Lactalbumin: A major protein fraction of milk obtained from the WHEY.Oleic Acid: An unsaturated fatty acid that is the most widely distributed and abundant fatty acid in nature. It is used commercially in the preparation of oleates and lotions, and as a pharmaceutical solvent. (Stedman, 26th ed)Oleic Acids: A group of fatty acids that contain 18 carbon atoms and a double bond at the omega 9 carbon.GlobulinsDietary Proteins: Proteins obtained from foods. They are the main source of the ESSENTIAL AMINO ACIDS.Protein Deficiency: A nutritional condition produced by a deficiency of proteins in the diet, characterized by adaptive enzyme changes in the liver, increase in amino acid synthetases, and diminution of urea formation, thus conserving nitrogen and reducing its loss in the urine. Growth, immune response, repair, and production of enzymes and hormones are all impaired in severe protein deficiency. Protein deficiency may also arise in the face of adequate protein intake if the protein is of poor quality (i.e., the content of one or more amino acids is inadequate and thus becomes the limiting factor in protein utilization). (From Merck Manual, 16th ed; Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 12th ed, p406)Protein HydrolysatesSoybean Proteins: Proteins which are present in or isolated from SOYBEANS.Nutritive Value: An indication of the contribution of a food to the nutrient content of the diet. This value depends on the quantity of a food which is digested and absorbed and the amounts of the essential nutrients (protein, fat, carbohydrate, minerals, vitamins) which it contains. This value can be affected by soil and growing conditions, handling and storage, and processing.Vegetable Proteins: Proteins which are present in or isolated from vegetables or vegetable products used as food. The concept is distinguished from PLANT PROTEINS which refers to non-dietary proteins from plants.Caseins: A mixture of related phosphoproteins occurring in milk and cheese. The group is characterized as one of the most nutritive milk proteins, containing all of the common amino acids and rich in the essential ones.Amino Acids: Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.Nitrogen: An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight [14.00643; 14.00728]. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.Digestion: The process of breakdown of food for metabolism and use by the body.Soybeans: An annual legume. The SEEDS of this plant are edible and used to produce a variety of SOY FOODS.Macaca fascicularis: A species of the genus MACACA which typically lives near the coast in tidal creeks and mangrove swamps primarily on the islands of the Malay peninsula.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Stearic Acids: A group of compounds that are derivatives of octadecanoic acid which is one of the most abundant fatty acids found in animal lipids. (Stedman, 25th ed)Fatty Acids: Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.DNA, Complementary: Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Cell Death: The termination of the cell's ability to carry out vital functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, responsiveness, and adaptability.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Mitochondria: Semiautonomous, self-reproducing organelles that occur in the cytoplasm of all cells of most, but not all, eukaryotes. Each mitochondrion is surrounded by a double limiting membrane. The inner membrane is highly invaginated, and its projections are called cristae. Mitochondria are the sites of the reactions of oxidative phosphorylation, which result in the formation of ATP. They contain distinctive RIBOSOMES, transfer RNAs (RNA, TRANSFER); AMINO ACYL T RNA SYNTHETASES; and elongation and termination factors. Mitochondria depend upon genes within the nucleus of the cells in which they reside for many essential messenger RNAs (RNA, MESSENGER). Mitochondria are believed to have arisen from aerobic bacteria that established a symbiotic relationship with primitive protoeukaryotes. (King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Mucins: High molecular weight mucoproteins that protect the surface of EPITHELIAL CELLS by providing a barrier to particulate matter and microorganisms. Membrane-anchored mucins may have additional roles concerned with protein interactions at the cell surface.Cytochrome c Group: A group of cytochromes with covalent thioether linkages between either or both of the vinyl side chains of protoheme and the protein. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992, p539)Fiji: A republic consisting of an island group in Melanesia, in the southwest Pacific Ocean. Its capital is Suva. It was discovered by Abel Tasman in 1643 and was visited by Captain Cook in 1774. It was used by escaped convicts from Australia as early as 1804. It was annexed by Great Britain in 1874 but achieved independence in 1970. The name Fiji is of uncertain origin. In its present form it may represent that of Viti, the main island in the group. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p396 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p186)Camping: Living outdoors as a recreational activity.Protective Clothing: Clothing designed to protect the individual against possible exposure to known hazards.Armadillos: Burrowing, chiefly nocturnal mammals of the family Dasypodidae having bodies and heads encased in small bony plates. They are widely distributed in the warmer parts of the Americas.Clothing: Fabric or other material used to cover the body.Armadillo Domain Proteins: A family of proteins that contain several 42-amino acid repeat domains and are homologous to the Drosophila armadillo protein. They bind to other proteins through their armadillo domains and play a variety of roles in the CELL including SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION, regulation of DESMOSOME assembly, and CELL ADHESION.Recreation Therapy: The enhancement of physical, cognitive, emotional and social skills so an individual may participate in chosen activities. Recreational modalities are used in designed intervention strategies, incorporating individual's interests to make the therapy process meaningful and relevant.
The alpha-lactalbumin must be partially unfolded to allow for release of the calcium ion and replacement with an oleic acid ... HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) is a complex between alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid that induces ... The oleic acid is necessary for stabilizing this molecule in this partially unfolded state. Over the past several years, ... Alpha-lactalbumin is the primary protein component of human milk. In a 1995 study, it was discovered by Swedish scientist ...
The alpha-lactalbumin must be partially unfolded to allow for release of the calcium ion and replacement with an oleic acid ... HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) is a complex between alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid that induces ... The oleic acid is necessary for stabilizing this molecule in this partially unfolded state. Over the past several years, ... responsible for the tumoricidal activity was found in 2000 and found to be a complex of alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid.[3] ...
1. Influence Of Dietary Lactalbumin Hydrolysate On The Immune System Of Mice And Resistance To Salmonellosis Bounous G., Stevenson M.M., Kongshavn P.A. J Infect Dis. Sep; 144(3) :281. (1981). In the present study we investigated the effect of four weeks of treatment with a diet containing lactalbumin hydrolysate (LAH: Nestlé, Vevey, Switzerland) on the immune response of C3H/HeN mice. Our data indicate that it was possible to increase the level of this type of protein in the diet above the minimum requirement (12% LAH) and thus produce augmented humoral immune responsiveness and resistance to salmonellosis. Lactalbumin = Whey Protein Concentrate. 2. Influence Of Dietary Proteins On The Immune System Of Mice Bounous G., Kongshavn P.A. J Nutr.Sep; 112(9) :1747-55 (1982). The effect of graded amounts of dietary laetalbumin (L) and casein (C) hydrolyzates on the immune responsiveness of C3H/HeN ...
Альфа-лактальбумин (англ. Lactalbumin, alpha- LALBA) - это важный белок сыворотки коровьего молока, а также молока других млекопитающих, кодируемый в геноме человека геном LALBA.[1][2][3]. У приматов экспрессия гена альфа-лактальбумина повышается в ответ на гормон пролактин и приводит к повышению синтеза лактозы.[4] α-лактальбумин входит в состав гетеродимера регуляторной субъединицы синтетазы лактозы, а β-1,4-галактозилтрансфераза (beta4Gal-T1) является каталитической субъединицей. Эти белки активируют синтетазу лактозы, которая переносит остаток галактозы к молекуле ...
HAMLET carries out independent attacks on many distinct cell organelles, including mitochondria, proteasomes, and histones, and interferes with cell processes such as macroautophagy. It has been shown that HAMLET binds to the cell surface and rapidly invades cells, with tumor cells taking up far more protein than healthy, differentiated cells. The mechanism of its entry is poorly understood, but recent studies indicate that the oleic acid in the HAMLET complex interacts with phosphatidylserine and o-glycosylated mucin on the plasma membrane, both of which are expressed in greater amounts on the plasma membrane of tumor cells, possibly providing for HAMLET's specificity.[6] One of the most prominent targets of HAMLET once inside the cell is the mitochondrion. Electron microscopy has revealed physical damage to the mitochondrial membranes and assays have found cytochrome c release and activation of the caspase cascade, the most notable ones being caspases 2, 3, and 9.[7] Cell ...
Hyde Park is a hamlet and census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Hyde Park, Dutchess County, New York, United States.[1] Its population was 1,908 as of the 2010 census.[2] The hamlet of Hyde Park is on the western side of the town of Hyde Park, bordered on the west by the Hudson River. The northern edge of the hamlet is Crum Elbow Creek, a tributary of the Hudson. On the north side of the creek, just outside the hamlet, is the Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site. The Springwood Estate, preserved as the Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site, is just outside the hamlet to the south. U.S. Route 9 passes through the center of the hamlet, leading north 5 miles (8 km) to Staatsburg and south 6 miles (10 km) to Poughkeepsie, the county seat. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the Hyde Park CDP has an area of 1.2 square miles (3.1 km2), all of it land.[2] ...
... is a hamlet in Alberta, Canada within the Municipal District of Foothills No. 31.[1] It is located in the foothills of the Canadian Rockies at an elevation of 1,185 metres (3,888 ft). The hamlet is located northwest of the intersection of the Cowboy Trail (Highway 22) and Highway 549, approximately 11 kilometres (6.8 mi) north of Turner Valley and 35 kilometres (22 mi) southwest of Calgary's city limits. The hamlet consists of residential, commercial and environmental reserve parcels.[2] Millarville Community School is located in the hamlet.[3] The school includes a kindergarten program through to grade eight. The hamlet is within census division No. 6 and in the federal riding of Macleod. The post office first opened in April 1892.[4] ...
The hamlet of Chelsea was originally known as Low Point and derived its name from a low point of land extending into the river.[3] It also served to distinguish it from the next hamlet north on the east bank of the river, once known as High Point, now New Hamburg. Around 1800, Abram Gerow, of Westchester, moved to Low Point and set up a cooperage business. The area was surveyed and laid out into streets in 1812. The hamlet was called Low Point until the completion of the Hudson River Railroad. At that time it was named Carthage. However as mail was being misdirected to another Carthage in Jefferson County, it was renamed Carthage Landing. In 1901, when the railroad built a new station, the name became Chelsea.[4] About 1820, Cornelius Carman established a shipyard at Carthage Landing, where sloops and steamboats were launched, but it could not withstand the competition with Fishkill Landing after John Peter DeWint completed the Long Dock about 1815, with facilities for the shipment of produce ...
... is a hamlet in the Town of Fallsburg, New York in Sullivan County, New York. The town lies along County Road 104 and was originally developed because it was on the main route between the Villages of Liberty and Monticello, New York. The zip code for Hurleyville is 12747.. Hurleyville is bordered by the Town of Thompson, the Town of Liberty, the hamlet of Loch Sheldrake and the hamlet of South Fallsburg.. Hurleyville was originally settled by William Hurley. The local economy was originally centered on dairy farming, but gradually became part of the Catskills Borscht Belt resort area. During its heyday as a resort Hurleyville was home to many popular summer hotels, bungalow colonies and boarding houses, the biggest and best known was the rather grand Columbia Hotel located atop Columbia Hill.. Hurleyville was a station stop along the New York, Ontario & Western Railway (O&W). Due to mail getting mixed in with that of Hurley, New York, Hurleyville was temporarily renamed ...
Northfield is a hamlet in Delaware County, New York. It is located northwest of Walton at the corner of White Hill Road and Loomis Brook Road. Kerrs Creek flows southeast through the hamlet. Teed Pond is located west and Loomis Mountain is located south-southwest of the hamlet. ...
... (Breisgau) is a municipality in the district of Breisgau-Hochschwarzwald in Baden-Württemberg in southern Germany. Ebringen is located about 5 km (3 mi) south of Freiburg at the Schoenberg and belongs to the Freiburg metropolitan area. The entire area of the municipality is located in the Schoenberg range, foothills of the Black Forest, which is geologically a part of the Rhine Rift Valley. The Schoenberg is characterized by a very diverse surface geology from the Triassic and Jurassic periods of the Mesozoic, Paleogene conglomerates and volcanism and glacial loess deposits. The residential area is divided by a bypass road into the village Ebringen north of the road and the hamlet Talhausen south of the road. The hamlet Berghausen on the Schoenberg was abandoned in the 15th century. Today there is only a chapel at this place. Ebringen extends from west to east with the neighbourhoods Herrengaerten (1970), Kaiserstuhl (1960), Gruben (1980), Hinterdorf (old), Unterdorf (old), Wiedenhut ...
The sunflower seed is the fruit of the sunflower (Helianthus annuus). There are three types of commonly used sunflower seeds: linoleic (most common), high oleic, and NuSun developed for sunflower oil. Each variety has its own unique levels of monounsaturated, saturated, and polyunsaturated fats. The information in this article refers mainly to the linoleic variety. For commercial purposes, sunflower seeds are usually classified by the pattern on their husks. If the husk is solid black, the seeds are called black oil sunflower seeds. The crops may be referred to as oilseed sunflower crops. These seeds are usually pressed to extract their oil. Striped sunflower seeds are primarily used for food; as a result, they may be called confectionery sunflower seeds. The term "sunflower seed" is actually a misnomer when applied to the seed in its pericarp (hull). Botanically speaking, it is a cypsela. When dehulled, the edible remainder is called the sunflower kernel or ...
... (TTA) is a synthetic fatty acid used as a nutritional supplement. TTA acts as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) agonist and increases mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation in vitro.[1] In rodent studies, TTA has been reported to have other activities such as reducing inflammation[2] and preventing high fat diet induced adiposity and insulin resistance.[3] In human clinical study, there have been mixed observations in preliminary studies. One Phase I study showed no significant changes in the blood lipids or free fatty acids[4] and another showed that TTA attenuates dyslipidemia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.[1] ...
Fatty acid binding protein 6, ileal (gastrotropin), also known as FABP6, is a protein which in humans is encoded by the FABP6 gene. This gene encodes the ileal fatty acid binding protein. Fatty acid binding proteins are a family of small, highly conserved, cytoplasmic proteins that bind long-chain fatty acids and other hydrophobic ligands. FABP6 and FABP1 (the liver fatty acid binding protein) are also able to bind bile acids. It is thought that FABPs roles include fatty acid uptake, transport, and metabolism. Transcript variants generated by alternate transcription promoters and/or alternate splicing have been found for this gene. GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000170231 - Ensembl, May 2017 GRCm38: Ensembl release 89: ENSMUSG00000020405 - Ensembl, May 2017 "Human PubMed Reference:". "Mouse PubMed Reference:". "Entrez Gene: FABP6 fatty ...
HAMLET carries out independent attacks on many distinct cell organelles, including mitochondria, proteasomes, and histones, and interferes with cell processes such as macroautophagy. It has been shown that HAMLET binds to the cell surface and rapidly invades cells, with tumor cells taking up far more protein than healthy, differentiated cells. The mechanism of its entry is poorly understood, but recent studies indicate that the oleic acid in the HAMLET complex interacts with phosphatidylserine and o-glycosylated mucin on the plasma membrane, both of which are expressed in greater amounts on the plasma membrane of tumor cells, possibly providing for HAMLET's specificity.[6] One of the most prominent targets of HAMLET once inside the cell is the mitochondrion. Electron microscopy has revealed physical damage to the mitochondrial membranes and assays have found cytochrome c release and activation of the caspase cascade, the most notable ones being caspases 2, 3, and 9.[7] Cell ...
The alpha-lactalbumin must be partially unfolded to allow for release of the calcium ion and replacement with an oleic acid ... HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) is a complex between alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid that induces ... The oleic acid is necessary for stabilizing this molecule in this partially unfolded state. Over the past several years, ... Alpha-lactalbumin is the primary protein component of human milk. In a 1995 study, it was discovered by Swedish scientist ...
Human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) and its analogues are partially unfolded protein-oleic acid ... in order to understand the nature of the interaction between a-lactalbumin and oleic acid moieties, charge-specific chemical ... employed and the biophysical and biological properties of the wild type and chemically modified bovine a-lactalbumin-oleic acid ... At the protein level, ATP5B (r?=?0.71, P?,?0.0001) and p53 (r?=?0.455, P?=?0.015) were found to be strongly associated with ...
Human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) and its analogues are partially unfolded protein-oleic acid ... in order to understand the nature of the interaction between a-lactalbumin and oleic acid moieties, charge-specific chemical ... employed and the biophysical and biological properties of the wild type and chemically modified bovine a-lactalbumin-oleic acid ... complexes that exhibit selective tumoricidal activity normally absent in the native protein itself, ...
The complex consists of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, and both the protein and the fatty acid are ... The protein reported on in these studies is human alpha-lactalbumin. Researchers use the acronym HAMLET to describe what human ... alpha-lactalbumin does to tumor cells; it is lethal to them. "Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEThal to tumor cells" is what ... HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a molecular complex derived from human milk that kills tumor ...
HAMLET (human -lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a complex of human -lactalbumin and oleic acid (C18:1:9 cis) that ... and thus remains partially unfolded regardless of solvent conditions. The D87A mutant protein was found to be inactive in the ... alpha-Lactalbumin unfolding is not sufficient to cause apoptosis, but is required for the conversion to HAMLET (human alpha- ... This study examined if unfolding of -lactalbumin is sufficient to induce cell death. We used the bovine -lactalbumin Ca2+ site ...
The alpha-lactalbumin must be partially unfolded to allow for release of the calcium ion and replacement with an oleic acid ... HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) is a complex between alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid that induces ... The oleic acid is necessary for stabilizing this molecule in this partially unfolded state. Over the past several years, ... responsible for the tumoricidal activity was found in 2000 and found to be a complex of alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid.[3] ...
... which is a complex of the partially unfolded human/ bovine α-LA and a necessary cofactor, oleic acid (C18:1). The iron- ... inhibitor peptides that have different levels have IC50 values than alpha-laktoglubul and beta-lactalbumin can be produced [22- ... Benefits of whey proteins in food applications include its high protein and amino acid content; low calorie, fat, and sodium ... α-LA possesses several classes of fatty acid binding sites, and binds to 5-doxylstearic acid, stearic acid, and palmitic acid [ ...
HAMLET (human -lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a complex of human -lactalbumin and oleic acid (C18:1:9 cis) that ... and thus remains partially unfolded regardless of solvent conditions. The D87A mutant protein was found to be inactive in the ... The Protein Society}, series = {Protein Science}, title = {alpha-Lactalbumin unfolding is not sufficient to cause apoptosis, ... HAMLET (human -lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a complex of human -lactalbumin and oleic acid (C18:1:9 cis) that ...
The complexes formed by partially folded human and bovine alpha-lactalbumin with oleic acid (OA) have been reported to display ... Local unfolding is required for the site-specific protein modification by transglutaminase. ... The oleic acid complexes of proteolytic fragments of alpha-lactalbumin display apoptotic activity. ... The biological activities of protein/oleic acid complexes reside in the fatty acid. ...
Alpha hydroxy acid Lactic acid. Proteins (building muscles and bones) Whey protein. Alpha-lactalbumin. HAMLET (Human Alpha- ... Oleic acid Palmitoleic acid Heptadecenoic acid. Saturated fatty acids Stearic. Palmitic acid Lauric acid Myristic acid. ... Corn maltodextrin Protein. Partially hydrolyzed reduced minerals whey protein concentrate (from cows milk) Fats. Palm olein. ... Upon erection, both foreskin layers unfold onto the upper penile shaft, leaving the highly innervated frenulum, glans, and ...
After partial unfolding and binding to oleic acid, alpha-lactalbumin forms the HAMLET complex, which enters tumor cells and ... The presence of non-protein alpha-dialkyl-amino acids such as alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-A1B) and isovaline (Iva), which ... fluorescently labeled rhGAA indicates that a significant portion of the endocytosed enzyme in the KO was trapped as a partially ... fumaric acid, maleic acid, linoleic acid, oleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, squalene, and arachidonic acid) in the loose-fit ...
Weve aggregated over 250 studies to figure out whey proteins health benefits. ... Whey protein is a fast-digesting protein that is easily absorbed by your body. ... The binding of oleic acid to a-lactalbumin partially unfolds the protein, which is causative of the increased anti-cancer ... Fast J, et al. Stability of HAMLET--a kinetically trapped alpha-lactalbumin oleic acid complex. Protein Sci. (2005) ...
HCV was directly incubated with the purified proteins and then mixed with both cell types, or the proteins were incubated with ... However, α-lactalbumin, human IgGs and casein failed to demonstrate any activity against HCV infectivity. ... The proteins were added to cells or virus at different concentrations and time intervals. Pretreated PBMCs and Huh7.5 cells ... α-lactalbumin were purified from camel milk and their anti-HCV effect was examined using PBMCs and Huh7.5 cell-lines. They were ...
Alpha hydroxy acid. Lactic acid. Proteins (building muscles and bones). Whey protein. Alpha-lactalbumin. HAMLET (Human Alpha- ... Oleic acid. Palmitoleic acid. Heptadecenoic acid. Saturated fatty acids. Stearic. Palmitic acid. Lauric acid. Myristic acid. ... Protein. Partially hydrolyzed reduced minerals whey protein concentrate (from cows milk). Fats. Palm olein. Soybean oil. ... The choices give rise to unrealistic expectations of how the birth will unfold and attachment to the outcome. Whether the ...
Stability of HAMLET-a kinetically trapped alpha-lactalbumin oleic acid complex. Protein Sci 14:329. ... Protein-dependent Membrane Interaction of A Partially Disordered Protein Complex with Oleic Acid: Implications for Cancer ... Alpha-lactalbumin unfolding is not sufficient to cause apoptosis, but is required for the conversion to HAMLET (human alpha- ... Alpha-Lactalbumin, engineered to be nonnative and inactive, kills tumor cells when in complex with oleic acid: a new biological ...
  • Richly endowed with a profusion of blood vessels, it also has a ridged band of peripenic muscles that protects the urinary tract from contaminants, and an undersurface lined with mucocutaneous tissue found nowhere else on the body, which contains ectopic glands that produce natural emollients and antibacterial proteins similar to those found in mother's milk. (drmomma.org)
  • Lysozyme is another antibacterial protein present in milk, tears, saliva, and other secretions of mammals. (biomedcentral.com)
  • TGase allows the modification of proteins at the level of Gln or Lys residues using as substrate an alkyl-amine or a Gln-mimicking moiety, respectively. (jove.com)
  • The reaction is site-specific, since Gln and Lys derivatization occurs preferentially at residues embedded in flexible regions of protein substrates. (jove.com)
  • An analysis of the X-ray structure of avidin allowed us to predict Gln126 and Lys127 as potential sites of TGase's attack, because these residues are located in the flexible/unfolded C-terminal region of the protein. (jove.com)
  • On the other hand, incubation of avidin with TGase in the presence of carbobenzoxy-l-glutaminyl-glycine in order to derivatize Lys residue(s) resulted in a clean and high yield production of an avidin derivative, retaining the biotin binding properties and the quaternary structure of the native protein. (jove.com)
  • This study examined if unfolding of -lactalbumin is sufficient to induce cell death. (lu.se)
  • To extend the study of the camel milk proteins which have antiviral activity against HCV, camel naïve polyclonal IgGs, α-lactalbumin were purified from camel milk and their anti-HCV effect was examined using PBMCs and Huh7.5 cell-lines. (biomedcentral.com)
  • HCV was directly incubated with the purified proteins and then mixed with both cell types, or the proteins were incubated with the cells and then exposed to HCV, or the HCV pre-infected cells were treated with the proteins to inhibit intracellular replication. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Both the common and a variant isozyme of acid alpha -glucosidase have been purified from a heterozygous placenta with CM-Sephadex, ammonium sulfate precipitation, dialysis, Amicon filtration, affinity chromatography by Sephadex G-100, and DEAE-cellulose chromatography. (worldwidescience.org)
  • Rabbit antiacid alpha-glucosidase antibodies produced against the common isozyme were found to cross-react with both peaks of the variant isozyme. (worldwidescience.org)
  • A similar rate of hydrolysis of isomaltose by both isozymes was found indicating that the reduced catalytic activity of the variant isozyme toward glycogen is not the result of a reduced ability of this enzyme to cleave the alpha-1,6 linkages of glycogen. (worldwidescience.org)
  • Proteolytic digestion of the modified protein, followed by mass spectrometry, allowed us to identify Lys127 as the major site of reaction, together with a minor modification of Lys58. (jove.com)
  • En plus d'être nécessaires dans des conditions physiologiques particulières (développement pré- et post-natal, croissance (Riediger et al. (worldwidescience.org)