Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: An Act prohibiting a health plan from establishing lifetime limits or annual limits on the dollar value of benefits for any participant or beneficiary after January 1, 2014. It permits a restricted annual limit for plan years beginning prior to January 1, 2014. It provides that a health plan shall not be prevented from placing annual or lifetime per-beneficiary limits on covered benefits. The Act sets up a competitive health insurance market.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Health Insurance Exchanges: State-provided health insurance marketplaces established under the PATIENT PROTECTION AND AFFORDABLE CARE ACT.Federal Government: The level of governmental organization and function at the national or country-wide level.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Small Business: For-profit enterprise with relatively few to moderate number of employees and low to moderate volume of sales.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.United StatesEmployee Retirement Income Security Act: A 1974 Federal act which preempts states' rights with regard to workers' pension benefits and employee benefits. It does not affect the benefits and rights of employees whose employer is self-insured. (From Slee & Slee, Health Care Reform Terms, 1993)Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services: Insurance providing for payment of services rendered by the pharmacist. Services include the preparation and distribution of medical products.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Cost Sharing: Provisions of an insurance policy that require the insured to pay some portion of covered expenses. Several forms of sharing are in use, e.g., deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments. Cost sharing does not refer to or include amounts paid in premiums for the coverage. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Ephrin-B1: A transmembrane domain containing ephrin that is specific for EPHB1 RECEPTOR; EPHB2 RECEPTOR and EPHB3 RECEPTOR. It is widely expressed in a variety of developing and adult tissues.Insurance Benefits: Payments or services provided under stated circumstances under the terms of an insurance policy. In prepayment programs, benefits are the services the programs will provide at defined locations and to the extent needed.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.Orthodontic Appliances: Devices used for influencing tooth position. Orthodontic appliances may be classified as fixed or removable, active or retaining, and intraoral or extraoral. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p19)Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Fees, Dental: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for dental services.Dental Auxiliaries: Personnel whose work is prescribed and supervised by the dentist.Drug Costs: The amount that a health care institution or organization pays for its drugs. It is one component of the final price that is charged to the consumer (FEES, PHARMACEUTICAL or PRESCRIPTION FEES).Eligibility Determination: Criteria to determine eligibility of patients for medical care programs and services.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Accountable Care Organizations: Organizations of health care providers that agree to be accountable for the quality, cost, and overall care of Medicare beneficiaries who are enrolled in the traditional fee-for-service program who are assigned to it. Assigned means those beneficiaries for whom the professionals in the organization provide the bulk of primary care services. (www.cms.gov/OfficeofLegislation/Downloads/Accountable CareOrganization.pdf accessed 03/16/2011)Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Orphan Nuclear Receptors: A broad category of receptor-like proteins that may play a role in transcriptional-regulation in the CELL NUCLEUS. Many of these proteins are similar in structure to known NUCLEAR RECEPTORS but appear to lack a functional ligand-binding domain, while in other cases the specific ligands have yet to be identified.Reimbursement Mechanisms: Processes or methods of reimbursement for services rendered or equipment.Drugs, Generic: Drugs whose drug name is not protected by a trademark. They may be manufactured by several companies.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Formularies as Topic: Works about lists of drugs or collections of recipes, formulas, and prescriptions for the compounding of medicinal preparations. Formularies differ from PHARMACOPOEIAS in that they are less complete, lacking full descriptions of the drugs, their formulations, analytic composition, chemical properties, etc. In hospitals, formularies list all drugs commonly stocked in the hospital pharmacy.Risk Sharing, Financial: Any system which allows payors to share some of the financial risk associated with a particular patient population with providers. Providers agree to adhere to fixed fee schedules in exchange for an increase in their payor base and a chance to benefit from cost containment measures. Common risk-sharing methods are prospective payment schedules (PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM), capitation (CAPITATION FEES), diagnosis-related fees (DIAGNOSIS-RELATED GROUPS), and pre-negotiated fees.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Insurance Pools: An organization of insurers or reinsurers through which particular types of risk are shared or pooled. The risk of high loss by a particular insurance company is transferred to the group as a whole (the insurance pool) with premiums, losses, and expenses shared in agreed amounts.Medicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.Fraud: Exploitation through misrepresentation of the facts or concealment of the purposes of the exploiter.Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act: Public Law 104-91 enacted in 1996, was designed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the healthcare system, protect health insurance coverage for workers and their families, and to protect individual personal health information.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Insurance, Health, Reimbursement: Payment by a third-party payer in a sum equal to the amount expended by a health care provider or facility for health services rendered to an insured or program beneficiary. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Health: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Legislation, Hospital: Laws and regulations concerning hospitals, which are proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Economics, Hospital: Economic aspects related to the management and operation of a hospital.Comparative Effectiveness Research: Conduct and synthesis of systematic research comparing interventions and strategies to prevent, diagnose, treat, and monitor health conditions. The purpose of this research is to inform patients, providers, and decision-makers, responding to their expressed needs, about which interventions are most effective for which patients under specific circumstances. (hhs.gov/recovery/programs/cer/draftdefinition.html accessed 6/12/2009)Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Cost Control: The containment, regulation, or restraint of costs. Costs are said to be contained when the value of resources committed to an activity is not considered excessive. This determination is frequently subjective and dependent upon the specific geographic area of the activity being measured. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Prospective Payment System: A system wherein reimbursement rates are set, for a given period of time, prior to the circumstances giving rise to actual reimbursement claims.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.National Health Insurance, United StatesSocioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Tax Exemption: Status not subject to taxation; as the income of a philanthropic organization. Tax-exempt organizations may also qualify to receive tax-deductible donations if they are considered to be nonprofit corporations under Section 501(c)3 of the United States Internal Revenue Code.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Employer Health Costs: That portion of total HEALTH CARE COSTS borne by an individual's or group's employing organization.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Health Literacy: Degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Community Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Health Services Administration: The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.Economic Competition: The effort of two or more parties to secure the business of a third party by offering, usually under fair or equitable rules of business practice, the most favorable terms.Financing, Personal: Payment by individuals or their family for health care services which are not covered by a third-party payer, either insurance or medical assistance.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Universal Coverage: Health insurance coverage for all persons in a state or country, rather than for some subset of the population. It may extend to the unemployed as well as to the employed; to aliens as well as to citizens; for pre-existing conditions as well as for current illnesses; for mental as well as for physical conditions.Insurance Selection Bias: Adverse or favorable selection bias exhibited by insurers or enrollees resulting in disproportionate enrollment of certain groups of people.Regional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.Health Food: A non-medical term defined by the lay public as a food that has little or no preservatives, which has not undergone major processing, enrichment or refinement and which may be grown without pesticides. (from Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Health Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
  • Suspends clinical laboratory commercial payer data reporting for one year until 2021 under the Laboratory Access for Beneficiaries (LAB) Act, which was passed as part of the FY 2020 Appropriations Act. (morganlewis.com)
  • The Act allows Congress to enact a "disapproval" resolution that would end the suspension of the debt ceiling. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because Congress was unable to reach consensus on necessary offsets for the long-term authorization of the expiring healthcare "extenders," these programs are only funded for six months (i.e., through May 22, 2020). (morganlewis.com)
  • The Congressional Review Act (CRA) requires a 60-day delay in the effective date of a major rule from the date of publication in the Federal Register or receipt of the rule by Congress, whichever is later. (gao.gov)
  • Although a package of 'fixes' to the bill is currently making its way through Congress, the Act became the law of the land on March 23, 2010. (verywell.com)
  • Modeled after the FEHB, which provides insurance for federal workers including members of Congress, the Exchange is not a centralized, government-controlled plan. (verywell.com)
  • Through the ACA, Congress sought to eliminate the financial disincentives to obtaining preventive health care. (massbar.org)
  • The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), the nation's largest professional organization for women's health care physicians, denounces U.S. House passage of the American Health Care Act (AHCA). (acog.org)
  • ACOG is the leading authority on women's health and, for more than 65 years, the U.S. Congress has sought our moderate voice because of our steadfast commitment to ensuring public policy that is rooted in facts, science and evidence-based medicine. (acog.org)
  • But the Court held that the AIA was a congressionally imposed limitation and that Congress could determine the application of the AIA by calling the financial cost it imposes under any statute either a "tax" or a "penalty. (honigman.com)
  • In reaching this conclusion, the majority rejected the minority contention, and Congress' findings under HIPAA, that the health care market was a unified market composed of both health providers and payers, and since everyone would participate in this market at some point in their lives, everyone was a market participant who chose to pay either through insurance or by "self-funding" out of their own pocket. (honigman.com)
  • Given these aspects of the health care market, the minority saw the individual mandate as an unexceptional extension of Congress' commerce clause authority. (honigman.com)
  • In an effort to control and reduce health costs, Congress passed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on March 23, 2010, a highly contentious and controversial bill which was the subject of a recent Supreme Court decision regarding the individual mandate requiring the purchase of health insurance. (moneycrashers.com)
  • PolitiFact has checked hundreds of claims about health care reform and read the plans under consideration by Congress. (politifact.com)
  • The House Ways and Means Health Subcommittee will hold a hearing Friday, March 15 at 9:30 a.m. with MedPAC Chairman Glenn Hackbarth to review the commission's annual March report to Congress. (mondaq.com)
  • WASHINGTON -- With midterm elections just six months away, Democrats continued to praise the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) in an effort to hold on to seats in Congress, while Republicans criticized the law as much as possible in an effort to regain seats they lost in 2008. (medpagetoday.com)
  • From the very start of Mr. Obama's presidency, the Republicans in Congress took dead aim at what became the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. (baltimoresun.com)
  • If a member, insured, or enrollee were receiving treatment for ASD, the bills would allow BCBSM, an insurer, or an HMO to request a review of that treatment consistent with current protocols and to require a treatment plan. (mi.gov)
  • Witnesses at a recent California legislative committee hearing bemoaned what is well known among health care policy wonks: poor access to primary care and its relationship to complex, chronic conditions that drive the 80-20 rule on health care spending: that 20 percent of patients account for 80 percent of the health care spend. (wordpress.com)
  • We need to look at better management of chronic conditions," said Assembly member Richard Pan (D-Sacramento), chair of the Committee on Health. (wordpress.com)
  • The numbers are "astounding," according to Sophia Chang, director of the Better Chronic Disease Care Program at the California HealthCare Foundation and one of the panelists at yesterday's hearing. (wordpress.com)
  • Health plans would benefit because insureds that pay for their own primary care - likely through pre-paid primary care contracts with primary care doctors and clinics - would have access to primary care and lifestyle coaching to ward off the development or progression of chronic conditions. (wordpress.com)
  • The majority of this population is currently uninsured, low-income, and has high rates of chronic and communicable illnesses, as well as mental health and substance use disorders. (corrections.com)
  • Chronic illnesses such as diabetes can have insidious consequences for low-income patients and throughout low-income communities. (uchicago.edu)
  • Coinsurance is your share of the costs of a covered service, calculated as a percent of the allowed amount for the service. (docplayer.net)
  • For example, if the plan s allowed amount for an overnight in-network hospital stay is $1,000, the cost would be covered in full since this plan does not require coinsurance. (docplayer.net)
  • Coinsurance: Some plans include coinsurance. (heartheworld.org)
  • Coinsurance is a cost sharing requirement that makes you responsible for paying a certain percentage of any costs. (heartheworld.org)
  • The survey did not allow for a respondent to report that a plan had a copayment for primary care visits and coinsurance for visits with a specialist physician. (kff.org)
  • Coinsurance: Instead of, or in addition to, paying a fixed amount up front (a co-payment), the co-insurance is a percentage of the total cost that insured person may also pay. (chiefofleast.com)
  • This means you pay a smaller fixed amount every month, but it will take a longer time for insurance to kick in and begin cost-sharing (meaning you will pay your percentage of coinsurance for every bill). (chiefofleast.com)
  • The rules implement the 2008 Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act, which took on greater urgency with the administration's vow to address gun violence after a series of mass shootings across the United States in the past few years. (mcall.com)
  • After passage of the 2008 mental-health parity law, more than 30 states passed laws of their own implementing its requirements, including Maryland. (mcall.com)
  • The preamble explains that plans will be able to take into account clinically appropriate standards of care in the parity analysis. (vorys.com)
  • All through the president's successful re-election campaign and thereafter, he had been busy touting the act's benefits and castigating its opponents as bearers of inaccurate information about how the law would work. (baltimoresun.com)
  • You can save money on Nuvaring 120/15 mcg using online pharmacies Aug 05, 2020 · In fact, at this time, the NuvaRing costs up to $180 per vaginal ring at many pharmacies. (pimaair.org)
  • Plan B One-Step and the generic one-pill emergency contraception formulations are available without a prescription or any age limitations Aug 20, 2020 · You can customize fluoxetine cost cvs each type of photo by size, colors, and design. (pimaair.org)
  • While the Ohio Department of Insurance (ODI) is the state agency that regulates insurance in the state, the Department is not administering the Affordable Care Act mandated exchange. (ohio.gov)
  • State adoption of the Revised UFADAA, along with incorporation of digital assets into traditional estate and tax planning, will prevent identity theft of clients, preserve estate assets, and ease estate administration. (csun.edu)
  • Our campus participates in the California State University (CSU) Health Insurance Education Project (HIEP) , which is a statewide initiative to educate the SJSU community-specifically, students, their families, and part-time SJSU employees-on their rights, responsibilities, and opportunities under the new federal Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Covered California. (sjsu.edu)
  • One in four college students does not have health insurance in California, making them one of the largest uninsured populations in the state. (sjsu.edu)
  • Now healthcare reform makes it easy for them to get out of the insuring business: give every worker a small raise along with the URL for the state health insurance exchange. (calbrokermag.com)
  • Require LARA to submit annual reports to the State Budget Director and the Legislature on the funding awarded under the program and the program's administrative costs. (mi.gov)
  • The bill would state the intent of the Legislature to enact legislation that would develop a revenue plan, taking into consideration anticipated federal revenue available for the Healthy California program. (ca.gov)
  • The bill would create the Healthy California Trust Fund in the State Treasury, as a continuously appropriated fund, consisting of any federal and state moneys received for the purposes of the act. (ca.gov)
  • This in turn is based on the fallacy that the way to an equitable state of "universal healthcare" is through comprehensive third-party payment. (aapsonline.org)
  • States must create EHB benchmark plans from their default benchmark state health plans by adding any mandatory categories that are not in their default plans. (apta.org)
  • To obtain more information on the health marketplace in your state, visit https://www.healthcare.gov or call (800) 318-2596. (diabetesselfmanagement.com)
  • Under the bipartisan "Empowering States to Innovate Act" introduced by Senators Ron Wyden, Scott Brown, and Mary Landrieu, State Innovation Waivers would be available three years earlier than under current law, so long as States meet certain criteria, including certifying that their proposals would cover at least as many of their residents as the policies in the Affordable Care Act would have covered. (blogspot.com)
  • The law has already made nearly $2.8 billion available to states and every State has taken steps - and, in some cases, bold actions - to implement the law and improve health insurance accountability and affordability for their citizens. (blogspot.com)
  • an average number of plans available in a state does not mean that the same number of plans is available throughout the entire state. (brookings.edu)
  • I said these were in no particular order, but this is certainly the number one issue for federal/state governments and health plans. (brookings.edu)
  • Here are some suggestions for how to listen to, and translate, key statements related to health care that may be in the State of the Union Address. (medicareadvocacy.org)
  • But the largest plans, since they are regulated at the federal level, were not affected by state laws. (mcall.com)
  • These state laws set an early and enduring commercial standard for providing covered treatment for patients diagnosed with diabetes. (ncsl.org)
  • Full mandates require every state regulated health policy to cover the mandated benefit. (ncsl.org)
  • On the other side of the political spectrum, researchers from the conservative Cato Institute hosted a forum on legal challenges to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act being prepared by 21 state attorneys general. (medpagetoday.com)
  • The state passed healthcare reform in 2006 in order to greater decrease the uninsured rate among its citizens. (chiefofleast.com)
  • This bill would establish the New York Health Benefit Exchange ("Exchange"), a public benefit corporation that will serve as a market- place for the purchase and sale of qualified health plans in the State of New York, in accordance with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Pub. (ny.us)
  • As illustrated below, there are relevant benefit design and provider reimbursement features that could be grouped under each priority area as a way to reinforce and implement a health plan's quality improvement strategies. (commonwealthfund.org)
  • Their plan's prescription drug benefits proved invaluable, as Mom was prescribed over a dozen medications per day, including several new and expensive drugs. (verywell.com)
  • If the company still denies payment after considering your appeal, the Affordable Care Act allows you to have an independent review organization decide whether to uphold or overturn the plan's decision, usually called an external review. (cancer.net)