Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Social Sciences: Disciplines concerned with the interrelationships of individuals in a social environment including social organizations and institutions. Includes Sociology and Anthropology.Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.PaperNatural Science Disciplines: The sciences dealing with processes observable in nature.Behavioral Sciences: Disciplines concerned with the study of human and animal behavior.Religion and ScienceLibrary Science: Study of the principles and practices of library administration and services.Information Science: The field of knowledge, theory, and technology dealing with the collection of facts and figures, and the processes and methods involved in their manipulation, storage, dissemination, publication, and retrieval. It includes the fields of COMMUNICATION; PUBLISHING; LIBRARY SCIENCE; and informatics.Libraries, MedicalResearch: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.National Academy of Sciences (U.S.): A United States organization of distinguished scientists and engineers established for the purpose of investigating and reporting upon any subject of art or science as requested by any department of government. The National Research Council organized by NAS serves as the principal operating agency to stimulate and support research.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Cognitive Science: The study of the precise nature of different mental tasks and the operations of the brain that enable them to be performed, engaging branches of psychology, computer science, philosophy, and linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.Philosophy: A love or pursuit of wisdom. A search for the underlying causes and principles of reality. (Webster, 3d ed)Biology: One of the BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE DISCIPLINES concerned with the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of animals, plants, and microorganisms.Translational Medical Research: The application of discoveries generated by laboratory research and preclinical studies to the development of clinical trials and studies in humans. A second area of translational research concerns enhancing the adoption of best practices.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Technology: The application of scientific knowledge to practical purposes in any field. It includes methods, techniques, and instrumentation.United StatesLaboratory Animal Science: The science and technology dealing with the procurement, breeding, care, health, and selection of animals used in biomedical research and testing.Academies and Institutes: Organizations representing specialized fields which are accepted as authoritative; may be non-governmental, university or an independent research organization, e.g., National Academy of Sciences, Brookings Institution, etc.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Library Services: Services offered to the library user. They include reference and circulation.Physiology: The biological science concerned with the life-supporting properties, functions, and processes of living organisms or their parts.Awards and PrizesResearch Support as Topic: Financial support of research activities.Nutritional Sciences: The study of NUTRITION PROCESSES as well as the components of food, their actions, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Research Personnel: Those individuals engaged in research.Librarians: Specialists in the management of a library or the services rendered by a library, bringing professional skills to administration, organization of material and personnel, interpretation of bibliothecal rules, the development and maintenance of the library's collection, and the provision of information services.Library Surveys: Collection and analysis of data pertaining to operations of a particular library, library system, or group of independent libraries, with recommendations for improvement and/or ordered plans for further development.Societies: Organizations composed of members with common interests and whose professions may be similar.Publications: Copies of a work or document distributed to the public by sale, rental, lease, or lending. (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p181)Societies, Scientific: Societies whose membership is limited to scientists.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It conducts and supports basic and applied research to reduce the burden of human illness and dysfunction from environmental causes by, defining how environmental exposures, genetic susceptibility, and age interact to affect an individual's health. It was established in 1969.Nobel PrizeFaculty: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.Engineering: The practical application of physical, mechanical, and mathematical principles. (Stedman, 25th ed)National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.History, 18th Century: Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.Knowledge: The body of truths or facts accumulated in the course of time, the cumulated sum of information, its volume and nature, in any civilization, period, or country.Information Dissemination: The circulation or wide dispersal of information.Congresses as Topic: Conferences, conventions or formal meetings usually attended by delegates representing a special field of interest.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Databases, Bibliographic: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of references and citations to books, articles, publications, etc., generally on a single subject or specialized subject area. Databases can operate through automated files, libraries, or computer disks. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, FACTUAL which is used for collections of data and facts apart from bibliographic references to them.Physics: The study of those aspects of energy and matter in terms of elementary principles and laws. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Peer Review, Research: The evaluation by experts of the quality and pertinence of research or research proposals of other experts in the same field. Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.Behaviorism: A psychologic theory, developed by John Broadus Watson, concerned with studying and measuring behaviors that are observable.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Library Collection Development: Development of a library collection, including the determination and coordination of selection policy, assessment of needs of users and potential users, collection use studies, collection evaluation, identification of collection needs, selection of materials, planning for resource sharing, collection maintenance and weeding, and budgeting.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Facility Design and Construction: Architecture, exterior and interior design, and construction of facilities other than hospitals, e.g., dental schools, medical schools, ambulatory care clinics, and specified units of health care facilities. The concept also includes architecture, design, and construction of specialized contained, controlled, or closed research environments including those of space labs and stations.Interdisciplinary Studies: Programs of study which span the traditional boundaries of academic scholarship.Library AssociationsBooksStudents: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.HumanitiesNeurosciences: The scientific disciplines concerned with the embryology, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology, etc., of the nervous system.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Library Automation: The use of automatic machines or processing devices in libraries. The automation may be applied to library administrative activities, office procedures, and delivery of library services to users.Information Storage and Retrieval: Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.History, 17th Century: Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.Scientific Misconduct: Intentional falsification of scientific data by presentation of fraudulent or incomplete or uncorroborated findings as scientific fact.Models, Educational: Theoretical models which propose methods of learning or teaching as a basis or adjunct to changes in attitude or behavior. These educational interventions are usually applied in the fields of health and patient education but are not restricted to patient care.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Interdisciplinary Communication: Communication, in the sense of cross-fertilization of ideas, involving two or more academic disciplines (such as the disciplines that comprise the cross-disciplinary field of bioethics, including the health and biological sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences and law). Also includes problems in communication stemming from differences in patterns of language usage in different academic or medical disciplines.Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Library Administration: Planning, organizing, staffing, direction, and control of libraries.National Library of Medicine (U.S.): An agency of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to advancement of medical and related sciences. Major activities of this institute include the collection, dissemination, and exchange of information important to the progress of medicine and health, research in medical informatics and support for medical library development.Journalism, Medical: The collection, writing, and editing of current interest material on topics related to biomedicine for presentation through the mass media, including newspapers, magazines, radio, or television, usually for a public audience such as health care consumers.Online Systems: Systems where the input data enter the computer directly from the point of origin (usually a terminal or workstation) and/or in which output data are transmitted directly to that terminal point of origin. (Sippl, Computer Dictionary, 4th ed)Education, Veterinary: Use for general articles concerning veterinary medical education.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Textbooks as Topic: Books used in the study of a subject that contain a systematic presentation of the principles and vocabulary of a subject.Anatomy: A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.Interlibrary LoansCell Biology: The study of the structure, behavior, growth, reproduction, and pathology of cells; and the function and chemistry of cellular components.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.MEDLARS: A computerized biomedical bibliographic storage and retrieval system operated by the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLARS stands for Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System, which was first introduced in 1964 and evolved into an online system in 1971 called MEDLINE (MEDLARS Online). As other online databases were developed, MEDLARS became the name of the entire NLM information system while MEDLINE became the name of the premier database. MEDLARS was used to produce the former printed Cumulated Index Medicus, and the printed monthly Index Medicus, until that publication ceased in December 2004.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.History, 16th Century: Time period from 1501 through 1600 of the common era.Computer Communication Networks: A system containing any combination of computers, computer terminals, printers, audio or visual display devices, or telephones interconnected by telecommunications equipment or cables: used to transmit or receive information. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Information Systems: Integrated set of files, procedures, and equipment for the storage, manipulation, and retrieval of information.Sociology: A social science dealing with group relationships, patterns of collective behavior, and social organization.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Ethics, Professional: The principles of proper conduct concerning the rights and duties of the professional, relations with patients or consumers and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the professional and interpersonal relations with patient or consumer families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Information Services: Organized services to provide information on any questions an individual might have using databases and other sources. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Medical Informatics: The field of information science concerned with the analysis and dissemination of medical data through the application of computers to various aspects of health care and medicine.Library Technical Services: Acquisition, organization, and preparation of library materials for use, including selection, weeding, cataloging, classification, and preservation.Animal Nutrition Sciences: The study of NUTRITION PROCESSES, as well as the components of food, their actions, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease in animals.Abstracting and Indexing as Topic: Activities performed to identify concepts and aspects of published information and research reports.Bioethics: A branch of applied ethics that studies the value implications of practices and developments in life sciences, medicine, and health care.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Academic Medical Centers: Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Computational Biology: A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.Libraries, Hospital: Information centers primarily serving the needs of hospital medical staff and sometimes also providing patient education and other services.Career Mobility: The upward or downward mobility in an occupation or the change from one occupation to another.Epidemiology: Field of medicine concerned with the determination of causes, incidence, and characteristic behavior of disease outbreaks affecting human populations. It includes the interrelationships of host, agent, and environment as related to the distribution and control of disease.MuseumsAllergy and Immunology: A medical specialty concerned with the hypersensitivity of the individual to foreign substances and protection from the resultant infection or disorder.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Botany: The study of the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of plants.Medical Laboratory Science: The specialty related to the performance of techniques in clinical pathology such as those in hematology, microbiology, and other general clinical laboratory applications.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Education, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.Medicine in Literature: Written or other literary works whose subject matter is medical or about the profession of medicine and related areas.Diffusion of Innovation: The broad dissemination of new ideas, procedures, techniques, materials, and devices and the degree to which these are accepted and used.Chromatography, Paper: An analytical technique for resolution of a chemical mixture into its component compounds. Compounds are separated on an adsorbent paper (stationary phase) by their varied degree of solubility/mobility in the eluting solvent (mobile phase).Literature, ModernUser-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Biotechnology: Body of knowledge related to the use of organisms, cells or cell-derived constituents for the purpose of developing products which are technically, scientifically and clinically useful. Alteration of biologic function at the molecular level (i.e., GENETIC ENGINEERING) is a central focus; laboratory methods used include TRANSFECTION and CLONING technologies, sequence and structure analysis algorithms, computer databases, and gene and protein structure function analysis and prediction.Libraries: Collections of systematically acquired and organized information resources, and usually providing assistance to users. (ERIC Thesaurus, http://www.eric.ed.gov/ accessed 2/1/2008)Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Education: Acquisition of knowledge as a result of instruction in a formal course of study.Molecular Biology: A discipline concerned with studying biological phenomena in terms of the chemical and physical interactions of molecules.Ethics, Research: The moral obligations governing the conduct of research. Used for discussions of research ethics as a general topic.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.History of MedicineUnited States Government Agencies: Agencies of the FEDERAL GOVERNMENT of the United States.Technology Transfer: Spread and adoption of inventions and techniques from one geographic area to another, from one discipline to another, or from one sector of the economy to another. For example, improvements in medical equipment may be transferred from industrial countries to developing countries, advances arising from aerospace engineering may be applied to equipment for persons with disabilities, and innovations in science arising from government research are made available to private enterprise.Career Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.Mentors: Senior professionals who provide guidance, direction and support to those persons desirous of improvement in academic positions, administrative positions or other career development situations.Animal Husbandry: The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.Internationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.Toxicology: The science concerned with the detection, chemical composition, and biological action of toxic substances or poisons and the treatment and prevention of toxic manifestations.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Philosophy, MedicalConflict of Interest: A situation in which an individual might benefit personally from official or professional actions. It includes a conflict between a person's private interests and official responsibilities in a position of trust. The term is not restricted to government officials. The concept refers both to actual conflict of interest and the appearance or perception of conflict.Informatics: The field of information science concerned with the analysis and dissemination of data through the application of computers.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Animal Welfare: The protection of animals in laboratories or other specific environments by promoting their health through better nutrition, housing, and care.Guidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Creativity: The ability to generate new ideas or images.History, 15th Century: Time period from 1401 through 1500 of the common era.Animal Experimentation: The use of animals as investigational subjects.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.School Admission Criteria: Requirements for the selection of students for admission to academic institutions.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Genetics: The branch of science concerned with the means and consequences of transmission and generation of the components of biological inheritance. (Stedman, 26th ed)Systems Theory: Principles, models, and laws that apply to complex interrelationships and interdependencies of sets of linked components which form a functioning whole, a system. Any system may be composed of components which are systems in their own right (sub-systems), such as several organs within an individual organism.Access to Information: Individual's rights to obtain and use information collected or generated by others.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Eugenics: The attempt to improve the PHENOTYPES of future generations of the human population by fostering the reproduction of those with favorable phenotypes and GENOTYPES and hampering or preventing BREEDING by those with "undesirable" phenotypes and genotypes. The concept is largely discredited. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Schools, Health Occupations: Schools which offer training in the area of health.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.ComputersMEDLINE: The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).Famous PersonsNursing Research: Research carried out by nurses, generally in clinical settings, in the areas of clinical practice, evaluation, nursing education, nursing administration, and methodology.Policy: A course or method of action selected to guide and determine present and future decisions.Education, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform individuals of recent advances in their particular field of interest. They do not lead to any formal advanced standing.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Great BritainMicrobiology: The study of microorganisms such as fungi, bacteria, algae, archaea, and viruses.Education, Premedical: Preparatory education meeting the requirements for admission to medical school.Computer-Assisted Instruction: A self-learning technique, usually online, involving interaction of the student with programmed instructional materials.Plagiarism: Passing off as one's own the work of another without credit.Behavioral Research: Research that involves the application of the behavioral and social sciences to the study of the actions or reactions of persons or animals in response to external or internal stimuli. (from American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed)Ethics: The philosophy or code pertaining to what is ideal in human character and conduct. Also, the field of study dealing with the principles of morality.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Students, Health Occupations: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program in the health occupations.Bioethical Issues: Clusters of topics that fall within the domain of BIOETHICS, the field of study concerned with value questions that arise in biomedicine and health care delivery.Community-Institutional Relations: The interactions between members of a community and representatives of the institutions within that community.Libraries, Digital: Libraries in which a major proportion of the resources are available in machine-readable format, rather than on paper or MICROFORM.Education, Professional: Formal education and training in preparation for the practice of a profession.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Peer Review: An organized procedure carried out by a select committee of professionals in evaluating the performance of other professionals in meeting the standards of their specialty. Review by peers is used by editors in the evaluation of articles and other papers submitted for publication. Peer review is used also in the evaluation of grant applications. It is applied also in evaluating the quality of health care provided to patients.Human Genome Project: A coordinated effort of researchers to map (CHROMOSOME MAPPING) and sequence (SEQUENCE ANALYSIS, DNA) the human GENOME.Public Opinion: The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Architecture as Topic: The art and science of designing buildings and structures. More generally, it is the design of the total built environment, including town planning, urban design, and landscape architecture.Interior Design and Furnishings: The planning of the furnishings and decorations of an architectural interior.Judicial Role: The kind of action or activity proper to the judiciary, particularly its responsibility for decision making.Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Embryology: The study of the development of an organism during the embryonic and fetal stages of life.Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: The processes and properties of living organisms by which they take in and balance the use of nutritive materials for energy, heat production, or building material for the growth, maintenance, or repair of tissues and the nutritive properties of FOOD.
  • NEW ORLEANS, March 21, 2018 -- It's likely not the first thing you think of when you see elephant dung, but this material turns out to be an excellent source of cellulose for paper manufacturing in countries where trees are scarce, scientists report. (eurekalert.org)
  • White papers will be accepted from now until March 9, 2018. (nap.edu)
  • KDD-2018 invites submission of papers describing innovative research on all aspects of data science, and of applied papers describing designs and implementations for practical tasks in data science. (kdnuggets.com)
  • KDD-2018 , to be held in London, 19-23 August, 2018, invites submission of papers describing innovative research on all aspects of knowledge discovery and data mining, ranging from theoretical foundations to novel models and algorithms for data mining problems in science, business, medicine, and engineering. (kdnuggets.com)
  • Nurturing new talent 2018 The RSAI aims to continue promoting the development of Regional Science by nurturing new talent in 2018. (regionalscience.org)
  • The 2018 ISSS Conference will explore foundational discoveries about the nature of complex systems which are now arising from research in systems disciplines such as Systems Biology, Systems Medicine, Systems Psychology, Systems Economics, Complexity Science and General Systems Research. (isss.org)
  • The 2018 Conference of the International Society for the Systems Sciences (ISSS) will bring together these specialised strands of work, laying foundations for establishing the profound systems science that would enable us to design and optimize for elegant functionality and enduring value at any level of complexity. (isss.org)
  • The Monsanto Papers are a treasure trove of internal documents slowly released since March 2017 as part of a US lawsuit by cancer victims against Monsanto over its ubiquitous herbicide, glyphosate. (greenleft.org.au)
  • AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions. (sciencemag.org)
  • An investigation into the flow of fluids in the space between the brain cells and their role in cleansing the brain of neurotoxic waste products is the winner of the 2014 Newcomb Cleveland Prize of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). (aaas.org)
  • I am especially excited that this award-winning author team contributed to ' Science in the Classroom'," said Shirley Malcom, director of the Education and Human Resources Programs (EHR) at AAAS. (aaas.org)
  • CISE Ph.D. student Yuanwen Huang and his advisor Prabhat Mishra won the Best Paper Award at the IEEE International Symposium on Quality Electronic Design (ISQED 2016) for their paper entitled "Reliability and Energy-aware Cache Reconfiguration for Embedded Systems. (ufl.edu)
  • An interdisciplinary team led by Professor Zachary Taylor's team in the Departments of Bioengineering, Electrical Engineering, and Surgery has won the 2016 THz Science and Technology Best Paper Award for their work on Corneal Tissue Water Content sensing using THz imaging. (ucla.edu)
  • A paper titled, "The iAAMCS Ecosystem: Retaining Blacks/African-Americans in CS PhD Programs," recently earned a best paper award at the 2020 Research on Equity and Sustained Participation in Engineering, Computing, and Technology (RESPECT) Conference. (ufl.edu)
  • The work was supported by the Austrian Academic Exchange Service , the Department of Science and Technology in South Africa, Europe 2020 , the Ministry of Education Malaysia , the University of Vienna and the Vienna Zoo . (eurekalert.org)
  • This symposium will honor the 2020 Innovators in Science Award Winners and highlight their outstanding research accomplishments. (nyas.org)
  • Congratulations to Mohan Zalake, a Human-Centered Computing Ph.D. student, for receiving the best paper award at Association for Computing Machinery's 2019 International Conference on Intelligent Virtual Agents (ACM IVA). (ufl.edu)
  • The Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) is pleased to announce the winners for best papers in Risk Analysis: An International Journal and the best research posters for 2019. (eurekalert.org)
  • The editorial staff of Risk Analysis selected the 2019 Best Paper award winners. (eurekalert.org)
  • This article provides solutions to all the questions of Biology of CBSE Board's X Class question paper of 2019 Main Set-I, Set-2, Set-3 question papers. (indiastudychannel.com)
  • We're not the first to notice that scientists enjoy using literary allusions in their paper titles. (slate.com)
  • The scientists' analysis of 156 pieces of paper money from 21 countries found that all contained traces of BPA. (eurekalert.org)
  • In support of these goals, the Society publishes Protein Science, the premier journal in the field, hosts an annual international symposium, and facilitates the education of early-career protein scientists across all lines of discipline. (prweb.com)
  • 1,2,3 This paper convinced many secular scientists of the validity of the astronomical, or Milankovitch, ice age theory. (icr.org)
  • Even after this problem was publicly discussed, beginning in March of this year, secular scientists still seem unwilling to acknowledge what appears to be a glaringly obvious problem in this iconic paper. (icr.org)
  • As advances in science and technology often involve collaboration among scientists from different fields, we are bringing together a diverse group of investigators, many from areas not conventionally associated with EEG, to actively encourage multidisciplinary research in EEG and foster new ideas. (bio.net)
  • And one, Science Publishing Group, has now recruited me as a "peer reviewer" of other scientists' work - an independent expert who checks how well it is done. (ottawacitizen.com)
  • In this book, edited by philosopher of science Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther, Edwards's key papers are assembled alongside commentaries by leading scientists, discussing Edwards's influence on their own research and on thinking in their field overall. (cambridge.org)
  • This book is a resource both for anyone interested in the history and philosophy of genetics, statistics, and science, and for scientists seeking to develop new algorithmic and statistical methods for understanding the genetic relationships between and among species both extant and extinct. (cambridge.org)
  • Alternatively, you can consider submitting papers that would be of interest to action researchers and system scientists to build long term research collaboration between members of ISSS to apply action research to advance systems sciences. (isss.org)
  • No longer must you search for specialty litmus paper. (stevespanglerscience.com)
  • I just searched for the paper 'Political Attitudes Vary with Physiological Traits' on Google Scholar and found a large number of papers citing the paper in question, and searches on regular search engines turn up an even more vast number of mass media references to the paper. (ycombinator.com)
  • The new paper does not suggest ignoring team composition, which it says has important implications for scientific diversity by virtue of cognitive diversity -- which research, in turn, suggests can heighten creativity and the search for new solutions. (insidehighered.com)
  • Founded in 1929 as the Institute of Paper Chemistry in Appleton, Wisconsin, it moved to Georgia Tech's campus in 1989, and integrated its operations with Georgia Tech on July 1, 2003. (wikipedia.org)
  • He was able to acquire the financial support of 19 pulp and paper companies that encompassed 90 percent of the state's paper industry and in 1929 IPST was founded as the Institute of Paper Chemistry in Appleton, Wisconsin. (wikipedia.org)
  • My advice would be to forget about wood processing for paper and focus on the protein chemistry common in the wool industry and apply that knowledge to feathers with the understanding that feathers lack structural features commonly found in hair and wool such as cuticle. (physicsforums.com)
  • Footnotes came largely from a paper on wine chemistry. (nationalpost.com)
  • But the white paper notes that average academic impact of Chinese research is not yet matching its growth in output, and lags behind the world average in a number of subject areas in normalised citation impact, one of the indicators of impact from research. (researchinformation.info)
  • Indeed, more science-specific research on this topic is needed, the paper argues, and those few studies focusing on science tend to count citation rates, publication productivity and patents, as opposed to other measures of impact. (insidehighered.com)
  • The paper, "Differentially Private k-Means Clustering" is co-authored by Ph.D. candidate Dong Su and his advisor, Professor Ninghui Li, in collaboration with Professor Elisa Bertino, Dr. Jianneng Cao from Institute for Infocomm Research, and Dr. Hongxia Jin from Samsung Research America. (purdue.edu)
  • Paper (top) can be made from cellulose derived from elephant manure (bottom). (eurekalert.org)
  • The purified cellulose requires little if any grinding to break it down into nanofibers in preparation for use in paper, in contrast to conventional methods. (eurekalert.org)
  • Cellulose fibres are used in a variety of products including: textiles, paper products and diapers because of their strength, durability and ability to absorb and transport water. (sciencephoto.com)
  • It was re-envisioned as a more direct link between the paper industry and Georgia Tech faculty and researchers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Disaster science as it relates to responder safety and health can present unique challenges to occupational safety and health researchers. (cdc.gov)
  • Short really is sweet when it comes to scientific paper titles, according to researchers looking for the secret to academic stardom. (phys.org)
  • These results are consistent with the intriguing hypothesis that papers with shorter titles may be easier to understand," and thus more eye-catching, according to researchers from the data science lab at Britain's Warwick Business School. (phys.org)
  • The researchers waded through some 140,000 papers, focusing on those most-cited between 2007 and 2013, with titles ranging from one to 55 words. (phys.org)
  • This year the Citizen has published a series of stories about "predatory" science journals, which will seemingly print anything for a fee and prey on junior researchers who are desperate to publish. (ottawacitizen.com)
  • I do believe that is how science should work, with findings confirmed by independent researchers. (discovermagazine.com)
  • Researchers from the Health Research Center received an award from The American Planning Association (APA) and American Public Health Association (APHA), in partnership with the Georgia Tech Built Environment and Public Health Clearinghouse for their paper entitled "Bridging the Divide: Policymakers and Public Health Researchers. (wvu.edu)
  • And some of these, nicknamed predatory journals, offer fast, cut-rate service to young researchers under pressure to publish who have trouble getting accepted by the big science journals. (nationalpost.com)
  • Researchers from the Purdue Computer Science Department, Institute for Infocomm Research and Samsung Research America won the Best Paper Award at the 6th ACM Conference on Data and Application Security and Privacy conference, recently held in New Orleans, LA. (purdue.edu)
  • The presentation of the paper is unconventional because the paper contains no references due to the inaccessibility of the existing scientific literature to 8-10 year olds. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • Poster Sessions/Research Tables - informal presentation of papers or abstracts. (bio.net)
  • Graduate student Saugata Sinha, a Ph.D. student in RIT's Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science, won the award based on reviewers' recommendations and the presentation of his paper, "Differentiation between malignant and normal human thyroid tissue using frequency analysis of multispectral photoacoustic images. (rit.edu)
  • Conference organizer Nathan Cahill, associate professor in RIT's School of Mathematical Science, described Sinha's research and presentation as "great examples of the high quality we strive to achieve in this workshop. (rit.edu)
  • We invite abstracts for presentation of papers, posters and workshops about the conference theme specifically or in connection with the themes of the ISSS's Systems Integration Groups (SIGs) and Exploratory Groups, which are listed below. (isss.org)
  • 3.1 In the first quarter of each year, the Editor in Chief of Regional Science Policy and Practice identifies the list of up to three (3) papers published two years before that have highest citations until the end of the previous year. (regionalscience.org)
  • 3.4 The Editor-in-Chief of Regional Science Policy and Practice will inform the Executive Director of RSAI of the decision of the Jury, and the Executive Director of RSAI will inform the recipient(s) of the Award. (regionalscience.org)
  • The awarding of the Newcomb-Cleveland Prize marks one of the highlights of the year for Science and the continuation of a tradition that is more than 90 years old," said Marcia McNutt, editor-in-chief of the Science family of journals. (aaas.org)
  • Full papers will be invited for accepted abstracts, and these will be published in the online Journal Proceedings of the ISSS. (isss.org)
  • You are encouraged to submit abstracts (and full papers) to the conference that meet the aims of the action research SIG as well as the respective conference theme. (isss.org)
  • In 1919, Samuel G. Plantz, the president of Lawrence College (now Lawrence University), worked with Monroe A. Wertheimer, president of the Thilmany Pulp and Paper Company (and a trustee of Lawrence College) to plan a night school for paper mill workers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Roozbeh Ketabi and Babak Alipour, both Ph.D. students from the University of Florida Department of Computer & Information Science & Engineering (CISE), and Ahmed Helmy, a CISE professor, won best poster at the IEEE International Conference on Computer Communications (INFOCOM). (ufl.edu)
  • His award-winning paper represents one aspect of his thesis research, which he conducts under Navalgund Rao, professor in the Center for Imaging Science, and Dr. Vikram Dogra, professor of radiology and urology in the department of imaging sciences at the University of Rochester Medical Center. (rit.edu)
  • PLOS Genetics announces a special collection of papers to highlight recent advances in our understanding of how faces form, curated by Seth Weinberg of the University of Pittsburgh, and colleagues. (eurekalert.org)
  • Londa Schiebinger, John L. Hinds Professor of History of Science at Stanford University, and the paper's senior author, said this week that "we in North America and Western Europe have not been entirely successful increasing the numbers of women in science, despite our many efforts. (insidehighered.com)
  • Papers in Regional Science is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the Regional Science Association International (RSAI). (wikipedia.org)
  • A group of UK primary school children have achieved a world first by having their school science project accepted for publication in an internationally recognised peer-reviewed Royal Society journal. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • That's the conclusion of a new study in the ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology . (eurekalert.org)
  • The Protein Society, the leading international society devoted to furthering protein research, and the publishers of the journal Protein Science announce the second annual selection of two junior investigators to give talks at the 28th Annual Symposium of The Protein Society (July 27-30, 2014, San Diego, CA, USA). (prweb.com)
  • The findings, which Mueller and Oppenheimer describe in a forthcoming issue of the journal Psychological Science , were a bit surprising. (psychologicalscience.org)
  • Keep in mind a high-profile journal like Science is extremely competitive and receives many paper submissions. (ycombinator.com)
  • Science as a journal brings the eyeballs and thus has, in my opinion, an obligation to publish data indicating that extremely influential studies they have previously published are likely flawed. (ycombinator.com)
  • A succinct title made a study more likely to be cited by fellow academics-the gold standard for measuring its reach, the British team wrote in a study published Wednesday by the Royal Society Open Science journal. (phys.org)
  • To illustrate the "short is sweet" phenomenon, researcher Adrian Letchford offered a tale of two studies published in 2010 in the prestigious journal Science . (phys.org)
  • The paper on chicken feed made it to publication with a different journal, the American International Journal of Contemporary Scientific Research, published in India. (ottawacitizen.com)
  • This is a proper academic journal, published by ex - arms dealers Elsevier, which I myself have read in the Radcliffe Science Library in Oxford. (badscience.net)
  • The Impact Factor measures the average number of citations received in a particular year by papers published in the journal during the two preceding years. (elsevier.com)
  • The purpose of this award is to recognize the best refereed paper published in the volume year of the Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology (JASIST) preceding the ASIS&T annual meeting. (asist.org)
  • Adherence to "Instructions for Contributors" found in the Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology for format, graphics, citations, etc. (asist.org)
  • 1. Working papers should be journal article length: 6,000-12,000 words. (uci.edu)
  • The Association's oldest prize, now supported by The Fodor Family Trust, annually recognizes the author or authors of an outstanding paper published in the Research Articles or Reports sections of the journal Science between June and the following May. (aaas.org)
  • WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA) today released Sodium and Salt: A Guide for Consumers, Policymakers and the Media, a science policy paper that provides policymakers, consumers, journalists and health professionals with current and scientifically accurate information and resources on sodium and salt. (gmaonline.org)
  • At the time, the Science paper on XMRV, authored by Judy Mikovits of the Whittemore Peterson Institute in Reno, Nevada, and colleagues, was under siege because a raft of other studies had failed to replicate the data. (sciencemag.org)
  • My colleagues and I could have called it 'Paper Titles', or if we were really bold, 'Titles,'" Letchford said of the team's own study. (phys.org)
  • She noted that in a separate analysis of 1.5 million medical papers, she and colleagues saw a link between diversity in participation and methods, specifically between author gender and attention to gender- and sex-specific analysis of phenomena. (insidehighered.com)
  • All types of manuscript-communications, full papers, Minireviews and Perspectives, will be considered for publication. (rsc.org)
  • Life Science White Papers are in-depth articles aimed to educate and inform site visitors interested in life science research. (news-medical.net)
  • The committee is requesting community input on these topics in the form of white papers. (nap.edu)
  • Please find below recommended topics for white papers and submission guidelines. (nap.edu)
  • Note that the committee will also consider reports from the Program Analysis (PAG) study groups, so these need not be resubmitted as white papers, although any important and relevant updates to these reports are encouraged. (nap.edu)
  • Albert Porcar-Castell as co-author in Science paper "OCO-2 advances photosynthesis observation from space via solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence" published 13th of October. (helsinki.fi)
  • Ahmed Helmy, Ph.D., and his former Ph.D. student (Dr. Gautam Thakur, UF graduate, now at Oakridge National Labs) received the InternetTC Best Paper 2013 award from the Internet Technical Committee (ITC), in coordination with IEEE Communications Society (ComSoc). (ufl.edu)
  • OptNetSci, UF's Optima Network Science research group, won the best paper award at the IEEE International Conference on Mobile Ad-hoc and Sensor Networks (MSN) in Maui, Hawaii, December 2014, for the paper entitled "Online Algorithms for Optimal Resource Management in Dynamic D2D Communications", authored by Alan Kuhnle, Xiang Li, and My T. Thai. (ufl.edu)
  • The Award recognizes annually a scientist who have demonstrated creativity, merit and prospective effectiveness through the publication of a paper of remarkable quality in Regional Science Policy and Practice. (regionalscience.org)
  • 2.3 The award selects only one paper per year. (regionalscience.org)
  • 3.3 The Jury will appraise and rank the papers in a meeting in person and/or by email/teleconference in March to select the paper to receive the Award. (regionalscience.org)
  • All papers published in the volume year of JASIST preceding the ASIS&T annual meeting are eligible for the award. (asist.org)
  • The JASIST Editorial Board is responsible for nominating papers for this award. (asist.org)
  • The John Wiley & Sons Best JASIST Paper Award was established in 1969. (asist.org)
  • The Collage Executable Paper represents a milestone for the Article of the Future, Elsevier's ongoing mission to enhance the online article format. (elsevier.com)
  • The paper contains a full empirical attempt to model and a significant regional issue of policy and practice concern: the spatial patterns of energy efficiency across the prefectures of Japan. (regionalscience.org)
  • The authors note that "approximately 40% of empirical papers finding a negative effect, 40% finding no effect, and 20% finding a positive effect" but "overall support for the resource curse hypothesis is weak when potential publication bias and method heterogeneity are taken into account. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although a recent study found traces of BPA in U.S. currency, nobody knew until now about BPA in paper money worldwide. (eurekalert.org)
  • A social science is a science that deals with the subjectivity of an area of study. (customwritings.com)
  • In my mind, they should have done this months ago," says Jonathan Stoye of the Medical Research Council National Institute for Medical Research in London, who co-authored a study in PLoS ONE in May that questioned the results of the PNAS paper . (sciencemag.org)
  • But when PNAS finally published the paper in August 2010 , some retrovirologists disputed the authors' claim that their study supported Mikovits's work. (sciencemag.org)
  • In preparation for and as an input to the upcoming decadal surveys in astronomy and astrophysics and planetary science, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine has been charged with carrying out a study on the science strategy for field of extrasolar planets. (nap.edu)
  • The committee will regularly consult with the concurrent study on the "State of the Science of Astrobiology. (nap.edu)
  • The study itself was entitled: "The advantage of short paper titles"-a terse offering in the verbose world of scientific publishing . (phys.org)
  • He also says that the "Blinded with science" study was designed to test a specific hypothesis. (discovermagazine.com)
  • The range of proposed suggestions and solutions found in this white paper are based on our first-hand, wide-ranging study and explicitly address some of the issues our research identifies. (researchinformation.info)
  • With their paper, Brenner and his co-workers founded the yet-to-be-named field of connectomics , the determination and study of complete maps of the synapses in nervous systems. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • In this issue of The Morning Paper Quarterly Review Adrian Colyer looks at how simple testing can avoid catastrophic failures, symbolic reasoning vs. neural networks, how to infer a smartphone password via WiFi signals, how and why Facebook does load testing in production, and automated SLOs in enterprise clusters. (infoq.com)
  • Buy a single issue of Science for just $15 USD. (sciencemag.org)
  • Indicate during the submission process in "Author's Comments" that your paper is being submitted for this feature issue. (lww.com)
  • The challenging issue addressed by the paper is how to support efficient and high-quality clustering while at the same assuring the privacy of individuals to whom the data refer to. (purdue.edu)
  • The reductionists believe that one day consciousness will be fully explained by the methods used only by the hard sciences. (customwritings.com)
  • The paper is itself a model of how regional science methods can be harnessed for making contributions to policy and practice. (regionalscience.org)
  • A prospective paper with great impact well rooted theoretically and with sound methods. (regionalscience.org)
  • A global science lobby group like the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI), for instance, which is funded by dozens of large agribusiness and food multinational companies, and whose purpose is to influence regulatory agencies and their methods to make sure they do not look too closely into the hazards of industry products, received more than 20 per cent of its funding from Monsanto in 2012. (greenleft.org.au)
  • But a new paper seeks to push science's gender diversity conversation beyond just composition of teams, to research methods and research questions -- along with how to manage each in different disciplinary and organizational settings. (insidehighered.com)
  • This new paper demonstrates that one of the more controversial reprogramming factors (c-myc) is not absolutely necessary to produce iPS cells which gives us hope that methods may be developed soon that produce cells which can be used in human patients. (sciencemediacentre.org)
  • All other correspondence should be addressed to the authors of each paper. (ttu.edu)
  • In an 'executable paper', authors have the ability to embed chunks of executable code and data into their papers, and readers may execute that code within the framework of the research article. (elsevier.com)
  • The title of the paper is, "Decades of field data reveal that turtles senesce in the wild," and in the publication, Warner and the other authors of the paper explore the effects of aging on a population of approximately 1,000 individual painted turtles in the backwaters of the Mississippi River over a 24-year period. (auburn.edu)