Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Child of Impaired Parents: Child with one or more parents afflicted by a physical or mental disorder.Single Parent: A natural, adoptive, or substitute parent of a dependent child, who lives with only one parent. The single parent may live with or visit the child. The concept includes the never-married, as well as the divorced and widowed.Professional-Family Relations: The interactions between the professional person and the family.Fathers: Male parents, human or animal.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Child Behavior: Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.Parental Consent: Informed consent given by a parent on behalf of a minor or otherwise incompetent child.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Child Rearing: The training or bringing-up of children by parents or parent-substitutes. It is used also for child rearing practices in different societies, at different economic levels, in different ethnic groups, etc. It differs from PARENTING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the child and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.Child Behavior Disorders: Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Child Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the child.Bereavement: Refers to the whole process of grieving and mourning and is associated with a deep sense of loss and sadness.Child Psychology: The study of normal and abnormal behavior of children.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Adult Children: Children who have reached maturity or the legal age of majority.Adolescent Behavior: Any observable response or action of an adolescent.Family Relations: Behavioral, psychological, and social relations among various members of the nuclear family and the extended family.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Paternal Behavior: The behavior patterns associated with or characteristic of a father.Disabled Children: Children with mental or physical disabilities that interfere with usual activities of daily living and that may require accommodation or intervention.Adoption: Voluntary acceptance of a child of other parents to be as one's own child, usually with legal confirmation.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Child Care: Care of CHILDREN in the home or in an institution.Intergenerational Relations: The interactions between individuals of different generations. These interactions include communication, caring, accountability, loyalty, and even conflict between related or non-related individuals.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Schools: Educational institutions.Early Intervention (Education): Procedures and programs that facilitate the development or skill acquisition in infants and young children who have disabilities, who are at risk for developing disabilities, or who are gifted. It includes programs that are designed to prevent handicapping conditions in infants and young children and family-centered programs designed to affect the functioning of infants and children with special needs. (From Journal of Early Intervention, Editorial, 1989, vol. 13, no. 1, p. 3; A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, prepared for the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, 1976)Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity: A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Hybridization, Genetic: The genetic process of crossbreeding between genetically dissimilar parents to produce a hybrid.Father-Child Relations: Interaction between the father and the child.Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Child Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological maturing of an individual from birth up to but not including ADOLESCENCE.Family Conflict: Struggle or disagreement between parents, parent and child or other members of a family.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Consanguinity: The magnitude of INBREEDING in humans.Caregivers: Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.Mother-Child Relations: Interaction between a mother and child.Family Characteristics: Size and composition of the family.Proxy: A person authorized to decide or act for another person, for example, a person having durable power of attorney.United StatesChild Custody: The formally authorized guardianship or care of a CHILD.Parental Leave: The authorized absence from work of either parent prior to and after the birth of their child. It includes also absence because of the illness of a child or at the time of the adoption of a child. It does not include leave for care of siblings, parents, or other family members: for this FAMILY LEAVE is available.Peer Group: Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.Crosses, Genetic: Deliberate breeding of two different individuals that results in offspring that carry part of the genetic material of each parent. The parent organisms must be genetically compatible and may be from different varieties or closely related species.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Socialization: The training or molding of an individual through various relationships, educational agencies, and social controls, which enables him to become a member of a particular society.Education: Acquisition of knowledge as a result of instruction in a formal course of study.Sibling Relations: Interactions and relationships between sisters and/or brothers. The concept also applies to animal studies.Siblings: Persons or animals having at least one parent in common. (American College Dictionary, 3d ed)Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.Family Therapy: A form of group psychotherapy. It involves treatment of more than one member of the family simultaneously in the same session.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Internal-External Control: Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Nuclear Family: A family composed of spouses and their children.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Object Attachment: Emotional attachment to someone or something in the environment.Grief: Normal, appropriate sorrowful response to an immediate cause. It is self-limiting and gradually subsides within a reasonable time.Personality Assessment: The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Includes two similar disorders: oppositional defiant disorder and CONDUCT DISORDERS. Symptoms occurring in children with these disorders include: defiance of authority figures, angry outbursts, and other antisocial behaviors.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Infant Care: Care of infants in the home or institution.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Television: The transmission and reproduction of transient images of fixed or moving objects. An electronic system of transmitting such images together with sound over a wire or through space by apparatus that converts light and sound into electrical waves and reconverts them into visible light rays and audible sound. (From Webster, 3rd ed)Truth Disclosure: Truthful revelation of information, specifically when the information disclosed is likely to be psychologically painful ("bad news") to the recipient (e.g., revelation to a patient or a patient's family of the patient's DIAGNOSIS or PROGNOSIS) or embarrassing to the teller (e.g., revelation of medical errors).Consumer Satisfaction: Customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a benefit or service received.Social Adjustment: Adaptation of the person to the social environment. Adjustment may take place by adapting the self to the environment or by changing the environment. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996)Child Advocacy: Promotion and protection of the rights of children; frequently through a legal process.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Developmental Disabilities: Disorders in which there is a delay in development based on that expected for a given age level or stage of development. These impairments or disabilities originate before age 18, may be expected to continue indefinitely, and constitute a substantial impairment. Biological and nonbiological factors are involved in these disorders. (From American Psychiatric Glossary, 6th ed)Maternal Behavior: The behavior patterns associated with or characteristic of a mother.Faculty: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Play and Playthings: Spontaneous or voluntary recreational activities pursued for enjoyment and accessories or equipment used in the activities; includes games, toys, etc.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Temperament: Predisposition to react to one's environment in a certain way; usually refers to mood changes.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Hospitals, Pediatric: Special hospitals which provide care for ill children.Safety: Freedom from exposure to danger and protection from the occurrence or risk of injury or loss. It suggests optimal precautions in the workplace, on the street, in the home, etc., and includes personal safety as well as the safety of property.Nursing Methodology Research: Research carried out by nurses concerning techniques and methods to implement projects and to document information, including methods of interviewing patients, collecting data, and forming inferences. The concept includes exploration of methodological issues such as human subjectivity and human experience.Divorce: Legal dissolution of an officially recognized marriage relationship.Conduct Disorder: A repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms or rules are violated. These behaviors include aggressive conduct that causes or threatens physical harm to other people or animals, nonaggressive conduct that causes property loss or damage, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violations of rules. The onset is before age 18. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Crying: To utter an inarticulate, characteristic sound in order to communicate or express a feeling, or desire for attention.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Inheritance Patterns: The different ways GENES and their ALLELES interact during the transmission of genetic traits that effect the outcome of GENE EXPRESSION.Autistic Disorder: A disorder beginning in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual. (DSM-V)Child Day Care Centers: Facilities which provide care for pre-school and school-age children.Authoritarianism: The personality pattern or syndrome consisting of behavioral and attitudinal characteristics reflecting a preoccupation with the factors of power and authority in interpersonal relationships.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Insemination, Artificial, Heterologous: Human artificial insemination in which the semen used is that of a man other than the woman's husband.Single-Parent Family: A household that includes children and is headed by one adult.Marriage: The social institution involving legal and/or religious sanction whereby individuals are joined together.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Neonatal Screening: The identification of selected parameters in newborn infants by various tests, examinations, or other procedures. Screening may be performed by clinical or laboratory measures. A screening test is designed to sort out healthy neonates (INFANT, NEWBORN) from those not well, but the screening test is not intended as a diagnostic device, rather instead as epidemiologic.Friends: Persons whom one knows, likes, and trusts.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Role: The expected and characteristic pattern of behavior exhibited by an individual as a member of a particular social group.Anxiety, Separation: Anxiety experienced by an individual upon separation from a person or object of particular significance to the individual.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Child Development Disorders, Pervasive: Severe distortions in the development of many basic psychological functions that are not normal for any stage in development. These distortions are manifested in sustained social impairment, speech abnormalities, and peculiar motor movements.Tobacco Smoke Pollution: Contamination of the air by tobacco smoke.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Alleles: Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.Genetic Markers: A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.Intensive Care Units, Pediatric: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill infants and children. Neonates are excluded since INTENSIVE CARE UNITS, NEONATAL is available.Intellectual Disability: Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. This has multiple potential etiologies, including genetic defects and perinatal insults. Intelligence quotient (IQ) scores are commonly used to determine whether an individual has an intellectual disability. IQ scores between 70 and 79 are in the borderline range. Scores below 67 are in the disabled range. (from Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, p28)Behavior Therapy: The application of modern theories of learning and conditioning in the treatment of behavior disorders.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Child Abuse: Abuse of children in a family, institutional, or other setting. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Pediatric Obesity: BODY MASS INDEX in children (ages 2-12) and in adolescents (ages 13-18) that is grossly above the recommended cut-off for a specific age and sex. For infants less than 2 years of age, obesity is determined based on standard weight-for-length percentile measures.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Overweight: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is above certain standard of acceptable or desirable weight. In the scale of BODY MASS INDEX, overweight is defined as having a BMI of 25.0-29.9 kg/m2. Overweight may or may not be due to increases in body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE), hence overweight does not equal "over fat".Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.

What parents think of fever. (1/5222)

OBJECTIVES: We aimed to assess knowledge, perception and management of fever by parents. METHODS: We conducted a questionnaire survey among 392 parents of children attending locally a paediatric clinic at The Royal Oldham Hospital. The main outcome measures were answers to questions covering a variety of aspects of the knowledge, perception and management of fever by parents. RESULTS: Almost half the parents used a liquid crystal forehead thermometer. Most could not use a glass thermometer. Thirty per cent did not know normal body temperature and would have treated children with a temperature below 38 degrees C. Sixty-four per cent treated fever with both paracetamol and tepid sponging. Most parents awakened children at night for antipyretics. Eighty-one per cent thought that untreated fever was most likely to cause fits or brain damage and 7% thought it could cause death. CONCLUSION: Parents perceive fever as being dangerous. They have a poor knowledge and measure it inaccurately. Needless consultations and hospital admissions could be avoided by a change in perception.  (+info)

B cell lymphoproliferative disorders following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: risk factors, treatment and outcome. (2/5222)

Twenty-six cases of B cell lymphoproliferative disorder (BLPD) were identified among 2395 patients following hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCT) for which an overall incidence of BLPD was 1.2%. The true incidence was probably higher, since 9/26 of the diagnoses were made at autopsy. No BLPD was observed following autologous HSCT, so risk factor analyses were confined to the 1542 allogeneic HSCT. Factors assessed were HLA-mismatching (> or = 1 antigen), T cell depletion (TCD), presence of acute GvHD (grades II-IV), donor type (related vs unrelated), age of recipient and donor, and underlying disease. Factors found to be statistically significant included patients transplanted for immune deficiency and CML, donor age > or = 18 years, TCD, and HLA-mismatching, with recipients of combined TCD and HLA-mismatched grafts having the highest incidence. Factors found to be statistically significant in a multiple regression analysis were TCD, donor age and immune deficiency, although 7/8 of the patients with immunodeficiencies and BLPD received a TCD graft from a haploidentical parent. The overall mortality was 92% (24/26). One patient had a spontaneous remission, but subsequently died >1 year later of chronic GVHD. Thirteen patients received therapy for BLPD. Three patients received lymphocyte infusions without response. The only patients with responses and longterm survival received alpha interferon (alphaIFN). Of seven patients treated with alphaIFN there were four responses (one partial and three complete). These data demonstrate that alphaIFN can be an effective agent against BLPD following HSCT, if a timely diagnosis is made.  (+info)

Genetic linkage of IgA deficiency to the major histocompatibility complex: evidence for allele segregation distortion, parent-of-origin penetrance differences, and the role of anti-IgA antibodies in disease predisposition. (3/5222)

Immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency (IgAD) is characterized by a defect of terminal lymphocyte differentiation, leading to a lack of IgA in serum and mucosal secretions. Familial clustering, variable population prevalence in different ethnic groups, and a predominant inheritance pattern suggest a strong genetic predisposition to IgAD. The genetic susceptibility to IgAD is shared with a less prevalent, but more profound, defect called "common variable immunodeficiency" (CVID). Here we show an increased allele sharing at 6p21 in affected members of 83 multiplex IgAD/CVID pedigrees and demonstrate, using transmission/diseqilibrium tests, family-based associations indicating the presence of a predisposing locus, designated "IGAD1," in the proximal part of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The recurrence risk of IgAD was found to depend on the sex of parents transmitting the defect: affected mothers were more likely to produce offspring with IgAD than were affected fathers. Carrier mothers but not carrier fathers transmitted IGAD1 alleles more frequently to the affected offspring than would be expected under random segregation. The differential parent-of-origin penetrance is proposed to reflect a maternal effect mediated by the production of anti-IgA antibodies tentatively linked to IGAD1. This is supported by higher frequency of anti-IgA-positive females transmitting the disorder to children, in comparison with female IgAD nontransmitters, and by linkage data in the former group. Such pathogenic mechanisms may be shared by other MHC-linked complex traits associated with the production of specific autoantibodies, parental effects, and a particular MHC haplotype.  (+info)

Allowing for missing parents in genetic studies of case-parent triads. (4/5222)

In earlier work, my colleagues and I described a log-linear model for genetic data from triads composed of affected probands and their parents. This model allows detection of and discrimination between effects of an inherited haplotype versus effects of the maternal haplotype, which presumably would be mediated by prenatal factors. Like the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT), the likelihood-ratio test (LRT) based on this model is not sensitive to associations that are due to genetic admixture. When used as a method for testing for linkage disequilibrium, the LRT can be regarded as an alternative to the TDT. When one or both parents are missing, the resulting incomplete triad must be discarded to ensure validity of the TDT, thereby sacrificing information. By contrast, when the problem is set in a likelihood framework, the expectation-maximization algorithm allows the incomplete triads to contribute their information to the LRT without invalidation of the analysis. Simulations demonstrate that much of the lost statistical power can be recaptured by means of this missing-data technique. In fact, power is reasonably good even when no triad is complete-for example, when a study is designed to include only mothers of cases. Information from siblings also can be incorporated to further improve the statistical power when genetic data from parents or probands are missing.  (+info)

Psychosocial and economic problems of parents of children with epilepsy. (5/5222)

The parents of children with epilepsy (PCE) face multiple psychosocial and economic problems that are often neglected. We undertook this study to ascertain these problems among the patients attending a tertiary referral center for epilepsy in India. A structured questionnaire was administrated to parents of 50 children aged between 5-10 years and having epilepsy for more than 1 year's duration. Some 52% of the children had partial epilepsy whilst the remaining had generalized epilepsy. The median seizure frequency was one per 6 months. The majority of the patients (86%) were living in villages. The family income was less than 1000 Rs per month (1 USD = 42 INR) for 66% of the patients. A decline in social activities, after the onset of epilepsy in their children, was reported by 80% of the parents. Daily routines were significantly affected in over 75% of the parents. Parents had been experiencing frustration (52%) and hopelessness (76%), whilst 60% were in financial difficulties. The most important item of expenditure was cost of drugs or cost of travel to hospital for 54% and 36% parents respectively. Impaired emotional status and poor social adaptation were co-related with the severity of epilepsy (frequent seizures/generalized seizures/attention disorder) and low economic status of the parents. These observations need to be borne in mind while organizing rehabilitation programs for epilepsy.  (+info)

Health effects of passive smoking-10: Summary of effects of parental smoking on the respiratory health of children and implications for research. (6/5222)

BACKGROUND: Two recent reviews have assessed the effect of parental smoking on respiratory disease in children. METHODS: The results of the systematic quantitative review published as a series in Thorax are summarised and brought up to date by considering papers appearing on Embase or Medline up to June 1998. The findings are compared with those of the review published recently by the Californian Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Areas requiring further research are identified. RESULTS: Overall there is a very consistent picture with odds ratios for respiratory illnesses and symptoms and middle ear disease of between 1.2 and 1.6 for either parent smoking, the odds usually being higher in pre-school than in school aged children. For sudden infant death syndrome the odds ratio for maternal smoking is about 2. Significant effects from paternal smoking suggest a role for postnatal exposure to environmental tobacco smoke. Recent publications do not lead us to alter the conclusions of our earlier reviews. While essentially narrative rather than systematic and quantitative, the findings of the Californian EPA review are broadly similar. In addition they have reviewed studies of the effects of environmental tobacco smoke on children with cystic fibrosis and conclude from the limited evidence that there is a strong case for a relationship between parental smoking and admissions to hospital. They also review data from adults of the effects of acute exposure to environmental tobacco smoke under laboratory conditions which suggest acute effects on spirometric parameters rather than on bronchial hyperresponsiveness. It seems likely that such effects are also present in children. CONCLUSIONS: Substantial benefits to children would arise if parents stopped smoking after birth, even if the mother smoked during pregnancy. Policies need to be developed which reduce smoking amongst parents and protect infants and young children from exposure to environmental tobacco smoke. The weight of evidence is such that new prevalence studies are no longer justified. What are needed are studies which allow comparison of the effects of critical periods of exposure to cigarette smoke, particularly in utero, early infancy, and later childhood. Where longitudinal studies are carried out they should be analysed to look at the way in which changes in exposure are related to changes in outcome. Better still would be studies demonstrating reversibility of adverse effects, especially in asthmatic subjects or children with cystic fibrosis.  (+info)

Diabetic nephropathy is associated with an increased familial risk of stroke. (7/5222)

OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that genetic susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy is associated with an increased familial risk of vascular disease, we have examined the causes and rates of death of parents of individuals with type 1 diabetes complicated by diabetic nephropathy compared with the causes and rates of death of parents of control subjects with diabetes uncomplicated by nephropathy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Individuals with at least a 14-year duration of type 1 diabetes complicated by diabetic nephropathy were identified and matched for age, sex, and duration of diabetes to control subjects. A total of 118 patients and 118 matched control subjects were identified and approached to obtain information on parental age and cause of death. For parents who had died, the cause of death was ascertained from the death certificate. RESULTS: Kaplan-Meier curves showed that parents of subjects with nephropathy (PN) had reduced survival compared with parents of diabetic subjects without nephropathy (PC) (log rank test P < 0.05). There was an excess of all vascular deaths and, in particular, strokes in the parents of subjects with nephropathy (PN: 20 of 103 deaths, 19% vs. PC: 3 of 66 deaths, 4%; Fisher's exact test P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Parents of diabetic patients with nephropathy have reduced survival. This seems to be largely explained by an increase in vascular deaths and, in particular, a four-fold increase in the number of strokes. This supports the hypothesis that a common hereditary risk factor predisposes to both vascular death and diabetic renal disease.  (+info)

Urinary cotinine and exposure to parental smoking in a population of children with asthma. (8/5222)

BACKGROUND: Studies of the effects of tobacco smoke often rely on reported exposure to cigarette smoke, a measure that is subject to bias. We describe here the relationship between parental smoking exposure as assessed by urinary cotinine excretion and lung function in children with asthma. METHODS: We studied 90 children 4-14 years of age, who reported a confirmed diagnosis or symptoms of asthma. In each child, we assessed baseline pulmonary function (spirometry) and bronchial responsiveness to carbachol stimulation. Urinary cotinine was measured by HPLC with ultraviolet detection. RESULTS: Urinary cotinine concentrations in the children were significantly correlated (P <0.001) with the number of cigarettes the parents, especially the mothers, smoked. Bronchial responsiveness to carbachol (but not spirometry test results) was correlated (P <0.03) with urinary cotinine in the children. CONCLUSION: Passive smoke exposure increases the bronchial responsiveness to carbachol in asthmatic children.  (+info)

  • Most drownings in kids happen in the late afternoon, 4-7 pm, and it's usually because everybody is at the swimming pool hanging out, and parents are having a little party and people really aren't watching the kids that much," Waltzman said. (yahoo.com)
  • Some kids may be worried about loved ones getting infected, particularly if their parents are essential workers. (sharecare.com)
  • If parents are not resilient, if they're broken down by this, those kids do worse," she cautions. (sharecare.com)
  • Kids that are getting positive messages from their parents are doing better. (sharecare.com)
  • Parents are matched as closely as possible based on the child's diagnosis, family structure, and cultural, racial or religious factors. (tn.gov)
  • The most important thing a parent can do for their student is to encourage them to visit or contact the Career Development Center to establish a regular line of communication. (emerson.edu)
  • We know you've played an important role in preparing your student for their time with us and we hope you will take part in our Parent/Guardian Orientation program, whether your student is a freshman or transferring in. (limcollege.edu)
  • Parents may not be aware that the consequences of a head injury at a young age -in childhood or adolescence-can ruin a young person's life. (amenclinics.com)
  • Because of the tremendous impact a head injury can have on a young person's life, it is critical for parents to talk about the dangerous Skull Breaker Challenge and to monitor children's internet usage appropriately. (amenclinics.com)
  • Parents' top concerns about playdates include children being unsupervised, hearing inappropriate language, getting into medications and harmful substances, and getting injured, according to the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health at the University of Michigan. (scitechdaily.com)
  • It's admirable that the media is getting the word out about this trending challenge, but most of the coverages neglect to inform parents about the very real and lasting harm that can come from a head injury in early life. (amenclinics.com)
  • However, our poll suggests that many parents are not proactive when it comes to having these conversations. (scitechdaily.com)
  • This unique fundraiser enables the Ferris Parent Teacher Group (PTG) to allocate proceeds from the show to various activities including: academics, athletics, administrative and supply needs to classrooms, teachers and students. (spokaneschools.org)
  • This vital twice-a-year ritual is not supposed to be a 5-second hand-off, but a significant chance for teachers and parents to discuss each child's academic struggles and triumphs. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Find even more tips and ideas for supporting your child's learning in our guides for parents. (cambridge.org)
  • When parents first learn that their child will not be able to experience life as other children do, there may be a sense of loss, both of the child's future and of the parents' own hopes and expectations. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • It really bothers me when parents send me an email asking about their child's grade, as if the info isn't always right there in front of them. (reddit.com)
  • Infographic depicts measles symptoms, including the serious health problems the disease can cause, but parents have the power to protect their children with MMR vaccine. (cdc.gov)
  • As a possible consequence of these trends, recent national surveys found that 23% of parents questioned the number of shots recommended for their children, 1 and 25% were concerned that vaccines might weaken the immune system. (aappublications.org)
  • Approximately, 10 million children nationwide have a parent who has been incarcerated. (parentinginsideout.org)
  • 2.3 million of those children, or roughly one child out of every 30, currently has a parent in state or federal prison. (parentinginsideout.org)
  • Parenting Inside Out has helped thousands of parents rebuild their relationships with their children and families. (parentinginsideout.org)
  • Parents in Texas have voiced complaints with their school district after finding out that children have been riding to school on an overcrowded bus and have even been sitting on the floor. (yahoo.com)
  • The ERG includes parents who are single, parents of new (or soon to arrive) babies, teens and beyond, adopted children, multiples, special (needs) children. (microsoft.com)
  • How we can be better parents to our own children? (forbes.com)
  • Parents must avoid thrusting their unfulfilled dreams and ambitions on their children. (forbes.com)
  • Many parents do not allow their children to start dating at too early age. (usingenglish.com)
  • Many parents do not like their children to go on dates when they are still students. (usingenglish.com)
  • As parents we tell our children what is right and what is wrong, but is it really the truth? (angelfire.com)
  • Biometrics is one of the fastest-growing areas of homeland security, but the expanding use of fingerprints and retinal scans to school-age children is prompting some parents to complain. (wired.com)
  • The Daily Beast spoke to parents, teachers, and admissions consultants about how far parents go to get their children the most impressive educations money can buy. (thedailybeast.com)
  • He and his wife, Mary Leppert, who is co-publisher as well as editor of the paper, are organizers of the conference, which is intended for children as well as parents. (latimes.com)
  • Evidence shows that parents play a huge role in academic progress: Engaged parents set expectations for children and help them achieve goals. (chicagotribune.com)
  • When parents decide to end their marriage it is tough on the children, but it doesn't have to be. (lulu.com)
  • The good news out of this rather depressing research is that parents, through their actions both towards their children as well as towards each other, have a huge influence on how children will adjust to the divorce both in the short and long term. (lulu.com)
  • Parents have a couple of extra thoughts… Will I have enough time to spend with my children? (ucas.com)
  • Parent University is a program that "supports, engages, and empowers" parents who have children in Toledo Public Schools. (bgsu.edu)
  • The interaction builds a trusted line of communication between parents and teachers, and also the parents feel more confident in being able to help their children with their homework. (bgsu.edu)
  • We (six adult children) would appreciate some ideas to improve the quality of life for our semi-invalid parents. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Your mom may be happier than you think, because you're giving her what any mature parent wants most: grown children who love each other and who include her in their lives. (washingtonpost.com)
  • MOSCOW (AP) - Russia's ombudsman for children's rights sought on Thursday to reassure American would-be adoptive parents that they will be allowed to take their children back to the United States. (yahoo.com)
  • Parents at St Mary's also accused Roedean of misleading parents by telling them that children would not have to sit the selective school's entrance exam. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • What does listening to the promises of governors and CEOs about education quality profit an unemployed parent in East Los Angeles if her children's school building is falling apart, its class sizes increasing, while the opulence of Beverly Hills is staring her children in the face? (edweek.org)
  • Providing parents with avenues to learn English would also help promote ELL parent involvement and encourage parents to read and write with their children at home. (edweek.org)
  • SEEC believes that parents and teachers are partners in the education of children and values input from parents. (si.edu)
  • Parents must examine their children for the little brown bugs and seek treatment before students can be readmitted back to school. (baltimoresun.com)
  • If children have it and parents don't check it or take them to the doctor, it will spread. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Right now there are more than 16 million U.S. parents with no spouse raising children younger than 18 . (monster.com)
  • From figuring out childcare and how to pay for it, to feeling that friction between needing to work and wanting to spend a good amount of time with your children-single parents handle so much without having an in-house partner to share that load," she says. (monster.com)
  • Parents do have disagreements from time to time, but they should never do it in front of the children. (answers.com)
  • Children often become scared when their parents fight, so if their fighting scares you, it's ok to tell them that, too. (answers.com)
  • Information for parents to support their children thinking about a future in chemistry. (rsc.org)
  • Certainly legislators do not know children and their needs as well as the parents who bore them, raise them, and provide for them. (indystar.com)
  • Parents were much more likely to protect their children from cigarette smoke when they were aged under five. (theage.com.au)
  • This was written in response to the wonder of having children, and the almost frighteningly ceaseless love that develops within parents. (lulu.com)
  • children learn to read they can read it to their parents. (lulu.com)
  • UPF is aware of the role of parents everywhere as the primary caregivers and teachers of their children, setting the foundation for success in life. (slideshare.net)
  • In a family, parents are responsible for the welfare of the children and offer the children an embracing, unconditional love that overlooks and compensates for their weaknesses. (slideshare.net)
  • The children, in turn, respect their parents as the source of their very being, as their teachers, and as the ones who have labored and sacrificed for their sakes. (slideshare.net)
  • 2. UN General Assembly ResolutionA/RES/66/292 established June 1 as theGlobal Day of Parents, to be observedannually honoring parents throughout theworld.The resolution invites Member States tocelebrate the day in partnership with civilsociety, in particular involving young peopleand children. (slideshare.net)
  • Parents are the primary caregivers and teachersof their children, setting the foundation forsuccess in life. (slideshare.net)
  • Older children generally find it less traumatic if parents explain to them that vaccination is a good thing. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The SU provides a number of resources for student parents, such as a comprehensive Student Parent Handbook with information about childcare throughout the University, colleges, city and holiday play schemes, as well as information about childcare for children with disabilities and funding for student parents. (ox.ac.uk)
  • There are also SU student parent socials where parents and children can come, have tea and biscuits, and meet other student parents. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Three-quarters of parents in the United States are at least moderately involved in school activities when their children are in elementary school, according to a study by Child Trends, a nonprofit research group in Washington, D.C. But that involvement drops sharply when students reach middle school or junior high. (csmonitor.com)
  • Mr. Riley exhorts parents to limit the time children spend watching TV. (csmonitor.com)
  • Parents, he says, must read to their children and spend more time with them. (csmonitor.com)
  • Waterman feels that the skills learned from parenting your children can help you in providing care, or parenting, your parents. (bankrate.com)
  • Children need to recognize that no parent wants their children to take over their lives. (bankrate.com)
  • She thinks children should look toward finding ways to bring back the joy to life if it's missing from their parents' lives. (bankrate.com)
  • Parents, published by Meredith Corporation, is an American mass circulation monthly magazine that features scientific information on child development geared to help parents in raising their children. (wikipedia.org)
  • The magazine was originally titled Children, The Magazine for Parents. (wikipedia.org)
  • The second edition of Parenting Inside Out was published in September 2017 and reflects both new research in trauma-informed interventions and gender-responsive interventions. (parentinginsideout.org)
  • The Rockefeller University's Parents & Science initiative is a unique resource for parents and educators who want to learn more about how scientific research is transforming our understanding of childhood and adolescent health and behavior. (youtube.com)
  • Proceeds from the Parents & Science Discovery Fund support complimentary lectures for parents and educators, Rockefeller investigators who are exploring human development and childhood diseases, and the University's year-round, hands-on Science Outreach programs for K-12 students and educators. (youtube.com)
  • Simply dialing ``H'' for homework and creating other links between parents and schools will not solve all the problems American educators face. (csmonitor.com)
  • In cases where your parents really are being taken advantage of, consider giving them a cash allowance, says Carlo Panaccione, a certified financial planner and president of Navigation Group in Redwood Shores, Calif. "A lot of people will avoid it because they are afraid of conflict with their parents," Panccione says. (kiplinger.com)
  • For information on parental involvement, visit nea.org/parents . (nea.org)
  • In We Love it When Parents are Involved in School , NEA president Lily Eskelsen García discusses the importance of parental involvement and how one struggling school turned everything around when the conversation turned to the parents. (nea.org)
  • Waterman's main message is one of involvement in our parents' lives. (bankrate.com)
  • The sister who lives with your parents is certainly doing her share, but the rest of you can help in other ways. (washingtonpost.com)
  • To help single parents cope with these unique challenges, we connected with experts to share some strategies for balancing single parenting with a fulfilling career. (monster.com)
  • These are some of the things the academy did last year following feedback from parents, students and the wider community. (google.com)
  • With support from both their parents and the Wasserman Center, students will be better able to find genuine career satisfaction in the future. (nyu.edu)
  • Saturday trips during the program are mandatory for students unless otherwise approved by the parent/guardian and the program coordinator. (ou.edu)
  • If parents or any other visitors are planning to visit students at Sooner Discovery on campus, a parent/guardian must call at least 2 hours in advance to approve of the visitation. (ou.edu)
  • Students are not allowed to leave campus unless they notify and get approval from a parent/guardian (24 hour approval is necessary) and the Sooner Discovery staff team. (ou.edu)
  • Students will be allowed to leave campus on Sundays on their own, with parent approval, as long as they do not drive with any other Sooner Discovery students in their vehicle. (ou.edu)
  • 17) The school fosters effective communications and relationships between parents, students, faculty and administration. (google.com)
  • 22) The school communicates expectations for student learning and goals for improvement to students and parents. (google.com)
  • Even though Maddi Georgoff is barely out of college, she's creating an innovative program to help parents of K-12 students get involved in their education. (bgsu.edu)
  • We know selecting the right college or university can be a daunting task for students and parents both. (bgsu.edu)
  • Develop connections between parents, students and the UNH community. (unh.edu)
  • Those students tend to be concentrated in schools serving low-income populations and lacking adequate instruction or materials-a problem that is exacerbated by communication and cultural barriers between schools and parents, it says. (edweek.org)
  • There are things parents can do to help high schoolers and soon-to-be-college students prepare for their next phase in life. (fastweb.com)
  • The Childcare Services website provides information to students about all aspects of childcare to enable parents to make informed decisions that best suits their needs. (ox.ac.uk)
  • By then, nearly half of all students have parents who do not attend PTA meetings, back-to-school nights, science fairs, or school plays, and do not serve on school committees. (csmonitor.com)
  • Yet studies over the years consistently show that students whose parents remain involved in school activities tend to do better academically. (csmonitor.com)
  • a ``Homework Hotline,'' allows parents of middle-school students to keep track of homework assignments by dialing a special number and punching in a code assigned to each teacher. (csmonitor.com)
  • That multi-year growth story won Parenting placement on Adweek magazine's 2005 "Hot List," which acknowledges the ten best performers in the magazine industry. (wikipedia.org)
  • Information for parents, ready for use by childcare providers in newsletters, e-mail blasts, web pages, or other publications. (cdc.gov)
  • Oxfordshire County Council provides information for parents on childcare provision in Oxford including day nurseries, childminders, schools and after-school childcare provision. (ox.ac.uk)
  • As part of a reentry program, Parenting Inside Out has a proven impact on reducing recidivism and criminal behavior, while improving family relationships and parenting skills. (parentinginsideout.org)
  • As a community we also serve as a resource to Microsoft product groups, providing input and feedback from a parent/family perspective. (microsoft.com)
  • The book explores all facets of the complex parent-kid relationship - from shopping, watching TV and dining to family vacations, sports and driving. (nypost.com)
  • In May 2004, Zagat Survey teamed up with Parenting magazine to release its first U.S. Family Travel Guide . (wikipedia.org)
  • The SU has a mailing list that disseminates information about family-friendly events, funding opportunities and wanted items for parents. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Talk to friends and family about their thoughts on how your parents are doing. (bankrate.com)
  • When our academy is notified of its next Ofsted inspection, parents will be invited to give their views about the school to inspectors using the Parent View online facility as this has replaced Ofsted's paper questionnaire. (google.com)
  • If you do not have a computer or an email address or if you would like help to use Parent View, please come into school and ask at reception. (google.com)
  • A high school in Houston implemented a dress code for parents just one day after denying a mother entry because of her outfit. (yahoo.com)
  • Parents' Nursery School was incorporated in 1947 as a non-profit, integrated cooperative nursery school. (idealist.org)
  • Field also sponsors classes for parents, including English classes, GED programs and Zumba lessons, all to make visiting the school less intimidating. (chicagotribune.com)
  • For instance, math isn't taught the way it was when many parents were in school. (bgsu.edu)
  • Roedean School, the world-renowned girls school, has been accused of "holding a gun to parents' heads" after it forced through massive fee rises at a school it took over. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • Dr. Lani Majer, director of school health with the county Health Department, said parents are welcome to call health centers about checking for lice. (baltimoresun.com)
  • For now, instruction is offered during recess, since parents objected to holding the class either before or after school. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Parent concerns about the school performance program seem to have more to do witha lack of faith in the program. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Cromwell principal Richard Chilipko said he is aware of parent concerns and has directed them to school system leaders. (baltimoresun.com)
  • We have suggestions of what you, as a parent, can help your student with during the month of May, whether they're currently a high school junior or a high school senior. (fastweb.com)
  • Do Parents Value School Effectiveness? (nber.org)
  • School choice may lead to improvements in school productivity if parents' choices reward effective schools and punish ineffective ones. (nber.org)
  • We study relationships among parent preferences, peer quality, and causal effects on outcomes for applicants to New York City's centralized high school assignment mechanism. (nber.org)
  • Edward D. Curtis' well-made point ("Why We Love Our D-Rated School") perfectly illustrates why parents and parents only should hold schools accountable. (indystar.com)
  • THE phrase ``school dropout'' usually describes teenagers, not their parents. (csmonitor.com)
  • Calling parents ``the true owners of the school,'' he outlined a multipronged effort to forge better links between the classroom and the home. (csmonitor.com)
  • A rigid 9-to-5 work day gives parents little opportunity during a 9-to-3 school day to attend teacher conferences or other activities. (csmonitor.com)
  • HealthyChildren.org , the official American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) website for parents, is the only pa​renting website backed by 67,000 pediatricians and includes over 5,000 articles on children's health and safety topics-including entire sections with articles on topics related to tobacco , teen substance use , and media . (aap.org)
  • Whether they're seeking general information about children's health, or specific answers to a pediatric issue, parents can be confident and trust in the information they find on HealthyChildren.org . (aap.org)
  • They told me about having trouble convincing a parent to sign a health care directive. (forbes.com)
  • If parents feel stressed and unable to cope, their own health can be at risk. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Her other ideas include: getting your parents' consent to be part of their doctor appointments, meeting with financial services professionals and lawyers to better know what's going on with your parents' health and finances. (bankrate.com)
  • But some nutritionists and public health experts wonder if parents these days are relying too much on the sneak attack. (latimes.com)
  • They talked a lot about how hard it is to persuade our aging parents to listen to us. (forbes.com)
  • When the other single parents see just how far down the rabbit hole of PTA, parenting and princesses Will has gone, they band together to get him out in the dating world and make him realize that being a great parent doesn't mean sacrificing everything about your own identity. (youtube.com)
  • When we want our parent to make some kind of change, make it our problem and take all the blame. (forbes.com)
  • If parents follow our rules, it should make the teen-age years less awkward and reduce the pain and suffering we go through. (nypost.com)
  • But the goal for the next two years is to reach out to those parents who could drastically benefit from this program and the connections that they would make because of the Parent University. (bgsu.edu)
  • With wages remaining flat, and employment becoming more episodic or fluid, many single parents find themselves struggling to make ends meet and create a financial cushion to keep them afloat during transitions. (monster.com)
  • the two major reasons that can make parents to fight at night are: 1) they are having problems with their sexual relationship and 2) they are having financial problems. (answers.com)
  • Fodrini-Johnson suggests that you help your parents develop a giving plan that allows them to make donations but only to one or two organizations that matter most to them. (kiplinger.com)
  • If you already have key information about their accounts and have power of attorney, become a joint account holder so you can receive bank statements or set up online banking (if your parents haven" target="_blank">www.annualcreditreport.com to make sure they aren't victims of identity theft. (kiplinger.com)
  • Give your parents a secured credit card, which allows them to make a deposit that becomes their credit limit, and take away the other cards. (kiplinger.com)
  • Get the latest parents news and features from PEOPLE.com, including advice from celebrity parents and breaking news about who's expecting, who just gave birth and more adventures in parenting. (people.com)
  • Cloistered in Palisades, N.Y., the nation's governors and selected business people with high-level consultants met to recommend the public education future of over 51 million schoolchildren and their parents. (edweek.org)
  • The people who KILLED his parents. (answers.com)
  • This is the toughest step to take and is geared more to people whose parents have dementia and need a lot of help managing their finances. (kiplinger.com)
  • Proto-Indo-European terms for immediate biological parents, or other people who take on a parenting role. (wiktionary.org)
  • West County Parents Forum is a Restricted Group with 169 members. (yahoo.com)
  • More than 1.3 million members strong and growing every day, the Parents Television Council (PTC) was established in 1995 as a nonpartisan group, offering private sector solutions to restore television to its roots as an independent and socially responsible entertainment medium. (idealist.org)
  • In March 2007, Time Inc. sold 18 of its magazines to the Sweden-based Bonnier Group , including Parenting magazine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Time Inc.'s Parenting Group and Time4 Media titles have combined with Bonnier's U.S. magazine partner, World Publications, to form a new company called Bonnier Corporation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Greg Schumann was named vice president, group publisher of The Parenting Group in October 2007. (wikipedia.org)
  • Waterman founded a nationwide advocacy group called "Parenting Our Parents" or POP, and wrote a book about her experience in caring for her parents. (bankrate.com)
  • However as a single Mum and back with my parents, I have had to recalculate my finances, ensure all possible loans and grants are applied for and calculated so I know my budgets! (ucas.com)
  • SEEC's Benefit Auction is the main fundraising activity conducted by the Parents' Association and the single most important source of income for the scholarship program. (si.edu)
  • A Monster survey reveals that single parents have unique struggles, but solutions are available. (monster.com)
  • Employers need to understand the struggles of single parents. (monster.com)
  • On the other hand, even with flexible work hours, a more important factor for many single parents is stable and sufficient income, says Amanda Clayman, Prudential's Financial Wellness Advocate. (monster.com)
  • The community version is appropriate for parents on parole or probation. (parentinginsideout.org)
  • 16) There are open lines of communication between the Administration and parent community. (google.com)
  • Having graduated Magna Cum Laude in May from Bowling Green State University, Georgoff is already putting her bachelor of arts degree in sociology to good use by serving the Toledo community as the Parent Engagement and Resource Coordinator with Partners in Education. (bgsu.edu)
  • Our primary goal really is parent engagement and connections between the community and the parents and the schools. (bgsu.edu)
  • Even though Parent University is in its infancy, Georgoff is hoping to get as much community engagement as possible. (bgsu.edu)
  • A summit where governors and business leaders were not the major players, but where parents and other community members received the spotlight, would have been refreshing indeed. (edweek.org)
  • Develop a plan to get the information you need to help your parents. (bankrate.com)
  • When they are grown, they should be responsible to care for their parents in their old age. (slideshare.net)
  • As such, parents have vigorously schemed, bribed, and brown-nosed the admissions offices of their first-choice schools, including the kindergartens. (thedailybeast.com)
  • Starting this month, in 70 Chicago public schools, parents who pick up their children's report cards and join in teacher conferences will receive a Walgreen reward card worth $25 in free merchandise at the chain's stores. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Can this incentive lure more parents into schools? (chicagotribune.com)
  • Parents prefer schools that enroll high-achieving peers, and these schools generate larger improvements in short- and long-run student outcomes. (nber.org)
  • https://books.google.com/books?id=QntiAAAAMAAJ&q=%22parents%27+magazine%22+apostrophe&dq=%22parents%27+magazine%22+apostrophe&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwihhOGp98fSAhXCWCYKHdYbBq4Q6AEIKTAB http://law.justia.com/cases/federal/district-courts/FSupp/793/1222/1369335/ Parents Magazine Press, Grand Comics Database. (wikipedia.org)
  • Good parenting is about being a good role model. (forbes.com)
  • Parents play an important role in promoting the personal development and academic success of their son or daughter during college. (csun.edu)
  • Zella van Ornum Glimm, "The Way to Good Posture," Parents Magazine 6 (Nov. 1931), p. 28. (jhu.edu)
  • This is the part of the university application process which causes a great deal of stress to teens - not to mention distress to their parents, who may not feel in the mood for an in-depth analysis of their son/daughter's career prospects when they are trying to cook tea or put out the bins! (ucas.com)
  • Most parents and teens will fight over how the teen is not allowed to go to a party or whatever they want to go to. (answers.com)
  • If we can find a way to get our parent to smile or laugh at all, about anything, we're a step ahead. (forbes.com)