Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Compliance: Distensibility measure of a chamber such as the lungs (LUNG COMPLIANCE) or bladder. Compliance is expressed as a change in volume per unit change in pressure.Insurance, Hospitalization: Health insurance providing benefits to cover or partly cover hospital expenses.Drug Packaging: Containers, packaging, and packaging materials for drugs and BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS. These include those in ampule, capsule, tablet, solution or other forms. Packaging includes immediate-containers, secondary-containers, and cartons. In the United States, such packaging is controlled under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act which also stipulates requirements for tamper-resistance and child-resistance. Similar laws govern use elsewhere. (From Code of Federal Regulations, 21 CFR 1 Section 210, 1993) DRUG LABELING is also available.Lung Compliance: The capability of the LUNGS to distend under pressure as measured by pulmonary volume change per unit pressure change. While not a complete description of the pressure-volume properties of the lung, it is nevertheless useful in practice as a measure of the comparative stiffness of the lung. (From Best & Taylor's Physiological Basis of Medical Practice, 12th ed, p562)Chemistry, Pharmaceutical: Chemistry dealing with the composition and preparation of agents having PHARMACOLOGIC ACTIONS or diagnostic use.Delayed-Action Preparations: Dosage forms of a drug that act over a period of time by controlled-release processes or technology.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Transdermal Patch: A medicated adhesive patch placed on the skin to deliver a specific dose of medication into the bloodstream.Tablets: Solid dosage forms, of varying weight, size, and shape, which may be molded or compressed, and which contain a medicinal substance in pure or diluted form. (Dorland, 28th ed)Cathartics: Agents that are used to stimulate evacuation of the bowels.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Medication Adherence: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in taking drugs or medicine as prescribed. This includes timing, dosage, and frequency.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Drug Compounding: The preparation, mixing, and assembling of a drug. (From Remington, The Science and Practice of Pharmacy, 19th ed, p1814)Treatment Refusal: Patient or client refusal of or resistance to medical, psychological, or psychiatric treatment. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Orthodontic Appliances: Devices used for influencing tooth position. Orthodontic appliances may be classified as fixed or removable, active or retaining, and intraoral or extraoral. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p19)Occult Blood: Chemical, spectroscopic, or microscopic detection of extremely small amounts of blood.Tooth Movement: Orthodontic techniques used to correct the malposition of a single tooth.Drug Delivery Systems: Systems for the delivery of drugs to target sites of pharmacological actions. Technologies employed include those concerning drug preparation, route of administration, site targeting, metabolism, and toxicity.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Capsules: Hard or soft soluble containers used for the oral administration of medicine.Orthodontic Appliance Design: The planning, calculation, and creation of an apparatus for the purpose of correcting the placement or straightening of teeth.Drug Therapy: The use of DRUGS to treat a DISEASE or its symptoms. One example is the use of ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS to treat CANCER.Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Administration, Cutaneous: The application of suitable drug dosage forms to the skin for either local or systemic effects.Drug Carriers: Forms to which substances are incorporated to improve the delivery and the effectiveness of drugs. Drug carriers are used in drug-delivery systems such as the controlled-release technology to prolong in vivo drug actions, decrease drug metabolism, and reduce drug toxicity. Carriers are also used in designs to increase the effectiveness of drug delivery to the target sites of pharmacological actions. Liposomes, albumin microspheres, soluble synthetic polymers, DNA complexes, protein-drug conjugates, and carrier erythrocytes among others have been employed as biodegradable drug carriers.Self Administration: Administration of a drug or chemical by the individual under the direction of a physician. It includes administration clinically or experimentally, by human or animal.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Technology, Pharmaceutical: The application of scientific knowledge or technology to pharmacy and the pharmaceutical industry. It includes methods, techniques, and instrumentation in the manufacture, preparation, compounding, dispensing, packaging, and storing of drugs and other preparations used in diagnostic and determinative procedures, and in the treatment of patients.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Biological Availability: The extent to which the active ingredient of a drug dosage form becomes available at the site of drug action or in a biological medium believed to reflect accessibility to a site of action.Administration, Topical: The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.Drug Combinations: Single preparations containing two or more active agents, for the purpose of their concurrent administration as a fixed dose mixture.Cross-Over Studies: Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Colonoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the luminal surface of the colon.Antihypertensive Agents: Drugs used in the treatment of acute or chronic vascular HYPERTENSION regardless of pharmacological mechanism. Among the antihypertensive agents are DIURETICS; (especially DIURETICS, THIAZIDE); ADRENERGIC BETA-ANTAGONISTS; ADRENERGIC ALPHA-ANTAGONISTS; ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITORS; CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS; GANGLIONIC BLOCKERS; and VASODILATOR AGENTS.Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Hypoglycemic Agents: Substances which lower blood glucose levels.Helicobacter Infections: Infections with organisms of the genus HELICOBACTER, particularly, in humans, HELICOBACTER PYLORI. The clinical manifestations are focused in the stomach, usually the gastric mucosa and antrum, and the upper duodenum. This infection plays a major role in the pathogenesis of type B gastritis and peptic ulcer disease.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Helicobacter pylori: A spiral bacterium active as a human gastric pathogen. It is a gram-negative, urease-positive, curved or slightly spiral organism initially isolated in 1982 from patients with lesions of gastritis or peptic ulcers in Western Australia. Helicobacter pylori was originally classified in the genus CAMPYLOBACTER, but RNA sequencing, cellular fatty acid profiles, growth patterns, and other taxonomic characteristics indicate that the micro-organism should be included in the genus HELICOBACTER. It has been officially transferred to Helicobacter gen. nov. (see Int J Syst Bacteriol 1989 Oct;39(4):297-405).Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.United StatesSolubility: The ability of a substance to be dissolved, i.e. to form a solution with another substance. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Vascular Capacitance: The measure of a BLOOD VESSEL's ability to increase the volume of BLOOD it holds without a large increase in BLOOD PRESSURE. The vascular capacitance is equal to the change in volume divided by the change in pressure.Elasticity: Resistance and recovery from distortion of shape.Hand Hygiene: Practices involved in preventing the transmission of diseases by hand.Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.

Single blind, randomised controlled trial of pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, vaginal cones, and no treatment in management of genuine stress incontinence in women. (1/6919)

OBJECTIVE: To compare the effect of pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, vaginal cones, and no treatment for genuine stress incontinence. DESIGN: Stratified, single blind, randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Multicentre. PARTICIPANTS: 107 women with clinically and urodynamically proved genuine stress incontinence. Mean (range) age was 49.5 (24-70) years, and mean (range) duration of symptoms 10.8 (1-45) years. INTERVENTIONS: Pelvic floor exercise (n=25) comprised 8-12 contractions 3 times a day and exercise in groups with skilled physical therapists once a week. The electrical stimulation group (n=25) used vaginal intermittent stimulation with the MS 106 Twin at 50 Hz 30 minutes a day. The vaginal cones group (n=27) used cones for 20 minutes a day. The untreated control group (n=30) was offered the use of a continence guard. Muscle strength was measured by vaginal squeeze pressure once a month. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pad test with standardised bladder volume, and self report of severity. RESULTS: Improvement in muscle strength was significantly greater (P=0.03) after pelvic floor exercises (11.0 cm H2O (95% confidence interval 7.7 to 14.3) before v 19.2 cm H2O (15.3 to 23.1) after) than either electrical stimulation (14.8 cm H2O (10. 9 to 18.7) v 18.6 cm H2O (13.3 to 23.9)) or vaginal cones (11.8 cm H2O (8.5 to 15.1) v 15.4 cm H2O (11.1 to 19.7)). Reduction in leakage on pad test was greater in the exercise group (-30.2 g; -43. 3 to 16.9) than in the electrical stimulation group (-7.4 g; -20.9 to 6.1) and the vaginal cones group (-14.7 g; -27.6 to -1.8). On completion of the trial one participant in the control group, 14 in the pelvic floor exercise group, three in the electrical stimulation group, and two in the vaginal cones group no longer considered themselves as having a problem. CONCLUSION: Training of the pelvic floor muscles is superior to electrical stimulation and vaginal cones in the treatment of genuine stress incontinence.  (+info)

Maternal vitamin A or beta-carotene supplementation in lactating bangladeshi women benefits mothers and infants but does not prevent subclinical deficiency. (2/6919)

The effects of maternal postpartum vitamin A or beta-carotene supplementation on maternal and infant serum retinol concentrations, modified relative dose-response (MRDR) ratios and breast milk vitamin A concentrations were assessed during a community-based trial in Matlab, Bangladesh. At 1-3 wk postpartum, women were randomly assigned to receive either (1) a single dose of 200,000 international units [60,000 retinol equivalents (RE)] vitamin A followed by daily placebos (n = 74), (2) daily doses of beta-carotene [7.8 mg (1300 RE)] (n = 73) or (3) daily placebos (n = 73) until 9 mo postpartum. Compared to placebos, vitamin A supplementation resulted in lower maternal MRDR ratios (i.e., increased liver stores) and higher milk vitamin A concentrations at 3 mo, but these improvements were not sustained. The beta-carotene supplementation acted more slowly, resulting in milk vitamin A concentrations higher than the placebo group only at 9 mo. Irrespective of treatment group, over 50% of women produced milk with low vitamin A concentrations (/=0. 06. We conclude that while both interventions were beneficial, neither was sufficient to correct the underlying subclinical vitamin A deficiency in these women nor to bring their infants into adequate vitamin A status.  (+info)

An analysis of multiple misplaced parental social contingencies. (3/6919)

This study analyzed the training of a mother to modify five subclasses of her attention to her young child's noncompliance with instructions, and also displayed the changes in her child's behavior correlated with these events. Training in four subclasses consisted of teaching the mother to withhold various forms of social attention to her daughter's undesired behavior; training in the fifth subclass involved introduction of a brief room-timeout procedure for noncompliance. The effectiveness of the parent-training procedure, consisting of initial instructions and daily feedback, was demonstrated through a multiple-baseline design across the five subclasses of parent behavior. Sequential decreased in the first three subclasses of the mother's social attention to undesired child behavior resulted in incomplete improvements in some child responses; however, a decrease in the fourth subclass resulted in a significant increase in undesired child behavior. Complete remediation of all child behaviors was achieved following the training of a timeout procedure for noncompliance. Postchecks conducted up to 16 weeks later showed that these effects were durable.  (+info)

The effects of social punishment on noncompliance: a comparison with timeout and positive practice. (4/6919)

The effects of social punishment, positive practice, and timeout on the noncompliant behavior of four mentally retarded children were assessed in a multitreatment withdrawal design. When programmed, the experimental procedure occurred contigent on non-compliance to experimenter-issued commands. Commands were given at 55-sec intervals throughout each experimental session. The results showed (1) lower levels of noncompliance with social punishment than with the positive-practice or timeout conditions, and (2) that relatively few applications of social punishment were required to obtain this effect. The advantages of social punishment over other punishment procedures, considerations to be made before using it, and the various aspects of the procedure that contribute to its effectiveness were discussed.  (+info)

Following advice in general practice. (5/6919)

A random sample of 521 patients to whom prescriptions had been issued in an urban general practice were investigated to see how well they followed advice about taking medicines.Most factors that have been previously reported as affecting this did not appear to do so. A very high degree of compliance was achieved and it is suggested that the key factor in this is the relationship between doctor and patient.  (+info)

A multiple drug interaction study of stavudine with agents for opportunistic infections in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. (6/6919)

The effects of multiple opportunistic infection medications on stavudine pharmacokinetics were evaluated. Ten patients with CD4 counts of less than 200 cells/mm3 received stavudine (40 mg twice daily) in combination with one to three other drugs used to treat opportunistic infections. Serial blood samples for stavudine concentrations were collected after 1 week of therapy on each regimen and assayed for stavudine by using a validated high-pressure liquid chromatography method. Although the maximum concentration of drug in serum was significantly decreased when the drug was given in combination with three opportunistic infection medications, the area under the concentration-time curve did not significantly differ across various treatment regimens. Stavudine exposure was not significantly altered by multiple concomitant medications. Side effects were minor throughout the 3-month study period. The tolerability of stavudine, combined with its lack of drug interactions, makes it an attractive agent for use as part of a combination regimen.  (+info)

Itraconazole oral solution as prophylaxis for fungal infections in neutropenic patients with hematologic malignancies: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter trial. GIMEMA Infection Program. Gruppo Italiano Malattie Ematologiche dell' Adulto. (7/6919)

To evaluate the efficacy and safety of itraconazole oral solution for preventing fungal infections, a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter trial was conducted: 405 neutropenic patients with hematologic malignancies were randomly assigned to receive either itraconazole, 2.5 mg/kg every 12 hours (201 patients), or placebo (204 patients). Proven and suspected deep fungal infection occurred in 24% of itraconazole recipients and in 33% of placebo recipients, a difference of 9 percentage points (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.6% to 22.5%; P = .035). Fungemia due to Candida species was documented in 0.5% of itraconazole recipients and in 4% of placebo recipients, a difference of 3.5 percentage points (95% CI, 0.5% to 6%; P = .01). Deaths due to candidemia occurred in none of the itraconazole recipients compared with 4 placebo recipients, a difference of 2 percentage points (95% CI, 0.05% to 4%; P = .06). Aspergillus infection was documented in four itraconazole recipients (one death) and one placebo recipient (one death). Side effects causing drug interruption occurred in 18% of itraconazole recipients and 13% of placebo recipients. Itraconazole oral solution was well-tolerated and effectively prevented proven and suspected deep fungal infection as well as systemic infection and death due to Candida species.  (+info)

Higher dosage nicotine patches increase one-year smoking cessation rates: results from the European CEASE trial. Collaborative European Anti-Smoking Evaluation. European Respiratory Society. (8/6919)

The Collaborative European Anti-Smoking Evaluation (CEASE) was a European multicentre, randomized, double-blind placebo controlled smoking cessation study. The objectives were to determine whether higher dosage and longer duration of nicotine patch therapy would increase the success rate. Thirty-six chest clinics enrolled a total of 3,575 smokers. Subjects were allocated to one of five treatment arms: placebo and either standard or higher dose nicotine patches (15 mg and 25 mg daily) each given for 8 or 22 weeks with adjunctive moderately intensive support. The 12 month sustained success rates were: 25 mg patch for 22 weeks (L-25), 15.4%; 25 mg patch for 8 weeks (S-25), 15.9%; 15 mg patch for 22 weeks (L-15), 13.7%; 15 mg patch for 8 weeks (S-15), 11.7%; and placebo (P-0) 9.9% (placebo versus 15 mg, p<0.05; 25 mg versus 15 mg, p<0.03; 25 mg versus placebo, p<0.001, Chi-squared test). There was no significant difference in success rate between the two active treatment durations. Of the first week abstainers (n=1,698), 25.1% achieved success at 12 months as opposed to first week smokers, 2.7% of 1,877 subjects (p< 0.001). In summary, a higher than standard dose of nicotine patch was associated with an increase in the long-term success in smoking cessation but continuation of treatment beyond 8-12 weeks did not increase the success rates.  (+info)

  • Being able to track ingestion of medications prescribed for mental illness may be useful for some patients," Dr. Mitchell Mathis, director of psychiatry products in the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in the news release. (upi.com)
  • But some doctors worry that digital medications could present their own problems, as patients feel "tracked" by medical professionals and others. (upi.com)
  • Non-compliance was defined as missing at least two days of medications per week. (bibliomed.org)
  • Twenty six out of thirty two (81.25%) patients did not comply with their antihypertensive medications. (bibliomed.org)
  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has given the nod to Abilify MyCite, for use in patients with schizophrenia, an add-on treatment for depression, and to help control episodes of either manic or "mixed" episodes for people with bipolar disorder. (upi.com)
  • According to The New York Times, medical noncompliance costs the United States $100 billion annually, mainly because failure to adhere to treatment leads to sicker patients who often require expensive hospitalization. (upi.com)
  • Noncompliance with medical regimens is a tough problem, especially when it comes to patients with serious mental health issues, such as schizophrenia, depression and bipolar disorder. (upi.com)
  • Rationale, aims and objective The objectives were to describe and evaluate the structured medication questionnaire and to improve data handling of results from the Morisky four-item scale for patient compliance and Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire-specific (BMQ-specific). (lu.se)
  • Methods A questionnaire was developed with the purpose of being used when identifying medication errors and assessing patient compliance to and beliefs about medicines. (lu.se)
  • The choice of how to use and present data from those scales in research depends on patient characteristics and how discriminating one would like the scales to be. (lu.se)
  • Lindsay Wall, a clinical pharmacist at Benzer Pharmacy, says she has patients with more than 25 doses per day and compliance can be a challenge for older patients. (prweb.com)
  • D. K. Bagwell and R. L. West, "Assessing compliance: active versus inactive trainees in a memory intervention," Clinical Interventions in Aging , vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 371-382, 2008. (hindawi.com)
  • Clinical Benefits of Fixed Dose Combinations Translated to Improved Patient Compliance. (medworm.com)
  • Glenn Krauss is well-recognized and respected subject matter expert in the revenue cycle with a specialized emphasis and focus upon collaborating and working closely with physicians in promoting, advocating for, educating and achieving sustainable improvement in clinical documentation that accurately reflects and reports the communication of fully informed coordinated patient care. (corporatecomplianceinsights.com)
  • It is important to monitor stroke patients for AFib as early detection and treatment can prevent a secondary stroke from occurring,' said Judy Lenane, RN, MHA, executive vice president and chief clinical officer of iRhythm Technologies, Inc. 'High patient compliance enables providers to obtain higher quality of data and provide a more definitive diagnosis. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Therefore, additional cases may be detected in patients with lower clinical suspicion. (bmj.com)
  • SOUDERTON, Pennsylvania, March 21, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- The Almac Group and Exco InTouch announced today that Almac's Clinical Technologies business unit, the leading provider of IXRS(R) (Interactive Voice and Web Response) services relating to patient and drug supply management, has formed an exclusive integrated patient management alliance with Exco InTouch, an innovative firm specializing in patient recruitment, retention, compliance and ePRO services. (fiercebiotech.com)
  • The alliance will be focused on the integration of both technology and processes by both firms to deliver patient management, compliance, retention, and ePRO service offerings to sponsors of clinical trials. (fiercebiotech.com)
  • Examples of messages include reminders to attend clinic visits or to fill out patient diaries, medication prompts, notices to attend appointments in a fasted state, to return unused medication, and even encouragement messages to keep all patients motivated to participate in the clinical trial. (fiercebiotech.com)
  • The Almac-Exco InTouch alliance offers sponsors the benefit of alleviating clinical trial site personnel of significant administrative burdens and activities relating to protocol compliance. (fiercebiotech.com)
  • As trials become increasingly more complex and global, the application of such cost-effective technologies to drive compliance and enhance clinical trial site productivity will serve a vital role in the drug development process. (fiercebiotech.com)
  • Almac President Jim Murphy comments on the alliance with Exco InTouch: "The alliance between Almac and Exco InTouch provides sponsors with a practical, cost-effective solution to managing patients during a clinical trial. (fiercebiotech.com)
  • Clinical severity and impact of haemophilia on quality of life have been generally considered to be lower for haemophilia B (HB) compared with haemophilia A (HA) patients. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Arterial endothelial dysfunction and arterial compliance abnormalities are early arterial changes in DM2 patients which occur earlier than structural abnormalities of vessel walls and clinical onset of cardiovascular complications [ 3 - 5 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Paper I showed that routine whole-body CT of high-energy trauma patients may lead to excessive radiation exposure without clinical benefit. (diva-portal.org)
  • In conclusion, whole body CT in trauma should be used only in patients with clinical findings. (diva-portal.org)
  • The information and recommendations we offer are based on over 30 years of peer review research and personal clinical experience which guides us in providing a valuable resource to our readers, customers and patients regarding maintaining healthy vision naturally. (naturaleyecare.com)
  • Up to 50% of patients with the clinical syndrome of heart failure have preserved left ventricular systolic function (HF-PSF). (nih.gov)
  • To determine the clinical profiles of RF/RHD patients at Pediatric Department of Tarlac Provincial Hospital, Tarlac city, Philippines and the factors related to their compliance with Benzathine Penicillin G Prophylaxis treatment, the ex post-facto research was done using the charts of patients. (sciencedomain.org)
  • If an association of arterial endothelial dysfunction and arterial compliance abnormalities with cerebral small vessel disease could be established, this would support the significance of measuring arterial endothelial dysfunction and arterial compliance abnormalities for early prediction, stratification, and prevention of this cardiovascular complication in DM2 patients. (hindawi.com)
  • We compared arterial compliance, microvascular vasodilator function and venous capacitance (VC) in 3 groups of patients (n=12 each) matched for the presence of coronary heart disease: 1) HF and preserved systolic function (HF-PSF), 2) HF and reduced systolic function (HF-RSF) and 3) controls (no HF, PSF). (nih.gov)
  • Arterial compliance was assessed by measuring aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) with applanation tonometry. (nih.gov)
  • The primary objective is to determine the acceptance of, and compliance with, 6 months of teriparatide subcutaneous injections in patients with severe osteoporosis who have failed on OR are intolerant to currently available osteoporosis therapies. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Objective: To know the compliance of DOTS therapy in TB patients in District Raipur and to find out the reasons of non-compliance of DOTS therapy among the patients. (cogprints.org)
  • In all patients objective daytime sleepiness was assessed by multiple sleep latency before and after CPAP therapy. (bmj.com)
  • Rationale, aims and objective The objectives were to describe and evaluate the structured medication questionnaire and to improve data handling of results from the Morisky four-item scale for patient compliance and Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire-specific (BMQ-specific). (lu.se)
  • This objective is paramount to effective glaucoma management where visual outcome is heavily dependent on patient compliance. (arvojournals.org)
  • however, since anti-tTG antibodies remain high for longer and are not a completely reliable marker of GFD intake, detection of fecal GIPs offers a direct, objective, quantitative assessment of exposure, even occasional, to gluten and could be used to check dietary compliance. (minervamedica.it)
  • The objective of this work is to understand the place of the pharmaceutical industry in the creation of new compliance marketing tools, but also to understand the current and unmet patient's needs. (cnrs.fr)
  • Although protein-restricted diets are used for more than a century in patients with advanced Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), their efficacy and safety is still debatable. (centerwatch.com)
  • To evaluate transdermal diclofenac in terms of analgesic efficacy, safety, compliance and cost-effectiveness and to compare it with oral tablets and intramuscular (IM) injections following surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars. (springer.com)
  • Transdermal diclofenac is an excellent alternative to oral and parenteral routes of drug administration in oral surgical procedures with adequate analgesic efficacy, good compliance and fewer side effects. (springer.com)
  • Patients who experienced side effects from CPAP used their CPAP machines significantly less than those who did not. (bmj.com)
  • The result was significantly higher patient compliance, and greater laboratory efficiency leading to significant return on investment. (darkdaily.com)
  • In the cerebral circulation, the Fontan patients have a significantly higher initial slope of increasing AVDO2 compared with normals. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Preoperative C p in DS patients was significantly lower than that in controls [2.27 (1.62-3.0) vs. 2.50 (1.86-3.31) mL/mmHg/m 2 , p = 0. although there was no significant difference in mean pulmonary arterial pressure and R p between the groups. (springer.com)
  • Postoperative home oxygen therapy (HOT) was performed in 39 patients (36 DS patients) and multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that postoperative HOT was significantly related to low preoperative C p ( p = 0.039) and DS ( p = 0.0001). (springer.com)
  • The nurse's hand hygiene compliance in the group with group nursing and risk management was better than that of the control group (X 2 =7.388, P=0.003), the patient's NIR was lower than that of the control group (X 2 =4.520, P=0.034), and the satisfaction with nursing was significantly higher than that of the control group, showing statistically significant difference X 2 =7.110, P=0.002). (alliedacademies.org)
  • A recent patient survey by the National Rosacea Society has documented the importance of compliance with medical therapy, as 88 percent of the respondents said their symptoms reappear or increase in severity if they fail to use their medication as directed. (rosacea.org)
  • To assess the possible association of aortic compliance and brachial endothelial function with cerebral small vessel disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) patients by using 3.0 T high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. (hindawi.com)
  • Quantitative evaluation of aortic compliance and endothelial function by using high-resolution MRI may be potentially useful to stratify DM2 patients with risk of cerebral small vessel disease. (hindawi.com)
  • To our knowledge, there has been no report so far about association between aortic compliance and brachial endothelial function with cerebral small vessel disease in DM2 patients by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). (hindawi.com)
  • The patients were interviewed at their homes during July and August 1995. (who.int)
  • The report, in the Oct. 9, 1995 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, predicts that 40 percent of patients who receive outpatient drug therapy will experience a treatment failure and/or new medical problem as a result of improper use. (managedcaremag.com)
  • Pour étudier l'observance des schémas thérapeutiques, on a examiné 172 patients chez lesquels la tuberculose a été diagnostiquée pendant les trois premiers mois de 1995. (who.int)
  • Les patients ont été interviewés à leur domicile au cours des mois de juillet et août 1995. (who.int)
  • All patients prescribed antituberculosis therapy during January-March 1995 were identified from records kept in the six chest dispensaries of Alexandria (El-Maamora, Bacous, Moharrem Bey, El-Gomrok, Al-Kabbary and Kom-El-Shokafa). (who.int)
  • Despite this growing popularity, little is known about patient compliance predictors for OHCs' users. (jmir.org)
  • It identified 3 interrelated predictors that may affect patient compliance: patient empowerment gained through peer-to-peer OHCs, satisfaction with the physician, and commitment to the physician. (jmir.org)
  • A Web-based survey tested the conceptual model and assessed the effects of patient empowerment gained through OHCs on patient satisfaction and commitment to the physician, as well as the effects of these 3 predictors on patient compliance with the proposed treatment. (jmir.org)
  • A path analysis using structural equation modeling tested the proposed relationships between the predictors and their respective paths on patient compliance. (jmir.org)
  • Transdermal group had better overall global assessment by patients with 16.67%, 46.67% and 20% participants reporting excellent, very good and good pain control, respectively. (springer.com)
  • Because communication occurs via Health Buddy when the patient responds to a short automated survey of perhaps a dozen questions, the patient's acceptance of Health Buddy and his or her willingness to use it daily is crucial to its success. (rand.org)
  • Patients can also permit their caregivers and physician to access the information through a web-based portal," the FDA noted -- opening the possibility that others can track a patient's adherence, or lack thereof, to drug therapy. (upi.com)
  • The cancer care clinics not only serve patients in the best possible way, but they also give mental support to patient's family. (sooperarticles.com)
  • Careful investigation and analysis of patient safety events (events not primarily related to the natural course of the patient's illness or underlying condition), as well as evaluation of corrective actions, is essential to reduce risk and prevent patient harm. (psqh.com)
  • Unlike breast and colon cancer screening, a patient's primary care physician must approve the patient to get a lung cancer screening exam during a shared-decision making visit. (acr.org)
  • The group nursing and risk management have better effect on nurse's hand hygiene compliance and patient's NIR and satisfaction with nursing. (alliedacademies.org)
  • eDiary, which provides patients with easy-to-follow prompts, built-in reminders and polite electronic nagging to ensure patients comply in a timely fashion. (medgadget.com)
  • Reminder Rosie is a talking alarm clock that allows caregivers to record reminders for loved ones or patients to remind them to take medication, eat meals, attend important events and appointments. (prweb.com)
  • Emphasizing that reminders work well only if patients are motivated to do what you are reminding them about, Berger said, 'Discharge interventions in a hospital only work well if the patient is involved in the decision making and if the patient expects the discharge to happen and is prepared for it. (drugtopics.com)
  • Although many factors affect compliance, much of the underlying cause of drug misusage stems from the incongruity between drug pharmacology and human physiology. (managedcaremag.com)
  • Side effects of nausea and hunger were occasionally troublesome but did not affect compliance. (who.int)
  • Multidisciplinary and integral solutions are needed to improve the compliance, with special attention paid to adolescents. (springer.com)
  • however improvement in stroke education measure compliance was noted at both of our hospitals during the first year. (ahajournals.org)
  • Perennial application of SCIT seems to increase compliance in comparison to the preseasonal application. (dovepress.com)
  • More information about the disease and the importance of compliance should be provided to tuberculosis patients at the time of diagnosis and initiation of therapy. (who.int)
  • Risk factors associated with default, failure and death among tuberculosis patients treated in a DOTS programme in Tiruvallur district, South India, 2000. (cogprints.org)
  • Because of their lightweight nature, 3D printed braces can help improve patient compliance in the group most affected by scoliosis -- adolescent females. (techtarget.com)
  • However, the traditional chemical-based FOBT has a known high rate of false negatives and very poor patient compliance due to patient preparation demands: a special diet for several days prior to the test, for instance. (darkdaily.com)
  • Flank pain, haematuria and poor patient compliance : beware the 'forgotten' JJ stent! (up.ac.za)
  • Better patient compliance. (epill.com)
  • This report, " Cleaning Up Your Medical Laboratory's FOB Testing Program: New Opportunities for Better Patient Compliance, Increased Accuracy, and a Happier Staff ," describes how the next generation technology for an immunochemical fecal occult blood test (iFOBT) compares favorably to traditional testing. (darkdaily.com)
  • The Dark Report is happy to offer our readers a chance to download our recently published FREE White Paper " Cleaning Up Your Medical Laboratory's Fecal Occult Blood Testing Program: New Opportunities for Better Patient Compliance, Increased Accuracy, and a Happier Staff " at absolutely no charge. (darkdaily.com)
  • A new general of fecal occult blood laboratory tests utilizing immunochemistry demonstrates higher sensitivity, fewer false negatives, and greater patient compliance, which can lead to better laboratory efficiency and cost savings. (darkdaily.com)
  • IT compliance officers are trying to comply with health care privacy regulations, but they're not getting the resources needed, AHIMA says. (baselinemag.com)
  • Fewer hospitals and health care facilities are complying with federal laws to protect patient privacy, and more patients are refusing to sign forms to release health information, according to a survey by the American Health Information Management Association. (baselinemag.com)
  • For the past three years, AHIMA has surveyed over a thousand hospitals and health care facilities about their compliance with HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) rules that protect patient privacy. (baselinemag.com)
  • The survey found that patients were asking more questions about the privacy of their health information, and 22 percent of institutions reported that some patients refused to sign release of information forms. (baselinemag.com)
  • Hospitals are not using IT to help with HIPAA compliance," said Roger Werman, head of RMW Associates, a consultancy for health care practices, based in Indialantic, Fla. Both Werman and Rode said a shift to electronic-based records would largely eliminate the biggest burden health care facilities face in HIPAA compliance: tracking what patient information is released to what entities. (baselinemag.com)
  • A patient enters various types of data (e.g., biometric readings, diary entries, responses to surveys and health assessments, etc.) to a health data management system that includes a patient compliance monitoring system. (google.com)
  • The article provides the insights of William J. Spratt, a health care attorney with K&L Gates, regarding the effecs of the economic crisis to health care providers in which patient compliance is a major issue. (ebscohost.com)
  • Although health care organizations deal with many types of government and professional regulations, as adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) progresses, they also need to form policies of their own to secure patient data, according to an April 11 report from HIMSS Analytics and Kroll Advisory Solutions , a provider of IT security. (eweek.com)
  • Patients were randomly selected from the pharmacy claims data files of a health maintenance organization. (nih.gov)
  • For starters, patients need to have a voice in their care and they should have full access to data related to their care, including their complete health record. (healthcareitnews.com)
  • Without fully including patients in their own health care decisions, patient engagement programs are nothing more than paternalistic compliance programs. (healthcareitnews.com)
  • Improvement strategies implemented included stroke program CNS or RN seeing all known stroke/TIA inpatients, creation of a spiral bound stroke educational booklet and an audio CD version, development of a stroke education teaching screen in the electronic health record, and revision of an individualizable Stoke/TIA Patient Discharge Instruction template that included required content. (ahajournals.org)
  • In order to move to a patient engagement atmosphere, the authors suggest adopting the Health Belief Model, developed by psychologists in the 1950's. (claimsjournal.com)
  • But if you then show your patients the probe graphic in the patient education section of the Gum Health Physical , the visual will help your patients understand why pocketing is a serious condition. (colgateprofessional.com)
  • If you provide patients with a report from the Gum Health Physical, they will be able to review your instructions which can help them effectively implement these instructions at home. (colgateprofessional.com)
  • The key is to be persistent in your commitment to your patients' oral health and to not let frustration overwhelm you. (colgateprofessional.com)
  • Provide your patients with a Gum Health Physical report to help them remember what they need to do at home. (colgateprofessional.com)
  • Additionally, both physician quality and Internet health information quality have significant effects on patient-physician concordance, with physician quality exhibiting a much stronger relationship. (jmir.org)
  • In addition, the level of agreement between a patient and their physician regarding the medical situation is more reliant on the perceived quality of their physician than on the perceived quality of Internet health information used. (jmir.org)
  • This research found that only the perceived quality of the physician has a significant relationship with the perceived information gap between the patient and their physician and the quality of the Internet health information has no relationship with this perceived information gap. (jmir.org)
  • Meanwhile, online health communities (OHCs) are becoming more common and are commonly used by individuals with health problems, and they may have a role in facilitating compliance. (jmir.org)
  • Real-world comparative analysis of bleeding complications and health-related quality of life in patients with haemophilia A and haemophilia B. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The interest in dietary management resurged, since the high prevalence of revealed a major impact not only on morbidity, mortality, social activities and patients' quality of life, but also on health budget. (centerwatch.com)
  • A systematic review was chosen as a design to identify primary studies that answeredthe following research question: What is the current evidence on interventions to promote psychiatric patients' compliance to mental health treatment? (scielo.org.za)
  • The systematic review identified several interventions that can improve patients' compliance in mental health treatment, for example adherence therapy and motivational interviewing techniques during in-hospital stay. (scielo.org.za)
  • This article systematically explains the background and rationale to use of a systematic review, the research objectives, research design and method, steps of the systematic review and conclusion statements regarding interventions to promote psychiatric patients' compliance to mental health treatment. (scielo.org.za)
  • Health literacy in patient education and patient adherence. (helsinki.fi)
  • Adherence to treatment requires the active participation of the patient in self-management of treatment and cooperation between the patient and the health care provider. (who.int)
  • The Department of Health must find ways to provide the secondary chemoprophylaxis to RF/RHD patients for free to improve the compliance rate, thus, provide bigger chance for the RF/RHD patients to survive their disease. (sciencedomain.org)
  • Implementation Guide for Transmission of Patient Chief Complaint as Public Health Information using Version 2.3.1 of the Health Level Seven (HL7) Standard Protocol" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • A new measure of compliance could assist in understanding the patients' needs and concerns other than the obvious financial, fear and psychological reasons as well as shedding some light on the way dentists operate and how that affects compliance. (igi-global.com)
  • Previous psychological studies show that patient concern over cancer screening false positives is short-term with no lasting effects. (acr.org)
  • Home / Test Division / Reference Database / 1980 to 1989 / 1982 / Physiological and psychological variables predict compliance to prescribed exercise. (umn.edu)
  • Cerebral hemodynamics in the presence of decreased systemic venous compliance in patients with Fontan physiology may limit anaerobic exercise capacity. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Reduced anaerobic exercise capacity in Fontan patients may be secondary to limitation of cerebral blood flow, secondary to low systemic venous compliance due to absence of a sub-pulmonary ventricle, and augmented hyperventilatory response during exercise. (biomedsearch.com)
  • German sales data for different preparations of the allergen manufacturer Allergopharma GmbH & Co. KG were retrospectively evaluated for 5 consecutive years, based on prescriptions per patient: pollen sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) and high-dose hypoallergenic (allergoid) or unmodified depot pollen and mite preparations for subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT). (dovepress.com)
  • The company's eDiary PRO prompts patients in studies to answer questions about their real-time experience with a new drug or product, shifting the burden of reporting away from written diaries. (medgadget.com)
  • Our findings are particularly timely since many chronic hepatitis C patients are now being prescribed direct-acting antiviral drugs, which have a complex dosing regimen that may be even harder for patients to maintain than the two-drug standard therapy," said lead author Vincent Lo Re, MD, MSCE, an assistant professor of Infectious Disease and Epidemiology. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Literacy issues, financial hurdles, and socioeconomic problems such as unstable living situations can all hamper patients' abilities to properly maintain their drug regimen. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has given the nod to Abilify MyCite, for use in patients with schizophrenia, an add-on treatment for depression, and to help control episodes of either manic or "mixed" episodes for people with bipolar disorder. (upi.com)
  • More than one-third [‎34.9%]‎ of the patients were not adhering to the antituberculosis drug regimen. (who.int)
  • The Almac-Exco InTouch offering serves a pressing need in the drug development process: Engaging, retaining, and enhancing compliance of patients from the earliest stages of recruitment and throughout the course of a trial. (fiercebiotech.com)
  • Patients on treatment with levothyroxine (T4) are informed to take this drug in the morning, at least 30 min before having breakfast. (mdpi.com)
  • Compliance with drug dosage was recorded. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Can motivational interviewing improve patients' drug compliance rates? (drugtopics.com)
  • Systematic non-compliance to chemotherapeutic treatment among a portion of the eligible population is thought to be a major obstacle to the elimination of helminth infections by mass drug administration (MDA). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Patients were most non adherent to frequency of drug administration. (arvojournals.org)
  • These data show us that we need to develop and test interventions to help patients be more successful at taking their medicine and have the best chance at being cured. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The patient is encouraged to enter as much data as is practical and as frequently as possible. (google.com)
  • The feedback loop of the present invention provides compliance messages to the patient in a timely manner that are responsive to the data entered by the patient. (google.com)
  • Data from the remaining 119 medical records were compared with data from pharmacy claims to calculate compliance rates for each medication. (nih.gov)
  • Comparison of medical record data with pharmacy claims data is an effective indirect measure of patients' compliance with prescribed oral theophylline and inhaled anti-inflammatory agents. (nih.gov)
  • The high patient compliance and large volume of quality ECG data obtained resulted in a timely and definitive diagnosis of AFib, which is often difficult to detect. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • This report provides data for patient-focused organizations to build or reinforce their adherence and compliance programs - and to address the hurdles that make these undertakings such challenging endeavors. (giiresearch.com)
  • Method Case records of all bariatric patients screened for OSA over a 16-month period were reviewed, and CPAP compliance data retrieved for those with confirmed OSA who commenced CPAP therapy. (bmj.com)
  • Baseline and compliance data of bariatric and sleep patients. (bmj.com)
  • The 2B-anesthesia machine that does process date and time information pass the stand-alone and data out compliance test. (apsf.org)
  • The Joint Commission regularly collects standards compliance data to identify areas that present the greatest challenges to accredited organizations and certified programs. (psqh.com)
  • data were extracted of 80 patients. (who.int)
  • Prescription data of 85,241 patients receiving pollen or mite SCIT and 706 patients receiving pollen SLIT were included in this analysis. (dovepress.com)
  • The Austrian Haemophilia Registry collects epidemiological data on patients with haemophilia, on treatment modalities and potential side effects. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Lung compliance is measured as a change in the volume of lungs per unit change in the pressure. (bartleby.com)
  • The combined average value of the compliance for the lung and the chest wall is 0.1 L/cm of water. (bartleby.com)
  • The wall of the lungs and the thoracic wall recoil, but the compliance of only the lung wall is 2.0 L/cm of water. (bartleby.com)
  • Option (d) states that when lung compliance decreases, there is an increase in the ventilation rate and decrease in the tidal volume. (bartleby.com)
  • Option (a) states that there will only be an increase in the ventilation rate when the lung compliance decreases but the tidal volume also decreases. (bartleby.com)
  • Social and operational determinants of patient behaviour in lung tuberculosis. (cogprints.org)
  • Physician ignorance of lung cancer screening guidelines, lack of patient and physician education on the benefits of screening and drastically low Medicare reimbursement for low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) lung cancer screening exams may be resulting in thousands of unnecessary deaths each year. (acr.org)
  • CT lung cancer screening can save more lives than any cancer screening test in history, but patients are not hearing about this test from their doctors. (acr.org)
  • Non-compliance of immunosuppression after lung-transplantation provokes rejection, infection and renal insufficiency. (ersjournals.com)
  • Conclusion: When patients are pre-councelled, Moviprep® provides adequate colonic cleansing in 73% with the standard regimen and 89 % after additional prep in subjects undergoing surveillance colonoscopy in a rural setting. (who.int)
  • Cerebral small vessel disease is one of the common cardiovascular complications in DM2 patients [ 8 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • However, complications occur in up to one-third of patients, which most commonly include stent encrusation, stent migration, stent fracture and secondary stone formation. (up.ac.za)
  • Most all, of my scleral lens patients are using hydrogen peroxide systems which helps eliminate complications both on the anterior surface of the lens and in the tear reservoir between the lens and the cornea. (reviewob.com)