Alopecia Areata: Loss of scalp and body hair involving microscopically inflammatory patchy areas.Alopecia: Absence of hair from areas where it is normally present.Scalp: The outer covering of the calvaria. It is composed of several layers: SKIN; subcutaneous connective tissue; the occipitofrontal muscle which includes the tendinous galea aponeurotica; loose connective tissue; and the pericranium (the PERIOSTEUM of the SKULL).Hair Follicle: A tube-like invagination of the EPIDERMIS from which the hair shaft develops and into which SEBACEOUS GLANDS open. The hair follicle is lined by a cellular inner and outer root sheath of epidermal origin and is invested with a fibrous sheath derived from the dermis. (Stedman, 26th ed) Follicles of very long hairs extend into the subcutaneous layer of tissue under the SKIN.Minoxidil: A potent direct-acting peripheral vasodilator (VASODILATOR AGENTS) that reduces peripheral resistance and produces a fall in BLOOD PRESSURE. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p371)Dermoscopy: A noninvasive technique that enables direct microscopic examination of the surface and architecture of the SKIN.Hair: A filament-like structure consisting of a shaft which projects to the surface of the SKIN from a root which is softer than the shaft and lodges in the cavity of a HAIR FOLLICLE. It is found on most surfaces of the body.Mice, Inbred C3HTrichotillomania: Compulsion to pull out one's hair.Autoimmune Diseases: Disorders that are characterized by the production of antibodies that react with host tissues or immune effector cells that are autoreactive to endogenous peptides.Inosine Pranobex: An alkylamino-alcohol complex of inosine used in the treatment of a variety of viral infections. Unlike other antiviral agents, it acts by modifying or stimulating cell-mediated immune processes rather than acting on the virus directly.CyclobutanesHerbal Medicine: The study of medicines derived from botanical sources.Abbreviations as Topic: Shortened forms of written words or phrases used for brevity.Dictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Abbreviations: Works consisting of lists of shortened forms of written words or phrases used for brevity. Acronyms are included here.MEDLINE: The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).Natural Language Processing: Computer processing of a language with rules that reflect and describe current usage rather than prescribed usage.Hair Diseases: Diseases affecting the orderly growth and persistence of hair.Rosmarinus: A plant genus of the LAMIACEAE family. It is known as a spice and medicinal plant.Diterpenes, Abietane: A group of DITERPENES cyclized into 3-ring PHENANTHRENES.Lamiaceae: The mint plant family. They are characteristically aromatic, and many of them are cultivated for their oils. Most have square stems, opposite leaves, and two-lipped, open-mouthed, tubular corollas (united petals), with five-lobed, bell-like calyxes (united sepals).Origanum: A plant genus of the family LAMIACEAE that is the source of a familiar food seasoning.Spices: The dried seeds, bark, root, stems, buds, leaves, or fruit of aromatic plants used to season food.Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Oils, Volatile: Oils which evaporate readily. The volatile oils occur in aromatic plants, to which they give odor and other characteristics. Most volatile oils consist of a mixture of two or more TERPENES or of a mixture of an eleoptene (the more volatile constituent of a volatile oil) with a stearopten (the more solid constituent). The synonym essential oils refers to the essence of a plant, as its perfume or scent, and not to its indispensability.
  • Although systemic CsA appears to be effective in alopecia areata, the adverse effect profile, the recurrence rate after treatment discontinuation, and thus, the inability to produce long-term remissions, make CsA unattractive for the treatment of alopecia areata. (medscape.com)
  • The Breakthrough Therapy designation for alopecia areata was supported by positive results from a Phase 2 study, which will be presented during the late-breaking news session at the 27th European Academy of Dermatology and Venerology (EADV) Congress in Paris on September 15, 2018. (drugs.com)
  • In all forms of alopecia areata, the hair follicles remain alive and are ready to resume normal hair production whenever they receive the appropriate signal. (naaf.org)
  • This is the first well-controlled study of oral JAK inhibitors in alopecia areata, helping enhance our understanding of this disease with significant unmet need and advance the science of kinase inhibition," said Michael Vincent, M.D, Ph.D., Senior Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer, Pfizer Inflammation and Immunology. (businesswire.com)