Heart Sounds: The sounds heard over the cardiac region produced by the functioning of the heart. There are four distinct sounds: the first occurs at the beginning of SYSTOLE and is heard as a "lubb" sound; the second is produced by the closing of the AORTIC VALVE and PULMONARY VALVE and is heard as a "dupp" sound; the third is produced by vibrations of the ventricular walls when suddenly distended by the rush of blood from the HEART ATRIA; and the fourth is produced by atrial contraction and ventricular filling.Heart Auscultation: Act of listening for sounds within the heart.Phonocardiography: Graphic registration of the heart sounds picked up as vibrations and transformed by a piezoelectric crystal microphone into a varying electrical output according to the stresses imposed by the sound waves. The electrical output is amplified by a stethograph amplifier and recorded by a device incorporated into the electrocardiograph or by a multichannel recording machine.Heart Murmurs: Heart sounds caused by vibrations resulting from the flow of blood through the heart. Heart murmurs can be examined by HEART AUSCULTATION, and analyzed by their intensity (6 grades), duration, timing (systolic, diastolic, or continuous), location, transmission, and quality (musical, vibratory, blowing, etc).Sound: A type of non-ionizing radiation in which energy is transmitted through solid, liquid, or gas as compression waves. Sound (acoustic or sonic) radiation with frequencies above the audible range is classified as ultrasonic. Sound radiation below the audible range is classified as infrasonic.Pacemaker, Artificial: A device designed to stimulate, by electric impulses, contraction of the heart muscles. It may be temporary (external) or permanent (internal or internal-external).Kinetocardiography: The graphic recording of chest wall movement due to cardiac impulses.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Stethoscopes: Instruments intended to detect and study sound produced by the heart, lungs, or other parts of the body. (from UMDNS, 1999)Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Sound Localization: Ability to determine the specific location of a sound source.Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted: Computer-assisted processing of electric, ultrasonic, or electronic signals to interpret function and activity.Cineangiography: Motion pictures of the passage of contrast medium through blood vessels.Biological Clocks: The physiological mechanisms that govern the rhythmic occurrence of certain biochemical, physiological, and behavioral phenomena.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Heart Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.Heart Block: Impaired conduction of cardiac impulse that can occur anywhere along the conduction pathway, such as between the SINOATRIAL NODE and the right atrium (SA block) or between atria and ventricles (AV block). Heart blocks can be classified by the duration, frequency, or completeness of conduction block. Reversibility depends on the degree of structural or functional defects.Sinoatrial Node: The small mass of modified cardiac muscle fibers located at the junction of the superior vena cava (VENA CAVA, SUPERIOR) and right atrium. Contraction impulses probably start in this node, spread over the atrium (HEART ATRIUM) and are then transmitted by the atrioventricular bundle (BUNDLE OF HIS) to the ventricle (HEART VENTRICLE).Sound Spectrography: The graphic registration of the frequency and intensity of sounds, such as speech, infant crying, and animal vocalizations.Sick Sinus Syndrome: A condition caused by dysfunctions related to the SINOATRIAL NODE including impulse generation (CARDIAC SINUS ARREST) and impulse conduction (SINOATRIAL EXIT BLOCK). It is characterized by persistent BRADYCARDIA, chronic ATRIAL FIBRILLATION, and failure to resume sinus rhythm following CARDIOVERSION. This syndrome can be congenital or acquired, particularly after surgical correction for heart defects.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Mitral Valve: The valve between the left atrium and left ventricle of the heart.Defibrillators, Implantable: Implantable devices which continuously monitor the electrical activity of the heart and automatically detect and terminate ventricular tachycardia (TACHYCARDIA, VENTRICULAR) and VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION. They consist of an impulse generator, batteries, and electrodes.Prosthesis-Related Infections: Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).Device Removal: Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Wireless Technology: Techniques using energy such as radio frequency, infrared light, laser light, visible light, or acoustic energy to transfer information without the use of wires, over both short and long distances.Answering Services: Communication services provided by a person or a machine to record and relay the message from the caller.Patient Identification Systems: Organized procedures for establishing patient identity, including use of bracelets, etc.Diagnosis: The determination of the nature of a disease or condition, or the distinguishing of one disease or condition from another. Assessment may be made through physical examination, laboratory tests, or the likes. Computerized programs may be used to enhance the decision-making process.Equipment and Supplies: Expendable and nonexpendable equipment, supplies, apparatus, and instruments that are used in diagnostic, surgical, therapeutic, scientific, and experimental procedures.Device Approval: Process that is gone through in order for a device to receive approval by a government regulatory agency. This includes any required preclinical or clinical testing, review, submission, and evaluation of the applications and test results, and post-marketing surveillance. It is not restricted to FDA.Equipment Safety: Freedom of equipment from actual or potential hazards.Patient Participation: Patient involvement in the decision-making process in matters pertaining to health.Medical Device Legislation: Laws and regulations pertaining to devices used in medicine, proposed for enactment, or enacted by a legislative body.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Atrial Fibrillation: Abnormal cardiac rhythm that is characterized by rapid, uncoordinated firing of electrical impulses in the upper chambers of the heart (HEART ATRIA). In such case, blood cannot be effectively pumped into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES). It is caused by abnormal impulse generation.Anti-Arrhythmia Agents: Agents used for the treatment or prevention of cardiac arrhythmias. They may affect the polarization-repolarization phase of the action potential, its excitability or refractoriness, or impulse conduction or membrane responsiveness within cardiac fibers. Anti-arrhythmia agents are often classed into four main groups according to their mechanism of action: sodium channel blockade, beta-adrenergic blockade, repolarization prolongation, or calcium channel blockade.Short-Wave Therapy: The use of focused short radio waves to produce local hyperthermia in an injured person or diseased body area.Radiology Information Systems: Information systems, usually computer-assisted, designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information for planning, organizing, directing, and controlling administrative activities associated with the provision and utilization of radiology services and facilities.Transducers: Any device or element which converts an input signal into an output signal of a different form. Examples include the microphone, phonographic pickup, loudspeaker, barometer, photoelectric cell, automobile horn, doorbell, and underwater sound transducer. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Acoustics: The branch of physics that deals with sound and sound waves. In medicine it is often applied in procedures in speech and hearing studies. With regard to the environment, it refers to the characteristics of a room, auditorium, theatre, building, etc. that determines the audibility or fidelity of sounds in it. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Ultrasonography: The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.Ultrasonics: A subfield of acoustics dealing in the radio frequency range higher than acoustic SOUND waves (approximately above 20 kilohertz). Ultrasonic radiation is used therapeutically (DIATHERMY and ULTRASONIC THERAPY) to generate HEAT and to selectively destroy tissues. It is also used in diagnostics, for example, ULTRASONOGRAPHY; ECHOENCEPHALOGRAPHY; and ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY, to visually display echoes received from irradiated tissues.Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted: Methods developed to aid in the interpretation of ultrasound, radiographic images, etc., for diagnosis of disease.Microbubbles: Small encapsulated gas bubbles (diameters of micrometers) that can be used as CONTRAST MEDIA, and in other diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Upon exposure to sufficiently intense ultrasound, microbubbles will cavitate, rupture, disappear, release gas content. Such characteristics of the microbubbles can be used to enhance diagnostic tests, dissolve blood clots, and deliver drugs or genes for therapy.Phantoms, Imaging: Devices or objects in various imaging techniques used to visualize or enhance visualization by simulating conditions encountered in the procedure. Phantoms are used very often in procedures employing or measuring x-irradiation or radioactive material to evaluate performance. Phantoms often have properties similar to human tissue. Water demonstrates absorbing properties similar to normal tissue, hence water-filled phantoms are used to map radiation levels. Phantoms are used also as teaching aids to simulate real conditions with x-ray or ultrasonic machines. (From Iturralde, Dictionary and Handbook of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Imaging, 1990)Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Tachycardia, Ventricular: An abnormally rapid ventricular rhythm usually in excess of 150 beats per minute. It is generated within the ventricle below the BUNDLE OF HIS, either as autonomic impulse formation or reentrant impulse conduction. Depending on the etiology, onset of ventricular tachycardia can be paroxysmal (sudden) or nonparoxysmal, its wide QRS complexes can be uniform or polymorphic, and the ventricular beating may be independent of the atrial beating (AV dissociation).Tachycardia: Abnormally rapid heartbeat, usually with a HEART RATE above 100 beats per minute for adults. Tachycardia accompanied by disturbance in the cardiac depolarization (cardiac arrhythmia) is called tachyarrhythmia.Atrial Flutter: Rapid, irregular atrial contractions caused by a block of electrical impulse conduction in the right atrium and a reentrant wave front traveling up the inter-atrial septum and down the right atrial free wall or vice versa. Unlike ATRIAL FIBRILLATION which is caused by abnormal impulse generation, typical atrial flutter is caused by abnormal impulse conduction. As in atrial fibrillation, patients with atrial flutter cannot effectively pump blood into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES).
... pacemakers, artificial hips, surgical lasers, automated patient monitors and blood chemistry sensors. • design and develop ... and medical professionals to design medical devices like artificial hearts, pacemakers, dialysis machines, and surgical lasers ... medical or biological imaging - combining knowledge of a physical phenomenon (for example, sound, radiation or magnetism) with ... Courses of study include a sound background in mechanical, chemical, or industrial engineering, and specialized biomedical ...
... the vibrations from the heart muscles would be enough to allow the generator to power a pacemaker. This would eliminate the ... Sensors and Actuators A: Physical. Special Issue of the Micromechanics Section of Sensors and Actuators based upon ... The vibration may be from sound pressure waves or other ambient sources. Vibration powered generators usually consist of a ... and is able to power things in high vibration environments like sensors on machinery in manufacturing plants, or sensors that ...
In digital radiography the sensors shape a plate, but in the EOS system, which is a slot-scanning system, a linear sensor ... The excretory function of the kidneys, iodine-concentrating ability of the thyroid, blood flow to heart muscle, etc. can be ... This results in fewer sound waves penetrating to organs and reflecting back to the transducer, resulting in loss of information ... The use of MRI is currently contraindicated for patients with pacemakers, cochlear implants, some indwelling medication pumps, ...
In 1960, Denis Noble developed the first computer model of the heart pacemaker. The formal study of systems biology, as a ... Development of syntactically and semantically sound ways of representing biological models.[citation needed] Network-based ... Robots and automated sensors enable such large-scale experimentation and data acquisition. These technologies are still ... Noble, Denis (5 November 1960). "Cardiac action and pacemaker potentials based on the Hodgkin-Huxley equations". Nature. 188 ( ...
"Wireless Sensor Networks." Smart Environments: Technologies, Protocols, and Applications, ed. D.J. Cook and S.K. Das, John ... This has been used in biomedical situations such as pacemakers, as well as for short-range Rfid tags. Common examples of ... New wireless technologies, such as mobile body area networks (MBAN), have the capability to monitor blood pressure, heart rate ... Sonic, especially ultrasonic short range communication involves the transmission and reception of sound. Electromagnetic ...
Since sound is vibration, propagating through a medium such as air, the detection of these vibrations, that is the sense of the ... Stimulation of stretch sensors that sense dilation of various blood vessels may result in pain, for example headache caused by ... Cardioception refers to the perception of the activity of the heart.[citation needed] Chronoception refers to how the passage ... leading to the hypothesis that dopamine influences internal pacemaker, or "clock," activity. For instance, amphetamine, which ...
... or new chest pain Suspected pulmonary embolism or new shortness of breath A third heart sound, fourth heart sound, a cardiac ... Sensors, Cables and. "12-Lead ECG Placement Guide with Illustrations , Cables and Sensors". Cables and Sensors. Retrieved 2017- ... During each heartbeat, a healthy heart has an orderly progression of depolarization that starts with pacemaker cells in the ... the heart rate is the rate in which the sinoatrial node depolarizes as it is the source of depolarization of the heart. Heart ...
The cardiac pacemaker cells of the sinoatrial node in the heart provide a good example. Although such pacemaker potentials have ... In sensory neurons, an external signal such as pressure, temperature, light, or sound is coupled with the opening and closing ... Glauner KS, Mannuzzu LM, Gandhi CS, Isacoff E (1999). "Spectroscopic mapping of voltage sensor movement in the Shaker potassium ... The cardiac cells of the sinoatrial node provide the pacemaker potential that synchronizes the heart. The action potentials of ...
... or to permanently replace the heart in case heart transplantation is impossible. Artificial pacemakers represent another ... Cochlear implants bypass most of the peripheral auditory system to provides a sense of sound via a microphone and some ... Hybrid Sensor/Processor Architecture American Society for Artificial Internal Organs (ASAIO) Artificial Organ Experts 3d Petri ... without the removal of the heart itself. Besides these, lab-grown hearts and 3D bioprinted hearts are also being researched. ...
... within the nervous system or pacemaker of the heart, upsetting normal operations. This effect might explain cases where cardiac ... But light travels 300,000 kilometers in a second, almost a million times the speed of sound. Sound travels at the slower speed ... lead to the complete destruction of a facility or process or simply cause the failure of a remote electronic sensor; it can ... EMPs - the discharge process produces an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) which may damage an artificial pacemaker, or otherwise ...
Main articles: Cardiac action potential, Electrical conduction system of the heart, Cardiac pacemaker, and Heart arrhythmia ... Bezanilla F (2000). "The voltage sensor in voltage-dependent ion channels". Physiol. Rev. 80 (2): 555-592. PMID 10747201.. ... For illustration, in the human ear, hair cells convert the incoming sound into the opening and closing of mechanically gated ... The cardiac pacemaker cells of the sinoatrial node in the heart provide a good example.[g] Although such pacemaker potentials ...
creation of septal defect in heart Blalock-Hanlon procedure. shunt from heart chamber to blood vessel. atrium to pulmonary ... Another requirement is the ability of pacemaker impulses detection and analysis. Such ability may be useful when the physician ... Another innovation is the inclusion of a triaxial movement sensor, which records the patient's physical activity, and on ... "www.heart.org. Retrieved 8 April 2018.. *^ Meldrum, Stuart J (1993). "Obituary for Wilford "Bill" Glasscock". Journal of ...
Echocardiography allows detailed structures of the heart, including chamber size, heart function, the valves of the heart, as ... sensors such as image sensors (particularly CMOS sensors) and biosensors, and processors such as microcontrollers, ... A path of reflected sound waves in a multilayered structure can be defined by an input acoustic impedance (ultrasound sound ... such as pacemakers. These risks are strictly controlled as part of the design of the instrument and the scanning protocols used ...
The question of neural modeling is at the heart of the following projects: Electrical retinal prosthesis[edit]. Further reading ... Nossenson, N.; Messer, H. (2010). "Modeling neuron firing pattern using a two state Markov chain". Sensor Array and ... The models in this category were derived following experiments involving natural stimulation such as light, sound, touch, or ... Globus Pallidus-Pedunculopontine Loop on the Transmission of the Subthalamic Nucleus-External Globus Pallidus-Pacemaker ...
A third heart sound, fourth heart sound, a cardiac murmur[11] or other findings suggestive of a structural heart disease ... Sensors, Cables and. "12-Lead ECG Placement Guide with Illustrations , Cables and Sensors". Cables and Sensors. Retrieved 2017- ... During each heartbeat, a healthy heart has an orderly progression of depolarization that starts with pacemaker cells in the ... the heart rate is the rate in which the sinoatrial node depolarizes as it is the source of depolarization of the heart. Heart ...
In 1960, Denis Noble developed the first computer model of the heart pacemaker.[17] ... development of syntactically and semantically sound ways of representing biological models;[citation needed] network-based ... Robots and automated sensors enable such large-scale experimentation and data acquisition. These technologies are still ... Noble, Denis (5 November 1960). "Cardiac action and pacemaker potentials based on the Hodgkin-Huxley equations". Nature. 188 ( ...
... to cause the cardiac device to store the data when the patient experiences symptoms that appear to be due to an abnormal heart ... A physician may select which sensors are used to store the data and may also adjust the number of memory buffers in which the ... A cardiac device that stores physiological sensor data from multiple sensors is provided. A patient may use a portable ... Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.. Apparatus and method for outputting heart sounds. US20050137629 *. Dec 8, 2003. Jun 23, 2005. Dyjach ...
During a monitoring period, a sensing circuit produces an electrogram signal of the patients heart and a sound sensor produces ... time intervals between selected heart sounds, and time intervals between selected heart sound and selected electrogram features ... A processor determines a predetermined characteristic of the heart sounds, such as amplitude, ... Relative changes in the average time intervals over time provides an indication of the progression or regression of the heart ...
... heart sound information, such as can be received from a heart sound sensor such as a microphone; acceleration information, such ... The sensor 36B can include a distal pacing or sensing electrode, or a pressure sensor. The right ventricular septum lead 65 can ... The lead system 108 can be coupled to a patient heart 107, and configured to deliver an electrostimulation therapy to the heart ... one or more of these functions can help improve a patients heart rhythm or can help coordinate a spatial nature of a heart ...
An implantable sensor such as an accelerometer or a microphone senses an acoustic signal indicative heart sounds including S3. ... A heart sound processing system trends the S3 index on a periodic basis to allow continuous monitoring of the S3 activity level ... The S3 index is a ratio, or an estimate of the ratio, of the number of S3 beats to the number of all heart beats, where the S3 ... which is indicative of conditions related to heart failure. ... beats are each a heart beat during which an occurrence of S3 is ...
Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.. Ischemia detection using a heart sound sensor. US20070033068 *. 11 Oct 2005. 8 Feb 2007. Rajendra Rao ... Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.. Ischemia detection using a heart sound sensor. US8831735. 31 Oct 2007. 9 Sep 2014. Michael Sasha John ... Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.. Ischemia detection using a heart sound sensor. US7951087. 23 Dec 2009. 31 May 2011. Cardiac ... Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.. Ischemia detection using a heart sound sensor. US8043213. 18 Dec 2002. 25 Oct 2011. Cardiac ...
A method for operating a cardiac pacemaker in which paces and senses are counted during each cardiac cycle and associated with ... Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.. Ischemia detection using a heart sound sensor US8108034B2 (en) 2005-11-28. 2012-01-31. Cardiac ... Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.. Ischemia detection using a heart sound sensor US8758260B2 (en) 2005-06-08. 2014-06-24. Cardiac ... Ischemia detection using a heart sound sensor US8108034B2 (en) 2005-11-28. 2012-01-31. Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.. Systems and ...
Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.. Ischemia detection using a heart sound sensor. US8768461. 6 Sep 2011. 1 Jul 2014. Pacesetter, Inc.. ... Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.. Ischemia detection using a heart sound sensor. US8046069. 22 Dec 2005. 25 Oct 2011. Cardiac ... Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.. Sensor guided epicardial lead. US7529585. 8 Aug 2006. 5 May 2009. Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.. Method ... Pacemakers can enforce a minimum heart rate either asynchronously or synchronously. In asynchronous pacing, the heart is paced ...
Heart sound sensor. US4676255 *. 3 Jul 1985. 30 Jun 1987. Cosman Eric R. Telemetric in-vivo calibration method and apparatus ... Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.. Apparatus and method for outputting heart sounds. US20050148896 *. 24 Dec 2003. 7 Jul 2005. Siejko ... such as pressure sensor, glucose level monitor, a pulmonary sound sensor, volume sensor, satellite pacing device, or any other ... Dual-use sensor for rate responsive pacing and heart sound monitoring. US20050131472 *. 2 Feb 2005. 16 Jun 2005. Cardiac ...
Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.. Ischemia detection using a heart sound sensor US20070016056A1 (en) * 2005-07-15. 2007-01-18. Scott ... Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.. Ischemia detection using a heart sound sensor US8275456B2 (en) 2002-11-12. 2012-09-25. Cardiac ... Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.. Ischemia detection using a heart sound sensor US8758260B2 (en) 2005-06-08. 2014-06-24. ... Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.. Hemodynamic stability assessment based on heart sounds US20100225200A1 (en) * 2009-03-05. 2010-09-09 ...
Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.. Ischemia detection using a heart sound sensor. US8996101 *. 27 Apr 2012. 31 Mar 2015. Medtronic, Inc. ... Dual-use sensor for rate responsive pacing and heart sound monitoring. US7938781. 10 Jun 2010. 10 May 2011. Cardiac Pacemakers ... Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.. Ischemia detection using a heart sound sensor. US8041425. 10 Aug 2009. 18 Oct 2011. Cardiac ... Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.. Dual-use sensor for rate responsive pacing and heart sound monitoring. ...
For an electrocardiogram, a nurse or doctor places sensors on your skin that measure your hearts electrical signals. ... An echocardiogram uses sound waves to measure the size and thickness of your heart muscle. ... Temporary pacemakers can control certain types of problems. You may need a temporary pacemaker after a heart attack or heart ... Why do I need a pacemaker?. You need a pacemaker if your heart is pumping too quickly or slowly. In either case, your body ...
Heart sound sensor. US4676255. 3 Jul 1985. 30 Jun 1987. Cosman Eric R. Telemetric in-vivo calibration method and apparatus ... Reversible implantable acoustic sensor. US8548592. 8 Apr 2011. 1 Oct 2013. Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.. Ultrasonic transducer for ... such as pressure sensor, glucose level monitor, a pulmonary sound sensor, volume sensor, satellite pacing device, or any other ... The treatment of heart failure and heart arrhythmias can be enhanced through the use of chronically implanted sensors. For ...
... senses heart rate, and can detect pacemaker edges, while the bioimpedance channel measures respiration. It all sounds like ... Towards Low-Power Wearables: A New Biopotential and Bioimpedance Sensor from Maxim Integrated. December 20, 2017 by Nick Davis ... Cold Storage and Cold Chain Monitoring: A Highly Accurate Digital Temperature Sensor from ams. A new highly accurate cold chain ... 5Hz is recommended for heart rate monitoring applications. This setting provides superior rejection of motion artifacts at the ...
Heart disease patients sometimes have to wear monitors for a month or more. ... soundoff (25 Responses). * Paperwork. Im a RN in an ICU, and if we could get away from the spaghetti bowl of lines coming from ... when the patient is wearing one of these and has an AICD pacemaker, or needs to be externally paced or defibd, what happens to ... narrow snake-like silicon filaments that serve as wires connected to tiny sensors designed to monitor particular bodily ...
A non-cardiac patient parameter detector 118 is also shown, which may be, for example, a respiration detector, heart sound ... and the activity/posture sensors and other non-cardiac parameter sensors (e.g., 118) discussed above with reference to FIGS. 1 ... Pacemaker having PVC response and PMT terminating features. US4809697. 14 Oct 1987. 7 Mar 1989. Siemens-Pacesetter, Inc.. ... Tachycardias may begin in the upper chambers of the heart (the atria) or the lower chambers of the heart (the ventricles). A ...
Care guide for Congenital Heart Disease (Inpatient Care). Includes: possible causes, signs and symptoms, standard treatment ... A pacemaker can control your heart beat. An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) can make your heart beat in a regular ... The tube has a small ultrasound sensor on the end. Your heart appears clearly on the monitor because your esophagus is right ... An alarm will sound if your oxygen level is low or cannot be read. ...
... and it certainly sounds as though you need the CLS sensor turning on. ... Reference to a heart specialist, followed by more tests etc, and I eventually found myself the proud owner of a pacemaker which ... Pacemaker Club is an online community for pacemaker, implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and cardiac resynchronization ... Youll never get a pacemaker to do as well as a healthy sinus node but since well never have one of those again, were stuck ...
... heart H. For example, wireless sensor 120C is positioned to monitor the heart H and lungs L simultaneously. Multiple sensors ... For example, physiological signals, such as subcutaneous ECG, cardiac electrogram (EGM), blood pressure, and heart sound ... impedance sensing in some cardiac pacemakers to provide a sensor-indicated pacing rate for rate-responsive cardiac pacing. See ... blood pressure sensor, an activity sensor, an oxygen sensor, or any other sensor that is expected to provide a variable signal ...
According to the product labeling, the Audicor Upgrade System, when used with Audicor Sensors in the V3 and V4 positions on the ... normal left ventricular function and an implanted DDD pacemaker. Circ J. 2009;73(4):654-657. ... widely available tool in the detection and management of heart disease. Unfortunately, accurate interpretation of heart sounds ... Thus, automated heart sound analysis, also known as CAA, has the potential to become a cost-effective screening and diagnostic ...
Multiple on-line sensor systems and methods. US5690687. 22. Aug. 1996. 25. Nov. 1997. Pacesetter, Inc.. Pacemaker with improved ... S1-S4 heart sounds, cardiac murmurs, and other acoustic information. The lead system 810 of the CRM device 800 may incorporate ... EMG sensor 820, electroencephalogram (EEG) sensors, cardiac electrogram sensors, nerve activity sensors, and/or other sensors ... wherein the sensor system comprises a transthoracic impedance sensor or an inter-thoracic pressure sensor. ...
A heart pacemaker which is arranged to stimulate the apical area of the heart. Stimulation of this area provides synchronous ... by increasing the frequency of pacing pulses to the heart. Physical activity is preferably sensed by a sensor placed on the ... The diaphragm sensing means may sense sound levels generated by the diaphragm. ... A heart pacemaker which is arranged to stimulate the apical area of the heart. Stimulation of this area provides synchronous ...
Also, a pulse will not be palpable and no heart sounds will be heard because the heart is not pumping blood effectively enough ... This makes it the natural pacemaker of the heart and, at rest, generally makes the heart contract at 60-100 beats per minute ( ... There are the sensors, which detect the activity of muscle and the chemical changes within it, the brain, which integrates the ... How do we know this? Heart failure When the heart cannot meet the metabolic needs of the body it is said to be in heart failure ...
A further application is the assessment of Second Heart Sound (S2) amplitude variations at increasing heart rates. The aim of ... this study was to assess the relationship between second heart sound amplitude variations at increasing heart rates and ... The transcutaneous force sensor was positioned in the precordial region in 146 consecutive patients referred for exercise (n = ... heart rate, and cardiac index with best correlation (R = .57) for mean pressure. S2 recording quantitatively documents systemic ...
Temporary pacemakers can control certain types of problems. You may need a temporary pacemaker after a heart attack or heart ... An echocardiogram uses sound waves to measure the size and thickness of your heart muscle.. For an electrocardiogram, a nurse ... or doctor places sensors on your skin that measure your hearts electrical signals.. For Holter monitoring, you wear a device ... Why do I need a pacemaker?. You need a pacemaker if your heart is pumping too quickly or slowly. In either case, your body ...
... heart sounds, and respiratory rate (R). A separate unit (SunTech Tango+™) is used in conjunction with the HIC-4000I Impedance ... The Nexfin uses a single finger sensor wrapped around a participants finger to make necessary measurements. ... This system detects and records pacemaker pulses in accordance with the Association for the Advancement of Medical ... The Cardio-Pulmonary Suite is equipped to conduct research in lung and heart health in a broad range of populations including ...
  • Pacing therapy can also be used in the treatment of congestive heart failure (CHF). (google.com)
  • A smart scale checks her weight every morning to help her watch for fluid retention, keeping her congestive heart failure in check. (slate.com)
  • The early reports of obstructive sleep apnea in the medical literature described individuals who were very severely affected, often presenting with severe hypoxemia , hypercapnia and congestive heart failure . (thefullwiki.org)
  • 6. The apparatus of claim 5, wherein the second electrical energy delivery circuit is configured to provide, as the pre-shock conditioning electrostimulation, a series of electrostimulation pacing pulses to be delivered to the natural electrical conduction system of the heart between the atrioventricular node and the Purkinje fibers, inclusive. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Cardiac pacemakers are cardiac rhythm management devices that provide electrical stimulation in the form of pacing pulses to selected chambers of the heart. (google.com)
  • Pacemakers typically have a programmable electronic controller that causes the pacing pulses to be output in response to lapsed time intervals and sensed intrinsic cardiac activity. (google.com)
  • 1. A method of pacing the heart, comprising the step of providing pacing pulses to the apical area of the heart, by at least one of a plurality of electrodes positioned externally about the apex of the heart. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • 5. A method in accordance with claim 1, comprising the steps of positioning and operating the pacing electrodes epicardially to send pulses to the apex of the heart with such bias to the left or right of the apical area or centrally around the intraventricular septal area, or any combination thereof, so as to initiate a desired uniform spread of polarization wave through the heart. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • This system detects and records pacemaker pulses in accordance with the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI). (concordia.ca)
  • Pacemakers can deliver pacing pulses asynchronously at a fixed rate or synchronously in a manner that depends upon sensed intrinsic beats. (justia.com)
  • Most pacemakers today are operated in some sort of synchronous mode where the pacing pulses are delivered upon the expiration of escape intervals that are reset by sensed intrinsic depolarizations of the heart. (justia.com)
  • This device uses electrical pulses to prompt the heart to beat at a normal rate. (cdc.gov)
  • Pacemakers use low-energy electrical pulses to overcome this faulty electrical signaling. (cdc.gov)
  • The Sana Sleep Mask, comprising a mask with ear buds, is worn when the user is ready for bed and pulses specific algorithms of light and sound to effect neuromodulation. (hsandm.com)
  • A patient may use a portable triggering device to cause the cardiac device to store the data when the patient experiences symptoms that appear to be due to an abnormal heart condition. (google.com)
  • You might be having symptoms even if you had a heart defect repaired as a child. (drugs.com)
  • ECP may also encourage the development of collateral blood flow to the heart and thus contribute to the relief of angina symptoms. (justia.com)
  • The most common symptoms of heart failure are shortness of breath, swelling in legs and feet, fatigue, weight gain, and sometimes faster and irregular heartbeats. (johnmuirhealth.com)
  • Our heart failure program includes intensive patient education designed to help patients understand their disease and proactively manage their symptoms. (johnmuirhealth.com)
  • This system non-invasively measures pulmonary artery systolic, diastolic and mean pressures from a sensor implanted into the pulmonary artery and allows cardiologists to adjust treatment before the patient feels a worsening of their heart failure symptoms. (johnmuirhealth.com)
  • Heart failure patients can make many healthy choices to improve their symptoms and increase life expectancy. (johnmuirhealth.com)
  • If you have acute heart failure, the symptoms can come on very quickly. (kentcardio.com)
  • Supraventricular tachycardia is generally not life-threatening unless you have other heart disorders, but you should talk to your doctor if you are experiencing bothersome symptoms. (drugs.com)
  • On reflection, this was by no means all his fault as pacemaker implants generally took place at St. George's, Tooting, South West London, the current site of St. George's, and far from the main hospital at Hyde Park Corner (now the Lanesborough Hotel). (bjcardio.co.uk)
  • Based on technologies used, the market for microelectronic medical implants is segmented into RF technology, sensors, and others. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • While these robust metals help deliver sound reliability and performance for implants, they come with a number of potential drawbacks that may include interference with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and even a potential for effects on performance from exposure to magnetic fields. (schott.com)
  • Common examples where these materials are used include pacemakers, RFID tags, neurostimulators, and various other implants with wireless communication functions. (schott.com)
  • Methods, systems and devices for providing cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) to a patient using a leadless cardiac pacemaker (LCP) and an extracardiac. (patents.com)
  • Innovators are working on everything from nanosensors that could detect heart attacks before they happen, to pill-sized leadless pacemakers. (mddionline.com)
  • In some examples, a leadless pacing device (hereinafter, "LPD") is configured for implantation in a ventricle of a heart of a patient, and is configured to switch between an atrio-ventricular synchronous pacing mode and an asynchronous ventricular pacing mode in response to detection of one or more sensing events, which may be, for example, undersensing events. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • Stimulation of this area provides synchronous mechanical contraction of the left and right ventricles and overcomes the problem of pacemaker induced left bundle branch block type conduction disturbance. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • After about 150 milliseconds, the impulse moves to the ventricles, causing them to contract and pump blood away from the heart. (madehow.com)
  • In people with heart failure, for example, the scan images often show enlarged and weakened ventricles. (healthdocbox.com)
  • Challenging - because we rely heavily on fetal heart rate (FHR) patterns which are at best a very indirect reflection of fetal brain status. (perigen.com)
  • More recent work provides a simpler proposal namely that the chemoreflex with both parasympathetic and sympathetic components is the major initiator of fetal heart rate decelerations. (perigen.com)
  • The following review is by no mean an exhaustive discussion of the thousands of published articles on fetal heart rate monitoring. (perigen.com)
  • We have attempted to produce a succinct review the physiology of fetal heart rate control that is relevant to the clinician caring for women in labor. (perigen.com)
  • Understanding the mechanisms of fetal heart rate control are important because they help us to infer the physiological state of the baby and gauge whether intervention is really necessary. (perigen.com)
  • The fetal heart rate results from the combined effect of several fluctuating influences mediated through extrinsic and intrinsic cardiac control mechanisms. (perigen.com)
  • Although the fetal heart rate is related to fetal brain state, it is also affected by a number of other factors. (perigen.com)
  • The fetal heart rate results from the combined effect of several fluctuating influences mediated through extrinsic cardiac control mechanisms (sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves and circulating catecholamines ), as well as intrinsic cardiac factors (myocardium and its conducting system). (perigen.com)
  • What Regulates the Fetal Heart Rate? (perigen.com)
  • The new sensors are an improvement on existing at-home fetal heart rate monitors that simply don't provide a level of accuracy that can be relied on by clinicians. (medgadget.com)
  • The pre-shock or post-shock conditioning therapies can include electrostimulation therapies provided to the natural electrical conduction system of the heart between the atrioventricular node and the Purkinje fibers, inclusive, such as at or near a His bundle of a heart. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • In an example, a defibrillation threshold can be reduced by providing a pre-shock conditioning electrostimulation therapy to the natural electrical conduction system of the heart between the atrioventricular node and the Purkinje fibers, inclusive, such as at or near a His bundle. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Bundle branch block - A problem with the heart where the conduction system can't conduct electricity correctly. (okheart.com)
  • Conduction system - The fibers that carry electrical impulses through the heart. (okheart.com)
  • Disturbances of the conduction system of the heart. (morehealthis.com)
  • The main node of the conduction system of the heart is located in the upper part of the right atrium. (morehealthis.com)
  • ESI relies on the collection via external sensors of the electrical activity generated by multiple tissue sites within an organ, and the mathematical manipulation of that data to localize areas where patterns of electrical conduction are blocked or excessively active. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • A cardiac device that stores physiological sensor data from multiple sensors is provided. (google.com)
  • means for receiving the trigger signal from the triggering device when the patient desires to retain the data, wherein the control means comprises programmable means for receiving programming instructions from a physician that direct the control means to store data from a subset of the sensors. (google.com)
  • 13. The system of claim 12 , wherein the external device includes the external heart sound module. (google.ca)
  • A pacemaker is an electrically-charged medical device. (aarpmedicareplans.com)
  • The device can check your heart rate, brain activity and muscle contractions, researchers say. (cnn.com)
  • Zargis Medical Corporation (Princeton, NJ) has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance to market Zargis Acoustic Cardioscan, a computer-aided electronic auscultatory device intended to support physicians in analyzing heart sounds in patients. (aetna.com)
  • The FDA indications for use states that the device is not intended as a sole means of diagnosis and that interpretation of heart sounds with the Zargis Acoustic Cardioscan are only significant when used in conjunction with physician over-read as well as consideration of all other patient data. (aetna.com)
  • Use of an intracardiac micromanometer (capable of recording simultaneous sound and pressure), with an image amplifier, an external speaker system and external phonocardiograms, allows certainty both as to location of the sound-sensing device and discrimination of artifact. (annals.org)
  • When the force of the heart current was applied to this device, the string moved, and these deflections were then recorded on photographic paper. (madehow.com)
  • The sensors in the tools they use look like little colored cars, and the doctor "drives" the entire device with a small handle that operates the catheter. (azfamily.com)
  • Seek medical advice before undertaking a new or altered training regime using this device, particularly if using this device together with a pacemaker or other medical devices. (sonymobile.com)
  • The device sounds an alarm if no breath is detected after a pre-set time. (avnet.com)
  • This device allows sensors in hard to access locations to be powered without electrical wires or batteries that need to be replaced. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to the team that created the device, the vibrations from the heart muscles would be enough to allow the generator to power a pacemaker. (wikipedia.org)
  • A pacemaker is a small device that's placed in the chest or abdomen to help control abnormal heart rhythms. (cdc.gov)
  • This year, Sana Health earned that honor for a neuro-modulation device that integrates a heart rate variability sensor for personalized chronic pain management. (hsandm.com)
  • Sana Health is developing a non-invasive neuro-modulation device that integrates a heart rate variabil-ity (HRV) sensor to treat patients with severe chronic pain. (hsandm.com)
  • With a skin-contact HRV sensor built into the forehead area, the device is designed to monitor minor fluctuations in a patient's nervous system for tailored audio-visual stimulation to the nervous system's unique responses to help patients achieve a deep, natural state of relaxation and reduce pain levels quickly. (hsandm.com)
  • FineHeart is developing the ICOMS, a hybrid system that combines a Pacemaker and a Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) designed to offer patients a new way to manage heart failure disease. (hsandm.com)
  • Those with pacemakers, especially older models, know the limitations of medical imaging and even potential harm from devices such as metal detectors they face due to the construction of their device. (schott.com)
  • This allows their prototype to be positioned directly on the pregnant woman's abdomen to measure the heart rate without having to use a gel or having electronic leads snaking to another device. (medgadget.com)
  • The PhysioNet Cardiovascular Signal Toolbox is an open-source modular program for calculating heart rate variability (HRV) implemented in Matlab with evidence-based algorithms and output formats. (physionet.org)
  • It has sound and visual programmable alarms that are triggered automatically when you exceed the upper and lower limits of the adjusted values for blood pressure and heart rate, and it has 03 priority levels. (usdefib.com)
  • Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a term used to describe defects in the structure of the heart. (drugs.com)
  • It may also be called congenital heart defect. (drugs.com)
  • A congenital heart defect should be monitored regularly, even if you do not have problems. (drugs.com)
  • We describe the anaesthetic management of a parturient with a permanent pacemaker for congenital heart block, presenting for elective caesarean section. (ispub.com)
  • Sophisticated fluoroscopy, like we have at CUVS, also enables advanced interventional procedures, such as stent placement (trachea, urethra, ureter) or ureteral bypass , pacemaker implantation, and repair of some congenital heart conditions. (cuvs.org)
  • It's a chance for Fraser to walk the hospital's cardiac surgical team through his process, to get the operating room to his exact specifications, and to begin training Dell Children's in the uncompromising attention to detail that makes him one of the best congenital heart surgeons in the world. (texasexes.org)
  • Each year,about 40,000 infants in the U.S. are born with congenital heart disease, the most common of all birth defects. (texasexes.org)
  • Because of improvements in fetal imaging technology, many complex congenital heart defects that will need surgery are detected during pregnancy. (texasexes.org)
  • Blood may not be able to flow to your heart correctly, or it may not flow through your heart correctly. (drugs.com)
  • A heart defect can lower your blood oxygen level. (drugs.com)
  • It is used to check for heart enlargement and other problems with blood flow. (drugs.com)
  • You may also need a TEE to check for certain problems such as blood clots or infection inside the heart. (drugs.com)
  • Cardiac catheterization is used to show the blood vessels in your heart. (drugs.com)
  • A catheter is threaded into your heart through a blood vessel in your arm, leg, or neck. (drugs.com)
  • To follow the rules the body uses the heart to pump blood throughout the cardiovascular system so the cells of the body can get what they need. (arn.org)
  • When they depolarize they send an electrical impulse through the conducting system to the other heart cells which depolarizes them and makes them contract and pump the blood where it needs to go. (arn.org)
  • Blood is then pumped from the right side of the heart through the main pulmonary artery to the lungs and from the left side of the heart through the aorta to the rest of the body. (arn.org)
  • Significant determinants of S2 amplitude were blood pressure, heart rate, and cardiac index with best correlation (R = .57) for mean pressure. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In fact, the maximum amplitude of vibrations measured by the sensor following the ECG T wave originates from the physical phenomenon of the abrupt deceleration of the moving aortic blood mass. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This system is primarily intended for the assessment of heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, basal thoracic impedance (Zo), rate of change of impedance (dZ/dt), pre-ejection period (PEP), delta-Z (dZ), heart sounds, and respiratory rate (R). A separate unit (SunTech Tango+™) is used in conjunction with the HIC-4000I Impedance Cardiograph to measure blood pressure. (concordia.ca)
  • Cardiac catheterization - A procedure where a thin, hollow tube is fed through a blood vessel into the heart in order to diagnose and treat certain heart conditions. (okheart.com)
  • A heart chamber in fibrillation cannot pump blood effectively. (okheart.com)
  • James also receives an injection of "smart blood"-a nanoscale sensor that continuously tracks the carrier's location based on a GPS signal emitted from inside the body. (embopress.org)
  • Their technology involves tiny blood stream nano sensor chips that might sense the precursor of a heart attack. (mddionline.com)
  • The ECP treatment compresses the blood vessels in the lower limbs to increase blood flow to the heart. (justia.com)
  • This lowers resistance in the blood vessels in the legs so that blood may be pumped more easily from the heart. (justia.com)
  • For example, coronary blood flow that supplies the heart is greatest during diastole, and increased aortic pressure during diastole will increase that flow to benefit patients suffering from coronary artery disease. (justia.com)
  • The balloon Is inflated to widen blocked areas where blood flow to the heart muscle has been reduced or cutoff. (starkmedicalspecialties.com)
  • Myocardial perfusion imaging is a test that uses a low dose of a radioactive agent to evaluate the blood flow and function of the heart. (starkmedicalspecialties.com)
  • Since blood flow to the heart is best tested when you increase the work of the heart, this test is usually done with exercise. (starkmedicalspecialties.com)
  • Non-invasive techniques to assess myocardial blood flow, evaluate the pumping function of the heart as well as visualize the size and location of a heart attack. (adventhealth.com)
  • The scan shows how well the heart is pumping blood. (johnmuirhealth.com)
  • As the heart fails, the diameter of the heart increases and so does the wall tension (following the Law of Laplace [see Gjesdal (2011) 1 for a detailed explanation]), which both restricts blood flow (as capillaries get stretched and compressed) and increases oxygen consumption. (gresham.ac.uk)
  • These blood clots forming in the heart may circulate to other organs and lead to blocked blood flow (ischemia). (stelizabeth.com)
  • The movement of the signal causes your heart to squeeze (contract), sending blood to your heart and body. (stelizabeth.com)
  • Monitoring of ECG, heart rate (HR), arterial haemoglobin saturation (SaO 2 ) and invasive blood pressure (iBP) was commenced. (ispub.com)
  • When breathing stops during sleep, involuntary reflexes cause you to startle awake, accelerating heart rate and increasing blood pressure. (wtop.com)
  • Lack of oxygen and chronic sleep deprivation contribute to all sorts of health issues - from high blood pressure and heart disease to depression and stroke. (wtop.com)
  • These are two risk factors for developing atherosclerosis-deposits of fatty substances called plaques that can block the blood vessel, causing a heart attack or stroke. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • When Ryerson University researchers beamed a laser on red blood cells, the cells emitted high-frequency sounds. (chatelaine.com)
  • As the signal travels, it causes the heart to contract and pump blood. (cdc.gov)
  • Newer pacemakers can monitor your blood temperature, breathing rate, and other factors. (cdc.gov)
  • Blood moves through the heart and body at a slower rate, putting increased pressure on the heart and preventing it from pumping enough oxygen and nutrients to meet the body's needs. (kentcardio.com)
  • Coronary artery disease causes decreased blood flow to the heart muscle. (kentcardio.com)
  • The term came into use around 1969 to describe procedures that trained research subjects to alter brain activity, blood pressure, muscle tension, heart rate and other "involuntary" bodily functions. (healthywomen.org)
  • Described as an electrical bicycle of the heart, the ICOMS will propel blood to support the native cardiac contraction by accelerating the blood at every beat with no external wiring, reducing the risk of severe infections and providing patients with an improved quality of life. (hsandm.com)
  • the largest vein that drains the heart muscle's deoxygenated blood. (studystack.com)
  • These ineffective contractions of the heart may cause you to feel light-headed or dizzy because the brain isn't receiving enough blood and oxygen. (drugs.com)
  • And in 1975, Dr. Herbert Benson published his groundbreaking work The Relaxation Response , which described in detail the stress-reduction mechanism in the body that short-circuits the "fight-or-flight" response and lowers blood pressure, relieves muscle tension, and controls heart rate. (encyclopedia.com)
  • A multiple gated acquisition (or MUGA) scan is a test that uses a radioactive substance, called a tracer, to study how well your heart is pumping blood. (healthdocbox.com)
  • wherein the processor is programmed to determine relative changes in the time interval between the selected heart sound and the selected cardiac event within the patient's cardiac signal, the processor further being programmed to detect a progression of heart disease based on the relative changes in the time interval. (google.com)
  • wherein the processor is programmed to detect relative changes in the absence or presence of selected heart sounds. (google.com)
  • When it comes to saving both lives and money, nanosensors that detect heart attacks before they happen sound like a good deal. (mddionline.com)
  • EKGs provide useful data and can help detect various problems related to heart function. (madehow.com)
  • Piezoelectric transducers, which detect mechanical vibrations, may be useful for evaluating cardiac and/or breathing movements when the sensor is placed under an animal's body. (j-atamis.org)
  • This includes 10 to 17 percent of men and 3 to 9 percent of women ages 30 to 70 with moderate-to-severe disease, the range that contributes to chronic health conditions such as heart disease and stroke. (wtop.com)
  • These episodes can interfere with sound sleep and reduce the flow of oxygen to vital organs, contributing to daytime sleepiness, fatigue and depressed mood. (wtop.com)