Limb Salvage: An alternative to amputation in patients with neoplasms, ischemia, fractures, and other limb-threatening conditions. Generally, sophisticated surgical procedures such as vascular surgery and reconstruction are used to salvage diseased limbs.Amputation: The removal of a limb or other appendage or outgrowth of the body. (Dorland, 28th ed)Salvage Therapy: A therapeutic approach, involving chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or surgery, after initial regimens have failed to lead to improvement in a patient's condition. Salvage therapy is most often used for neoplastic diseases.Ischemia: A hypoperfusion of the BLOOD through an organ or tissue caused by a PATHOLOGIC CONSTRICTION or obstruction of its BLOOD VESSELS, or an absence of BLOOD CIRCULATION.Leg: The inferior part of the lower extremity between the KNEE and the ANKLE.Tibial Arteries: The anterior and posterior arteries created at the bifurcation of the popliteal artery. The anterior tibial artery begins at the lower border of the popliteus muscle and lies along the tibia at the distal part of the leg to surface superficially anterior to the ankle joint. Its branches are distributed throughout the leg, ankle, and foot. The posterior tibial artery begins at the lower border of the popliteus muscle, lies behind the tibia in the lower part of its course, and is found situated between the medial malleolus and the medial process of the calcaneal tuberosity. Its branches are distributed throughout the leg and foot.Vascular Patency: The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.Popliteal Artery: The continuation of the femoral artery coursing through the popliteal fossa; it divides into the anterior and posterior tibial arteries.Lower Extremity: The region of the lower limb in animals, extending from the gluteal region to the FOOT, and including the BUTTOCKS; HIP; and LEG.Femoral Artery: The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.Arterial Occlusive Diseases: Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.Veins: The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Extremities: The farthest or outermost projections of the body, such as the HAND and FOOT.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Inguinal Canal: The tunnel in the lower anterior ABDOMINAL WALL through which the SPERMATIC CORD, in the male; ROUND LIGAMENT, in the female; nerves; and vessels pass. Its internal end is at the deep inguinal ring and its external end is at the superficial inguinal ring.Limb Buds: Distinct regions of mesenchymal outgrowth at both flanks of an embryo during the SOMITE period. Limb buds, covered by ECTODERM, give rise to forelimb, hindlimb, and eventual functional limb structures. Limb bud cultures are used to study CELL DIFFERENTIATION; ORGANOGENESIS; and MORPHOGENESIS.Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Polytetrafluoroethylene: Homopolymer of tetrafluoroethylene. Nonflammable, tough, inert plastic tubing or sheeting; used to line vessels, insulate, protect or lubricate apparatus; also as filter, coating for surgical implants or as prosthetic material. Synonyms: Fluoroflex; Fluoroplast; Ftoroplast; Halon; Polyfene; PTFE; Tetron.Life Tables: Summarizing techniques used to describe the pattern of mortality and survival in populations. These methods can be applied to the study not only of death, but also of any defined endpoint such as the onset of disease or the occurrence of disease complications.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Gangrene: Death and putrefaction of tissue usually due to a loss of blood supply.Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Peripheral Vascular Diseases: Pathological processes involving any one of the BLOOD VESSELS in the vasculature outside the HEART.Osteosarcoma: A sarcoma originating in bone-forming cells, affecting the ends of long bones. It is the most common and most malignant of sarcomas of the bones, and occurs chiefly among 10- to 25-year-old youths. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Saphenous Vein: The vein which drains the foot and leg.Atherectomy: Endovascular procedure in which atheromatous plaque is excised by a cutting or rotating catheter. It differs from balloon and laser angioplasty procedures which enlarge vessels by dilation but frequently do not remove much plaque. If the plaque is removed by surgical excision under general anesthesia rather than by an endovascular procedure through a catheter, it is called ENDARTERECTOMY.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Angioplasty, Balloon: Use of a balloon catheter for dilation of an occluded artery. It is used in treatment of arterial occlusive diseases, including renal artery stenosis and arterial occlusions in the leg. For the specific technique of BALLOON DILATION in coronary arteries, ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, CORONARY is available.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Graft Occlusion, Vascular: Obstruction of flow in biological or prosthetic vascular grafts.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Intermittent Claudication: A symptom complex characterized by pain and weakness in SKELETAL MUSCLE group associated with exercise, such as leg pain and weakness brought on by walking. Such muscle limpness disappears after a brief rest and is often relates to arterial STENOSIS; muscle ISCHEMIA; and accumulation of LACTATE.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha: Serum glycoprotein produced by activated MACROPHAGES and other mammalian MONONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. It has necrotizing activity against tumor cell lines and increases ability to reject tumor transplants. Also known as TNF-alpha, it is only 30% homologous to TNF-beta (LYMPHOTOXIN), but they share TNF RECEPTORS.Tumor Burden: The total amount (cell number, weight, size or volume) of tumor cells or tissue in the body.Foot: The distal extremity of the leg in vertebrates, consisting of the tarsus (ANKLE); METATARSUS; phalanges; and the soft tissues surrounding these bones.Arteriosclerosis Obliterans: Common occlusive arterial disease which is caused by ATHEROSCLEROSIS. It is characterized by lesions in the innermost layer (ARTERIAL INTIMA) of arteries including the AORTA and its branches to the extremities. Risk factors include smoking, HYPERLIPIDEMIA, and HYPERTENSION.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Sarcoma: A connective tissue neoplasm formed by proliferation of mesodermal cells; it is usually highly malignant.Surgical Flaps: Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Vascular Grafting: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES, or transplanted BLOOD VESSELS, or other biological material to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Femoral NeoplasmsDiabetic Foot: Common foot problems in persons with DIABETES MELLITUS, caused by any combination of factors such as DIABETIC NEUROPATHIES; PERIPHERAL VASCULAR DISEASES; and INFECTION. With the loss of sensation and poor circulation, injuries and infections often lead to severe foot ulceration, GANGRENE and AMPUTATION.Chondrosarcoma: A slowly growing malignant neoplasm derived from cartilage cells, occurring most frequently in pelvic bones or near the ends of long bones, in middle-aged and old people. Most chondrosarcomas arise de novo, but some may develop in a preexisting benign cartilaginous lesion or in patients with ENCHONDROMATOSIS. (Stedman, 25th ed)Peripheral Arterial Disease: Lack of perfusion in the EXTREMITIES resulting from atherosclerosis. It is characterized by INTERMITTENT CLAUDICATION, and an ANKLE BRACHIAL INDEX of 0.9 or less.Wilms Tumor: A malignant kidney tumor, caused by the uncontrolled multiplication of renal stem (blastemal), stromal (STROMAL CELLS), and epithelial (EPITHELIAL CELLS) elements. However, not all three are present in every case. Several genes or chromosomal areas have been associated with Wilms tumor which is usually found in childhood as a firm lump in a child's side or ABDOMEN.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Arm: The superior part of the upper extremity between the SHOULDER and the ELBOW.Neoplasms, Experimental: Experimentally induced new abnormal growth of TISSUES in animals to provide models for studying human neoplasms.Iliac Artery: Either of two large arteries originating from the abdominal aorta; they supply blood to the pelvis, abdominal wall and legs.Foot Ulcer: Lesion on the surface of the skin of the foot, usually accompanied by inflammation. The lesion may become infected or necrotic and is frequently associated with diabetes or leprosy.Neoplasm Recurrence, Local: The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.Genes, Tumor Suppressor: Genes that inhibit expression of the tumorigenic phenotype. They are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. When tumor suppressor genes are inactivated or lost, a barrier to normal proliferation is removed and unregulated growth is possible.Groin: The external junctural region between the lower part of the abdomen and the thigh.Limb Deformities, Congenital: Congenital structural deformities of the upper and lower extremities collectively or unspecified.Fibula: The bone of the lower leg lateral to and smaller than the tibia. In proportion to its length, it is the most slender of the long bones.Leg Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the leg.Chemotherapy, Cancer, Regional Perfusion: Neoplasm drug therapy involving an extracorporeal circuit with temporary exclusion of the tumor-bearing area from the general circulation during which high concentrations of the drug are perfused to the isolated part.Blood Gas Monitoring, Transcutaneous: The noninvasive measurement or determination of the partial pressure (tension) of oxygen and/or carbon dioxide locally in the capillaries of a tissue by the application to the skin of a special set of electrodes. These electrodes contain photoelectric sensors capable of picking up the specific wavelengths of radiation emitted by oxygenated versus reduced hemoglobin.Tibia: The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.Carcinoid Tumor: A usually small, slow-growing neoplasm composed of islands of rounded, oxyphilic, or spindle-shaped cells of medium size, with moderately small vesicular nuclei, and covered by intact mucosa with a yellow cut surface. The tumor can occur anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract (and in the lungs and other sites); approximately 90% arise in the appendix. It is now established that these tumors are of neuroendocrine origin and derive from a primitive stem cell. (From Stedman, 25th ed & Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1182)Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Leg Bones: The bones of the free part of the lower extremity in humans and of any of the four extremities in animals. It includes the FEMUR; PATELLA; TIBIA; and FIBULA.Tumor Suppressor Protein p53: Nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the p53 gene (GENES, P53) whose normal function is to control CELL PROLIFERATION and APOPTOSIS. A mutant or absent p53 protein has been found in LEUKEMIA; OSTEOSARCOMA; LUNG CANCER; and COLORECTAL CANCER.Critical Illness: A disease or state in which death is possible or imminent.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Debridement: The removal of foreign material and devitalized or contaminated tissue from or adjacent to a traumatic or infected lesion until surrounding healthy tissue is exposed. (Dorland, 27th ed)Anastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.Transplantation, Autologous: Transplantation of an individual's own tissue from one site to another site.Angioplasty: Reconstruction or repair of a blood vessel, which includes the widening of a pathological narrowing of an artery or vein by the removal of atheromatous plaque material and/or the endothelial lining as well, or by dilatation (BALLOON ANGIOPLASTY) to compress an ATHEROMA. Except for ENDARTERECTOMY, usually these procedures are performed via catheterization as minimally invasive ENDOVASCULAR PROCEDURES.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.Leg Ulcer: Ulceration of the skin and underlying structures of the lower extremity. About 90% of the cases are due to venous insufficiency (VARICOSE ULCER), 5% to arterial disease, and the remaining 5% to other causes.Brain Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the intracranial components of the central nervous system, including the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, hypothalamus, thalamus, brain stem, and cerebellum. Brain neoplasms are subdivided into primary (originating from brain tissue) and secondary (i.e., metastatic) forms. Primary neoplasms are subdivided into benign and malignant forms. In general, brain tumors may also be classified by age of onset, histologic type, or presenting location in the brain.Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.Forefoot, Human: The forepart of the foot including the metatarsals and the TOES.Humerus: Bone in humans and primates extending from the SHOULDER JOINT to the ELBOW JOINT.Arteriovenous Shunt, Surgical: Surgical shunt allowing direct passage of blood from an artery to a vein. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Soft Tissue Neoplasms: Neoplasms of whatever cell type or origin, occurring in the extraskeletal connective tissue framework of the body including the organs of locomotion and their various component structures, such as nerves, blood vessels, lymphatics, etc.Axillary Artery: The continuation of the subclavian artery; it distributes over the upper limb, axilla, chest and shoulder.Neuroendocrine Tumors: Tumors whose cells possess secretory granules and originate from the neuroectoderm, i.e., the cells of the ectoblast or epiblast that program the neuroendocrine system. Common properties across most neuroendocrine tumors include ectopic hormone production (often via APUD CELLS), the presence of tumor-associated antigens, and isozyme composition.Aneurysm: Pathological outpouching or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any blood vessel (ARTERIES or VEINS) or the heart (HEART ANEURYSM). It indicates a thin and weakened area in the wall which may later rupture. Aneurysms are classified by location, etiology, or other characteristics.Tumor Suppressor Proteins: Proteins that are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. Deficiencies or abnormalities in these proteins may lead to unregulated cell growth and tumor development.Pelvic Bones: Bones that constitute each half of the pelvic girdle in VERTEBRATES, formed by fusion of the ILIUM; ISCHIUM; and PUBIC BONE.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Phantom Limb: Perception of painful and nonpainful phantom sensations that occur following the complete or partial loss of a limb. The majority of individuals with an amputated extremity will experience the impression that the limb is still present, and in many cases, painful. (From Neurol Clin 1998 Nov;16(4):919-36; Brain 1998 Sep;121(Pt 9):1603-30)Constriction, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.Tumor Microenvironment: The milieu surrounding neoplasms consisting of cells, vessels, soluble factors, and molecules, that can influence and be influenced by, the neoplasm's growth.Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Endovascular Procedures: Minimally invasive procedures, diagnostic or therapeutic, performed within the BLOOD VESSELS. They may be perfomed via ANGIOSCOPY; INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; INTERVENTIONAL RADIOGRAPHY; or INTERVENTIONAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Treatment Failure: A measure of the quality of health care by assessment of unsuccessful results of management and procedures used in combating disease, in individual cases or series.Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental: Experimentally induced mammary neoplasms in animals to provide a model for studying human BREAST NEOPLASMS.Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous: A benign tumor composed, wholly or in part, of cells with the morphologic characteristics of HISTIOCYTES and with various fibroblastic components. Fibrous histiocytomas can occur anywhere in the body. When they occur in the skin, they are called dermatofibromas or sclerosing hemangiomas. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, p1747)Neoplasm Metastasis: The transfer of a neoplasm from one organ or part of the body to another remote from the primary site.Operative Blood Salvage: Recovery of blood lost from surgical procedures for reuse by the same patient in AUTOLOGOUS BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS. It is collected during (intraoperatively) or after completion of (postoperatively) the surgical procedures.Tibial FracturesProspective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Neovascularization, Pathologic: A pathologic process consisting of the proliferation of blood vessels in abnormal tissues or in abnormal positions.Arm Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the arm.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Prostheses and Implants: Artificial substitutes for body parts, and materials inserted into tissue for functional, cosmetic, or therapeutic purposes. Prostheses can be functional, as in the case of artificial arms and legs, or cosmetic, as in the case of an artificial eye. Implants, all surgically inserted or grafted into the body, tend to be used therapeutically. IMPLANTS, EXPERIMENTAL is available for those used experimentally.Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Replantation: Restoration of an organ or other structure to its original site.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Intermittent Pneumatic Compression Devices: Instruments that generate intermittent forces, uniformed or graduated, to facilitate the emptying of VEINS. These devices are used to reduce limb EDEMA and prevent venous THROMBOEMBOLISM, such as deep vein thrombosis in the legs.Hindlimb: Either of two extremities of four-footed non-primate land animals. It usually consists of a FEMUR; TIBIA; and FIBULA; tarsals; METATARSALS; and TOES. (From Storer et al., General Zoology, 6th ed, p73)Artificial Limbs: Prosthetic replacements for arms, legs, and parts thereof.Embolectomy: Surgical removal of an obstructing clot or foreign material which has been transported from a distant vessel by the bloodstream. Removal of a clot at its original site is called THROMBECTOMY.Fractures, Spontaneous: Fractures occurring as a result of disease of a bone or from some undiscoverable cause, and not due to trauma. (Dorland, 27th ed)Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Popliteal Vein: The vein formed by the union of the anterior and posterior tibial veins; it courses through the popliteal space and becomes the femoral vein.Transplantation, Heterologous: Transplantation between animals of different species.Femoral Vein: The vein accompanying the femoral artery in the same sheath; it is a continuation of the popliteal vein and becomes the external iliac vein.Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of a prosthesis.Free Tissue Flaps: A mass of tissue that has been cut away from its surrounding areas to be used in TISSUE TRANSPLANTATION.Prosthesis-Related Infections: Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).Giant Cell Tumors: Tumors of bone tissue or synovial or other soft tissue characterized by the presence of giant cells. The most common are giant cell tumor of tendon sheath and GIANT CELL TUMOR OF BONE.Polyethylene Terephthalates: Polyester polymers formed from terephthalic acid or its esters and ethylene glycol. They can be formed into tapes, films or pulled into fibers that are pressed into meshes or woven into fabrics.Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: All tumors in the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT arising from mesenchymal cells (MESODERM) except those of smooth muscle cells (LEIOMYOMA) or Schwann cells (SCHWANNOMA).Biological Dressings: Human or animal tissue used as temporary wound coverings.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Mice, Inbred BALB COrthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Heel: The back (or posterior) of the FOOT in PRIMATES, found behind the ANKLE and distal to the TOES.Sarcoma, Ewing: A malignant tumor of the bone which always arises in the medullary tissue, occurring more often in cylindrical bones. The tumor occurs usually before the age of 20, about twice as frequently in males as in females.Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays: In vivo methods of screening investigative anticancer drugs, biologic response modifiers or radiotherapies. Human tumor tissue or cells are transplanted into mice or rats followed by tumor treatment regimens. A variety of outcomes are monitored to assess antitumor effectiveness.Ankle Brachial Index: Comparison of the BLOOD PRESSURE between the BRACHIAL ARTERY and the POSTERIOR TIBIAL ARTERY. It is a predictor of PERIPHERAL ARTERIAL DISEASE.Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Disease-Free Survival: Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Mice, Inbred C57BLLiver Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.Antigens, Neoplasm: Proteins, glycoprotein, or lipoprotein moieties on surfaces of tumor cells that are usually identified by monoclonal antibodies. Many of these are of either embryonic or viral origin.Neoplasm Proteins: Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.Thromboangiitis Obliterans: A non-atherosclerotic, inflammatory thrombotic disease that commonly involves small and medium-sized arteries or veins in the extremities. It is characterized by occlusive THROMBOSIS and FIBROSIS in the vascular wall leading to digital and limb ISCHEMIA and ulcerations. Thromboangiitis obliterans is highly associated with tobacco smoking.Colonic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Ovarian Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Angioscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery performed on the interior of blood vessels.Kidney Neoplasms: Tumors or cancers of the KIDNEY.Regional Blood Flow: The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Carcinoma, Ehrlich Tumor: A transplantable, poorly differentiated malignant tumor which appeared originally as a spontaneous breast carcinoma in a mouse. It grows in both solid and ascitic forms.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Fibrosarcoma: A sarcoma derived from deep fibrous tissue, characterized by bundles of immature proliferating fibroblasts with variable collagen formation, which tends to invade locally and metastasize by the bloodstream. (Stedman, 25th ed)Vascular Access Devices: Devices to be inserted into veins or arteries for the purpose of carrying fluids into or from a peripheral or central vascular location. They may include component parts such as catheters, ports, reservoirs, and valves. They may be left in place temporarily for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes.Skin Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.Carcinoma, Squamous Cell: A carcinoma derived from stratified SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS. It may also occur in sites where glandular or columnar epithelium is normally present. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Thrombectomy: Surgical removal of an obstructing clot or foreign material from a blood vessel at the point of its formation. Removal of a clot arising from a distant site is called EMBOLECTOMY.Cell Transformation, Neoplastic: Cell changes manifested by escape from control mechanisms, increased growth potential, alterations in the cell surface, karyotypic abnormalities, morphological and biochemical deviations from the norm, and other attributes conferring the ability to invade, metastasize, and kill.Endarterectomy: Surgical excision, performed under general anesthesia, of the atheromatous tunica intima of an artery. When reconstruction of an artery is performed as an endovascular procedure through a catheter, it is called ATHERECTOMY.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Glioma: Benign and malignant central nervous system neoplasms derived from glial cells (i.e., astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and ependymocytes). Astrocytes may give rise to astrocytomas (ASTROCYTOMA) or glioblastoma multiforme (see GLIOBLASTOMA). Oligodendrocytes give rise to oligodendrogliomas (OLIGODENDROGLIOMA) and ependymocytes may undergo transformation to become EPENDYMOMA; CHOROID PLEXUS NEOPLASMS; or colloid cysts of the third ventricle. (From Escourolle et al., Manual of Basic Neuropathology, 2nd ed, p21)DNA, Neoplasm: DNA present in neoplastic tissue.Sarcoma, Experimental: Experimentally induced neoplasms of CONNECTIVE TISSUE in animals to provide a model for studying human SARCOMA.Mice, SCID: Mice homozygous for the mutant autosomal recessive gene "scid" which is located on the centromeric end of chromosome 16. These mice lack mature, functional lymphocytes and are thus highly susceptible to lethal opportunistic infections if not chronically treated with antibiotics. The lack of B- and T-cell immunity resembles severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) syndrome in human infants. SCID mice are useful as animal models since they are receptive to implantation of a human immune system producing SCID-human (SCID-hu) hematochimeric mice.Pancreatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Testicular Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the TESTIS. Germ cell tumors (GERMINOMA) of the testis constitute 95% of all testicular neoplasms.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal: Neoplasms composed of primordial GERM CELLS of embryonic GONADS or of elements of the germ layers of the EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the gonads or present in an embryo or FETUS.Wounds, Nonpenetrating: Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.Rhabdoid Tumor: A rare but highly lethal childhood tumor found almost exclusively in infants. Histopathologically, it resembles RHABDOMYOSARCOMA but the tumor cells are not of myogenic origin. Although it arises primarily in the kidney, it may be found in other parts of the body. The rhabdoid cytomorphology is believed to be the expression of a very primitive malignant cell. (From Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p2210)Melanoma, Experimental: Experimentally induced tumor that produces MELANIN in animals to provide a model for studying human MELANOMA.Mice, Nude: Mutant mice homozygous for the recessive gene "nude" which fail to develop a thymus. They are useful in tumor studies and studies on immune responses.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Granulosa Cell Tumor: A neoplasm composed entirely of GRANULOSA CELLS, occurring mostly in the OVARY. In the adult form, it may contain some THECA CELLS. This tumor often produces ESTRADIOL and INHIBIN. The excess estrogen exposure can lead to other malignancies in women and PRECOCIOUS PUBERTY in girls. In rare cases, granulosa cell tumors have been identified in the TESTES.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Graft Survival: The survival of a graft in a host, the factors responsible for the survival and the changes occurring within the graft during growth in the host.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.External Fixators: External devices which hold wires or pins that are placed through one or both cortices of bone in order to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment. These devices allow easy access to wounds, adjustment during the course of healing, and more functional use of the limbs involved.Cell Survival: The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Glioblastoma: A malignant form of astrocytoma histologically characterized by pleomorphism of cells, nuclear atypia, microhemorrhage, and necrosis. They may arise in any region of the central nervous system, with a predilection for the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, and commissural pathways. Clinical presentation most frequently occurs in the fifth or sixth decade of life with focal neurologic signs or seizures.Mammary Neoplasms, Animal: Tumors or cancer of the MAMMARY GLAND in animals (MAMMARY GLANDS, ANIMAL).Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Transfection: The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Forelimb: A front limb of a quadruped. (The Random House College Dictionary, 1980)Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.
"Limb salvage in smusculoskeletal oncology", New York, 1987, 5 p. ----. The experience of the salvage operations in patients ... New Developments for limb salvage in musculoskeletal tumors. Ed.By T.Yamamuro, Springer-Verlag, Tokyo, 1989., 8 p. ----. ... Complex treatment of osteosarcoma patients- In: 2nd International Workshop on the design and application of tumor prosthesis ... 8th International Symposium on limb salvage, Florence, May 10-12, 1996, 1 p. ----, N.F.Mistakopoulo, G.G.Knirov, F.N. ...
Concept of Limb Salvage Surgery by Custom Mega Prosthesis "Padma Awards" (PDF). Ministry of Home Affairs, Government of India. ... Medical ethics and invention of Custom Mega Prostheses to avoid amputation for Bone tumor patients. For his efforts, he was ... Mayil Vahanan Natarajan to be medical varsity Vice-Chancellor [1] The Asia Pacific Musculoskeletal Tumour Society [2] Text ...
Although about 90% of patients are able to have limb-salvage surgery, complications, particularly infection, prosthetic ... Metastasis of tumors involving the limb bones is very common, usually to the lungs. The tumor causes a great deal of pain, and ... tumor bone. Tumor cells are included in the osteoid matrix. Depending on the features of the tumor cells present (whether they ... Also, the option to have rotationplasty after the tumor is taken out exists. Patients with osteosarcoma are best managed by a ...
Limb sparing surgery, or limb salvage surgery, means the limb is spared from amputation. Instead of amputation, the affected ... Many patients will not experience any symptoms, except for a painless mass. Some bone tumors may weaken the structure of the ... Treatment of bone tumors is highly dependent on the type of tumor. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are effective in some tumors ( ... Primary tumors of bone can be divided into benign tumors and cancers. Common benign bone tumors may be neoplastic, ...
... , also known as limb-saving or limb-salvage techniques, are performed in order to give patients an ... In the actual procedure, the bone affected by the tumor, as well as a small part of the healthy femoral and occasionally tibia ... This substance can deteriorate bony tissue and cause serious bone problems for the patient. Prosthetic limbs have been used for ... "Rotationplasty--Surgical Treatment Modality After Failed Limb Salvage Procedure." Archives of orthopaedic and trauma surgery ...
Limb salvage compared with amputation for osteosarcoma of the distal end of the femur. A long-term oncological, functional, and ... Predictive factors for local recurrence in osteosarcoma: 540 patients with extremity tumors followed for minimum 2.5 years ... with salvage chemotherapy based on histological tumor response. „J Clin Oncol". 6 (2), s. 329-37, Feb 1988. PMID: 2448428. ... a b c d Robert F. Todd, Kathleen A. Cooney, Teresa G. Hayes, Martha Pritchett Mims, Francis P. Worden: Tumor Board Review, ...
... or diabetic limb salvage. In the UK much controversy exists on the scope of podiatrists practicing surgery and the British ... A patient may also be referred to a foot and ankle surgeon for the surgical care of nail problems and phalangeal deformalities ... and tumors of the foot and ankle. Amputation and ankle arthroscopy (the use of a laparoscope in foot and ankle surgical ... Patients may also be referred to a foot and ankle surgeon for proper diagnosis and treatment of heel pain (such as a ...
About 13% of patients will present with multifocal tumors, and about 13% of patients will present with metastatic disease. The ... "Limb Salvage Surgery for Extremity Sarcomas". [unreliable medical source?] Soft Tissue Sarcoma. Clinical Practice Guidelines in ... Tumors more than 2 cm in diameter and tumors with necrosis and vascular invasion have been correlated with a worse outcome. The ... Rao, Bhaskar N.; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos (2003). "Local control in childhood extremity sarcomas: Salvaging limbs and sparing ...
Amputation is reserved for cases where limb salvage is not possible. If the patient continues to have a risk of further ... by a tumor or in the case of superior mesenteric artery syndrome Sickle cell disease (abnormally shaped red blood cells) ... Lack of blood flow to a limb results in acute limb ischemia. Reduced blood flow to the skin layers may result in mottling or ... If the condition of the ischemic limb is stabilized with anticoagulation, recently formed emboli may be treated with catheter- ...
... is probably Hua Tuo's best known patient. He suffered from chronic headaches, which were possibly caused by a brain tumour. [ ... Movement of the limbs facilitates the absorption of nutrients in food and enable the blood in the arteries to flow freely, ... The prison guard's wife burnt the book for fear of being implicated, but the guard manages to salvage some pages, which are ... Hua Tuo] would tell the patient how to take the medicine and then would go away, after which the patient's condition would ...
... used autotransfusion during the amputation of limbs by removing blood from the amputated limb and returning it to the patient ... salvaged vaginal blood from patients with postpartum hemorrhage. By swabbing the blood from the bleeding site and rinsing the ... There are possible exceptions to this contraindication: The surgeon feels complete removal of an encapsulated tumor is possible ... Typically the patient will require FFP and platelets as the estimated blood loss exceeds half of the patient's blood volume. ...
The use of a drug of last resort may be based on agreement among members of a patient's care network, including physicians and ... phocomelia and absence or truncation of limbs) after prenatal use by pregnant women, US Food and Drug Administration approved ... especially with multidrug-resistant pathogens or tumors. Such an alternative may be outside of extant regulatory requirements ... or medical best practices, in which case it may be viewed as salvage therapy. ...
... patient-controlled analgesia - Patient derived tumor xenografts - PCA - PDQ - peau d'orange - PEG-interferon alfa-2a - PEG- ... isolated limb perfusion - isolated lung perfusion - isotretinoin - itraconazole - IU - IV - IVP - ixabepilone J-107088 - J- ... salvage therapy - samarium 153 - saponin - saquinavir mesylate - sarCNU - sarcoma - sarcosinamide nitrosourea - sargramostim - ... tumor load - tumor marker - tumor model - tumor necrosis factor - tumor suppressor gene - tumor-derived - tumor-specific ...
Generally, patients with these lipomas present with strokes. However, patients with the Pai syndrome don't. That is why it is ... Nervous system lipomas are rare congenital benign tumors of the central nervous system, mostly located in the medial line and ... Lenyoun EH, Lampert JA, Xipoleas GD, Taub PJ (2011) Salvage of calvarial bone graft using acellular dermal matrix in nasal ... This pathway plays an important role in developing the midline central nervous system/craniofrontofacial region and the limbs. ...
Salvage chemotherapy or palliative chemotherapy is given without curative intent, but simply to decrease tumor load and ... Although prophylaxis is available and is often initiated in patients with large tumors, this is a dangerous side-effect that ... Moreno-Ramirez D, de la Cruz-Merino L, Ferrandiz L, Villegas-Portero R, Nieto-Garcia A (2010). "Isolated limb perfusion for ... Blood vessels in tumors are very different from those seen in normal tissues. As a tumor grows, tumor cells furthest away from ...
A radioactive pellet of iridium-192 had broken off inside the patient during treatment. The patient was transported back to a ... A local resident salvaged materials from a discarded radiation therapy machine containing 6,010 pellets of 60Co. The transport ... The most exposed person died, another lost a limb. A number of safety systems at the plant had been disabled, and workers were ... which was to be followed by 19.8 Gy to be delivered to the tumor only (in eleven fractions of 1.8 Gy). In the first phase of ...
Salvage chemotherapy or palliative chemotherapy is given without curative intent, but simply to decrease tumor load and ... Although prophylaxis is available and is often initiated in patients with large tumors, this is a dangerous side-effect that ... Isolated limb perfusion (often used in melanoma),[61] or isolated infusion of chemotherapy into the liver[62] or the lung have ... Blood vessels in tumors are very different from those seen in normal tissues. As a tumor grows, tumor cells furthest away from ...
Tumor hypoxia, the situation where tumor cells have been deprived of oxygen ... Therefore, in patients with chronic mitral stenosis, pulmonary capillary pressures of 40 to 45 mm Hg have been measured without ... For this reason, symptoms are worse when a limb is used. Pain may also be felt as a result of increased hydrogen ions leading ... Although the severity of airflow obstruction as measured by FEV1 is the best correlate with overall prognosis in patients with ...
... is probably Hua Tuo's best known patient. He suffered from chronic headaches, which were possibly caused by a brain tumour. ... Movement of the limbs facilitates the absorption of nutrients in food and enable the blood in the arteries to flow freely, ... The prison guard's wife burnt the book for fear of being implicated, but the guard manages to salvage some pages, which are ... Hua Tuo] would tell the patient how to take the medicine and then would go away, after which the patient's condition would ...
Bone and soft tissue tumors are relatively rare cancers but do occur in a number of children. Learn how Childrens Mercy is ... Limb Salvage Procedures. Patients with bone tumors in an extremity used to require an amputation. Because of the advances made ... many patients will be eligible for limb sparing options. The goal is to remove the entire tumor and replace affected bone with ... both benign and malignant bone tumors and are trained in reconstruction and are experienced in procedures such as limb salvage ...
Limb salvage procedures. Patients with bone tumors in an extremity used to require an amputation. Because of the advances made ... many patients will be eligible for limb sparing options. The goal is to remove the entire tumor and replace affected bone with ... both benign and malignant bone tumors and are trained in reconstruction and are experienced in procedures such as limb salvage ... Patients are discussed at monthly multidisciplinary patient care conferences to discuss their diagnoses and treatment needs. ...
We retrospectively reviewed 137 patients who underwent pelvic tumour resections. Patients with an estimated blood loss greater ... Sixty-one (44.53%) patients had blood loss greater than 3,000 ml. Tumours involving the acetabulum or sacrum, tumour volume ... Abstract  As a large amount of blood loss is sometimes encountered in limb salvage procedures for pelvic tumours, it is ... Home » Evaluation of blood loss during limb salvage surgery for pelvic tumours ...
Rotationplasty for limb salvage in the treatment of malignant tumors at the knee. A follow-up study of seventy patients.. ... Osteomyelitis in patients who have sickle-cell disease. Diagnosis and management.. Epps, C H Jr; Bryant, D D 3rd; Coles, M J; ... Shelf arthroplasty in patients who have Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease. A study of long-term results.. Kruse, R W; Guille, J T; ... Spontaneous dislocation of a vertebra in a patient who had neurofibromatosis. Report of a case with dural ectasia.. Winter, R B ...
... reconstruction for limb salvage surgery can be challenging because of the resultant large segmental bony defects. Structural ... After bone tumor resection, reconstruction for limb salvage surgery can be challenging because of the resultant large segmental ... Limb Salvage Limb Length Limb Length Discrepancy Ankle Instability Skin Paddle These keywords were added by machine and not by ... The overall limb salvage rate was 94%. Fourteen patients underwent an additional surgical procedure. Six patients underwent ...
"Limb salvage in smusculoskeletal oncology", New York, 1987, 5 p. ----. The experience of the salvage operations in patients ... New Developments for limb salvage in musculoskeletal tumors. Ed.By T.Yamamuro, Springer-Verlag, Tokyo, 1989., 8 p. ----. ... Complex treatment of osteosarcoma patients- In: 2nd International Workshop on the design and application of tumor prosthesis ... 8th International Symposium on limb salvage, Florence, May 10-12, 1996, 1 p. ----, N.F.Mistakopoulo, G.G.Knirov, F.N. ...
Infection around a megaprosthesis significantly compromises outcome and limb salvage. Patients are frequently immunosuppressed ... For example, a patient may suffer from a tumour in the knee and is advised that it should be resected. Until now, surgeons have ... patient-specific model to simulate different operative scenarios. For example, in the case of a tumour located close to the ... Extracorporeal irradiation Limb salvage and reconstruction can be challenging after en-bloc resection of malignant or ...
Musculoskeletal Tumors. *Sarcoma. *Vascular Anomalies of Bone and Soft Tissue. Treatments and Services. *Limb Salvage Surgery ... Patient Care * Find a Doctor Find a doctor by specialty or location. ... An innovative three-year PharmD program designed for the expanding pharmacist role in patient care. ...
Many sarcoma patients experience transient symptoms of depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress, and a minority develop ... Zahiten-Hinguranage, A, Bernd, L, and Sabo, D. (2003). Amputation or limb salvage? Assessing quality of life after tumor ... That research studied patients who had been treated with initial limb salvage procedures for locally advanced STS. Limb salvage ... Most studies concur that, in most respects, patients who undergo amputation and patients who undergo limb-salvage surgery do ...
Limb salvage surgery is now the preferred treatment for malignant tumors of the extremities at most institutions [ 3 , 12 , 16 ... Quality of life in bone tumor patients comparing limb salvage and amputation of the lower extremity. J Surg Oncol. 1992;51:47- ... Patient satisfaction after limb-sparing surgery and amputation for pediatric malignant bone tumors. J Pediatr Oncol Nurs. 1998; ... Application of limb salvage surgery for pediatric patients with expandable metallic endoprostheses is gaining acceptance. The ...
A technique that limits the application of chemotherapy to the cancerous region can preserve limbs in a high percentage of ... many of these because patients were able to have a surgical procedure to remove the tumors without amputation. For those who ... Regional Chemotherapy Technique for Extremity Sarcoma Salvages Patients Limbs from Amputation * Patient Self Checks Are ... The study also did not evaluate quality of life or patient-related factors for those who had limb salvage vs. those who had ...
About half of these tumors are rhabdomyosarcomas, and nonrhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcomas (NRSTSs) account for the ... the fifth most common solid tumors in children, are relatively rare and account for about 6-7% of all childhood malignancies. ... Limb-salvage procedures or amputation are the surgical options in patients with limb tumors. Limb or ray amputation may be ... New orthopedic limb-lengthening procedures and prostheses may make limb salvage more feasible than it once was in select ...
... to treat sarcoma patients with limb salvage surgery. His research interests include GPS surgical tumor mapping and improving ... limb salvage. Serving patients ages 1-90, Dr. Conrad is fluent in English, Dutch and French. His patients value his expertise ... Conrad has not only been treating patients for over 30 years for a variety of issues including sarcoma, pediatric bone tumors ... Conrad provides high-quality surgical treatment and management of musculoskeletal tumors.. Dr. Conrad has been honored with ...
Limb salvage surgery (LSS) was the index surgery in 43 patients. In the LSS group, 28 received preoperative radiotherapy and 13 ... Management of Primary Malignant Bone and Soft-Tissue Tumors of Foot and Ankle: Is It Worth Salvaging? ... Researchers sought to evaluate the efficacy of limb salvage procedures in terms of functional and oncological outcomes. The ... They were able to statistically match 1,574 patients who underwent a TAA (37.5 percent) with a patient who underwent ...
In limb-salvage surgery, the doctor removes the tumor and a portion of the healthy tissue around it, while saving as much of ... Some patients may have swelling or a mass in the area of the tumor. If the tumor is located in the leg, the patient may also ... Limb-Salvage Surgery. Currently, surgical treatment of localized osteosarcoma most often involves limb-salvage surgery rather ... In patients with osteosarcoma, chemotherapy is given before surgery to help shrink the tumor and prevent the spread of the ...
... patient samples as part of her ongoing studies aimed at understanding how immunotherapy affects the immune system and tumor ... Limb Salvage Therapy. *Pediatric Sarcoma. *Pelvic Sarcomas. Research/Expertise. *Research investigates gene functions tied to ... Request an Appointment Current Patients Find information and resources for current and returning patients. ... Your gift will help support our mission to end cancer and make a difference in the lives of our patients. ...
Limb salvage rate was 81%. Conclusion: We demonstrated that TM-ILP results in a limb salvage rate of 81% in patients with ... Almost all patients (85%) had intermediate- or high-grade tumors. Results: The overall response rate (ORR) was 71% (complete ... Long-term results of tumor necrosis factor α- and melphalan-based isolated limb perfusion in locally advanced extremity soft ... Patients and Methods: We analyzed 231 TM-ILPs in 208 consecutive patients (1991 to 2005), who were all candidates for ...
... in which a population of 100 patients have undergone tumor surgery for limb salvage. During the period of followup, one patient ... But while a patient who is lost to followup may undergo revision, a patient who has died cannot. The presence of such competing ... Patients ask two main questions when considering an orthopaedic reconstruction: (1) Does it work? And (2) will it last? We have ... A large proportion of patients will enjoy continued use of the implant for the full study period and beyond, some will undergo ...
Current concepts in the biological behavior of tumors, clinical staging,... ... Management of patients with musculo-skeletal neoplasms has always been one of the most challenging areas in oncology. ... Management of patients with musculo-skeletal neoplasms has always been one of the most challenging areas in oncology. Current ... Limb Salvage Proximal Humerus Giant Cell Tumor Left Femur Musculo Skeletal Tumour These keywords were added by machine and not ...
A variety of options for limb salvage exist dependent upon the size, location of the tumor and age of the patient among many ... Patients undergo surgery to remove all evidence of bulk disease. This includes the primary tumor as well as all sites of ... As most tumors occur in an extremity this can be achieved in virtually all patients. Historically this surgery was an ... Approximately 20% of patients present with radiographically detectable metastatic disease, but virtually all patients have ...
SURGERY: Patients undergo amputation or limb salvage surgery in week 11. Tumor tissue is. evaluated for histological response ... Long bone of upper limb. - Short bone of upper limb. - Long bone of lower limb. - Short bone of lower limb. - Vertebral column ... response (good [< 10% viable tumor] vs poor [≥ 10% viable tumor]). Patients in each group. are stratified according to site of ... The primary tumor must be located in the limbs or axial skeleton, including any. of the following sites*:. - ...
Limb salvage surgery has replaced amputation for malignant musculoskeletal tumors. Most bone sarcomas occur in the metaphyseal ... The fixation method included a plate in 5 patients, a locking plate in 5 patients, and only screws in 1 patient. The total ... M. C. Gebhardt, D. I. Flugstad, D. S. Springfield, and H. J. Mankin, "The use of bone allografts for limb salvage in high-grade ... Representative Case (Patient 7). The patient was a 16-year-old female with osteosarcoma of the left distal femur (Figure 2(a) ...
Despite a substantial complication rate, limb salvage is achieved in a majority of patients. When using growing prostheses in ... There are known prognostic factors that influence overall survival, such as histological subtype, tumor size, tumor grading, ... Of the patients with recurring radiating pain 13 met the inclusion criteria of the study group and 24 patients without any ... MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a retrospective study of patients with EOS who underwent MCGR from 2012 to 2018. Patients were ...
... in the treatment of patients with extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS) has been increasingly recognized in the last three ... Patient factors affecting the Toronto extremity salvage score following limb salvage surgery for bone and soft tissue tumors. J ... Advantage of limb salvage over amputation for proximal lower-extremity tumors. Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2006;444:201-8.CrossRef ... Amputation versus limb-salvage surgery in patients with osteosarcoma: a meta-analysis. World J Surg. 2016;40:2016-27.CrossRef ...
Kaplan-Meier survival curves showing prosthesis survival (A) and limb salvage (B) in patients with deep infections after ... We analyzed clinical data of 57 patients with deep infections involving tumor endoprostheses around the knee enrolled from the ... Ten-year prosthesis survival and limb salvage rates were 41.6% and 75.6%, respectively. Analysis of underlying clinical factors ... Factors that might influence this period include tumor location (B), tumor extension (C) and infection presentation period (D). ...
  • ILI for soft tissue sarcoma of the extremities can be repeated, whereas another procedure to administer chemotherapy to the arms or legs, hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion, requires an incision to openly cannulate the vessels and generally cannot be repeated, Dr. Mullinax explained. (facs.org)
  • The technique, first developed to deliver chemotherapy without systemic toxicity to patients with melanoma, was initially performed using hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion (HILP) with open cannulation. (medscape.com)
  • Calcifying aponeurotic fibroma is a rare soft tissue tumor that occurs in the distal extremities of children and adolescents. (bvsalud.org)
  • Master Mohammad was in terrible pain along with the swelling at the site of the tumor, when came to me. (apollohospitals.com)
  • Cachexia in Patients with Esophagus and Stomach cancer (diaqnosis? (wikipedia.org)
  • This article reviews the evidence about psychological adaptation, coping, and distress in cancer patients in general, and STS patients in particular. (sarcomahelp.org)
  • Risk and prevalence for depressive, anxiety, and posttraumatic symptoms and disorders in cancer and STS patients are reviewed, and the contribution of neuroticism, dispositional optimism, and monitoring/blunting to psychological adaptation in cancer patients is explored. (sarcomahelp.org)
  • Osteosarcoma is a type of cancer in which tumor cells produce immature bone known as osteoid. (aaos.org)
  • An MRI will help your doctor determine the extent of the tumor and look for the spread of cancer to other parts of your body. (aaos.org)
  • Your gift will help support our mission to end cancer and make a difference in the lives of our patients. (mdanderson.org)
  • For their key role in tumor development, RTKs are regarded as excellent targets for cancer chemotherapy. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Memorial Sloan Kettering has taken the lead in applying a limb-lengthening technique in people with bone cancer to restore long gaps in bone after removal of a tumor. (mskcc.org)
  • During the operation to remove the cancer, surgeons cleanly cut the bone and install a device - in most cases on the outside of the limb - that holds the bone very still. (mskcc.org)
  • It is an uncommon tumor with an overall incidence rate of less than 1% for cancer patients treated with radiation who survive five years. (bonetumor.org)
  • The incidence of hemipelvectomy has decreased as a result of more effective cancer therapy and use of limb salvage procedure. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Other less common types of bone cancer include: Chondrosarcoma (a cancer arising in cartilage cells, usually found in adults between ages 50-75, though the less common mesenchymal-chondrosarcoma is more frequent in younger patients), Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma of bone (MFH), Chondoma (a rare low grade malignancy occuring mostly between ages 30 -70), and other rare tumours. (cancerindex.org)
  • BCRT became a registered the charity in 2006 and raises funds for research into primary bone cancer, and provides information and support for patients and their families. (cancerindex.org)
  • Remove cancer tumors from many different types of soft tissues, including: muscle, cartilage, fat and connective tissues and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. (unm.edu)
  • It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. (oncolink.org)
  • For cancer care, patients have the advantage of drawing on the expertise of Spartanburg Regional's Gibbs Cancer Center & Research Institute. (spartanburgregional.com)
  • Published prospective and retrospective papers investigating BM and SREs in breast cancer patients in non-trial settings were identified and systematically reviewed. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • The pediatric PROMIS instruments have been tested in pediatric cancer populations and detected differences between survivors of cancer and patients currently actively treated. (cureus.com)
  • Even more remarkable than the sheer engineering complexity of the pelvic device is the fact that the patient, now considered a cancer survivor, is almost able to walk without any assistance. (medgadget.com)
  • Abstract  As a large amount of blood loss is sometimes encountered in limb salvage procedures for pelvic tumours, it is essential to identify risk factors predicting the possibility of extensive haemorrhage. (ebscohost.com)
  • Pelvic tumours involving the acetabulum or sacrum (odds ratio: 4.837), tumour volume greater than 400Â cm3 (odds ratio: 3.005) and planned operation time of more than 200 min (odds ratio: 3.784) independently predicted a large amount of blood loss. (ebscohost.com)
  • Currently, although many patients undergo PAO after having had prior pelvic osteotomy, there is limited. (ebscohost.com)
  • 1 The inaccessibility of the tumor due to a complex pelvic anatomy as well as its deep location makes early diagnosis and management of this sarcoma a challenging task. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Extensive pelvic surgeries are demanding for the surgeon and for the patient because of the navigational difficulty in the pelvis, numerous muscle attachments, and the proximity of the major blood vessels, nerves, and visceral organs. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)