertake both, and similarly investigates these women's breast cancer screening behaviour over a period of fifteen years. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Screening data for rounds 1, 2 and 5 (1989-2004) of the NHS breast cancer screening programme and for round 1 of the NHS bowel screening pilot (2000-2002) were obtained for women aged 50-69 resident in the English bowel screening pilot site, Coventry and Warwickshire, who had been invited to undertake breast and bowel cancer screening in the period 2000-2002. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Breast and bowel cancer screening uptake levels were calculated and compared using the chi-squared test. (biomedcentral.com)
  • 72,566 women were invited to breast and bowel cancer screening after exclusions. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Women in both groups who consistently chose to undertake breast cancer screening in rounds 1, 2 and 5 were more likely to complete round 1 bowel cancer screening. (biomedcentral.com)
  • South Asian women who undertook breast cancer screening in only one round were no more likely to complete bowel cancer screening than those who decided against breast cancer screening in all three rounds. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In contrast, similar women in the non-Asian population had an increased likelihood of completing the new bowel cancer screening test. (biomedcentral.com)
  • During the pilot, men and women aged 50 to 69 were invited to undertake bowel cancer screening. (biomedcentral.com)
  • All eligible men and women registered with a GP are now invited to undertake bowel cancer screening every two years. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Prior to roll-out of the national bowel cancer screening programme, a study was funded by the NHS Cancer Screening Programmes to investigate equity of bowel cancer screening uptake by ethnic minority populations in the English pilot site (Coventry and Warwickshire). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Researchers have found that bowel cancer cells have a mechanism by which they can switch off some key molecules on their surfaces and thus escape being recognised and killed by the immunotherapy agents. (news-medical.net)
  • University of Otago scientists have discovered a way to view the immune cell "landscape" of bowel cancer tumours, paving the way towards more individualised medicine and treatment for many other diseases in future. (news-medical.net)
  • Bowel cancer screening often begins after the age of fifty. (news-medical.net)
  • New statistics reveal that it should start earlier because bowel cancer is on the rise among younger population in Australia. (news-medical.net)
  • Using samples from existing bowel cancer population studies that span decades, the team aim to find links between the microbiota, tumour and patient characteristics. (cancerresearchuk.org)
  • Whilst the above work is ongoing, the team will capture the outputs and use them for two fresh strategies to tackle bowel cancer. (cancerresearchuk.org)
  • By the end of the project, they aim to have revolutionised understanding of the role the microbiota plays in cancer development, found new ways of preventing bowel cancer, and defined new treatment strategies through manipulating the gut microbiota. (cancerresearchuk.org)
  • By taking on a challenge of such epic proportions, the team hope to galvanise the entire research community working in this field, starting an expansion of innovative approaches to tackling bowel cancer. (cancerresearchuk.org)
  • Australian researchers have discovered a possible new test for bowel cancer and a new gene which raises the risk of breast cancer. (abc.net.au)
  • Australian researchers have discovered what could become a new test for bowel cancer and a new gene linked to a raised risk of breast cancer. (abc.net.au)
  • Bowel cancer is the second most common type of cancer affecting both men and women in Australia. (mydr.com.au)
  • Bowel cancer can cause bleeding into the bowel. (mydr.com.au)
  • There are often no symptoms in the early stages, which is why bowel cancer screening is important. (mydr.com.au)
  • Your doctor will ask about your symptoms and perform a physical examination before suggesting any tests that may be needed to diagnose possible bowel cancer. (mydr.com.au)
  • Various tests are used to diagnose and monitor bowel cancer, as well as work out the stage of the cancer (whether the cancer is contained in the bowel or has spread). (mydr.com.au)
  • Imaging tests (such as X-ray, CT or MRI) can be used to help determine whether the bowel cancer has spread to other organs. (mydr.com.au)
  • A full blood count may detect iron-deficiency anaemia , which can be caused by bleeding from bowel cancer. (mydr.com.au)
  • Surgery to remove bowel cancer can be done via laparoscopic (keyhole) surgery or open surgery. (mydr.com.au)
  • In people with bowel cancer that has spread to the liver, surgical removal of the liver tumour(s) is sometimes performed. (mydr.com.au)