Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Insurance, Psychiatric: Insurance providing benefits to cover part or all of the psychiatric care.Community Mental Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive mental health services provided for individuals in the community.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Deductibles and Coinsurance: Cost-sharing mechanisms that provide for payment by the insured of some portion of covered expenses. Deductibles are the amounts paid by the insured under a health insurance contract before benefits become payable; coinsurance is the provision under which the insured pays part of the medical bill, usually according to a fixed percentage, when benefits become payable.Foster Home Care: Families who care for neglected children or patients unable to care for themselves.Utilization Review: An organized procedure carried out through committees to review admissions, duration of stay, professional services furnished, and to evaluate the medical necessity of those services and promote their most efficient use.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.United StatesPublic Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Great BritainCommunity Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Health: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Community Mental Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of psychologic and psychiatric services to people living in a neighborhood or community.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Outpatient Clinics, Hospital: Organized services in a hospital which provide medical care on an outpatient basis.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Quality Control: A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.National Institute of Mental Health (U.S.): A component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH concerned with research, overall planning, promoting, and administering mental health programs and research. It was established in 1949.Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.EnglandChild Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Quality Improvement: The attainment or process of attaining a new level of performance or quality.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Health Literacy: Degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Risk Reduction Behavior: Reduction of high-risk choices and adoption of low-risk quantity and frequency alternatives.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Regional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Adolescent Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Catchment Area (Health): A geographic area defined and served by a health program or institution.Hospitals, Psychiatric: Special hospitals which provide care to the mentally ill patient.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Mentally Ill Persons: Persons with psychiatric illnesses or diseases, particularly psychotic and severe mood disorders.Ambulatory Care Facilities: Those facilities which administer health services to individuals who do not require hospitalization or institutionalization.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Health Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Reproductive Health: The physical condition of human reproductive systems.Total Quality Management: The application of industrial management practice to systematically maintain and improve organization-wide performance. Effectiveness and success are determined and assessed by quantitative quality measures.Psychiatric Nursing: A specialty concerned with the application of psychiatric principles in caring for the mentally ill. It also includes the nursing care provided the mentally ill patient.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Public Health Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with promoting and protecting the health of populations, using knowledge from nursing, social, and public health sciences to develop local, regional, state, and national health policy and research. It is population-focused and community-oriented, aimed at health promotion and disease prevention through educational, diagnostic, and preventive programs.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Women's Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Health Services, Indigenous: Health care provided to specific cultural or tribal peoples which incorporates local customs, beliefs, and taboos.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Prejudice: A preconceived judgment made without factual basis.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.Commitment of Mentally Ill: Legal process required for the institutionalization of a patient with severe mental problems.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Disasters: Calamities producing great damage, loss of life, and distress. They include results of natural phenomena and man-made phenomena. Normal conditions of existence are disrupted and the level of impact exceeds the capacity of the hazard-affected community.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Patient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.Health Services Administration: The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Crisis Intervention: Brief therapeutic approach which is ameliorative rather than curative of acute psychiatric emergencies. Used in contexts such as emergency rooms of psychiatric or general hospitals, or in the home or place of crisis occurrence, this treatment approach focuses on interpersonal and intrapsychic factors and environmental modification. (APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 7th ed)Deinstitutionalization: The practice of caring for individuals in the community, rather than in an institutional environment with resultant effects on the individual, the individual's family, the community, and the health care system.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.United States Department of Veterans Affairs: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to VETERANS. It was established March 15, 1989 as a Cabinet-level position.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Public Health Informatics: The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.BrazilHospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.United States Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to substance abuse and mental health. It is commonly referred to by the acronym SAMHSA. On 1 October 1992, the United States Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration (ADAMHA) became SAMHSA.Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Health Planning Guidelines: Recommendations for directing health planning functions and policies. These may be mandated by PL93-641 and issued by the Department of Health and Human Services for use by state and local planning agencies.Men's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of men.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Social Work, Psychiatric: Use of all social work processes in the treatment of patients in a psychiatric or mental health setting.Reproductive Health Services: Health care services related to human REPRODUCTION and diseases of the reproductive system. Services are provided to both sexes and usually by physicians in the medical or the surgical specialties such as REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE; ANDROLOGY; GYNECOLOGY; OBSTETRICS; and PERINATOLOGY.Veterans: Former members of the armed services.Comprehensive Health Care: Providing for the full range of personal health services for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and rehabilitation of patients.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Health Care Coalitions: Voluntary groups of people representing diverse interests in the community such as hospitals, businesses, physicians, and insurers, with the principal objective to improve health care cost effectiveness.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Caregivers: Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Insurance, Health, Reimbursement: Payment by a third-party payer in a sum equal to the amount expended by a health care provider or facility for health services rendered to an insured or program beneficiary. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Refugees: Persons fleeing to a place of safety, especially those who flee to a foreign country or power to escape danger or persecution in their own country or habitual residence because of race, religion, or political belief. (Webster, 3d ed)Medicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.Professional-Patient Relations: Interactions between health personnel and patients.
Outpatient Quality Improvement Network South Carolina OSU-PCPBRN - Ohio State University Primary Care Practice Based Research ... VA Mental Health Practice-Based Research Network Texas PCRC - Duke Primary Care Research Consortium North Carolina PDC PBRN - ... Health Care for the Homeless Practice Based Research Network Tennessee HHR - Holistic Healthcare and Research Centre HPRN - ... LA Net Community Health Network California LAC DHS ACN-R&I - Los Angeles County Department of Health Services, Ambulatory Care ...
The Trust was ordered to make urgent improvements to the safety of some of its services by the Care Quality Commission in ... it would re-procure adult out-patients mental health services in Bristol from Autumn 2014, enabling alternative providers to ... Social Welfare and Social Work portal Psychiatry portal List of NHS trusts Healthcare in Bristol Healthcare in Somerset ... Mental Health Act Annual Statement - Avon and Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust (PDF) (Report). Care Quality ...
Community Mental Health Centers (CMHCs) Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Facilities (CORFs) Critical Access Hospitals ( ... the survey checks quality assurance and not "continuous quality improvement". In other words, the process checks for minimal ... Pathology Services Psychiatric Hospitals Religious Nonmedical Health Care Institutions Rural Health Clinics Long Term Care ... Jost, Timothy Stoltzfus (1994). "Medicare and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations: A Healthy ...
Jun 2000). Reinventing VA Healthcare: Systematizing Quality Improvement and Quality Innovation. Medical Care. 38(6 Suppl 1) ... Enhancing Their Access to Outpatient Mental Health Services". Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. November 20, 2013. ... geriatic primary care clinics and other outpatient settings. Adult Day Health Care. The adult day health care (ADHC) program is ... Mental health services in 2006 were evaluated as a part of the Mental Health Strategic Plan. The report concluded: "Quality of ...
In 1981 the hospital expanded into psychiatric care by opening the Augustus F. Hawkins Mental Health Center. In 1998 it ... Inspectors concluded that there was no functioning quality improvement plan at the hospital. Los Angeles County health director ... It is felt that due to the political monopoly on healthcare and limited government funding, the hospital was unable to maintain ... an urgent care facility and outpatient clinic. The closure of King-Harbor had an immediate effect on health care services in ...
"Promoting Quality Health Care". URAC. Retrieved October 17, 2011. "Welcome to HQAA - Healthcare Quality Association on ... except for hospital-based outpatient mental health services), Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. In California, The Joint Commission ... The Center for Improvement in Healthcare Quality (CIHQ), based in Round Rock, Texas, was granted deeming authority for ... "Correctional Health Care Standards - National Commission on Correctional Health Care". " ...
... that the Trust would be among the first to trial the Care Quality Commission's planned approach to inspecting mental health ... Social Welfare and Social Work portal Psychiatry portal Healthcare in London List of NHS trusts "CCG study threatens mental ... Services available in south west London: Inpatient, outpatient and community services for children, adults and older people ... although it acknowledged some improvements. In 2011, the Trust began restructuring services in order to support the development ...
Effective Health Care Program. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. PMID 26020093. 15-EHC018-EF. Pies, ... community or involuntary outpatient treatment for people who have severe mental illness does not result in an improvement in ... When Norway introduced outpatient commitment in the 1961 Mental Health Act, it could only be mandated for to individuals who ... New York State Office of Mental Health (2005). Kendra's Law: Final Report on the Status of Assisted Outpatient Treatment (PDF ...
In behavioral healthcare (mental health and substance abuse treatment) routine health outcomes measurement has expanded beyond ... Whether mandated or adopted willingly, BHOM should be a part of standard practice and good quality care. Pushing the Quality ... authorizing inpatient care or number of out-patient sessions based on how, or if, questions are answered. This use of outcome ... of cases showing reliable improvement, while some of the more advanced tools can document reliable improvement on more than 50 ...
... Care Bill 2013". Hindustan Times. 9 August 2016.. *^ http://indianexpress.com/article/what-is/mental-healthcare- ... The Heartfulness meditation program has proven to show significant improvements in the state of mind of health-care ... quality of life, self-actualization and personal adaptation across all systems. Psychiatric social workers are mental health ... and opened the first outpatient mental health clinic in the United States.[12] ...
... mental health care policies need significant improvement in order to provide its people with the appropriate health care they ... Good mental health can improve life quality whereas poor mental health can worsen it. According to Richards, Campania, & Muse- ... "global annual rate of visits to mental health outpatient facilities is 1,051 per 100,000 population," while "in Africa the rate ... Mark, Tami L.; Shern, David L.; Bagalman, Jill Erin; Cao, Zhun; Thomson Healthcare (29 November 2007). Ranking America's Mental ...
How much does quality of child care vary between health workers with differing durations of training? An observational ... They leave the responsibility in the hands of local rural citizens who are trained as Community Mental Healthcare Workers ( ... The proportion of rural women on contraceptives in 2000 was 67%. The program resulted in profound improvement in maternal ... role plays and observation of patient interviews at the psychiatry outpatient department at St. John's Medical College Hospital ...
... costs and outcomes of mental health care?". Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica Supplement. 113 (429): 9-16. doi:10.1111/j.1600- ... thereby significantly improving quality of life. High quality psychiatric rehabilitation may also focus on vocational ... Assessment and treatment may be done on an outpatient basis; admission to an inpatient facility is considered if there is a ... and other client self-improvement efforts. Core principles of effective psychiatric rehabilitation must include providing hope ...
... high-quality healthcare services. It was designed to be a hub of education, improvement and innovation to support health ... Botany Downs Maternity Unit and Papakura Maternity Unit as well as dedicated mental health and rehabilitation units. Outpatient ... Middlemore is operated by Counties Manukau Health, offering tertiary hospital and specialist care, as well as a range of other ... It included: a 15 bed mental health services for older people ward, a 30 -bed plastics ward, 2 x 30 - bed surgical wards, 2 x ...
"Effective Palliative Care Programs Require Health System Change". Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2013-04-17. ... palliative care'. In the UK palliative care services offer inpatient care, home care, day care and outpatient services, and ... Evidence as of 2016 supports pallative care's efficacy in the improvement of a patient's quality of life. Palliative care is ... The interdisciplinary team also often includes a licensed mental health professional, a licensed social worker, or a counselor ...
... and increased access to basic health care of good quality. A number of non-governmental organisations, including Health and ... Even with substantial improvements in the health sector, the need for overseas treatment for some services might remain. The ... Level III: Nineteen District Hospitals (with 473 beds) that provide basic in-patient and outpatient care (although more the ... and mental and nervous disorders. This morbidity profile indicates that it can be improved substantially through enhanced ...
... in the institute was started in the year 1999 with the goal to achieve overall quality in teaching and patient care services. ... A new Out-Patient Department (OPD) was built in 1987. In the following year, another two storied building was built to ... During his tenure, the hospital saw marked improvement in the administration and treatment services. Dr. Bordoloi was the first ... is one of the oldest mental health care institutes in India established in the year 1876. It is located in Tezpur in Sonitpur ...
... and 10 Health Centers (HC). DHS' Ambulatory Care Network, which was created to provide primary care, outpatient specialty care ... mental health services, and other support systems. HWLA was one of the few sources of coordinated health care for disadvantaged ... second largest municipal health system, after NYC Health + Hospitals. DHS operates an extensive healthcare network throughout ... Department of Health Services. 19 July 2011. Retrieved 24 September 2013. "Summary of Accreditation Quality Information - H- ...
... improvements in several determinants of overall health, including physical health, mental health, functional limitations, joint ... "The Impact of Massachusetts Health Care Reform on Access, Quality, and Costs of Care for the Already-Insured". Health Services ... on costs of outpatient care for people who were already insured.[52] ... The healthcare insurance reform law was enacted as Chapter 58 of the Acts of 2006 of the Massachusetts General Court; its long ...
... private health services are offered at a relatively low cost with a shared emphasis on quality of care and quality improvement ... an increase in outpatient services, and the development of community-based mental health prevention and promotion programs. The ... Specifically, the mental health plan aims to achieve greater mental health through increased delivery of community-based care ... the MoH launched a strategic mental health plan in 2009 aimed at integrating mental health services into primary care. ...
"Health-related quality of life, work productivity, and health care resource utilization of subjects with irritable bowel ... Gender differences in healthcare-seeking may also play a role. Gender differences in trait anxiety may contribute to lower pain ... An improvement with a gluten-free diet of immune-mediated symptoms, including autoimmune diseases, once having reasonably ruled ... Hypnosis can improve mental well-being, and cognitive behavioural therapy can provide psychological coping strategies for ...
... prenatal and postpartum care, mental health care, well-care or preventive visits, inpatient utilization, drug utilization, and ... An "Acute Outpatient Depression Indicator" score based on a HEDIS measure predicted improvement in depression severity in one ... HEDIS measures do not account for many important aspects of health care quality. They count only a select set of healthcare ... Effectiveness of Care Access/Availability of Care Experience of Care Utilization and Relative Resource Use Health Plan ...
... personal care homes, centers for the aging (outpatient), and the like. These ombudsmen are trained and taught that they "work ... State of Minnesota Office of the Ombudsman for Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities The Rhode Island Department of ... During his tenure, he delivered four annual reports to Congress which included over 70 recommendations for improvements to ... thereby improving the quality of life for everyone involved. The Navy command ombudsman is a voluntary position, and seeks to ...
The Care Quality Commission formerly the Healthcare Commission reviews hospitals annually and rates a hospital on two points: " ... In addition to the main hospital building, the site houses The Fermoy Unit, an adult mental health unit opened the same time as ... It was removed from special measures in August 2015 after an inspection found "marked improvement in the quality of care being ... which provides outpatient care for children and a comprehensive GUM clinic opened summer 2008. The Fermoy unit and the Arthur ...
Nations adopted the Principles for the Protection of Persons with Mental Illness and the Improvement of Mental Health Care, ... MENTAL HEALTH RECOVERY, AND QUALITY OF LIFE AMONG PEOPLE WITH SERIOUS MENTAL ILLNESS. Journal of Community Psychology, 41(5), ... "Compulsory community and involuntary outpatient treatment for people with severe mental disorders". The Cochrane Database of ... and assist some people in attaining their right to healthcare when they may be unable to decide in their own interests. All ...
A recent phenomenon is that people with schizophrenia are at higher than average risk of physical ill health, and die earlier than the general population from natural causes. The fatal conditions include cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic disorders. Although death by suicide in schizophrenia has received much needed attention, death from cardiovascular disease is far more common, accounting for up to 75 percent of deaths. The causes of physical health problems include factors associated with mental illness and its treatment, poverty, poor housing, higher rates of smoking, poor diet and lack of exercise. Despite the high rates of physical health problems, mental health service users report that health care workers overlook their physical health needs. ...
The Federation, through its members and contacts in more than 94 countries on six continents, has responded to international mental health crises through its role as the only worldwide grassroots advocacy and public education organization in the mental health field. Its organizational and individual membership includes mental health workers of all disciplines, consumers of mental health services, family members, and concerned citizens. At its very outset the WFMH was concerned with educating both the public and influential professionals, and with human relations, with a view both to the health of individuals and that of groups and nations.[1] The WFMH founding document, "Mental Health and World Citizenship", understood ...
Licensing requirements can vary depending on which state a mental health counselor practices in. Across the United States, mental health counseling licensure is required to independently practice, but can be practiced without a license if under close supervision of a licensed practitioner. Licensing titles for mental health counselors vary from state to state: Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC), Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC), Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor (LPCC), and various forms of these titles may list differently per state statues. The title "Mental Health Counselor" (or variation thereof) is often a protected title and thus it may be a violation of state law for persons to hold themselves as such without a proper credential. A ...
... offer treatments, support or advocacy to people judged to have mental disorders (mental illnesses). Family practice (general practice) centers in communities are commonly the first line for assessment of mental health conditions, and may prescribe psychiatric drugs and sometimes provide basic counseling or therapy for "common mental disorders". Secondary medical services may include psychiatric hospitals, although since deinstitutionalization these have been restricted in favor of wards within general hospitals, and community mental health services based more locally. Such services may be provided on an inpatient or, more commonly, outpatient basis. They may offer a range of treatments, usually centered around psychiatric drugs, and be provided by a range of mental health professionals, ...
... are voluntary associations of people who share a common desire to overcome mental illness or otherwise increase their level of cognitive or emotional wellbeing. Despite the different approaches, many of the psychosocial processes in the groups are the same and they share similar relationships with mental health professionals. Mutual support or peer support is a process by which people voluntarily come together to help each other address common problems. Mutual support is social, emotional or instrumental support that is mutually offered or provided by persons with similar mental health conditions where there is some mutual agreement on what is helpful. Mutual support may include many other mental health consumer non-profits and social groups. Such groups are further distinguished as either Individual Therapy ...
Three quarters of countries around the world have mental health legislation. Compulsory admission to mental health facilities (also known as involuntary commitment) is a controversial topic. It can impinge on personal liberty and the right to choose, and carry the risk of abuse for political, social and other reasons; yet it can potentially prevent harm to self and others, and assist some people in attaining their right to healthcare when they may be unable to decide in their own interests.[164] All human rights oriented mental health laws require proof of the presence of a mental disorder as defined by internationally accepted standards, but the type and severity of disorder that counts can vary in different jurisdictions. The two most often utilized grounds for involuntary admission are ...
The Civilian Public Service (CPS) was a program of the United States government that provided conscientious objectors with an alternative to military service during World War II. From 1941 to 1947, nearly 12,000 draftees, willing to serve their country in some capacity but unwilling to perform any type of military service, accepted assignments in work of national importance in 152 CPS camps throughout the United States and Puerto Rico. Draftees from the historic peace churches and other faiths worked in areas such as soil conservation, forestry, fire fighting, agriculture, under the supervision of such agencies as the U.S. Forest Service, the Soil Conservation Service, and the National Park Service. Others helped provide social services and mental health services. The CPS men served without wages and minimal support from the federal government. The cost of maintaining the CPS camps and providing for the needs of the men was the responsibility of their ...
... is a clinical approach to those experiencing symptoms of psychosis for the first time. It forms part of a new prevention paradigm for psychiatry and is leading to reform of mental health services, especially in the United Kingdom and Australia. This approach centers on the early detection and treatment of early symptoms of psychosis during the formative years of the psychotic condition. The first three to five years are believed by some to be a critical period. The aim is to reduce the usual delays to treatment for those in their first episode of psychosis. The provision of optimal treatments in these early years is thought to prevent relapses and reduce the long-term impact of the condition. It is considered a secondary prevention strategy. The duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) has been shown as an indicator of prognosis, with a longer DUP associated with more long term disability. There are a number of functional components of the early psychosis ...
The anti-asylum movement or anti-asylum fight (Portuguese: movimento antimanicomial) is an organized movement in Brazil consisting of psychiatrists, psychologists and social workers requesting a humanitarian improvement in psychiatrist public services. University campuses, hospitals and workers of the field promote events in order to raise awareness and fight discrimination against mental patients. The movement itself was born after a chain of worldwide political events and is celebrated on May 18 in Brazil. On May 18, 1987 about 350 employees of Mental Health reunited in the Brazilian city of Bauru, state of São Paulo in order to discuss and propose ways to change the archaic and inefficient Mental Health System in the country. In its roots, the movement is connected to the Reforma Sanitária Brasileira (Brazilian Sanitary Reform) whose outcome was the Sistema Único de Saúde ...
... is a nonprofit, integrated health system based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. It provides health care across the full spectrum of health care services. Fairview currently operates ten hospitals, including University of Minnesota Medical Center,[1] forty eight primary care clinics and numerous specialty clinics in the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area and greater Minnesota. Fairview has 32,000 employees and 2,400 affiliated providers.. In June 2010, Thomson Reuters identified Fairview Health Services as one of the top ten health care systems in the United States.[2] The University of Minnesota Medical Center in Minneapolis was also recently recognized by U.S. News & World Report as a top hospital in the United States for treatment in six different specialties.[3] In ...
... (GAS) is a therapeutic method that refers to the development of a written follow-up guide between the client and the counselor used for monitoring client progress. GAS was first developed by Thomas Kiresuk and Robert Sherman in response to the wide variety of evaluation models regarding mental illness and treatment. With the advent of GAS, Kiresuk and Sherman sought to create an evaluation program that could measure effectiveness across several different modalities and justify economic and labor resources based on effectiveness. Evaluation practices are important for justification and support for services, especially in mental health. The existing evaluation procedures had problems in definition and measurement, and each mental health center used its own definitions and measurements to evaluate. This created unspecified and informal evaluations. The variety of evaluation methods also ...
Aisha was the daughter of Niren Chaudhary, the president of South Asia operations of YUM brand and Aditi, a mental healthcare worker. She had an elder brother named Ishan Chaudhary. She was born with an immune deficiency disorder. When she was 6 months old, she had to undergo a bone marrow transplant.[4] As a side effect of the bone marrow transplant, she developed a serious illness called pulmonary fibrosis- a type of condition that causes hardening of the lungs.[5] ...
Many winter service vehicles can be fitted with snowplows, to clear roads which are blocked by deep snow. In most cases, the plows are mounted on hydraulically-actuated arms, allowing them to be raised, lowered, and angled to better move snow. Most winter service vehicles include either permanently fixed plows or plow frames: 75% of the UK's Highways Agency vehicles include a plow frame to which a blade can be attached.[1] Winter service vehicles with both a plow frame and a gritting body are known as "all purpose vehicles", and while these are more efficient than using dedicated vehicles, the weight of the hopper often decreases the range of the vehicle. Therefore, most operators will keep at least a few dedicated plowing vehicles in store for heavy storms.[34] In the event that specially designed winter service vehicles are not available for plowing, other service or construction vehicles can be used instead: among those used by various authorities are graders,[23] bulldozers,[49] skid ...
COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH CENTERS (CMHC). Provide outpatient mental health services, 24-hour emergency care services, day ... outpatient primary care services and basic laboratory services in non-urban rural areas that have received a federal healthcare ... and what to do if you have an urgent health care issue please visit the New to Oregon Health Care web page​. ... FEDERALLY QUALIFIED HEALTH CENTERS (FQHC). Provide outpatient primary care to medically-underserved populations and areas. ...
... tertiary in-patient care, decentralised psychiatric care for severe mental disorders at primary healthcare (PHC) level, ... The need for improvements in both inpatient and outpatient psychosocial rehabilitation programmes was highlighted. Mayers et al ... Other articles concerned the quality of inpatient care. Joska et al.,15 in a case study of a psychiatric hospital in the ... Pretoria: Department of Health, 1997. [ Links ]. 5. Department of Health. Mental Health Care Act (17 of 2002). Pretoria: ...
New Fraser Health careers in Surrey, BC are added daily on SimplyHired.com. The low-stress way to find your next Fraser Health ... There are over 244 Fraser Health careers in Surrey, BC waiting for you to apply! ... 244 Fraser Health jobs available in Surrey, BC. See salaries, compare reviews, easily apply, and get hired. ... BCs first dedicated outpatient care and surgery centre and a.... Manager, Clinical Operations - Mental Health & Substance Use ...
Mental Health Outpatients Served Per 6 Month Period DRAFT, The CPT/HCPCS codes for the outpatient mental health services, Adult ... statistics on Mental Health Outpatients Served Per 6 Month Period: ... on medical necessity conducted by the Quality Improvement unit of the Mental Health .... are gravely disabled and cannot care ... Frequency: Mental health/counseling Mental health/counseling Mental health/counseling Mental health/counseling Other/ ...
Some safety improvements had been made to the room in A&E for patients with mental health needs. However, there were remaining ... urgent and emergency care, maternity, end of life care, outpatients, and diagnostic imaging at Dorset County Hospital and ... They understood the challenges to providing high-quality, sustainable services. They were supported by a committed, caring ... In urgent and emergency care, maternity services and outpatients, staff were not up to date with their mandatory training. ...
The regulator is now calling for NHS trusts to reflect on their findings and improve their care. ... no notable improvement in the last year and in some questions, a slightly higher proportion of people have reported a poor ... A survey of over 13,000 people who were treated and cared for in the community for their mental health problems has shown ... outpatient, children and young people and A&E services, ambulances, and inpatient services. ...
Center for Improvement in Healthcare Quality attains deeming authority More New OIG Opinion Leaves Door Open to New Preferred ... Health Care Fraud Enforcement Remains Hot as HEAT Continues Aggressive Enforcement of Health Care Laws in 2013 More ... Mental health provider faces False Claims Act lawsuit due to alleged unlicensed, untrained and unsupervised personnel More ... Health Care Providers Take Note: Your Contract With An HMO May Require Affirmative Action Compliance, Even If It Doesnt Say So ...
Timely Healthcare (HEALTH) Act, a bill that would reduce health care costs and promote access to quality, affordable health ... The Mental Health Awareness and Improvement Act of 2015, a bill to reauthorize and improve programs related to mental health ... Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment and Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment Systems and Quality Reporting Programs; Organ ... Timely Healthcare (HEALTH) Act, a bill that would reduce health care costs and promote access to quality, affordable health ...
We make sure health and social care services provide people with safe, effective, compassionate, high-quality care and we ... Child and adolescent mental health services. Requires improvement. Updated 17 May 2017 ... We rated outpatient and diagnostic imaging services as good overall.. Staff reported patient safety incidents and there was ... were good infection prevention and control measures within the service and this was reflected in the low numbers of healthcare ...
Outpatient, outreach, and home-based health care settings: If a facility has three or more TB patients for the preceding year, ... The quality improvement plan shall include specific goals, objectives, and methods. (2) The quality improvement plan shall ... Medical and mental health services. The programs policies and procedures shall address patient medical and mental health ... Quality improvement. The programs policies and procedures shall describe a written quality improvement plan that encompasses ...
This article describes an intervention to improve the quality of mental health care provided in outpatient substance abuse ... describes the design and implementation of an intervention to improve the quality of mental health care provided in outpatient ... Staff knowledge and attitudes about co-occurring disorders, job satisfaction, and morale all indicated an improvement at the ... few individuals with co-occurring disorders receive appropriate mental health care. This article ...
Population Health Training in Place Program (PH-TIPP) provides the opportunity for employees working at full-time positions in ... their skills in program evaluation as well as policy analysis and development with a focus on topics that improve the health of ... mental health, critical care, and inpatient/outpatient care. Mark evaluated the integrated behavior health program at a health ... Quality Improvement Director. Childrens Health Alliance of Wisconsin. Wisconsin Department of Health Services Family Health ...
2016) Barriers to office-based mental health care and interest in e-communication with providers. JMIR Mental Health, 3(3):e35 ... quality improvement, and clinical trials. Her clinical practice focusses on rapid access to assessment and treatment, and use ... Before coming to Manitoba, she worked for 3 years in outpatient general psychiatry, and was the mental health lead for the ... Hensel has research interests in health services, virtual care, and occupational mental health. Her experience includes work ...
... the opportunity to leverage research and program data to provide valuable insight in quality improvement among public health ... She had an insatiable eagerness to learn more about substance use, mental health, and their effects on people from all walks of ... Jessica has worked in a variety of roles, including but not limited to case management, direct client care, and supervisor as a ... She transitioned to working in an outpatient drug and alcohol treatment center where she was able to pursue a personal and ...
Outpatient Rotation: Primary Care-Mental Health Integration (PC-MHI) Clinical Supervisor: Mark Bradley, MD ... In addition, the fellow is also supported in pursuing quality improvement and research activity related to their work on the ... The New York VA is an integrated healthcare system for former and active duty military personnel, providing full continuity of ... primary care providers and nurses screen for common mental health conditions, and a multidisciplinary on-site mental health ...
... recent federal health policies have identified child mental health as a target area for quality improvement.6,7 The Child ... Previous studies of outpatient mental health care have shown that minority children are more likely to be undiagnosed33,34 and ... Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. HCUPnet, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. National statistics on children. ... Childrens mental health care: differences by race/ethnicity in urban/rural areas. J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2008;19(1): ...
... hospital providing the highest level quality complex care from cardiology to neurology to primary and mental health care for ... The Ralph H. Johnson VA achieved a 5-Star rating according to VAs Strategic Analytics for Improvement and Learning Value (SAIL ... Johnson VA Medical Center is a tertiary care teaching ... womens health, and the full range of inpatient and outpatient ... hospital providing the highest level quality complex care from cardiology to neurology to primary and mental health care for ...
Outpatient Utilization Review, Behavioral health, Mental Health. Ranked among the nations most integrated healthcare systems, ... Identification of quality of care issues through monitoring of outpatient pre/re-certification processes for treatment services ... processes for treatment services and Medicaid prior authorization processes through monitoring and continuous improvement. • ... Gathers, analyzes, and presents utilization data to BCS/Gallahue management for outpatient mental health and chemical ...
Career paths in mental health are an individual choice. Most LMFTs find careers in private practice, outpatient centers, ... Students receive higher quality training due to increased emphasis on program improvement. Of the 70 MFT programs in California ... government agencies, health practitioner offices, and residential care centers. For more statistics on LMFTs in the field, see ... The Frances Smith Center for Individual and Family Therapy provides high quality and affordable mental health services to the ...
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Information provided by:. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) ... Recent intervention work has shown that quality improvement strategies for depression in primary care are effective. Research ... Several studies document underutilization of outpatient specialty mental health services by African Americans. However, African ... Med Care. 1994 Jan;32(1):15-24. Cooper-Patrick L, Gallo JJ, Powe NR, Steinwachs DM, Eaton WW, Ford DE. Mental health service ...
Fairview Medication Therapy Management received an Innovation in Health Care Award for services to reduce readmissions for ... Integrating direct questions for patients on home infusion therapy provides insights to quality improvement measures. See ... See related abstract and article in The Mental Health Clinician, Volume 9 Issue 3. ... Fairview patients who primarily used a Fairview pharmacy had fewer outpatient, hospital and emergency room visits than those ...
Fully integrated care might be an unattainable ideal for many such organizations, but quality improvement across the treatment ... Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations-certified and methadone programs delivered more on-site primary care ... On-site primary care and mental health services in outpatient drug abuse treatment units. In: Journal of Behavioral Health ... On-site primary care and mental health services in outpatient drug abuse treatment units. Journal of Behavioral Health Services ...
... more than 33 million Americans receive health care for mental or substan... ... 4 Strengthening the Evidence Base and Quality Improvement Infrastructure 140-209 * 5 Coordinating Care for Better Mental, ... The effect of insurance benefit changes and use of child and adolescent outpatient mental health services. Medical Care 31(2): ... health care organizations, health plans, purchasers of group health care, and all involved in health care for mental and ...
Outpatient Quality Improvement Network South Carolina OSU-PCPBRN - Ohio State University Primary Care Practice Based Research ... VA Mental Health Practice-Based Research Network Texas PCRC - Duke Primary Care Research Consortium North Carolina PDC PBRN - ... Health Care for the Homeless Practice Based Research Network Tennessee HHR - Holistic Healthcare and Research Centre HPRN - ... LA Net Community Health Network California LAC DHS ACN-R&I - Los Angeles County Department of Health Services, Ambulatory Care ...
  • The previous chapters identify areas in which change is needed on the part of federal and state governments, health care organizations, and individual clinicians, among others. (nap.edu)
  • People with mental and/or substance-use (M/SU) problems and illnesses receive care from a range of provider organizations and individual clinicians-most often from private providers operating in market settings. (nap.edu)
  • The work on these 12 is already underway, with clinicians either leading deep dive investigations into individual trusts or drafting national reports to present the programme's findings and an action plan of changes and improvements. (hsj.co.uk)
  • Because there are only a handful of people qualified to train clinicians in many new therapies, the task of getting tens of thousands of mental health practitioners up to speed on evidence-based therapies through traditional in-person training is a nearly impossible challenge, Stein said. (healthcanal.com)
  • We know that front-line mental health clinicians turn over at about the rate of 35 percent a year," Stein said. (healthcanal.com)
  • The new National Vascular Registry will improve the quality of data collected and enable clinicians to continue their ongoing quality improvement and provide outcome information one year after the surgical procedure. (rcseng.ac.uk)
  • Our staff of clinicians include certified addiction counselors, social workers, a psychiatric nurse specialist, and psychiatrists who are experienced in working with individuals who are dealing with both substance abuse issues and mental health issues. (howtoquitheroin.com)
  • The reduction in HRQOL relative to the progression of the disease is also relevant for the allocation of health care resources, and should be taken into consideration by the clinicians treating people with HIV. (biomedcentral.com)
  • She returns to Community Behavioral Health Care after holding key positions for ISHN, United Healthcare and AMERICHOICE, where she helped implement the Medicare Advantage network for Region 1, oversaw recruitment and expansion projects for physicians and licensed clinicians in 10 states and implemented a new startup TennCare program in East Tennessee. (frontierhealth.org)
  • The NYU-HJD Comprehensive Pain Management Center may want to consider highlighting the word Comprehensive in its title because this integrated inpatient-outpatient program epitomizes all things comprehensive. (rutgers.edu)
  • As discussed in Chapter 8 in the discussion of the VA workforce, the committee identified issues with the adequacy of staffing levels for mental health personnel. (nap.edu)
  • However, data on mental health workforce provided by OMHSP to the committee did not include information about either social workers or nurses, two of the core mental health professions. (nap.edu)
  • It is an international systematic review articulating the evidence base on workforce interventions that may support high-quality cancer care to an expanding ageing population. (bmj.com)
  • Join us for a variety of activities that highlight the needs of these populations and present strategies for helping young people remain in care. (constantcontact.com)
  • Des suggestions ont été formulées pour mettre sur pied des services psychiatriques à l'attention de populations spécifiques, créer des services communautaires de soins de santé mentale, améliorer la recherche et la formation dans le domaine de la santé mentale et mettre à niveau les systèmes d'informations annuelles sur la santé mentale en utilisant des technologies informatiques de pointe. (who.int)
  • The Mental Health Atlas emphasized that, while it was important to address the many unmet needs of psychiatric populations worldwide, the challenges were greatest in low- and middle-income countries. (who.int)
  • Centered Medical Home Act became law.24 Under the Act, As use of the model has grown, public and private entities the state's commissioner of health, in consultation with have developed various PCMH model and recognition the state PCMH Stakeholder Council, is provided the rule- definitions, metrics, and performance standards. (cdc.gov)
  • The Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center is a regional referral center for robotic surgery, orthopedics and other specialties, and is the first VA National Tele-Mental Health Hub providing care for Veterans across the U.S. (va.gov)
  • Medical facilities are also available on NAS II at the Flight Line Clinic for active duty personnel and for occupational health care needs. (navy.mil)
  • Medical services there are limited to outpatient care such as sick call, physical examinations, aviation medicine and limited emergency services on both a walk-in and appointment basis. (navy.mil)
  • This report has prompted substantial interest in examining systems of medical care rather than individual physicians as the ultimate cause of medical error. (jaapl.org)
  • Harm was defined as any unintended physical injury resulting from medical care. (thepermanentejournal.org)
  • Experience in medical device or health care company is preferable. (pathologyoutlines.com)
  • Work closely with medical and dental providers as part of CHC's model of integrated care. (chc1.com)
  • Yet too many veterans in rural New Mexico communities face long travel times, a lack of health care options, and medical staff shortages," Udall said. (senate.gov)
  • But wait there's more: Medicare, which enrolls almost 50 million people, has long had inferior coverage for addiction and mental health outpatient care, reimbursing only 50% of costs versus 80% of those for other forms of medical care. (washingtonmonthly.com)
  • To ensure that regulated health care facilities comply with all applicable federal and state requirements, HFLC's Survey and Certification team conducts routine federal Medicare certification surveys and state licensure surveys as well as state and federal complaint investigations. (oregon.gov)
  • Approximately 43 percent of board and care residents were prescribed and 41 percent used at least one psychotropic agent, primarily on a routinely scheduled basis. (hhs.gov)