Ethics, Dental: The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the dentist, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the dentist in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Codes of Ethics: Systematic statements of principles or rules of appropriate professional conduct, usually established by professional societies.American Dental Association: Professional society representing the field of dentistry.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Insurance, Dental: Insurance providing coverage for dental care.Societies, Dental: Societies whose membership is limited to dentists.Universal Coverage: Health insurance coverage for all persons in a state or country, rather than for some subset of the population. It may extend to the unemployed as well as to the employed; to aliens as well as to citizens; for pre-existing conditions as well as for current illnesses; for mental as well as for physical conditions.Colonography, Computed Tomographic: A non-invasive imaging method that uses computed tomographic data combined with specialized imaging software to examine the colon.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Ambulatory Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on an outpatient basis. It may be hospital-based or performed in an office or surgicenter.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Health: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Health Literacy: Degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: Contextually focused form of cognitive behavioral psychotherapy that uses MINDFULNESS and behavioral activation to increase patients' psychological flexibility in areas such as ability to engage in values-based, positive behaviors while experiencing difficult thoughts, emotions, or sensations.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Community Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Regional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Attitude to Computers: The attitude and behavior associated with an individual using the computer.Public Health Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with promoting and protecting the health of populations, using knowledge from nursing, social, and public health sciences to develop local, regional, state, and national health policy and research. It is population-focused and community-oriented, aimed at health promotion and disease prevention through educational, diagnostic, and preventive programs.Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Reproductive Health: The physical condition of human reproductive systems.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Consumer Satisfaction: Customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a benefit or service received.Health Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Health Records, Personal: Longitudinal patient-maintained records of individual health history and tools that allow individual control of access.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Public Health Informatics: The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.Health Services Administration: The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Catchment Area (Health): A geographic area defined and served by a health program or institution.Reproductive Health Services: Health care services related to human REPRODUCTION and diseases of the reproductive system. Services are provided to both sexes and usually by physicians in the medical or the surgical specialties such as REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE; ANDROLOGY; GYNECOLOGY; OBSTETRICS; and PERINATOLOGY.Great BritainWomen's Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.Health Care Coalitions: Voluntary groups of people representing diverse interests in the community such as hospitals, businesses, physicians, and insurers, with the principal objective to improve health care cost effectiveness.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Health Services, Indigenous: Health care provided to specific cultural or tribal peoples which incorporates local customs, beliefs, and taboos.Men's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of men.Health Planning Guidelines: Recommendations for directing health planning functions and policies. These may be mandated by PL93-641 and issued by the Department of Health and Human Services for use by state and local planning agencies.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Public Opinion: The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Health Communication: The transfer of information from experts in the medical and public health fields to patients and the public. The study and use of communication strategies to inform and influence individual and community decisions that enhance health.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Food Preferences: The selection of one food over another.Health Planning Support: Financial resources provided for activities related to health planning and development.Adolescent Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Schools, Public Health: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of public health.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Rejection (Psychology): Non-acceptance, negative attitudes, hostility or excessive criticism of the individual which may precipitate feelings of rejection.United States Public Health Service: A constituent organization of the DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES concerned with protecting and improving the health of the nation.Community Mental Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive mental health services provided for individuals in the community.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Holistic Health: Health as viewed from the perspective that humans and other organisms function as complete, integrated units rather than as aggregates of separate parts.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Comprehensive Health Care: Providing for the full range of personal health services for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and rehabilitation of patients.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.United States Dept. of Health and Human Services: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.Diffusion of Innovation: The broad dissemination of new ideas, procedures, techniques, materials, and devices and the degree to which these are accepted and used.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Health Fairs: Community health education events focused on prevention of disease and promotion of health through audiovisual exhibits.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.Government Agencies: Administrative units of government responsible for policy making and management of governmental activities.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Health Food: A non-medical term defined by the lay public as a food that has little or no preservatives, which has not undergone major processing, enrichment or refinement and which may be grown without pesticides. (from Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Marketing of Health Services: Application of marketing principles and techniques to maximize the use of health care resources.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Prejudice: A preconceived judgment made without factual basis.Telemedicine: Delivery of health services via remote telecommunications. This includes interactive consultative and diagnostic services.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Social Distance: The degree of closeness or acceptance an individual or group feels toward another individual or group.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Dental Health Services: Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.Prepaid Health Plans: Contracts between an insurer and a subscriber or a group of subscribers whereby a specified set of health benefits is provided in return for a periodic premium.Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Health Planning Councils: Organized groups serving in advisory capacities related to health planning activities.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Health Transition: Demographic and epidemiologic changes that have occurred in the last five decades in many developing countries and that are characterized by major growth in the number and proportion of middle-aged and elderly persons and in the frequency of the diseases that occur in these age groups. The health transition is the result of efforts to improve maternal and child health via primary care and outreach services and such efforts have been responsible for a decrease in the birth rate; reduced maternal mortality; improved preventive services; reduced infant mortality, and the increased life expectancy that defines the transition. (From Ann Intern Med 1992 Mar 15;116(6):499-504)Occupational Health Nursing: The practice of nursing in the work environment.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Medical Informatics: The field of information science concerned with the analysis and dissemination of medical data through the application of computers to various aspects of health care and medicine.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.Information Services: Organized services to provide information on any questions an individual might have using databases and other sources. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)EnglandDepression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.IndiaEducation, Public Health Professional: Education and training in PUBLIC HEALTH for the practice of the profession.Information Dissemination: The circulation or wide dispersal of information.Insurance, Health, Reimbursement: Payment by a third-party payer in a sum equal to the amount expended by a health care provider or facility for health services rendered to an insured or program beneficiary. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Internationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Interinstitutional Relations: The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Government: The complex of political institutions, laws, and customs through which the function of governing is carried out in a specific political unit.Social Determinants of Health: The circumstances in which people are born, grow up, live, work, and age, as well as the systems put in place to deal with illness. These circumstances are in turn shaped by a wider set of forces: economics, social policies, and politics (http://www.cdc.gov/socialdeterminants/).

Why do dyspeptic patients over the age of 50 consult their general practitioner? A qualitative investigation of health beliefs relating to dyspepsia. (1/6162)

BACKGROUND: The prognosis of late-diagnosed gastric cancer is poor, yet less than half of dyspeptic patients consult their general practitioner (GP). AIM: To construct an explanatory model of the decision to consult with dyspepsia in older patients. METHOD: A total of 75 patients over the age of 50 years who had consulted with dyspepsia at one of two inner city general practices were invited to an in-depth interview. The interviews were taped, transcribed, and analysed using the computer software NUD.IST, according to the principles of grounded theory. RESULTS: Altogether, 31 interviews were conducted. The perceived threat of cancer and the need for reassurance were key influences on the decision to consult. Cues such as a change in symptoms were important in prompting a re-evaluation of the likely cause. Personal vulnerability to serious illness was often mentioned in the context of family or friends' experience, but tempered by an individual's life expectations. CONCLUSION: Most patients who had delayed consultation put their symptoms down to 'old age' or 'spicy food'. However, a significant minority were fatalistic, suspecting the worst but fearing medical interventions.  (+info)

Delay in presentation of patients with acute stroke to hospital in Oxford. (2/6162)

We identified prospectively all patients (181 patients, 183 episodes) admitted to hospital in Oxford with acute stroke from 1 January to 30 June 1997. Data were inadequate in 30, leaving 153 episodes in 151 patients (63 men, 90 women). Structured interviews were used to investigate the timing of events preceding admission. Most strokes (91%) occurred at home, and 36% of patients were alone. After a median delay of 15 min, 56% called a GP (median 30 min response), 41% an ambulance (median 48 min to admission), and 3% went directly to A&E. Median time from hospital admission to doctor assessment was 69 min. Factors reducing delay were: initially calling an ambulance rather than a GP (p < 0.0001); onset not at home (p < 0.001); symptoms improving between onset and admission (p < 0.002); and altered consciousness (p < 0.002). The stroke was not recognized by 44% of patients, but no significant delay resulted. Overall, 31% were admitted within 3 h of onset, 46% within 6 h. Initial contact with the GP is a major determinant of delay. If acute therapies for stroke become available, GPs should be the primary targets for an educational initiative.  (+info)

Where do people go for treatment of sexually transmitted diseases? (3/6162)

CONTEXT: Major public health resources are devoted to the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) through public STD clinics. However, little is known about where people actually receive treatment for STDs. METHODS: As part of the National Health and Social Life Survey, household interviews were performed from February to September 1992 with 3,432 persons aged 18-59. Weighted population estimates and multinomial response methods were used to describe the prevalence of self-reported STDs and patterns of treatment utilization by persons who ever had a bacterial or viral STD. RESULTS: An estimated two million STDs were self-reported in the previous year, and 22 million 18-59-year-olds self-reported lifetime STDs. Bacterial STDs (gonorrhea, chlamydia, nongonococcal urethritis, pelvic inflammatory disease and syphilis) were more common than viral STDs (genital herpes, genital warts, hepatitis and HIV). Genital warts were the most commonly reported STD in the past year, while gonorrhea was the most common ever-reported STD. Almost half of all respondents who had ever had an STD had gone to a private practice for treatment (49%); in comparison, only 5% of respondents had sought treatment at an STD clinic. Respondents with a bacterial STD were seven times more likely to report going to an STD clinic than were respondents with a viral STD--except for chlamydia, which was more likely to be treated at family planning clinics. Men were significantly more likely than women to go to an STD clinic. Young, poor or black respondents were all more likely to use a family planning clinic for STD treatment than older, relatively wealthy or white respondents. Age, sexual history and geographic location did not predict particular types of treatment-seeking. CONCLUSIONS: The health care utilization patterns for STD treatment in the United States are complex. Specific disease diagnosis, gender, race and income status all affect where people will seek treatment. These factors need to be taken into account when STD prevention strategies are being developed.  (+info)

Reactions to medical abortion among providers of surgical abortion: an early snapshot.(4/6162)

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Provider attitudes toward dispensing emergency contraception in Michigan's Title X programs.(5/6162)

 (+info)

Socioeconomic differences in childhood consultation rates in general practice in England and Wales: prospective cohort study. (6/6162)

OBJECTIVE: To establish how consultation rates in children for episodes of illness, preventive activities, and home visits vary by social class. DESIGN: Analysis of prospectively collected data from the fourth national survey of morbidity in general practice, carried out between September 1991 and August 1992. SETTING: 60 general practices in England and Wales. SUBJECTS: 106 102 children aged 0 to 15 years registered with the participating practices. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mean overall consultation rates for any reason, illness by severity of underlying disease, preventive episodes, home visits, and specific diagnostic category (infections, asthma, and injuries). RESULTS: Overall consultation rates increased from registrar general's social classes I-II to classes IV-V in a linear pattern (for IV-V v I-II rate ratio 1.18; 95% confidence interval 1.14 to 1. 22). Children from social classes IV-V consulted more frequently than children from classes I-II for illnesses (rate ratio 1.23; 1.15 to 1.30), including infections, asthma, and injuries and poisonings. They also had significantly higher consultation rates for minor, moderate, and serious illnesses and higher home visiting rates (rate ratio 2.00; 1.81 to 2.18). Consultations for preventive activities were lower in children from social classes IV-V than in children from social classes I-II (rate ratio 0.95; 0.86 to 1.05). CONCLUSIONS: Childhood consultation rates for episodes of illness increase from social classes I-II through to classes IV-V. The findings on severity of underlying illness suggest the health of children from lower social classes is worse than that of children from higher social classes. These results reinforce the need to identify and target children for preventive health care in their socioeconomic context.  (+info)

Voluntary euthanasia under control? Further empirical evidence from The Netherlands. (7/6162)

Nineteen ninety-six saw the publication of a major Dutch survey into euthanasia in the Netherlands. This paper outlines the main statistical findings of this survey and considers whether it shows that voluntary euthanasia is under effective control in the Netherlands. The paper concludes that although there has been some improvement in compliance with procedural requirements, the practice of voluntary euthanasia remains beyond effective control.  (+info)

The relationship between census-derived socio-economic variables and general practice consultation rates in three town centre practices. (8/6162)

BACKGROUND: The relationship between socio-economic factors and consultation rates is important in determining resource allocation to general practices. AIM: To determine the relationship between general practice surgery consultation rates and census-derived socio-economic variables for patients receiving the same primary and secondary care. METHOD: A retrospective analysis was taken of computerized records in three general practices in Mansfield, North Nottinghamshire, with 29,142 patients spread over 15 electoral wards (Jarman score range from -23 to +25.5). Linear regression analysis of surgery consultation rates at ward and enumeration district levels was performed against Jarman and Townsend deprivation scores and census socio-economic variables. RESULTS: Both the Townsend score (r2 = 59%) and the Jarman score (r2 = 39%) were associated with surgery consultation rates at ward level. The Townsend score had a stronger association than the Jarman score because all four of its component variables were individually associated with increased consultations compared with four out of eight Jarman components. CONCLUSIONS: Even in practices not eligible for deprivation payments there were appreciable differences in consultation rates between areas with different socio-economic characteristics. The results suggest that the variables used to determine deprivation payments should be reconsidered, and they support suggestions that payments should be introduced at a lower level of deprivation and administered on an enumeration district basis.  (+info)

  • As a health professional on the front line, the GP has contact with different kinds of people and the assessment of symptoms is a key function in primary care. (bjgpopen.org)
  • A review of factors associated with healthcare-seeking patterns for cancer symptoms identified a number of factors, such as demographic (age and sex), psychological (concern and fear), social (influence of family and friends), and behavioural (self-medication and watchful waiting). (bjgpopen.org)
  • 4,5 Likewise, prior studies conducted on specially selected populations, such as patients with musculoskeletal disorders or cancer, have shown associations between demographic, socioeconomic, health-related, and management factors. (bjgpopen.org)
  • 1,2 Knowledge of triggers for healthcare-seeking behaviour is key information for the GP to help them enhance the ability for early diagnosis and prompt treatment. (bjgpopen.org)
  • The identification of factors associated with healthcare-seeking behaviours has been an important research area for decades and both qualitative and quantitative studies have been conducted. (bjgpopen.org)
  • The assessment of patient experiences in the diagnostic phase heavily focuses on experiences in general practice, which does not seem appropriate in the German health care setting. (springer.com)
  • If employees see that you care about your work and your practice, they'll be more likely to care too. (pnc.com)
  • Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews with a heterogeneous sample of 16 patients drawn from a general practice. (bmj.com)
  • Accordingly, semistructured interviews were held with a small smaple of the patients of one inner city general practice. (bmj.com)
  • The practice has an annual patient turnover of 30%, the stable 70% tending to be long term Pimlico residents, often with several generations of family locally. (bmj.com)
  • ESRD care often occurs at dialysis centers that may be remote from hospitals or the main practice site or at home and thus are logical sites to employ telehealth because the care team may not always be physically available to the patient. (asnjournals.org)
  • Background: The practice of appropriate health care-seeking is important to reduce severe and life-threatening childhood illnesses. (who.int)
  • OHCs help to facilitate communication among professionals and patients and support coordination of care across traditional echelons, which does not happen spontaneously in busy practice. (jmir.org)
  • The rugged, elegant design of the Verifi™ fingerprint reader is a perfectly suitable for health care practice, as where necessary, waterproof versions can be directly sprayed with disinfectants without any ill effects. (prweb.com)
  • For the success and a constant growth of your practice, a solid patient flow and high treatment acceptance rate are vital. (straumann.com)
  • To help market your practice and present yourself to patients, Straumann® can offer you the realization of the practice marketing for your practice with our excellent business partners. (straumann.com)
  • Build business and leverage your patients to make them advocates of your practice. (straumann.com)
  • And last (but certainly not least) are financial considerations: the program is state-funded and so offered free to patients, but that model doesn't apply to dentists in private practice. (thewealthydentist.com)
  • NCCPA's specialty CAQ process is predicated on a strong belief in the value and importance of the physician-PA team, and in support of the procedures and patient case requirement, each applicant must provide attestation from a supervising physician who works in the specialty and is familiar with the PA's practice and experience. (nccpa.net)
  • In support of the procedures and patient case requirement, each applicant must provide attestation from a physician, lead/senior physician assistant, or physician/physician assistant post graduate program director who works in the specialty and is familiar with the physician assistant's practice and experience. (nccpa.net)
  • Successful implementation of a Home Telecare Management System (HTMS) requires acceptance by the users, especially when technical innovation is applied to manage chronic healthcare in elderly patients, who are unaccustomed to using modern technology. (igi-global.com)
  • Telehealth and remote monitoring of a patient's health status has become more commonplace in the last decade and has been applied to conditions such as heart failure, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. (asnjournals.org)
  • and, finally, the steady erosion of the public health care system because of chronic underfinancing and the seriousness and intensity of problems brought to its doorstep, including AIDS, drug addiction, and violence. (nap.edu)
  • Further, culturally informed health information technology should be used more for chronic diseases and disease management, as it is an innovative way to provide holistic care and reminders to otherwise underserved populations. (jmir.org)
  • Technology Acceptance and Care Self-Management: Consideration in Context of Chronic Care Management. (igi-global.com)
  • If left unmanaged, chronic care leads to serious health complications, resulting in poor patient quality of life and a costly time bomb for care providers. (igi-global.com)
  • If effectively managed, patients with chronic care tend to live a richer and more healthy life, resulting in a less costly total care solution. (igi-global.com)
  • Our health care system faces major threats as the number of people with multiple chronic conditions rises dramatically. (jmir.org)
  • First, due to rapid advances in medical knowledge, many health professionals lack sufficient expertise to address the complex health care needs of chronic patients. (jmir.org)
  • Third, chronic patients lack adequate tools to self-manage their disease. (jmir.org)
  • OHCs are a powerful tool to address some of the challenges chronic care faces today. (jmir.org)
  • Early hypertension, diabetes, and other common chronic issues can be easily cared for by a good primary care system. (forbes.com)
  • When effective lowering of uric acid levels cannot be achieved with oral medications, many gout patients progress to a severe form of the condition known as refractory chronic gout, which is characterized by frequent arthritic flares, chronic pain, physical disability and poor quality of life," said Michael A. Becker, M.D., Professor Emeritus of Medicine at The University of Chicago. (redorbit.com)
  • The availability of KRYSTEXXA has brought hope to refractory chronic gout patients who have not responded to conventional therapies and is the first and only FDA approved treatment for RCG," said John H. Johnson, Chief Executive Officer and President of Savient Pharmaceuticals. (redorbit.com)
  • Rapid assessment procedures for nutrition and primary health care : anthropological approaches to improving programme effectiveness / Susan C. M. Scrimshaw, Elena Hurtado. (who.int)
  • Self-medication contributes to the delay in the search for primary health care by tuberculosis patients. (scielo.br)
  • Regarding this time, studies carried out in Brazil point to variations in the time elapsed between the appearance of symptoms and the search, by TB patients, for primary health care. (scielo.br)
  • Information on culturally informed health and wellness technology and the use of these technologies to reduce health disparities facing historically underserved populations in the United States is sparse in the literature. (jmir.org)
  • To examine ways in which technology is being used by historically underserved populations to decrease health disparities through facilitating or improving health care access and health and wellness outcomes. (jmir.org)
  • Unfortunately, the fee for service system has decimated our primary care workforce through turf wars and payment disparities with specialty care and we now have a severe primary care shortage. (forbes.com)
  • Genomic Health's Oncotype IQ portfolio has guided personalized treatment decisions for more than one million cancer patients worldwide, and delivered more than 19% year-over-year overall revenue growth in the second quarter of 2019. (biospace.com)
  • Oct. 27, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Exact Sciences Corporation (Nasdaq: EXAS) today announced the entry into agreements to sell an aggregate of 8,605,483 shares (the "Shares") of its common stock, par value $0.01 per share, in a registered direct offering to ten institutional investors, including some of its largest shareholders as well as healthcare specialist firms Casdin Capital and Rock Springs Capital. (barrons.com)
  • Oct. 12, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Exact Sciences Corp. (NASDAQ: EXAS) today announced the introduction of the Oncotype MAP(TM) Pan-Cancer Tissue test for patients with advanced, metastatic, refractory, or recurrent cancer. (barrons.com)
  • Oct. 27, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) today released draft updated colorectal cancer screening guidelines recommending that screening begin at age 45, and including Exact Sciences' (NASDAQ: EXAS) Cologuard ® (referred to in the draft guidelines as sDNA-FIT) as a recommended screening method for all average-risk patients between the ages of 45 and 75. (gurufocus.com)
  • Presented by The American Journal of Managed Care and Joslin Diabetes Center. (ajmc.com)
  • Schmidt agreed that the opportunity for daily monitoring between physician visits, "when life happens," held great promise in diabetes care. (ajmc.com)
  • INDIANAPOLIS , Dec. 22, 2014 /CNW/ -- Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY) today announced a five-year research partnership with the University of Surrey to study health outcomes, focusing on the effects of treatment in people with type 2 diabetes, which affects about 95 percent of those with the disease. (newswire.ca)
  • By understanding how effectively individual care plans work we can learn more about how to improve and enhance diabetes care broadly. (newswire.ca)
  • Lilly has been a global leader in diabetes care since 1923, when we introduced the world's first commercial insulin. (newswire.ca)
  • Today we are building upon this heritage by working to meet the diverse needs of people with diabetes and those who care for them. (newswire.ca)
  • Due to this work he is considered the "father of biosensors," especially with respect to the glucose sensing for diabetes patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients with diabetes and their endocrinologists eventually persuaded acceptance. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the reviewed studies show how technology can be used to positively affect the health of historically underserved populations, the technology must be tailored toward the intended population, as personally relevant and contextually situated health technology is more likely than broader technology to create behavior changes. (jmir.org)
  • It can sometimes affect a person's behavior regarding his or her health, contributing to a delay in or neglect of measures that might prevent cancer. (cancer.gov)
  • The aim of the study was to examine late diagnoses and to assess the quality of care following diagnosis. (isharonline.org)
  • This is a collective health problem due not only to the high incidence of the disease but also to the delay in diagnosing it, once the diagnosis and early treatment of TB are essential factors in its control. (scielo.br)
  • In this perspective, the time the user waits from the appearance of the first symptoms to the search for primary healthcare service is a determining factor for the delay of the TB diagnosis. (scielo.br)
  • Health care-embedded, hospital-based biobanking differs from other forms of biobanking in that donors are not recruited among healthy volunteers or patients outside the clinic, but get involved because they seek diagnosis or treatment. (nature.com)
  • The update was made after TRICARE's review of its screening coverage policies to align them with the preventive services coverage mandate of the Affordable Care Act. (prnewswire.com)
  • Factors that lead to the lower U.S. systems shipments include lower procedure volumes, changing hospital capital-spending priorities associated with the implementation of the Affordable Care Act and the impact that anticipation of a new system may have had on customer capital-spending decisions. (globenewswire.com)
  • Our growing Precision Oncology portfolio and the addition of the Oncotype MAP test allow us to do just that for patients fighting late-stage or metastatic cancer," said Kevin Conroy, chairman and CEO of Exact Sciences. (barrons.com)
  • Examples of forward-looking statements include, among others, statements regarding expected future operating results, anticipated results of sales, marketing and patient adherence efforts, expectations concerning payer reimbursement, the anticipated results of product development efforts, the anticipated benefits of the pending acquisition of Thrive, including estimated synergies and other financial impacts, and the expected timing of completion of the transaction. (barrons.com)
  • Changing the payer system isn't going to fix the real problem of the underlying cost of care and how it is delivered. (forbes.com)
  • In Germany, PROMs are widely used in research for evaluating patient outcomes and quality of care. (springer.com)
  • The study aimed to assess the feasibility of patient-centred quality evaluation in oncological care in Germany using the German adaptation of the Danish National Cancer Patient Questionnaire. (springer.com)
  • The patient's perceptive is of paramount importance for the assessment of health care quality and essential for providing patient-centred care. (springer.com)
  • Also, high quality research contributions describing original and unpublished results of conceptual, constructive, empirical, experimental, or theoretical work in all areas of Patient Safety in Healthcare are cordially invited for presentation at the conference. (waset.org)
  • Mounting evidence has even shown that a focus on patient satisfaction alone can actually be deleterious in terms of achieving cost-effective, high-quality care. (springer.com)
  • To study the use of Online Health Communities (OHCs) as a tool to facilitate high-quality and affordable health care for future generations. (jmir.org)
  • As a rapidly growing demographic, experts say seniors require particularly high quality care and attention in areas such as independence, medication use, fall and dementia risk and co-occurrence of disease conditions. (ucsd.edu)
  • Regardless of its severity, anxiety can substantially interfere with the quality of life of cancer patients and their families, and should be evaluated and treated. (cancer.gov)
  • Improved patient-reported outcomes in physical function, pain and quality of life were also observed in KRYSTEXXA-treated patients. (redorbit.com)
  • Culturally Competent Nursing Care of the Muslim Patient. (prezi.com)
  • In an Age-Friendly Health System, evidence-based protocols, such as physical exercises and daily cognitive stimulation, are used to prevent decline and may reduce the length of a person's hospital stay, plus increase the likelihood that an individual can return home versus transferring to a skilled nursing facility. (ucsd.edu)
  • At this point in time hospital medicine was still fundamentally spiritual institutions, focused on nursing, general and spiritual care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Researchers at the Institute of Music and Neurologic Function, a non-profit research center founded in 1995 in New York City, study music's extraordinary power to awaken, stimulate and heal as they work with severely disabled patients at the Beth Abraham long-term residential care facility. (acatoday.org)
  • Building on the foundation of Medicare and Medicaid, enacted in 1965, four successive presidents-Lyndon Johnson, Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, and Jimmy Carter-paid such significant attention to national health care issues that many believed broad-scale reform was imminent. (nap.edu)
  • Kristen Mc- Govern of Sirona Strategies, which represents the Alliance for Connected Care, said CMS and Medicare lag behind with treatment reimbursement. (ajmc.com)
  • In an unprecedented move, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced a goal to have 90 % of traditional Medicare payments tied to value by 2018. (springer.com)
  • By definition, the Medicare Anti-Kickback Statute , which prohibits payments to induce referrals of government health program patients, does not apply to non-federal business, such as specimens from patients with commercial insurance coverage or self-pay patients. (jdsupra.com)
  • However, the OIG concluded that the "carve-out" of federal healthcare business did not necessarily mean that the Medicare Anti-Kickback Statute was not implicated. (jdsupra.com)
  • Referencing a long-standing concern about arrangements under which parties carve out business generated by federal health programs from "otherwise questionable financial arrangements," the OIG stated that such arrangements implicate the Medicare Anti-Kickback Statute "by disguising remuneration for Federal health care program business through the payment of amounts purportedly related to non-Federal health care program business. (jdsupra.com)
  • There are a number of business transactions in the healthcare industry that carve out federal healthcare program business with the goal of avoiding potential liability under the Medicare Anti-Kickback Statute. (jdsupra.com)
  • Medicare covers the Oncotype MAP test for qualifying members and commercial coverage varies by insurance plan and patient benefit level. (barrons.com)
  • Discussions about Medicare for all, free market care, and Obamacare address one issue - how we pay for health care. (forbes.com)
  • In one study of Medicare patients who were not up to date with colorectal cancer screening, 88% completed a Cologuard test within one year of the test order date. (gurufocus.com)
  • This study looked at the frequency and determinants of unplanned births among women in Beheira governorate, Egypt, and the effects on antenatal and postnatal care sought by the mother for herself and her child. (who.int)
  • To explore barriers to multiple advance care planning (ACP) steps and identify common barrier themes that impede older adults from engaging in the process as a whole. (nih.gov)
  • The study also found that less-educated women, mothers who did not attend for prenatal care and women with a history of abortions and fetal death were at an increased risk of fetal death. (nih.gov)
  • Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is a major public health problem that affects South African children and is a major contributor to the mortality of children under five years of age. (who.int)
  • Am J Public Health 82 (2): 249-51, 1992. (cancer.gov)
  • Taiwan Journal of Public Health , 26 (4), 261-269. (springermedizin.de)
  • Preventing the heterosexual spread of HIV into this vulnerable population is a formidable public health challenge. (curehunter.com)
  • In Germanic and Nordic languages, the term for 'public health' literally translates to 'people's health', for example Volksgesundheit in German, folkhälsa in Swedish and kansanterveys in Finnish. (routledge.com)
  • Melinta Therapeutics, Inc. is the largest pure-play antibiotics company, dedicated to saving lives threatened by the global public health crisis of bacterial infections through the development and commercialization of novel antibiotics that provide new therapeutic solutions. (yahoo.com)
  • USPSTF guidelines play a key role in addressing the public health crisis caused by colorectal cancer. (gurufocus.com)
  • Paradoxically, surveys of consumers' views on health care priorities probably do not elicit the personal ideas of respondents but tap into a more general ideological position closer to an earlier collectivist notion of health care. (bmj.com)
  • Ray Rabidoux said that, for example, health care reform may make it necessary to have more nurses and doctors practicing on site at Glacier Hills - which would theoretically reduce the need for elderly patients to be sent to the hospital from time to time. (annarbor.com)
  • Speaking to the health systems representatives in attendance, McGovern said that the transition to value-based care models will mean "it's going to be increasingly important for you to know what's happening when (patients) leave your facility, because you're going to be accountable for their outcomes. (ajmc.com)
  • 7 Patients and families deserve better healthcare delivery systems than they are currently getting, and a focus on PRM is one mechanism for realizing this aim. (springer.com)
  • However current healthcare systems around the work are primarily designed in order to serve a mainly healthy population, and not the increasing percentage of chronically ill often associated with an increasing obsese, terminally unwell and/or aging population. (igi-global.com)
  • In support of health systems and healthcare professionals, we have developed the COVID-19 hub. (philips.com)
  • UC San Diego Health is at the forefront of addressing the complex needs of seniors, recently becoming the first health care system in San Diego to join the Age-Friendly Health Systems initiative and be recognized as Committed to Care Excellence by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI). (ucsd.edu)
  • UC San Diego Health joins more than 100 health systems across the nation that are part of the initiative. (ucsd.edu)
  • We look forward to both sharing our best practices and learning what's working at other health care systems," said Alison Moore, MD, MPH , chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Gerontology at UC San Diego Health. (ucsd.edu)
  • The discussions, he said, center on how to reduce "hospital readmissions and some of those things that cost the health care systems extra dollars, to try to make sure that patients that move from one setting to another are being moved efficiently and only when necessary. (annarbor.com)
  • This has led to a growing usage of handwriting capable mobile technologies and devices able to sync up with EHR systems, thus allowing doctors to access patient records from remote locations and support them in the delivery of care procedures. (mdpi.com)
  • Notwithstanding the benefits of EHR systems and mobile technologies towards improving the delivery of care procedures [ 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 ], there are also indications that their use may have a negative impact on patient-centeredness [ 6 ]. (mdpi.com)
  • The public is tired of these political sound bites and doesn't have faith in either public or private payment systems to fix their health care woes. (forbes.com)
  • UC San Diego Health has spearheaded the four Ms at the Medicine for Seniors clinic in La Jolla and Senior Behavioral Health program in Hillcrest, with the goal of implementing the four Ms care approach in other areas of the system. (ucsd.edu)
  • A nationally representative sample of older adults was used to estimate the effects of religious salience and denomination on six different types of preventative health care (i.e. (isharonline.org)
  • and could facilitate greater "continuity of care" due to improving access and supporting the process of disease management by practitioners (Balas et al. (igi-global.com)
  • It allows practitioners to remotely evaluate, diagnose and treat patients while at the same time offering patients a method to more conveniently and affordably access healthcare. (business.com)
  • Caring Professionals, a New York based home health-care services company and best-in-class fingerprint authentication hardware manufacturer and network security solution provider Zvetco Biometrics today announced that Zvetco's Verifi™ line of fingerprint biometric readers will secure the electronic billing and access to Electronic Health Records of patients and customers. (prweb.com)
  • As a forward looking company, they have installed Zvetco biometric readers and Authasas client - server authentication software to biometrically control access to all patient records. (prweb.com)
  • Founded in 1999, Zvetco provides its customers in corporate enterprise, government, financial services, healthcare, gaming, food services and point-of-sale with cost-effective network security tools that prevent identity theft, increase accountability and eliminate the cost and inconvenience of password-based access. (prweb.com)
  • Yemenis face the loss of paid work, limited education opportunities, food and resource shortages and limited access to healthcare services. (msf.org.au)
  • Our focus is to provide support to the emergency department, which admits almost 3,000 people each month and includes five operating theatres, a 10-bed intensive care unit, inpatient departments of 130 beds and maternity services. (msf.org.au)
  • A questionnaire study was conducted among 760 outpatients of a northern German university hospital to assess their awareness of, and motivation for giving broad consent to health care-embedded biobanking, also addressing the issue of feedback on individual-level research findings. (nature.com)
  • At Philips, we help you connect data, technology and, most importantly, people - to solve your challenges in treating respiratory patients in the hospital and in the home. (philips.com)
  • Our new ventilator, provided globally for use under emergency use authorizations, fills the critical hospital ventilation shortage for COVID-19 patients. (philips.com)
  • Hospital response to a global budget program under universal health insurance in Taiwan. (springermedizin.de)
  • Due to the high security setting, our teams are only aware of the patients that successfully arrive at the hospital. (msf.org.au)
  • Special glucose meters for multi-patient hospital use are now used. (wikipedia.org)
  • Paris Medicine is a term defining the series of changes to the hospital and care received with a hospital that occurred during the period of the French Revolution. (wikipedia.org)
  • These early hospital-like institutions were deeply religions spaces, closely linked to the church, and their main focus was general care for the poor - food and shelter - along with spiritual treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Saltpêtrière became famous, especially for its patient population of mostly prostitutes, and also for becoming the largest hospital in the world by 1789. (wikipedia.org)
  • These practices vary from person to person be sure to consult your patient before assuming anything. (prezi.com)
  • Practices that do not choose to stock and provide H1N1 monovalent vaccine should identify locations for referral of patients for vaccination. (cdc.gov)
  • Warner Chilcott is a leading specialty pharmaceutical company currently focused on the women's healthcare and dermatology segments of the U.S. pharmaceuticals market. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Noting the renewed interest in health care reform and concerned that insufficient attention was being given to children and pregnant women in the debate, the National Forum on the Future of Children and Their Families (jointly sponsored by the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council) arranged for a preliminary review in 1988 of current suggestions for national health care reform (Cislowski, 1988). (nap.edu)
  • If by any chance you spot an inappropriate image within your search results please use this form to let us know, and we'll take care of it shortly. (definitions.net)
  • WHO HQ Library catalog › Results of search for 'su:{Patient acceptance of health care. (who.int)
  • Via empirical research and analysis of 221 patients' questionnaires, the partial least squares (PLS) technique indicates that most of the model's hypotheses are significant. (igi-global.com)