Yersinia enterocolitica: A species of the genus YERSINIA, isolated from both man and animal. It is a frequent cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in children.Yersinia Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus YERSINIA.Yersinia: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic rod- to coccobacillus-shaped bacteria that occurs in a broad spectrum of habitats.Yersinia pseudotuberculosis: A human and animal pathogen causing mesenteric lymphadenitis, diarrhea, and bacteremia.Yersinia pestis: The etiologic agent of PLAGUE in man, rats, ground squirrels, and other rodents.Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins: Proteins isolated from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria.Bodily Secretions: Endogenous substances produced through the activity of intact cells of glands, tissues, or organs.Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Infections: Infections with bacteria of the species YERSINIA PSEUDOTUBERCULOSIS.Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.Plague: An acute infectious disease caused by YERSINIA PESTIS that affects humans, wild rodents, and their ectoparasites. This condition persists due to its firm entrenchment in sylvatic rodent-flea ecosystems throughout the world. Bubonic plague is the most common form.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Bacterial Typing Techniques: Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.Yersinia ruckeri: A species of gram-negative bacteria responsible for red mouth disease in rainbow trout (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS). The bacteria is a natural component of fresh water ecosystems in the United States and Canada.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Plague Vaccine: A suspension of killed Yersinia pestis used for immunizing people in enzootic plague areas.Siphonaptera: An order of parasitic, blood-sucking, wingless INSECTS with the common name of fleas.Adhesins, Bacterial: Cell-surface components or appendages of bacteria that facilitate adhesion (BACTERIAL ADHESION) to other cells or to inanimate surfaces. Most fimbriae (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) of gram-negative bacteria function as adhesins, but in many cases it is a minor subunit protein at the tip of the fimbriae that is the actual adhesin. In gram-positive bacteria, a protein or polysaccharide surface layer serves as the specific adhesin. What is sometimes called polymeric adhesin (BIOFILMS) is distinct from protein adhesin.Pore Forming Cytotoxic Proteins: Proteins secreted from an organism which form membrane-spanning pores in target cells to destroy them. This is in contrast to PORINS and MEMBRANE TRANSPORT PROTEINS that function within the synthesizing organism and COMPLEMENT immune proteins. These pore forming cytotoxic proteins are a form of primitive cellular defense which are also found in human LYMPHOCYTES.Virulence Factors: Those components of an organism that determine its capacity to cause disease but are not required for its viability per se. Two classes have been characterized: TOXINS, BIOLOGICAL and surface adhesion molecules that effect the ability of the microorganism to invade and colonize a host. (From Davis et al., Microbiology, 4th ed. p486)Antigens, Bacterial: Substances elaborated by bacteria that have antigenic activity.Chromogenic Compounds: Colorless, endogenous or exogenous pigment precursors that may be transformed by biological mechanisms into colored compounds; used in biochemical assays and in diagnosis as indicators, especially in the form of enzyme substrates. Synonym: chromogens (not to be confused with pigment-synthesizing bacteria also called chromogens).Agar: A complex sulfated polymer of galactose units, extracted from Gelidium cartilagineum, Gracilaria confervoides, and related red algae. It is used as a gel in the preparation of solid culture media for microorganisms, as a bulk laxative, in making emulsions, and as a supporting medium for immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis.Serotyping: Process of determining and distinguishing species of bacteria or viruses based on antigens they share.O Antigens: The lipopolysaccharide-protein somatic antigens, usually from gram-negative bacteria, important in the serological classification of enteric bacilli. The O-specific chains determine the specificity of the O antigens of a given serotype. O antigens are the immunodominant part of the lipopolysaccharide molecule in the intact bacterial cell. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Electrodes: Electric conductors through which electric currents enter or leave a medium, whether it be an electrolytic solution, solid, molten mass, gas, or vacuum.Electrochemistry: The study of chemical changes resulting from electrical action and electrical activity resulting from chemical changes.2,2'-Dipyridyl: A reagent used for the determination of iron.Solar Energy: Energy transmitted from the sun in the form of electromagnetic radiation.Electrochemical Techniques: The utilization of an electrical current to measure, analyze, or alter chemicals or chemical reactions in solution, cells, or tissues.Luminescent Measurements: Techniques used for determining the values of photometric parameters of light resulting from LUMINESCENCE.Ruthenium: A hard, brittle, grayish-white rare earth metal with an atomic symbol Ru, atomic number 44, and atomic weight 101.07. It is used as a catalyst and hardener for PLATINUM and PALLADIUM.Dyscalculia: Impaired ability in numerical concepts. These inabilities arise as a result of primary neurological lesion, are syndromic (e.g., GERSTMANN SYNDROME ) or acquired due to brain damage.Faculty: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Faculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.Faculty, Dental: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a dental school.Faculty, Nursing: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a nursing school.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Erythema Nodosum: An erythematous eruption commonly associated with drug reactions or infection and characterized by inflammatory nodules that are usually tender, multiple, and bilateral. These nodules are located predominantly on the shins with less common occurrence on the thighs and forearms. They undergo characteristic color changes ending in temporary bruise-like areas. This condition usually subsides in 3-6 weeks without scarring or atrophy.Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis: A species of gram-positive, asporogenous bacteria that was originally isolated from necrotic areas in the kidney of a sheep. It may cause ulcerative lymphangitis, abscesses, and other chronic purulent infections in sheep, horses, and other warm-blooded animals. Human disease may form from contact with infected animals.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Mesenteric Lymphadenitis: INFLAMMATION of LYMPH NODES in the MESENTERY.Gastroenteritis: INFLAMMATION of any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM. Causes of gastroenteritis are many including genetic, infection, HYPERSENSITIVITY, drug effects, and CANCER.Immunity, Innate: The capacity of a normal organism to remain unaffected by microorganisms and their toxins. It results from the presence of naturally occurring ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS, constitutional factors such as BODY TEMPERATURE and immediate acting immune cells such as NATURAL KILLER CELLS.Oligopeptides: Peptides composed of between two and twelve amino acids.Toll-Like Receptors: A family of pattern recognition receptors characterized by an extracellular leucine-rich domain and a cytoplasmic domain that share homology with the INTERLEUKIN 1 RECEPTOR and the DROSOPHILA toll protein. Following pathogen recognition, toll-like receptors recruit and activate a variety of SIGNAL TRANSDUCING ADAPTOR PROTEINS.Toll-Like Receptor 4: A pattern recognition receptor that interacts with LYMPHOCYTE ANTIGEN 96 and LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDES. It mediates cellular responses to GRAM-NEGATIVE BACTERIA.Toll-Like Receptor 2: A pattern recognition receptor that forms heterodimers with other TOLL-LIKE RECEPTORS. It interacts with multiple ligands including PEPTIDOGLYCAN, bacterial LIPOPROTEINS, lipoarabinomannan, and a variety of PORINS.
... identical in all human pathogenic Yersinia species. Böhme, Katja; Steinmann, Rebekka; Kortmann, Jens; Seekircher, Stephanie; ... RNA thermometers regulate gene expression in response to temperature allowing pathogens like Yersinia to switch on silent genes ... Usually, RNA thermometers are located in the 5'UTR, but an intergenic RNA thermometer was found in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis ... Schwiesow, Leah; Lam, Hanh; Dersch, Petra; Auerbuch, Victoria (2015-12-07). "Yersinia Type III Secretion System Master ...
YadA is found in three pathogenic species of Yersinia, Y. pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis, and Y. enterocolitica. The YadA domain ... In Yersinia, it helps initiate the infectious process in host cells and are critical virulence factors. Additionally, bacteria ... In molecular biology, YadA is a protein domain which is short for Yersinia adhesin A. These proteins have strong sequence and ... YadA, an adhesin from Yersinia, was the first member of this family to be characterised. UspA2 from Moraxella was second. The ...
Because of horizontal gene transfer, it is possible to transfer the a clone of the DNA from Yersinia to a non-pathogenic E. ... Experiments involving Yersinia pseudotuberculosis have been used to change the virulence phenotype of non-pathogenic bacteria ... YopT (Yersinia outer protein T) from Yersinia is an example of modification of the host. It modifies the proteolytic cleavage ... Bacterial DNA can be alter from pathogenic to non-pathogenic, random mutations may be introduce to their genome, specific genes ...
The "cold-chain" hypothesis is that psychrotrophic bacteria such as Yersinia and Listeria species contribute to the disease. A ... There is an apparent connection between Crohn's disease, Mycobacterium, other pathogenic bacteria, and genetic markers. In many ... A Possible Pathogenic Mechanism for Crohn's Disease". Gastroenterology. 133 (5): 1487-98. doi:10.1053/j.gastro.2007.08.004. ...
Pathogenic bacteria and fungi have developed the means of survival in animal tissue. They may invade the gastro-intestinal ... Yersinia and Bacillus). Some bacteria survive for long periods of time in intracellular organelles, for instance Mycobacterium ... Besides siderophores, some pathogenic bacteria produce hemophores (heme binding scavenging proteins) or have receptors that ... Siderophores are also important for some pathogenic bacteria for their acquisition of iron. In mammalian hosts, iron is tightly ...
... is a genus of Enterobacteriaceae bacteria containing mostly plant pathogenic species which was named for the famous ... It contains Gram-negative bacteria related to Escherichia coli, Shigella, Salmonella, and Yersinia. They are primarily rod- ...
He has also carried out elegant and incisive genetic studies of Yersinia pestis to explore the origins and spread of plague ... Achtman's research interests are in the population genetics of pathogenic bacteria such as Vibrio cholerae, Salmonella, ... 2014). "Parallel independent evolution of pathogenicity within the genus Yersinia". Proceedings of the National Academy of ... Yersinia pestis, Neisseria meningitidis, Escherichia coli, Helicobacter pylori, and Bordetella. Achtman was one of the ...
The gram-negative bacteria include the model organism Escherichia coli, as well as many pathogenic bacteria, such as ... Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Yersinia pestis. They are an important medical ... Seitz P, Blokesch M (2013). "Cues and regulatory pathways involved in natural competence and transformation in pathogenic and ... The pathogenic capability of gram-negative bacteria is often associated with certain components of their membrane, in ...
His research relates to how pathogenic bacteria, specifically Yersinia pestis, the Black Death plague, cause disease in human ... In 2016 he spoke at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine on "Your Own Worst Enemy: How Yersinia ... He is a specialist in pathogenic bacteria, and specifically in how the Black Death plague causes disease in human beings and ... Wyndham Lathem, Ph.D., "Your Own Worst Enemy: How Yersinia pestis Turns the Body Against Itself." Department of Microbiology ...
... is a siderophore found in the pathogenic bacteria Yersinia pestis, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, and Yersinia enterocolitica, as ... In the absence of a high-affinity iron-chelating compound, pathogenic Yersinia, responsible for such lethal disease as the ... "Role of the Yersinia pestis Yersiniabactin Iron Acquisition System in the Incidence of Flea-Borne Plague". PLoS ONE. 5 (12): ... doi:10.1099/mic.0.037945-0. Perry, R. D.; Shah, J.; Bearden, S. W.; Thompson, J. M.; Fetherston, J. D. (2003). "Yersinia pestis ...
EPEC (see Pathogenic Escherichia coli) containing plasmids with genes for EAF (Escherichia coli adherence factor) will adhere ... and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, as well as infectious prions, such as in bovine spongiform encephalitis (Mad-cow disease), as ... M cells are exploited by several pathogenic gram-negative bacteria including Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhimurium, ...
Methylation of GATC motif by DamMT in pathogenic bacteria, for example,Vibrio cholerae, Yersinia pestis, and Yersinia ... mismatch repair and DNA replication enables pathogenic bacteria to combat against antibiotics. These results show why future ...
... coli Listeria monocytogenes Pathogenic vibrios Salmonella Shigella species Yersinia enterocolitica Protozoa Cryptosporidium ... Yersinia pestis (plague, category A) Chapare virus (category A areanavirus) Lujo (category A arenavirus) Chlamydia psittaci ( ... Marburg Yersinia pestis Diseases with bioterrorism potential, CDC category B: Brucella species (brucellosis) Burkholderia ...
The T3SS effectors of pathogenic E. coli, Shigella, Salmonella, and Yersinia regulate actin dynamics to facilitate their own ... Similarly, YopE, YopP, and YopJ (in Yersinia enterocolitica, Yersinia pestis, and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis respectively) ... Many pathogenic bacteria are known to have secreted effectors but for most species the exact number is unknown. Once a pathogen ... Many pathogenic bacteria have developed mechanisms to prevent apoptosis, not the least to maintain their host environment. For ...
... in collaboration with the discoverer of its pathogenic agent, Yersinia pestis, by Alexandre Yersin (1863-1943), and went to ... was its pathogenic agent, and Louis Pasteur became interested in it too. In 1906, a veterinarian and immunologist, Camille ...
Despite that fact, some pathogenic bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis ...
... plasmids in pathogenic Shigella and Yersinia, as well as the ability to bestow pathogenic properties onto E. coli via ... Adoption of a pathogenic lifestyle often yields a fundamental shift in an organism's ecological niche. The erratic phylogenetic ... Some notable exceptions include recently formed pathogenic bacteria. This was initially described in a study by Cole et al. in ... Another factor to consider is the change in population that corresponds to an evolution towards an obligately pathogenic life. ...
Therefore, PCR is recognized as a DNA detector in order to amplify and trace the presence of pathogenic strands in different ... used in food and beverage preparation Listeria Microbiology Salmonella Shigella Staphylococcus Vibrio Yeast infection Yersinia ... However, microorganisms and their products can also be used to combat these pathogenic microbes. Probiotic bacteria, including ...
... is a genus of pathogenic, Gram-negative bacteria. They are small coccobacillary or rod-shaped, nonmotile organisms ... Collins FM (1996). Pasteurella, Yersinia, and Francisella. In: Baron's Medical Microbiology (Baron S et al., eds.) (4th ed.). ... F. novicida and F. philomiragia (previously Yersinia philomiragia) are associated with septicemia and invasive systemic ...
citri Yersinia pestis Oliver JD (February 2005). "The viable but nonculturable state in bacteria". The Journal of Microbiology ... Jul 2010). "Recent findings on the viable but nonculturable state in pathogenic bacteria". FEMS Microbiol Rev. 34 (4): 415-25. ... "Entry of Yersinia pestis into the viable but nonculturable state in a low-temperature tap water microcosm". PLoS ONE. 6 (3): ...
Some members of Yersinia are pathogenic in humans; in particular, Y. pestis is the causative agent of the plague. Rodents are ... Yersinia is a genus of bacteria in the family Yersiniaceae. Yersinia species are Gram-negative, coccobacilli bacteria, a few ... Yersinia Enterocolitis Mimicking Crohn's Disease in a Toddler Sweden: Pork warnings over new stomach illness Yersinia genomes ... Speculations exist as to whether or not certain Yersinia can also be spread by protozoonotic mechanisms, since Yersinia species ...
"Yersinia pestis" (PDF). Wadsworth Center. 2006. "Bacteria Table" (PDF). Creighton University School of Medicine. Retrieved 2015 ... Pathogenic bacteria are bacteria that can cause disease. This article deals with human pathogenic bacteria. Although most ... Pathogenic bacteria also cause infections such as tetanus, typhoid fever, diphtheria, syphilis, and leprosy. Pathogenic ... Bacterial gastroenteritis is caused by enteric, pathogenic bacteria. These pathogenic species are usually distinct from the ...
Similar to the other pathogenic strains, there are signs of loss of function mutations. The chromosome of strain KIM is ... Among them was Yersinia-specific (also present in Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica) Ysr141 (Yersinia small RNA 141 ... The closest relative is the gastrointestinal pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, and more distantly Yersinia enterocolitica. ... Yersinia Pestis) Wyndham Lathem speaking on "From Mild to Murderous: How Yersinia pestis Evolved to Cause Pneumonic Plague.". ...
Isberg RR, Van Nhieu GT (1994). "Two mammalian cell internalization strategies used by pathogenic bacteria". Annu. Rev. Genet. ... This article incorporates text from the public domain Pfam and InterPro IPR015227 Yersinia pseudotuberculosis genome "Yersinia ... the superantigen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis-derived mitogen, and the high-pathogenicity island among Yersinia ... "Global discovery of small RNAs in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis identifies Yersinia-specific small, noncoding RNAs required for ...
Human pathogenic strains are usually confined to the intestinal tract and lead to enteritis/diarrhea. The portal of entry is ... Yersinia enterocolitica genomes and related information at PATRIC, a Bioinformatics Resource Center funded by NIAID "Yersinia ... However, Yersinia strains can be isolated from clinical materials, so have to be identified at the species level. Y. ... After oral uptake, Yersinia species replicate in the terminal ileum and invade Peyer's patches. From here they can disseminate ...
However, the bacterium responsible, Yersinia pestis, is commonly endemic in only a few rodent species and is usually ... has been found to be pathogenic in humans and carried by brown rats.[90] ...
Like the well-known pYV plasmid of human pathogenic Yersiniae, pYR4 is a member of the IncFII family. Thirty-one percent of the ... Vitronectin binds to a specific stretch within the head region of yersinia adhesin a and thereby modulates yersinia ... Yersinia ruckeri is the causative agent of enteric redmouth disease, a bacterial infection of marine and freshwater fish. The ... Here, we report and analyze the complete DNA sequence of pYR4, a plasmid from a highly pathogenic Norwegian Y. ruckeri isolate ...
Prevalence of pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica in groups of swine at slaughter.. Funk JA1, Troutt HF, Isaacson RE, Fossler CP ... In order to estimate the prevalence of swine herds infected with pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica, 103 lots of market swine ... Of the 107 pathogenic Y. enterocolitica isolates identified, 89.7% were serotype O:5 and 3.7% were serotype O:3. The results ... Pathogenic strains were defined as those harboring the ail gene which has been identified in Y. enterocolitica that causes ...
Variation in lipid A structure in the pathogenic yersiniae.. Rebeil R1, Ernst RK, Gowen BB, Miller SI, Hinnebusch BJ. ... Important pathogens in the genus Yersinia include the plague bacillus Yersinia pestis and two enteropathogenic species, ... Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica. A shift in growth temperature induced changes in the number and type ... the three yersiniae synthesized LPS containing predominantly hexa-acylated lipid A. This more complex lipid A stimulated human ...
CHROMagar Yersinia, a New Chromogenic Agar for Screening of Potentially Pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica Isolates in Stools. ... CHROMagar Yersinia, a New Chromogenic Agar for Screening of Potentially Pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica Isolates in Stools ... CHROMagar Yersinia, a New Chromogenic Agar for Screening of Potentially Pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica Isolates in Stools ... CHROMagar Yersinia, a New Chromogenic Agar for Screening of Potentially Pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica Isolates in Stools ...
Yersinia enterocolitica, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, and Yersinia pestis, and the salmonid fish pathogen, Yersinia ruckeri (20 ... Pathogenic Yersinia Species Carry a Novel, Cold-Inducible Major Cold Shock Protein Tandem Gene Duplication Producing both ... Pathogenic Yersinia Species Carry a Novel, Cold-Inducible Major Cold Shock Protein Tandem Gene Duplication Producing both ... Pathogenic Yersinia Species Carry a Novel, Cold-Inducible Major Cold Shock Protein Tandem Gene Duplication Producing both ...
... was shown to be in two fragments in pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica. The cleavage site in the structural gene of the 23S ... The 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) was shown to be in two fragments in pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica. The cleavage site in the ... Intervening sequences (IVSs) in the 23S ribosomal RNA genes of pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica strains. The IVSs in Y. ...
Fredriksson-Ahomaa, M; Wacheck, S; Koenig, M; Stephan, R (2009). Prevalence of pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia ... Prevalence of pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in wild boars in Switzerland ... Prevalence of anti-Yersinia antibodies in tonsil fluid was 65%. Detection rate of enteropathogenic Yersinia in tonsils of 153 ... Prevalence of anti-Yersinia antibodies in tonsil fluid was 65%. Detection rate of enteropathogenic Yersinia in tonsils of 153 ...
... two pathogenic species (Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis), and Yersinia enterocolitica, which includes typically ... Detection of pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica by using Congo red-magnesium oxalate agar medium. J. Clin. Microbiol.27:213-214 ... Pathogenic biotypes of Yersinia enterocolitica (serotypes O:3, O:8, O:9, and O:13), but not environmental biotypes (serotypes O ... Pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica Strains Increase the Outer Membrane Permeability in Response to Environmental Stimuli by ...
Yersinia enterocolitica - Isolation and identification from human clinical samples, from animal sources and from food; ... Yersinia enterocolitica - Culture; Molecular diagnosis (PCR); Molecular identification of pathogenic strains; Molecular ... Yersinia enterocolitica - Isolation and identification from human clinical samples, from animal sources and from food; ... Yersinia enterocolitica: Culture; Molecular diagnosis (PCR); Molecular identification of pathogen strains; Molecular ...
"Yersinia pestis" (PDF). Wadsworth Center. 2006. "Bacteria Table" (PDF). Creighton University School of Medicine. Retrieved 2015 ... Pathogenic bacteria are bacteria that can cause disease. This article deals with human pathogenic bacteria. Although most ... Pathogenic bacteria also cause infections such as tetanus, typhoid fever, diphtheria, syphilis, and leprosy. Pathogenic ... Bacterial gastroenteritis is caused by enteric, pathogenic bacteria. These pathogenic species are usually distinct from the ...
Isberg RR, Van Nhieu GT (1994). "Two mammalian cell internalization strategies used by pathogenic bacteria". Annu. Rev. Genet. ... This article incorporates text from the public domain Pfam and InterPro IPR015227 Yersinia pseudotuberculosis genome "Yersinia ... the superantigen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis-derived mitogen, and the high-pathogenicity island among Yersinia ... "Global discovery of small RNAs in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis identifies Yersinia-specific small, noncoding RNAs required for ...
The journal covers all pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi, prions, parasites, and protozoa that infect humans or animals. ... There are three species within the genus Yersinia that are pathogenic for humans: Yersinia enterocolitica, Yersinia ... of the three major pathogenic Yersinia species will allow the development of a cross-species microarray for pathogenic Yersinia ... and faster methods to identify pathogenic Yersinia in food systems during a food-related pathogenic crisis. ...
The journal covers all pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi, prions, parasites, and protozoa that infect humans or animals. ... A. S. Waage, T. Vardund, V. Lund, and G. Kapperud, "Detection of low numbers of pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica in ... pathogenic Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., and Yersinia enterocolitica, using a virulence factor gene-based ... H. Huang, W. L. Ma, X. Q. Dong, B. Zhang, Q. Wu, and W. L. Zheng, "DNA microarray for the detection of Yersinia pesits," Di Yi ...
YopJ has been shown to be secreted via a type III secretion system in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (27) and the function of most ... YopJ of Yersinia spp. Is Sufficient To Cause Downregulation of Multiple Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases in Eukaryotic Cells ... A secreted Salmonella protein with homology to an avirulence determinant of plant pathogenic bacteria. Wolf-Dietrich Hardt and ... and the animal pathogens Salmonella spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella spp., Yersinia spp., and Escherichia coli spp. ( ...
Yersinia enterocolitica subsp. enterocolitica ATCC ® 9610™ Designation: 33114 TypeStrain=True Application: Media testing ... pseudotuberculosis, and pathogenic for man. N.Y. State J. Med. 39: 1749-1753, 1939. ... Nucleotide (GenBank) : M59292 Yersinia enterocolitica 16S ribosomal RNA. Nucleotide (GenBank) : AF366378 Yersinia ... Yersinia enterocolitica subsp. enterocolitica (Schleifstein and Coleman) Frederiksen (ATCC® 9610D™) Add to ...
Pathogenic Yersinia sp. utilise a common type III secretion system to translocate several anti-host Yop effectors into the ... Pathogenic Yersinia sp. utilise a common type III secretion system to translocate several anti-host Yop effectors into the ... This suggests that LcrH-regulated secretion of the translocators could be used by Yersinia to control effector translocation ...
First, we demonstrated that Yersinia pestis is resistant or transiently resistant to various ameba species. Second, we showed ... Cultivation of pathogenic and opportunistic free-living amebas. Clin Microbiol Rev. 2002;15:342-54. DOIPubMed ... The ability to replicate in macrophages is conserved between Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Infect Immun. ... Easterday WR, Kausrud KL, Star B, Heier L, Haley BJ, Ageyev V, et al. An additional step in the transmission of Yersinia pestis ...
Yersinia pestis. Plasmids: R721, pAPEC-1, ColV-K30, F, pO157. Enterobacterial bacteriophages (φ): HK620, CP-933V, and P2. ... Identification of pathogen-specific and conserved genes expressed in vivo by an avian pathogenic Escherichia coli strain. ... Identification of pathogen-specific and conserved genes expressed in vivo by an avian pathogenic Escherichia coli strain ... Identification of pathogen-specific and conserved genes expressed in vivo by an avian pathogenic Escherichia coli strain ...
Over 250 Yersinia researchers from 18 countries gathered to present and discuss their research. ... The 9th International Symposium on Yersinia was held in Lexington, Kentucky, USA on October 10-14, 2006. ... TOC:Comparative Genome Analyses of the Pathogenic Yersiniae Based on the Genome Sequence of Yersinia enterocolitica Strain.- ... Genomics.- Comparative Genome Analyses of the Pathogenic Yersiniae Based on the Genome Sequence of Yersinia enterocolitica ...
Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis; and Yersinia pestis. Further examples of analytes include viruses such ... Process for the electrochemical decontamination of water polluted by pathogenic germs with peroxide formed in situ. ... as African horse sickness virus; African swine fever virus; Akabane virus; Avian influenza virus (highly pathogenic); Bhanja ...
Highly pathogenic avian influenza. *Monkeypox virus. *Yersinia pestis. *Other agents handled in the facility: *Mycobacterium ... Yersinia pestis CO92, BSL3 , aerosol, anterior cervical, footpad. *Mycobacterium tuberculosis multiple strains (sensitive, MDR ...
Yersinia enterocolitica. More preferably, the pathogenic-bacteria are Listeria monocytogenes. ... The use according to any of the claims 24 to 31, wherein the food-borne pathogenic bacterium is Listeria monocytogenes. ... 2. The culture according to claim 1, wherein the food-borne pathogenic bacterium is Listeria monocytogenes. 3. The culture of ... Food-borne pathogenic and spoilage bacteria can be aerobic, anaerobic or facultative anaerobic, and thus, the elimination of ...
There are three pathogenic species of Yersinia: Yersinia pestis, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. ... Pathogenic Yersinia species use a type III secretion system to inhibit phagocytosis by eukaryotic cells. At 37°C, the secretion ... Yersinia pestis causes plague and is transmitted by flea bites or infectious aerosols, while Yersinia enterocolitica and ... Temperature-inducible outer membrane protein of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica is associated with the ...
  • Our work is typically comparative - we do not work on a single pathogenic "pet" organism, but instead compare related surface proteins from different species, studying their similarities and subtle differences. (uio.no)
  • Os superantíxenos , adhesións bacterianas, e as accións das Yops (que son proteínas bacterianas que antes se pensaba que eran "proteínas da membrana externa de Yersinia ") que están codificadas no " plásmido para a virulencia de Yersinia ", normalente chamado pYV, causan a patoxénese no hóspede e permiten ás bacterias vivir parasiticamente. (wikipedia.org)
  • Yops of the Pathogenic Yersinia spp. (asmscience.org)
  • By action of these Yops, Yersinia resists phagocytosis and escapes primary killing by phagocytes. (jimmunol.org)
  • 1. A biologically pure culture of Lactobacillus curvatus bacterium deposited in the Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen and Zellkulturen GmBH (DSMZ) under the accession number DSM 18775, wherein said Lactobacillus curvatum bacterium has the ability at a temperature ranging from 2 to 10° C. of inhibiting the growth of at least one food-borne pathogenic bacterium without causing sensory changes in food. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • 3. The culture of Lactobacillus curvatus according to claim 1, wherein said Lactobacillus curvatus in addition to having the ability of inhibiting the growth of at least one food-borne pathogenic bacterium also has a bacteriocidal effect on at least one food-borne pathogenic bacterium at a temperature ranging from 2 to 10° C. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • 4. A composition for preserving a food product comprising an amount of the culture according to claim 1 effective to inhibit the growth of at least one food borne pathogenic bacterium at a temperature ranging from 2 to 10° C. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Yersinia enterocolitica , a gram-negative bacterium, is responsible for 50% of all the clinical sepsis episodes that occur as a result of transfusion of contaminated red blood cells (RBCs) ( 19 ). (asm.org)
  • Although non-pathogenic biotypes present in the various environments or in asymptomatic carrier animals including pigs, pets, and farm animals, recent findings show that they are responsible for mild and serious infectious including yersiniosis, diarrheal disease, erythema nodosum, focal abscess of liver, sepsis, and endocarditis. (minervamedica.it)
  • For the chromosomal integration site we chose the araFGHC-araBA locus of a Y. enterocolitica strain 8081 derivative, which is the highly pathogenic strain used in the genome sequencing project. (asm.org)
  • An example is the Ysc-Yop T3SS apparatus assembled by pathogenic Yersinia spp. (diva-portal.org)
  • Upon further investigation, a YopN C-terminal segment encompassing residues 278 to 287 was probably responsible, as this region is critical for YopN to control T3S, via enabling a specific interaction with TyeA.Investigated herein were molecular mechanisms to orchestrate substrate export by the T3SS of Yersinia. (diva-portal.org)
  • The predicted N-terminal element that occurs solely in the Yersinia YopD translocator family is essential for optimal T3SS and full disease progression. (diva-portal.org)
  • In contrast, the Yersinia T3SS is expressed under aerobic or anaerobic, iron-poor conditions, such as those encountered by Yersinia once they cross the epithelial barrier and encounter phagocytic cells. (prolekare.cz)
  • However, it was found that black esculin hydrolysis products produced by non- Yersinia colonies diffused within the medium and masked potentially virulent, esculin-negative Y. enterocolitica colonies ( 13 ). (asm.org)
  • The gene encoding the heat-stable enterotoxin (yst) was cloned from the chromosome of Yersinia enterocolitica W1024 (serotype O:9), and the nucleotide sequence was determined. (unibas.ch)
  • We identified a glucosyltransferase (YGT) and an ADP-ribosyltransferase (YART) in Yersinia mollaretii , highly related to glucosylating toxins from Clostridium difficile , the cause of antibiotics-associated enterocolitis. (sciencemag.org)
  • Both Yersinia toxins consist of an amino-terminal enzyme domain, an autoprotease domain activated by inositol hexakisphosphate, and a carboxyl-terminal translocation domain. (sciencemag.org)
  • Food-borne zoonotic diseases are caused by consuming food or drinking water contaminated by pathogenic (disease-causing) micro-organisms such as bacteria and their toxins, viruses and parasites. (europa.eu)
  • To establish a competitive advantage, pathogenic bacteria have evolved sophisticated strategies for evasion or neutralization of host defense mechanisms. (jimmunol.org)