Technology Transfer: Spread and adoption of inventions and techniques from one geographic area to another, from one discipline to another, or from one sector of the economy to another. For example, improvements in medical equipment may be transferred from industrial countries to developing countries, advances arising from aerospace engineering may be applied to equipment for persons with disabilities, and innovations in science arising from government research are made available to private enterprise.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Intellectual Property: Property, such as patents, trademarks, and copyright, that results from creative effort. The Patent and Copyright Clause (Art. 1, Sec. 8, cl. 8) of the United States Constitution provides for promoting the progress of science and useful arts by securing for limited times to authors and inventors, the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 5th ed, p1014)Entrepreneurship: The organization, management, and assumption of risks of a business or enterprise, usually implying an element of change or challenge and a new opportunity.Technology, Pharmaceutical: The application of scientific knowledge or technology to pharmacy and the pharmaceutical industry. It includes methods, techniques, and instrumentation in the manufacture, preparation, compounding, dispensing, packaging, and storing of drugs and other preparations used in diagnostic and determinative procedures, and in the treatment of patients.Marketing of Health Services: Application of marketing principles and techniques to maximize the use of health care resources.Licensure: The legal authority or formal permission from authorities to carry on certain activities which by law or regulation require such permission. It may be applied to licensure of institutions as well as individuals.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Public-Private Sector Partnerships: An organizational enterprise between a public sector agency, federal, state or local, and a private sector entity. Skills and assets of each sector are shared to deliver a service or facility for the benefit or use of the general public.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Foramen Ovale, Patent: A condition in which the FORAMEN OVALE in the ATRIAL SEPTUM fails to close shortly after birth. This results in abnormal communications between the two upper chambers of the heart. An isolated patent ovale foramen without other structural heart defects is usually of no hemodynamic significance.IndiaInvestments: Use for articles on the investing of funds for income or profit.Drug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.Afipia: A genus of gram-negative, oxidase-positive, nonfermentative rods which are motile by means of a single flagellum. Afipia felis and BARTONELLA HENSELAE are causative agents of CAT-SCRATCH DISEASE. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)Small Business: For-profit enterprise with relatively few to moderate number of employees and low to moderate volume of sales.NevadaEnteroendocrine Cells: Cells found throughout the lining of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT that contain and secrete regulatory PEPTIDE HORMONES and/or BIOGENIC AMINES.Enterochromaffin Cells: A subtype of enteroendocrine cells found in the gastrointestinal MUCOSA, particularly in the glands of PYLORIC ANTRUM; DUODENUM; and ILEUM. These cells secrete mainly SEROTONIN and some neuropeptides. Their secretory granules stain readily with silver (argentaffin stain).Enteric Nervous System: Two ganglionated neural plexuses in the gut wall which form one of the three major divisions of the autonomic nervous system. The enteric nervous system innervates the gastrointestinal tract, the pancreas, and the gallbladder. It contains sensory neurons, interneurons, and motor neurons. Thus the circuitry can autonomously sense the tension and the chemical environment in the gut and regulate blood vessel tone, motility, secretions, and fluid transport. The system is itself governed by the central nervous system and receives both parasympathetic and sympathetic innervation. (From Kandel, Schwartz, and Jessel, Principles of Neural Science, 3d ed, p766)Gastrointestinal Hormones: HORMONES secreted by the gastrointestinal mucosa that affect the timing or the quality of secretion of digestive enzymes, and regulate the motor activity of the digestive system organs.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Muscle, Smooth: Unstriated and unstriped muscle, one of the muscles of the internal organs, blood vessels, hair follicles, etc. Contractile elements are elongated, usually spindle-shaped cells with centrally located nuclei. Smooth muscle fibers are bound together into sheets or bundles by reticular fibers and frequently elastic nets are also abundant. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Hearing Aids: Wearable sound-amplifying devices that are intended to compensate for impaired hearing. These generic devices include air-conduction hearing aids and bone-conduction hearing aids. (UMDNS, 1999)Inventions: A novel composition, device, or process, independently conceived de novo or derived from a pre-existing model.Aluminum Oxide: An oxide of aluminum, occurring in nature as various minerals such as bauxite, corundum, etc. It is used as an adsorbent, desiccating agent, and catalyst, and in the manufacture of dental cements and refractories.Nanostructures: Materials which have structured components with at least one dimension in the range of 1 to 100 nanometers. These include NANOCOMPOSITES; NANOPARTICLES; NANOTUBES; and NANOWIRES.Biotechnology: Body of knowledge related to the use of organisms, cells or cell-derived constituents for the purpose of developing products which are technically, scientifically and clinically useful. Alteration of biologic function at the molecular level (i.e., GENETIC ENGINEERING) is a central focus; laboratory methods used include TRANSFECTION and CLONING technologies, sequence and structure analysis algorithms, computer databases, and gene and protein structure function analysis and prediction.Waiting Lists: Prospective patient listings for appointments or treatments.Digestive System Diseases: Diseases in any part of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT or the accessory organs (LIVER; BILIARY TRACT; PANCREAS).Gastroenterology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of the physiology and diseases of the digestive system and related structures (esophagus, liver, gallbladder, and pancreas).Time Management: Planning and control of time to improve efficiency and effectiveness.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Efficiency, Organizational: The capacity of an organization, institution, or business to produce desired results with a minimum expenditure of energy, time, money, personnel, materiel, etc.Wind: The motion of air relative to the earth's surface.Solar Energy: Energy transmitted from the sun in the form of electromagnetic radiation.Power Plants: Units that convert some other form of energy into electrical energy.Bioelectric Energy Sources: Electric power supply devices which convert biological energy, such as chemical energy of metabolism or mechanical energy of periodic movements, into electrical energy.Nuclear Power Plants: Facilities that convert NUCLEAR ENERGY into electrical energy.Flight, Animal: The use of wings or wing-like appendages to remain aloft and move through the air.Air Movements: The motion of air currents.Equipment Reuse: Further or repeated use of equipment, instruments, devices, or materials. It includes additional use regardless of the original intent of the producer as to disposability or durability. It does not include the repeated use of fluids or solutions.Meat Products: Articles of food which are derived by a process of manufacture from any portion of carcasses of any animal used for food (e.g., head cheese, sausage, scrapple).Polytetrafluoroethylene: Homopolymer of tetrafluoroethylene. Nonflammable, tough, inert plastic tubing or sheeting; used to line vessels, insulate, protect or lubricate apparatus; also as filter, coating for surgical implants or as prosthetic material. Synonyms: Fluoroflex; Fluoroplast; Ftoroplast; Halon; Polyfene; PTFE; Tetron.Food Inspection: Examination of foods to assure wholesome and clean products free from unsafe microbes or chemical contamination, natural or added deleterious substances, and decomposition during production, processing, packaging, etc.Disposable Equipment: Apparatus, devices, or supplies intended for one-time or temporary use.Water Wells: Constructions built to access underground water.Membranes, Artificial: Artificially produced membranes, such as semipermeable membranes used in artificial kidney dialysis (RENAL DIALYSIS), monomolecular and bimolecular membranes used as models to simulate biological CELL MEMBRANES. These membranes are also used in the process of GUIDED TISSUE REGENERATION.Trace Elements: A group of chemical elements that are needed in minute quantities for the proper growth, development, and physiology of an organism. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Metals: Electropositive chemical elements characterized by ductility, malleability, luster, and conductance of heat and electricity. They can replace the hydrogen of an acid and form bases with hydroxyl radicals. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Potentiometry: Solution titration in which the end point is read from the electrode-potential variations with the concentrations of potential determining ions. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Electrodes: Electric conductors through which electric currents enter or leave a medium, whether it be an electrolytic solution, solid, molten mass, gas, or vacuum.Zinc: A metallic element of atomic number 30 and atomic weight 65.38. It is a necessary trace element in the diet, forming an essential part of many enzymes, and playing an important role in protein synthesis and in cell division. Zinc deficiency is associated with ANEMIA, short stature, HYPOGONADISM, impaired WOUND HEALING, and geophagia. It is known by the symbol Zn.Copper: A heavy metal trace element with the atomic symbol Cu, atomic number 29, and atomic weight 63.55.
  • At the same time, patents are an important source of information since the publication of an invention is an incentive for further research and development. (dpma.de)
  • If a company files a patent application for an employee's invention, that employee is entitled to remuneration. (dpma.de)
  • A patent is not automatically created when you file an invention at the German Patent and Trade Mark Office (DPMA). (dpma.de)
  • The exclusive right of use and the right to prevent others from using the invention come into effect with the publication of the grant in the Patent Gazette ( Patentblatt ). (dpma.de)
  • If you are the proprietor of a patent, you can exploit your invention and secure an exclusive position in the market. (dpma.de)
  • Your success in obtaining a patent depends not only on the originality and utility of the invention, but also on how carefully you have kept a research notebook. (drexel.edu)
  • In the US, being able to prove when you made an invention may be vital to getting a patent, and it is important to know that patent claims are regularly challenged by competitors. (drexel.edu)
  • This can be most easily managed by submitting your invention disclosures as early as possible, preferably before any public discussion of the technology, so that we can help you to obtain the maximum benefit from U.S. and international patent laws. (drexel.edu)
  • If you fail to file a patent application within one year of disclosing your invention publicly, all possibilities of obtaining a patent are lost, both in the U.S. and in foreign countries. (drexel.edu)
  • ALL foreign patent opportunities for an invention are lost if ANY disclosure of that invention occurs prior to the filing of a patent application. (drexel.edu)
  • Having produced a non-obvious, non-abstract invention and playing by the patent office's rules is no guarantee of a patent granting. (ipwatchdog.com)
  • A patent is a form of intellectual property that gives its owner the legal right to exclude others from making, using, selling and importing an invention for a limited period of years, in exchange for publishing an enabling public disclosure of the invention. (wikipedia.org)
  • Typically, however, a patent application must include one or more claims that define the invention. (wikipedia.org)
  • Under the World Trade Organization 's (WTO) TRIPS Agreement , patents should be available in WTO member states for any invention, in all fields of technology, provided they are new, involve an inventive step, and are capable of industrial application. (wikipedia.org)
  • Among the forty invention disclosures filed for patenting by the NCCR members, eighteen patents were granted, between 2001 and 2011. (snf.ch)
  • University administrations and other stakeholders evaluate technology transfer offices (TTO) via 1) revenue generated, 2) licenses executed, 3) startups created, 4) invention disclosure forms (IDF) received, and 5) patents issued. (ipwatchdog.com)
  • The team provides an array of services to support technology transfer activities: negotiating collaborative agreements in accordance with Federal statutes and regulations, reviewing employee invention reports, making recommendations concerning the filing of domestic and foreign patent applications and working closely with inventors and outside parties to facilitate commercialization efforts for public health benefit. (cdc.gov)
  • We're launching Reclaim Invention , a new initiative to urge universities to rethink how they use patents. (eff.org)
  • When determining what parties to sell or license patents to, [ School name ] will take appropriate steps to research the past practices of potential buyers or licensees and favor parties whose business practices are designed to benefit society through commercialization and invention. (eff.org)
  • A Delaware federal judge on Tuesday invalidated a home audio patent that D&M Holdings accuses rival Sonos of infringing, saying the invention is routine and conventional in one of the first decisions to apply new Federal Circuit rules for such summary judgment motions. (law360.com)
  • Educates Center members about the process of invention disclosure and subsequent patent applications and facilitate interactions with University Technology Transfer Center. (rochester.edu)
  • The present invention relates to techniques forThe present invention relates to techniques fortransferring conductive patterns to a substrate,comprising a module configured to transfer a schemeof a sinterable material to said substrate and anoptical module. (iit.it)
  • Different patents and published patent applications may use different words to describe the same concepts and thus patents that cover different aspects of the invention may not show up in a search. (wikipedia.org)
  • Even the mainstream media fails to acknowledge the tremendous work put forth by inventors long before they file their first patent application. (ipwatchdog.com)
  • A crucial part of writing The Plight of the Patentee is conducting interviews with inventors (and their lawyers and investors) that have been wronged by the broken patent system. (ipwatchdog.com)
  • Sharing your stories and insights is crucial for producing a book that will benefit the entire community of inventors, patentees and patent professionals. (ipwatchdog.com)
  • This was incorporated into the Statute of Monopolies (1624) in which Parliament restricted the Crown's power explicitly so that the King could only issue letters patent to the inventors or introducers of original inventions for a fixed number of years. (wikipedia.org)
  • These are the April 17, 2016 KEI comments on the NIH proposed exclusive license to Ovensa, for patents on 5T4 antibodies for cancer treatment and diagnosis. (keionline.org)
  • Only written comments and/or applications for a license which are received by the NCI Technology Transfer Center on or before October 11, 2016 will be considered. (federalregister.gov)
  • One aspect of the debate has focused on the proposed European Union directive on the patentability of computer-implemented inventions, also known as the "CII Directive" or the "Software Patent Directive," which was ultimately rejected by the EU Parliament in July 2005. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are several arguments commonly given in defense of software patents or defense of the patentability of computer-implemented inventions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Her main areas of expertise are biotechnology, food technology, and pharmaceuticals, advising companies and research centers in patent drafting and prosecution, technology transfer and freedom to operate. (omicsonline.org)
  • The goal for the organization is to each year feature a mini-symposium on Technology Transfer at the NIH Research Festival that features former intramural investigators who have gone on to found or have successful careers in patent law, technology transfer or at companies. (nih.gov)
  • With strong support for FASTR (the Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act) in both parties, Vice-President Biden making open access a major component of his Cancer Moonshot initiative , and presumptive presidential nominee Hillary Clinton including access to research in her platform , signs are looking good that Congress will finally pass an open access mandate. (eff.org)
  • Even if we pass an open access law this year, though, there's still a major obstacle in the way of publicly funded research fully benefiting the public: patent trolls. (eff.org)
  • When patent trolls' intentions are so often at odds with the mission of research benefiting the world, it's worth asking: why do universities sell to them? (eff.org)
  • Even as we move toward a time when most publicly funded research is publicly available, patent trolls make it more difficult for practicing companies to use that knowledge (subscription required, ironically). (eff.org)
  • Universities filing patents for federally funded research is a relatively new phenomenon. (eff.org)
  • Today, it's unusual for a research university not to have a technology transfer office, an office whose job it is to file patents and sell or transfer them to third parties. (eff.org)
  • These practices not only help to back up patent claims, but also ensure against loss of valuable data, provide proof of fulfillment of contracts, and protect against allegations of conflict of interest or research fraud. (drexel.edu)
  • Unless done on a confidential basis, telling another party the details of your research may cost you patent rights. (drexel.edu)
  • It is Drexel's goal to see broad publication and dissemination of the results of your research, yet the very publication of those results can have a negative impact on your ability to patent new inventions. (drexel.edu)
  • Patenting brings to light the research activities created through university-industry collaborations. (mdpi.com)
  • They identified relevant technology that had been developed by a Thai research institution, the Center for Waste Utilization and Management at King Mongkut University of Technology, Thonburi. (wipo.int)
  • March 15, 2007 - According to research reported by the Georgia Institute of Technology, the 3D shells of tiny ocean creatures known as diatoms could provide the foundation for novel electronic devices. (electroiq.com)
  • Broadly speaking, developing countries view this monopoly as a blank check for high prices and limited availability, while developed countries view patents as the main way to provide incentives for their pharmaceutical industry to invest in research and development for new cures. (ip-watch.org)
  • Other proposed studies would explore alternative incentives for R&D such as a levy for pharmaceutical companies not engaging in research to tackle antimicrobial resistance, de-linkage of research funding and drug pricing, technology transfer, compulsory licences, exhaustion of rights to allow parallel trade, and a globally accessible licence database for compulsory and voluntary licences. (ip-watch.org)
  • Group B (developed nations), in its statement on the subject of patents and health delivered on 28 June, said patent protection is "critical for research & development" in the field of pharmaceuticals. (ip-watch.org)
  • From 2001 to 2013, this multi-disciplinary network coordinated by the University of Neuchâtel was able to count on the support of teams from the universities of Fribourg, Bern, Lausanne, Geneva and Zurich, as well as both Swiss Federal Institutes of Technology (ETHZ and EPFL) and research institutions such as Agroscope and CABI-Delémont. (snf.ch)
  • Their analysis of detailed firm-level data reveal that royalty payments for intangibles transferred to affiliates increase at the time of reforms, as do affiliate research and development (R&D) expenditures and total levels of foreign patent applications. (ssrn.com)
  • Despite this, the federal government disallows any of the $71 billion in research funding to be spent on filing patents to protect inventions. (ipwatchdog.com)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Technology Transfer Office (TTO) partners with industry, academia, non-profits, and other government agencies to transfer CDC's research portfolio into products and services to improve public health. (cdc.gov)
  • Despite that good advice, many research universities continue to sell patents to trolls. (eff.org)
  • Patenting and spin-off company formation are motivated exclusively by commercialization whilst joint research, contract research and consulting are strongly informed by research-related motives. (springer.com)
  • Nisbet says more parts of the university are contributing research and technology to take to market, and U-M is also attracting a broader set of industry partners to help commercialize that new technology. (xconomy.com)
  • Nisbet also points to the tech transfer office's venture accelerator, 16,000 square feet of office and lab space also housed at U-M's North Campus Research Complex. (xconomy.com)
  • You'll develop your chemistry skills in a high tech laboratory, home of world-class science research across a range of disciplines. (mdx.ac.uk)
  • Heterogeneity of patenting activity and its implications for scientific research ," Research Policy , Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 26-34, February. (repec.org)
  • Heterogeneity of Patenting Activity and Its Implications for Scientific Research ," ZEW Discussion Papers 07-028, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research. (repec.org)
  • Universities as a Source of Commercial Technology: A Detailed Analysis of University Patenting 1965-1988 ," NBER Working Papers 5068, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc. (repec.org)
  • PreveCeutical's President and Chief Science Officer, Dr. Mak Jawadekar stated: "I am pleased by the two new Australian patent applications which are based upon PreveCeutical's research collaboration with UQ and UniQuest. (finanznachrichten.de)
  • Technology Transfer has become an integral part of the biomedical research effort at the NIAAA. (nih.gov)
  • at the very least, the focus is shifting from large in-house research teams to smart approaches, strategic outsourcing and technology transfer. (bio-medicine.org)
  • This essay criticizes university efforts to patent and monetize the fruits of university research. (ssrn.com)
  • He has research interests in the areas of biomedical and pharmaceutical applications of nano- and micro-technology. (drexel.edu)
  • Dr. Pourrezaei has been instrumental in helping promote international partnerships and cooperation among Drexel University, Shanghai Tech University, Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, and the Shanghai Institute of Microsystems and Information Technology (SIMIT). (drexel.edu)
  • Technology transfer in computer science refers to the transfer of technology developed in computer science or applied computing research, from universities and governments to the private sector. (wikipedia.org)
  • All statements in this news release that are not purely historical are forward-looking statements and include any statements regarding beliefs, plans, expectations and orientations regarding the future including, without limitation, the granting of the Patent Applications and the continued research interests of PreveCeutical, PreveCeutical anticipated business plans and their prospects of success in executing their proposed plans. (menafn.com)
  • Software patents increase the return on investment made by the public on federally sponsored university research, and ensures the flow of knowledge that is required for society to progress. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ability to patent new software developed as a result of research encourages investment in software-related research by increasing the potential return of investment of said research. (wikipedia.org)
  • The research topic is "development of core and application technologies on high dynamic parallel cable robotics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Those obscure companies that just amass patents and sue people instead of actually making or selling anything? (eff.org)
  • Unfortunately, they sometimes end up in the hands of patent trolls-companies that serve no purpose but to amass patents and demand money from others. (eff.org)
  • Society, however, does not take advantage of the many findings linked to Biotechnology because the findings are published before any action has been taken to transfer the associated knowledge and technology to those companies that can develop a commercial product and put it on the market. (omicsonline.org)
  • A good knowledge of the special requirements for Biotechnology protection may help to avoid irreversible errors and to save money during the patent prosecution process. (omicsonline.org)
  • We feature seminars inviting representatives from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), law firms and biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies to discuss issues that are currently important to this field. (nih.gov)
  • Biotechnology is one of the most promising fields of technology, especially since molecular biology methods have enhanced our knowledge of genes, their structure, and their action. (springer.com)
  • The primary mission of technology transfer is to enable NIAAA intramural researchers to effectively interact with academia, nonprofit organizations, and the private sector, such as biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies through the establishment of collaborative relationships that will benefit human health. (nih.gov)
  • 50 percent of those active US patents are licensed to biotechnology companies for the development of therapeutics consistent with the spirit of the National Jewish Health brand promise, Science Transforming Life. (nationaljewish.org)
  • For example, in October 2001, the NIH exercised an option to make the licenses for the AIDS drug DDI non-exclusive, ten years after the initial FDA registration (see: Videx® Expanding Possibilities: A Case Study, NIH, National Institutes of Health Office of Technology Transfer, September 2003) in order to expand access to the drug, and to obtain lower cost supplies for federal programs. (keionline.org)
  • Unter den vierzig Erfindungen, die verschiedene Mitglieder des NFS zwischen 2001 und 2011 zur Patentierung einreichten, wurden achtzehn mit einem Patent geschützt. (snf.ch)
  • Detection of Defects in Protective Barriers" U.S. Patent 6, 204, 669 B1 March 20, 2001. (drexel.edu)
  • The TU Berlin holds shares in corporations, joint business partnerships and other legally autonomous businesses, or founds its own spin-off companies, especially when this is the most efficient means to fulfill the legal task of promoting the transfer of knowledge and technology. (tu-berlin.de)
  • These partnerships and strategic alliances will provide support for both new technologies and furthering the development of current technologies. (nih.gov)
  • 1 Article-27.1 places a strict obligation on member to provide patents for all patentable pharma and biopharma products. (igi-global.com)
  • Its decisions have largely dispatched injunctions to the dustbin of history, introduced tremendous confusion relative to which inventions are patentable, given succor to the Patent Trial and Appeals Board, rendered it easier for defendants to change jurisdiction (which is enormously expensive and disruptive for patentees), and have elevated the risks of plaintiffs being forced to pay defendants' legal fees. (ipwatchdog.com)
  • Software patents resulting from the production of patentable ideas can increase the valuation of small companies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Should a software developer hire a patent attorney to perform a clearance search and provide a clearance opinion, there is no guarantee that the search could be complete. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wait, patent trolls? (eff.org)
  • We don't even know how many university patents trolls control. (eff.org)
  • For every patent that gets licensed to a company that actually intends to carry the university's work forward, many others either go unlicensed (putting a strain on the university's resources) or are sold to trolls (putting a strain on practicing companies). (eff.org)
  • Patent protection strengthens the position of an enterprise in the global market and is a significant location factor. (dpma.de)
  • Many start-up companies originating from the TU Berlin serve as a motor for the regional job market and give an additional boost to the transfer of knowledge and technology. (tu-berlin.de)
  • China's lithium ion battery market rose 38% in 2010 to RMB 27.61 billion and is expected to keep growing rapidly, thanks to the country's strong automotive industry and competitive local governments pushing to develop high-end technologies, CCID Consulting reports. (electroiq.com)
  • Instead, we will partner with those who are actively working to bring new technologies and ideas to market, particularly in the areas of technology that those patents inhabit. (eff.org)
  • Software patents can afford smaller companies market protection by preventing larger companies from stealing work done by a smaller organization, leveraging their greater resources to go to market before the smaller company can. (wikipedia.org)
  • Two Florida men facing fraud charges settled a related case with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission Wednesday, agreeing to be barred from penny stock offerings and securities trading to resolve civil claims that they pilfered $2.5 million selling penny stocks based on dubious nanotechnology patents. (law360.com)
  • Dr. Pourrezaei has been working in the area of bio-optics, bio-nanotechnology, and biomedical technology development for several decades and has made many innovative achievements. (drexel.edu)
  • Utility models provide similar protection as patents with the difference that registration procedures are significantly shorter since the inventions are not technically examined (and can therefore be more easily challenged). (dpma.de)
  • individual ownership of the professors themselves) complement publication quantity and quality, patents assigned to corporations are negatively related to quantity and quality of publication output. (repec.org)
  • Western immunoblot is a low-cost and simple technology used in biomedical laboratories for detecting cellular proteins, such as HIV core proteins and other infectious biomolecules. (ohsu.edu)
  • Bacteria-based Biomedical Microbot Lab - Development of the fundamental technology for intelligent theragnostic bacteria-based microrobot. (wikipedia.org)
  • We will strive to ensure that any company we sell or license patents to does not have a history of litigation that resembles patent trolling. (eff.org)
  • Gary Becker, Nobel Prize-winning economist, argues, "Their exclusion from the patent system would discourage some software innovations, but the saving from litigation costs over disputed patent rights would more than compensate the economy for that cost. (wikipedia.org)
  • And just last month, we gave our Stupid Patent of the Month award to My Health , a company that appears to do very little besides file patent and trademark infringement lawsuits. (eff.org)
  • The patent portfolio of a company is a valuable asset and reveals the innovative potential of a company. (dpma.de)
  • Just a few weeks ago, we wrote about My Health, a company that appears to do nothing but file patent and trademark lawsuits. (eff.org)
  • Are you a tech company interested in doing business in Japan and abroad? (eu-japan.eu)
  • Huawei Technologies Co. on Tuesday slammed Samsung's bid to block an injunction issued in China last month barring the South Korean company from selling smartphones that infringe two Huawei patents, calling Samsung's request to a California federal judge "extraordinary. (law360.com)
  • The main objective of this paper is to give a case in point on the impacts of foreign technology transfers on the TC level of domestic company which operated in developing economy. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Apart from academic area, she has been engaged in industry area, reflected by her 5 patents and experience of patented technology transfer to a company working on road facility, enabling them to develop the self-cleaning road reflector. (edu.au)
  • Les différents types de collaboration observés entre les plates-formes du PRN, notamment en ce qui concerne les équipements de génomique et de bio-imagerie, constituent de bons exemples de la consolidation des réseaux reliant les secteurs privés et académiques, qui incluent des entreprises situées en Europe comme aux Etats-Unis. (snf.ch)
  • Reviewed and revised a package of legal instruments establishing a cross-border collaboration and technology transfer in the biotech-pharmaceutical industry. (gtlaw.com)
  • Among the studies suggested by the proposal is an analysis of the interface of competition law and patent rights in the context of pharmaceuticals in different countries. (ip-watch.org)
  • This technology substantially improves detection methods of samples present at trace concentrations in complex biological sample matrices. (ohsu.edu)
  • Detection of Defects In Protective Barriers" U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/051,585 also submitted for regular Patent. (drexel.edu)
  • The CfE access the huge potential of seven faculties to develop and form start-up ideas, start-up teams and start-up mentality within technological and knowledge based fundaments. (tu-berlin.de)
  • We're able to add funding resources to help develop the technology, and we're enhancing our relationship with venture capitalists both locally and nationally. (xconomy.com)