Fees, Medical: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for medical services.Fee Schedules: A listing of established professional service charges, for specified dental and medical procedures.Fees, Dental: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for dental services.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Skilled Nursing Facilities: Extended care facilities which provide skilled nursing care or rehabilitation services for inpatients on a daily basis.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Outpatient Clinics, Hospital: Organized services in a hospital which provide medical care on an outpatient basis.Capitation Fee: A method of payment for health services in which an individual or institutional provider is paid a fixed, per capita amount without regard to the actual number or nature of services provided to each patient.Relative Value Scales: Coded listings of physician or other professional services using units that indicate the relative value of the various services they perform. They take into account time, skill, and overhead cost required for each service, but generally do not consider the relative cost-effectiveness. Appropriate conversion factors can be used to translate the abstract units of the relative value scales into dollar fees for each service based on work expended, practice costs, and training costs.Prescription Fees: The charge levied on the consumer for drugs or therapy prescribed under written order of a physician or other health professional.Ambulatory Care Facilities: Those facilities which administer health services to individuals who do not require hospitalization or institutionalization.Medicare Part B: The voluntary portion of Medicare, known as the Supplementary Medical Insurance (SMI) Program, that includes physician's services, home health care, medical services, outpatient hospital services, and laboratory, pathology, and radiology services. All persons entitled to Medicare Part A may enroll in Medicare Part B on a monthly premium basis.Medicare Assignment: Concept referring to the standardized fees for services rendered by health care providers, e.g., laboratories and physicians, and reimbursement for those services under Medicare Part B. It includes acceptance by the physician.Residential Facilities: Long-term care facilities which provide supervision and assistance in activities of daily living with medical and nursing services when required.Financing, Personal: Payment by individuals or their family for health care services which are not covered by a third-party payer, either insurance or medical assistance.United StatesInsurance, Health, Reimbursement: Payment by a third-party payer in a sum equal to the amount expended by a health care provider or facility for health services rendered to an insured or program beneficiary. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Hospital Charges: The prices a hospital sets for its services. HOSPITAL COSTS (the direct and indirect expenses incurred by the hospital in providing the services) are one factor in the determination of hospital charges. Other factors may include, for example, profits, competition, and the necessity of recouping the costs of uncompensated care.Reimbursement Mechanisms: Processes or methods of reimbursement for services rendered or equipment.Economics, Medical: Economic aspects of the field of medicine, the medical profession, and health care. It includes the economic and financial impact of disease in general on the patient, the physician, society, or government.Durable Medical Equipment: Devices which are very resistant to wear and may be used over a long period of time. They include items such as wheelchairs, hospital beds, artificial limbs, etc.Facility Design and Construction: Architecture, exterior and interior design, and construction of facilities other than hospitals, e.g., dental schools, medical schools, ambulatory care clinics, and specified units of health care facilities. The concept also includes architecture, design, and construction of specialized contained, controlled, or closed research environments including those of space labs and stations.Uncompensated Care: Medical services for which no payment is received. Uncompensated care includes charity care and bad debts.Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (U.S.): A component of the Department of Health and Human Services to oversee and direct the Medicare and Medicaid programs and related Federal medical care quality control staffs. Name was changed effective June 14, 2001.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Ambulatory Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on an outpatient basis. It may be hospital-based or performed in an office or surgicenter.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Assisted Living Facilities: A housing and health care alternative combining independence with personal care. It provides a combination of housing, personalized supportive services and health care designed to meet the needs, both scheduled and unscheduled, of those who need help with activities of daily living. (www.alfa.org)Rate Setting and Review: A method of examining and setting levels of payments.Private Practice: Practice of a health profession by an individual, offering services on a person-to-person basis, as opposed to group or partnership practice.Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)Health Facility Administration: Management of the organization of HEALTH FACILITIES.Cost Sharing: Provisions of an insurance policy that require the insured to pay some portion of covered expenses. Several forms of sharing are in use, e.g., deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments. Cost sharing does not refer to or include amounts paid in premiums for the coverage. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Health Facilities, Proprietary: Health care institutions operated by private groups or corporations for a profit.Medicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.Inflation, Economic: An increase in the volume of money and credit relative to available goods resulting in a substantial and continuing rise in the general price level.Public Facilities: An area of recreation or hygiene for use by the public.Health Facility Planning: Areawide planning for health care institutions on the basis of projected consumer need.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Prospective Payment System: A system wherein reimbursement rates are set, for a given period of time, prior to the circumstances giving rise to actual reimbursement claims.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Competitive Bidding: Pricing statements presented by more than one party for the purpose of securing a contract.Facility Regulation and Control: Formal voluntary or governmental procedures and standards required of hospitals and health or other facilities to improve operating efficiency, and for the protection of the consumer.Long-Term Care: Care over an extended period, usually for a chronic condition or disability, requiring periodic, intermittent, or continuous care.Insurance, Physician Services: Insurance providing benefits for the costs of care by a physician which can be comprehensive or limited to surgical expenses or for care provided only in the hospital. It is frequently called "regular medical expense" or "surgical expense".Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Surgicenters: Facilities designed to serve patients who require surgical treatment exceeding the capabilities of usual physician's office yet not of such proportion as to require hospitalization.Nursing Homes: Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.Niger: A republic in western Africa, north of NIGERIA and west of CHAD. Its capital is Niamey.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Public Sector: The area of a nation's economy that is tax-supported and under government control.Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Insurance, Surgical: A specific type of health insurance which provides surgeons' fees for specified amounts according to the type of surgery listed in the policy.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Utilization Review: An organized procedure carried out through committees to review admissions, duration of stay, professional services furnished, and to evaluate the medical necessity of those services and promote their most efficient use.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Cancer Care Facilities: Institutions specializing in the care of cancer patients.Current Procedural Terminology: Descriptive terms and identifying codes for reporting medical services and procedures performed by PHYSICIANS. It is produced by the AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION and used in insurance claim reporting for MEDICARE; MEDICAID; and private health insurance programs (From CPT 2002).Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Efficiency, Organizational: The capacity of an organization, institution, or business to produce desired results with a minimum expenditure of energy, time, money, personnel, materiel, etc.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Privatization: Process of shifting publicly controlled services and/or facilities to the private sector.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.NepalMaternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Office Visits: Visits made by patients to health service providers' offices for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.Drug Costs: The amount that a health care institution or organization pays for its drugs. It is one component of the final price that is charged to the consumer (FEES, PHARMACEUTICAL or PRESCRIPTION FEES).Aqueous Humor: The clear, watery fluid which fills the anterior and posterior chambers of the eye. It has a refractive index lower than the crystalline lens, which it surrounds, and is involved in the metabolism of the cornea and the crystalline lens. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed, p319)Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.AfghanistanHospitals, Public: Hospitals controlled by various types of government, i.e., city, county, district, state or federal.Toilet Facilities: Facilities provided for human excretion, often with accompanying handwashing facilities.Hospital Costs: The expenses incurred by a hospital in providing care. The hospital costs attributed to a particular patient care episode include the direct costs plus an appropriate proportion of the overhead for administration, personnel, building maintenance, equipment, etc. Hospital costs are one of the factors which determine HOSPITAL CHARGES (the price the hospital sets for its services).Military Facilities: Areas designated for use by the armed forces personnel.Cost Allocation: The assignment, to each of several particular cost-centers, of an equitable proportion of the costs of activities that serve all of them. Cost-center usually refers to institutional departments or services.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Cost Savings: Reductions in all or any portion of the costs of providing goods or services. Savings may be incurred by the provider or the consumer.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Environmental Policy: A course of action or principle adopted or proposed by a government, party, business, or individual that concerns human interactions with nature and natural resources.Diagnosis-Related Groups: A system for classifying patient care by relating common characteristics such as diagnosis, treatment, and age to an expected consumption of hospital resources and length of stay. Its purpose is to provide a framework for specifying case mix and to reduce hospital costs and reimbursements and it forms the cornerstone of the prospective payment system.Organizational Case Studies: Descriptions and evaluations of specific health care organizations.Cost Control: The containment, regulation, or restraint of costs. Costs are said to be contained when the value of resources committed to an activity is not considered excessive. This determination is frequently subjective and dependent upon the specific geographic area of the activity being measured. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Fees and Charges: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for health care services.Burkina Faso: A republic in western Africa, south and east of MALI and west of NIGER. Its capital is Ouagadougou. It was formerly called Upper Volta until 1984.CambodiaCommunity Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.Inpatients: Persons admitted to health facilities which provide board and room, for the purpose of observation, care, diagnosis or treatment.Delivery, Obstetric: Delivery of the FETUS and PLACENTA under the care of an obstetrician or a health worker. Obstetric deliveries may involve physical, psychological, medical, or surgical interventions.Tanzania: A republic in eastern Africa, south of UGANDA and north of MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Dar es Salaam. It was formed in 1964 by a merger of the countries of TANGANYIKA and ZANZIBAR.Home Childbirth: Childbirth taking place in the home.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Hospitals, District: Government-controlled hospitals which represent the major health facility for a designated geographic area.Salaries and Fringe Benefits: The remuneration paid or benefits granted to an employee.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.Homes for the Aged: Geriatric long-term care facilities which provide supervision and assistance in activities of daily living with medical and nursing services when required.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Uganda: A republic in eastern Africa, south of SUDAN and west of KENYA. Its capital is Kampala.Health Facility Environment: Physical surroundings or conditions of a hospital or other health facility and influence of these factors on patients and staff.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Kenya: A republic in eastern Africa, south of ETHIOPIA, west of SOMALIA with TANZANIA to its south, and coastline on the Indian Ocean. Its capital is Nairobi.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Patient Credit and Collection: Accounting procedures for determining credit status and methods of obtaining payment.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Insurance, Liability: Insurance against loss resulting from liability for injury or damage to the persons or property of others.Contract Services: Outside services provided to an institution under a formal financial agreement.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Hospitals, Rural: Hospitals located in a rural area.United States Department of Veterans Affairs: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to VETERANS. It was established March 15, 1989 as a Cabinet-level position.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Drug Prescriptions: Directions written for the obtaining and use of DRUGS.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Intermediate Care Facilities: Institutions which provide health-related care and services to individuals who do not require the degree of care which hospitals or skilled nursing facilities provide, but because of their physical or mental condition require care and services above the level of room and board.Income: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Ghana: A republic in western Africa, south of BURKINA FASO and west of TOGO. Its capital is Accra.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Rehabilitation Centers: Facilities which provide programs for rehabilitating the mentally or physically disabled individuals.Hospitals, Veterans: Hospitals providing medical care to veterans of wars.Appointments and Schedules: The different methods of scheduling patient visits, appointment systems, individual or group appointments, waiting times, waiting lists for hospitals, walk-in clinics, etc.Trabecular Meshwork: A porelike structure surrounding the entire circumference of the anterior chamber through which aqueous humor circulates to the canal of Schlemm.Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Burundi: A republic in eastern Africa bounded on the north by RWANDA and on the south by TANZANIA. Its capital is Bujumbura.JapanPatient Protection and Affordable Care Act: An Act prohibiting a health plan from establishing lifetime limits or annual limits on the dollar value of benefits for any participant or beneficiary after January 1, 2014. It permits a restricted annual limit for plan years beginning prior to January 1, 2014. It provides that a health plan shall not be prevented from placing annual or lifetime per-beneficiary limits on covered benefits. The Act sets up a competitive health insurance market.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Personal Health Services: Health care provided to individuals.Substance Abuse Treatment Centers: Health facilities providing therapy and/or rehabilitation for substance-dependent individuals. Methadone distribution centers are included.Obstetrics: A medical-surgical specialty concerned with management and care of women during pregnancy, parturition, and the puerperium.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Dental Clinics: Facilities where dental care is provided to patients.CaliforniaEmployee Incentive Plans: Programs designed by management to motivate employees to work more efficiently with increased productivity, and greater employee satisfaction.MarylandRemuneration: Payment for a service or for a commodity such as a body part.Equipment and Supplies: Expendable and nonexpendable equipment, supplies, apparatus, and instruments that are used in diagnostic, surgical, therapeutic, scientific, and experimental procedures.Models, Econometric: The application of mathematical formulas and statistical techniques to the testing and quantifying of economic theories and the solution of economic problems.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Animals, LaboratoryPhysician Incentive Plans: Compensatory plans designed to motivate physicians in relation to patient referral, physician recruitment, and efficient use of the health facility.Diagnostic Services: Organized services for the purpose of providing diagnosis to promote and maintain health.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Cardiac Care Facilities: Institutions specializing in the care of patients with heart disorders.Ophthalmology: A surgical specialty concerned with the structure and function of the eye and the medical and surgical treatment of its defects and diseases.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Pharmacy Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the receiving, storing, and distribution of pharmaceutical supplies.Models, Economic: Statistical models of the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services, as well as of financial considerations. For the application of statistics to the testing and quantifying of economic theories MODELS, ECONOMETRIC is available.Insurance Claim Reporting: The design, completion, and filing of forms with the insurer.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Drug Utilization: The utilization of drugs as reported in individual hospital studies, FDA studies, marketing, or consumption, etc. This includes drug stockpiling, and patient drug profiles.Models, Organizational: Theoretical representations and constructs that describe or explain the structure and hierarchy of relationships and interactions within or between formal organizational entities or informal social groups.Ownership: The legal relation between an entity (individual, group, corporation, or-profit, secular, government) and an object. The object may be corporeal, such as equipment, or completely a creature of law, such as a patent; it may be movable, such as an animal, or immovable, such as a building.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Nature: The system of all phenomena in space and time; the totality of physical reality. It is both a scientific and philosophic concept appearing in all historic eras. (Webster 2d; Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Mali: A country in western Africa, east of MAURITANIA and south of ALGERIA. Its capital is Bamako. From 1904-1920 it was known as Upper Senegal-Niger; prior to 1958, as French Sudan; 1958-1960 as the Sudanese Republic and 1959-1960 it joined Senegal in the Mali Federation. It became an independent republic in 1960.Hospital Design and Construction: The architecture, functional design, and construction of hospitals.Government Programs: Programs and activities sponsored or administered by local, state, or national governments.Veterans: Former members of the armed services.GermanyPatient Transfer: Interfacility or intrahospital transfer of patients. Intrahospital transfer is usually to obtain a specific kind of care and interfacility transfer is usually for economic reasons as well as for the type of care provided.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Patient Discharge: The administrative process of discharging the patient, alive or dead, from hospitals or other health facilities.Hospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Specialties, Dental: Various branches of dental practice limited to specialized areas.Nigeria: A republic in western Africa, south of NIGER between BENIN and CAMEROON. Its capital is Abuja.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Zimbabwe: A republic in southern Africa, east of ZAMBIA and BOTSWANA and west of MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Harare. It was formerly called Rhodesia and Southern Rhodesia.Copying Processes: Reproduction of data in a new location or other destination, leaving the source data unchanged, although the physical form of the result may differ from that of the source.Fitness Centers: Facilities having programs intended to promote and maintain a state of physical well-being for optimal performance and health.
It is a government-recognised facility for training house officers and for medical fee reimbursement. Services include family ... Founded in 1921, the original hospital at Nagpur now provides 75 beds and a range of out-patient clinics. ... This institute aims at the Rehabilitation of the children by providing them medical attention & education simultaneously. In ...
An outpatient card at AIIMS costs a one-time fee of 10 rupees (around 20 cents U.S.) and thereafter outpatient medical advice ... Most medical facilities are run directly by the Ministry of Health or Ghana Health Service. The Government of Mauritius ... All citizens are entitled to be treated in public facilities free of charge, though a nominal fee of ~70 BWP (~$6.60 USD) is ... It also promised to tighten government control over medical fees in public hospitals and to set up a "basic medicine system" to ...
In 1950, it became one of the first facilities in the nation to offer radiation therapy for cancer patients in an outpatient ... PAMC agreed to provide medical care to nearby Stanford University students in exchange for a flat fee. ... In 2008, PAMF's three medical groups - Camino Medical Group, Palo Alto Medical Clinic, and Santa Cruz Medical Clinic - merged ... Palo Alto Medical Foundation (2005). "A Novel Type of Health Care Corporation". Palo Alto Medical Clinic: The First 75 Years. ...
China has 5,895 outpatient facilities: 1,266 outpatient facilities and 541 traditional medicine facilities. As of 2005 China ... National Medical Information Education Department of Medical Informatics - Peking University Chinese Medical & Biological ... Healthcare is now provided on a fee-for-service basis. The pricing structure attempts to facilitate equity by providing basic ... But the forepart HIS didn't consider medical information standards, and can't share medical information. Computers began to be ...
... 's facilities and services continue to grow, and now include home health services, clinical research, medical ... Scripps Health had issues with fees that Novation had collected from medical supply companies. Scripps estimated that the ... The system includes five hospitals and 19 outpatient facilities, and treats a half-million patients annually through 2,600 ... Scripps plans to start new medical school, San Diego Union-Tribune. March 25, 2008. Accessed August 11, 2010. ...
It soon started delivering babies and attending to medical and pediatric patients. In 1957, Dr. Fr. Giuseppe Ambrosoli, an ... Today, the hospital is a 350-bed facility, that admits patients in the disciplines of Internal Medicine, General Surgery, ... In 2005, nearly 58,500 outpatients were served and nearly 13,400 others were admitted. The hospital operates on income derived ... from patient fees, donations and annual government subsidies. However, no patient is turned away because of inability to pay. ...
Facility fees are extra costs tacked on to medical procedures and services at a hospital owned-facility. The legislation also ... The 2015 bipartisan legislation required disclosure of actual contracted rates for common outpatient, inpatient, surgical and ... The legislation would clarify the definition of facility fee and increase patient notification. It also seeks to clarify ... The legislation also was one of the first in the country to ban certain facility fees. ...
An outpatient card at AIIMS costs a one-time fee of 10 rupees (around 20 cents U.S.) and thereafter outpatient medical advice ... Most medical facilities are run directly by the Ministry of Health or Ghana Health Service.[7] ... All citizens are entitled to be treated in public facilities free of charge, though a nominal fee of ~70 BWP (~US$6.60) is ... The Government of Mauritius operates a system of medical facilities that provide treatment to citizens free of charge.[8] ...
... but it was later occurred difficulties on collecting the fees. The reason was most coolies unable to settle their medical fees ... 1906 - The medical staff extended the services for outpatients particularly the rural areas in Perak. 1917 - On 12 June, the ... and marked as the first hospital in Malaya and also Far East Asia to have those facilities. Mr. Leonard Wray chaired the ... In 1906, the Government medical staff extended the services for outpatients particularly the rural areas. The percentage of ...
Both the supply (medical facilities, pharmaceutical companies, professionals) and demand (patients, rural citizens) side of ... Township health centers were the second tier of the RCMS, consisting of small, outpatient clinics that primarily hired medical ... Furthermore, fee-for service in healthcare system provides incentives for healthcare providers to prescribe medicine or perform ... Urban Residents Basic Medical Insurance, Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance and New Rural Co-operative Medical Scheme cover ...
... may also receive medical and emergency dental care at military treatment facilities.[32] There is no charge for outpatient care ... which current members may seek health care from for an annual fee.[32] The attending physician provides routine exams, ... charges are at full reimbursement rates for both inpatient and outpatient care).[32] ...
... may also receive medical and emergency dental care at military treatment facilities. There is no charge for outpatient care if ... which current members may seek health care from for an annual fee. The attending physician provides routine exams, ... Outside the National Capital Region, charges are at full reimbursement rates for both inpatient and outpatient care). House ...
"Cabrini to become cancer outpatient facility" Town & Village (February 18, 2010) Dailey, Jessica. "Cabrini Medical Center ... 828,000 health facility assessment tax to New York State, $418,000 in fees to the New York State Department of Health, $412,000 ... The Emergency Department, acute inpatient units and most outpatient services are closed." On July 10, 2009, Cabrini Medical ... As of April 2008 the Cabrini Medical Center web site reported "As of March 14, 2008, many of the services at Cabrini Medical ...
... rather than on the basis of billing for each medical service provided (fee-for-service)). Most such plans are health ... Part B provides payments to physicians and surgeons in hospitals and skilled nursing facilities, as well as for medically- ... necessary outpatient hospital services such as ER, laboratory, X-rays and diagnostic tests, certain preventative medical ... Medicare Advantage plans provide beneficiaries the same medical services via capitated-fee as "Original Medicare" Parts A and B ...
... the HGPS is a teaching facility and has three medical residency programs in the areas of Family and Community Medicine, Medical ... However, by decree, the HGPS was created to provide non-profit medical assistance and uses the fees for services to continue to ... The country's first outpatient surgery program. • The permanence of the only functioning hospital bioethics committee in the ... The medical institutions of the Plaza de la Salud: the General Hospital (HGPS) and the Centers for Diagnostics and Advanced ...
Its facilities include two operating wards, "adult and pediatric inpatient wards, an infectious disease center, an outpatient ... It was formed to provide medical care to a small village named Cange in the central plateau of Haiti, that Farmer described as ... It was built in 1985 to treat patients who were incapable of paying hospital fees. Services cost the equivalent of about eighty ... The clinic saw three years of hardship, with patients afraid to seek medical treatment for fear of getting attacked by Haitian ...
Some SLHs offer intensive outpatient services, including on-site medical care. These homes are often staffed in shifts by ... Sober living houses (SLHs), also called sober homes and sober living environments, are facilities that provide safe housing and ... These types of sober livings do tend to charge higher fees, however, they are often able to provide a very affordable ... which documents alumni of Celebrity Rehab as they enter such facilities. VH1, which airs both shows, describes sober living ...
... of their medical fees, but fees are waived for low-income households receiving a government subsidy. Fees are also waived for ... Hospitals provided both out-patient and in-patient care. In addition, 79,000 clinics offered primarily out-patient services, ... Further, facilities would be designated by level of care and referrals would be required to obtain more complex care. Policy ... The negotiations determine the fee for every medical procedure and medication, and fees are identical across the country. If ...
Throughout the hospital's existence, the number of patients and facilities increased. As the private practice grew, more fees ... He graduated medical school in 1881, after forming many relationships with other medical colleagues. During his medical service ... Each morning before work began in the outpatient department, Main and his workers held morning service and gave an address; all ... Main was also invited to attend the Joint Conference of the National Medical Association of China and the China Medical ...
... one of the nation's leading academic medical centers, as a training site for medical residents and to provide patients with ... It first opened as Mercy Hospital in 1972 as a 319-bed acute care facility and was renamed for former Birmingham mayor Cooper ... Cooper Green Mercy provides healthcare services to all Jefferson County residents with fees based on family size and income. ... Cooper Green Mercy Health Services continues to provide comprehensive outpatient care to the County's most vulnerable citizens ...
Vishramalaya: A daytime facility for outpatients and relatives with lockers, a place to relax, a restaurant, bathrooms, toilets ... and patients need not pay any amount in form of their professional fees. However, the hospital charges a highly subsidized cost ... Prof PK Singh is the chief medical superintendent, who is assisted by Prof.Amita Agarwal who is the medical superintendent. ... Any Indian citizen with medical qualifications recognised by Medical council of India and who fulfills certain age and other ...
... of their medical fees, but fees are waived for low-income households receiving a government subsidy. Fees are also waived for ... Access to medical facilities is sometimes abused. Some patients with mild illnesses tend to go straight to hospital emergency ... Hospitals provided both out-patient and in-patient care. In addition, 79,000 clinics offered primarily out-patient services, ... The negotiations determine the fee for every medical procedure and medication, and fees are identical across the country. If ...
Approximately 10% of medical doctors work solely on private sector. Although high user fees may cause a barrier to use the ... Providers can only deliver drugs that are actually administered within their facilities. Health centers can give outpatient ... Due to the increased demand of medical care and lack of medical doctors, more medical faculties and university hospitals were ... Until 1750, the professor of medicine was the only trained medical doctor in Finland. An example of early treatment facilities ...
A facility requesting accreditation pays a substantial fee to the Joint Commission (the "accrediting" agency) and, upon ... the American Medical Association, and the Canadian Medical Association. In 1987 the company was renamed the Joint Commission on ... except for hospital-based outpatient mental health services), Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. In California, The Joint Commission ... JCI publishes an average fee of $46,000 for a full hospital survey. Reimbursement for surveyors' travel, living expenses, and ...
... for outpatients, to 13% -18% at VA medical centers. Many cancellations are due to non-medical problems such as a full ICU, ... Increasingly, facilities are hiring a physician medical director for the OR, as represented by a surgeon, anesthesiologist, or ... This is because fee-for-service hospitals have a positive contribution margin for almost all elective cases mostly due to a ... Because medical needs and regulatory requirements are constantly changing, the concept of appointing a medical director in the ...
The International Students Association was formed to look after the rights and needs of foreign students in Saint Petersburg, Russia. The goal of the International Students Associations is to keep a common place for information and communication for the foreign students community. Our goal is to promote the RIGHTS of foreign students in Saint Petersburg. Like, Monthly Transport card as Russian Students Get. Right to work. Proper Scholarship contract. e.g. Medical Insurance, Extra Hostel fees etc. Telephone, Internet fees, high price & low quality cafeteria inside the Foreign Students Hostel. Passport Carrying in the street & Militia Harassment. OVIR's improper behavior with foreign students & extra bribery, taking extra money without receipt. (IMOP!) Hostel Restriction. Saying not to get out in the evening, on the other hand, Prohibit to enter guest at the day time. e.g. Architecture University's Hostel beside Fontanka, ...
The National Union of Students (NUS) "Vote for Students" pledge is a pledge to vote against tuition fee increases that was signed by over 1000 candidates standing in the UK general election in 2010, notably including a large number of Labour Party MPs, who had introduced the fees in 1998 and all 57 subsequently elected Liberal Democrat MPs. The pledge states: "I pledge to vote against any increase in fees in the next parliament and to pressure the government to introduce a fairer alternative." The NUS asked politicians to sign the pledge as part of its Funding Our Future campaign. The NUS also asked students to use their vote in the General Election to support candidates who had signed the pledge. No party won an overall majority in the 2010 general election, and the Conservatives (with 306 MPs) and Liberal Democrats (with 57 MPs) formed a coalition government. Regarding higher education, the Coalition Agreement stated "We will await Lord ...
During the 1995-2005 period, some of the two dozen firms in San Diego and Virginia owned by Brent R. Wilkes received about $100 million in federal contracts. Most of Wilkes' government work came from earmarks.[29]. In November 2005, Wilkes was described as "co-conspirator No. 1" in a plea agreement signed by Representative Randy Cunningham, a California Republican on the House Appropriations Committee. In the plea deal, Cunningham admitted accepting more than $2.4 million in cash and gifts from Wilkes and other contractors.[30]. Since 1993, Lewis has received $88,000 in contributions from Wilkes and his associates.[14] Lewis has subsequently given $56,000 of that to Habitat for Humanity.[31] Wilkes paid Lowery's firm $160,000 in fees, according to original filings by Copeland Lowery.[32] In fact, those fees were substantially underreported: the firm's fees had increased to $25,000 a month by 2005, and total ...
From the beginning, Li has asserted his absolute authority over the transmission of the teachings and the use of healing powers of Falun Gong: he said in Changchun that only he is possessed of these right, and any who violate are to be expelled.[22] Li said: "If someone treats other people's illnesses or invites others to come to our practice point to be treated, this is a violation of the Dafa. The problem is serious: no one has the right to do so. If such a thing happens, that person is not my disciple. If an assistant does such a thing, replace him right away. These two phenomena must be resolutely eliminated." He wrote in Zhuan Falun prohibiting his followers charging fees for workshops, saying "If you collect fees, my dharma bodies will take away everything that you have, so that you will no longer belong to our Falun Dafa, and what you teach will not be our Falun Dafa."[23] Li Hongzhi describes Falun Gong as a "high-level cultivation ...
The RBRVS for each CPT code is determined using three separate factors: physician work, practice expense, and malpractice expense. The average relative weights of these are: physician work (52%), practice expense (44%), malpractice expense (4%).[2] A method to determine the physician work value was the primary contribution made by the Hsiao study. The RUC examines each new code to determine a relative value by comparing the physician work of the new code to the physician work involved in existing codes. The practice expense, determined by the Practice Expense Review Committee, consists of the direct expenses related to supplies and non-physician labor used in providing the service, and the pro rata cost of the equipment used. In addition, there is an amount included for the indirect expenses. In the development of the RBRVS, the physician work (including the physician's time, mental effort, technical skill, judgment, stress and an amortization of the physician's education), the practice expense ...
... became a huge commercial success at the Chinese box office, and also in countries such as Australia and Malaysia where there were reports of sold out tickets.[26][27][28] The film was noted for showing incredible legs at the box office despite being a tent pole movie earning seven times its prequel[29] and five times distributor's initial estimates.[30] It topped the international box office for all major films on three separate occasions - in its first three weekends.[31][32][33][34] Its unprecedented success has been attributed to various reasons such as its patriotic subject, nationalistic themes, and its bona-fide action sequences and stunts that have been said to be a breakthrough for Chinese films. The film was also released during the annual summer "blackout period" in which foreign movies are not released, and it only had to compete with other domestic movies.[35][36] It became the highest-grossing film in China after just twelve days of release, overtaking The Mermaid ...
Like all photometric units, the lux has a corresponding "radiometric" unit. The difference between any photometric unit and its corresponding radiometric unit is that radiometric units are based on physical power, with all wavelengths being weighted equally, while photometric units take into account the fact that the human eye's image-forming visual system is more sensitive to some wavelengths than others, and accordingly every wavelength is given a different weight. The weighting factor is known as the luminosity function. The lux is one lumen per square metre (lm/m2), and the corresponding radiometric unit, which measures irradiance, is the watt per square metre (W/m2). There is no single conversion factor between lux and W/m2; there is a different conversion factor for every wavelength, and it is not possible to make a conversion unless one knows the spectral composition of the light. The peak of the luminosity function is at 555 nm (green); the eye's image-forming visual system is more ...
Mitmed merepinna läheduses hõljuvad loomad on läbipaistvad, mis annab neile hea varjevärvuse[16]. Siiski on läbipaistvust raske saavutada kehal, mida moodustavate materjalide murdumisnäitaja erineb merevee omast. Näiteks meduusidel on želatiinilaadne keha, koosnedes peamiselt veest (98% vett). Nende mesoglöa (põhiline kehaseina moodustaja ainuõõssetel) on rakutu ja läbipaistev. See muudab nad küll ujuvamaks, kuid samas suurendab keha suurust lihasmassi kohta ja seega ei saa nad kiiresti ujuda, muutes selle krüpsise vormi kulukaks lõivsuhteks kiirusega[16]. Zooplankton on 50-90% läbipaistev. 50% läbipaistvus on piisav, et muuta loom nähtamatuks sellisele röövloomale nagu tursk 650 m sügavuses, kuid madalas rannikuvees peab nähtamatuse saavutamiseks olema suurem läbipaistvus, sest seal on valgustus parem ning röövloomad näevad kaugemale. Näiteks suudab tursk näha optimaalselt valgustatud rannikuvees saaki, mis on 98% läbipaistev. Seega saavutatakse krüpsiseks piisav ...
In their book on the problem of fair division, Steven Brams and Alan Taylor invoked the Thue-Morse sequence but did not identify it as such. When allocating a contested pile of items between two parties who agree on the items' relative values, Brams and Taylor suggested a method they called balanced alternation, or taking turns taking turns taking turns . . . , as a way to circumvent the favoritism inherent when one party chooses before the other. An example showed how a divorcing couple might reach a fair settlement in the distribution of jointly-owned items. The parties would take turns to be the first chooser at different points in the selection process: Ann chooses one item, then Ben does, then Ben chooses one item, then Ann does.[16]. Lionel Levine and Katherine Stange, in their discussion of how to fairly apportion a shared meal such as an Ethiopian dinner, proposed the Thue-Morse sequence as a way to reduce the advantage of moving first. They suggested that "it would be interesting to ...
... (PPP) is a component o some economic theories an is a technique uised tae determine the relative value o different sillers. ...
In June 2011, the Department of Health and Human Services announced the Federally Qualified Health Center Advanced Primary Care Practice (FQHC APCP) demonstration project.[7] This demonstration project is conducted under the authority of Section 1115A of the Social Security Act, which was added by section 3021 of the ACA and establishes the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (Innovation Center).[8] The CMS and Innovation Center in partnership with HRSA will operate the demonstration.[4][8] This initiative was designed to evaluate the impact of the advanced primary care practice (APCP) model, also referred to as the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) on improving health, quality of care and lowering the cost of care provided to Medicare beneficiaries.[4][8] The ACA will pay an estimated $42 million over three years (November 1, 2011 to October 31, 2014) to 500 FQHCs to coordinate care for 195,000 Medicare patients.[4][7][8] Participating FQHCs agree to adopt care coordination ...
Dürer's work on human proportions is called the Four Books on Human Proportion (Vier Bücher von Menschlicher Proportion) of 1528.[34] The first book was mainly composed by 1512/13 and completed by 1523, showing five differently constructed types of both male and female figures, all parts of the body expressed in fractions of the total height. Dürer based these constructions on both Vitruvius and empirical observations of, "two to three hundred living persons",[24] in his own words. The second book includes eight further types, broken down not into fractions but an Albertian system, which Dürer probably learned from Francesco di Giorgio's 'De harmonica mundi totius' of 1525. In the third book, Dürer gives principles by which the proportions of the figures can be modified, including the mathematical simulation of convex and concave mirrors; here Dürer also deals with human physiognomy. The fourth book is devoted to the theory of movement. Appended to the last book, however, is a ...
Although the problem was first found in brass, any alloy containing copper will be susceptible to the problem. It includes copper itself (as used in pipe for example), bronzes and other alloys with a significant copper content. Like all problems with hairline cracks, detection in the early stages of attack is difficult, but the characteristic blue coloration may give a clue to attack. Microscopic inspection will often reveal the cracks, and x-ray analysis using the EDX facility on the scanning electron microscope or SEM should reveal the presence of elemental nitrogen from ammoniacal traces. ...
Detailed profiles of 8 Assisted Living Facilities in Huntsville, AL. Average cost is 3495 per month. Reviews, ratings, costs, ... seniors need to keep in mind that residential facility fees typically include room and board. Those receiving care at home are ... Medicaid covers 1 in 5 Alabama residents, who receive a range of services, including inpatient and outpatient hospital care, ... Necessary medical appliances, equipment and supplies. *Assistive technology. *Adult day health care services ...
All of them charge outpatient hospital rates and facility fees. "As soon as a person walks in the door, theyre in the ... Its the facility fees charged at the suburban centers that the hospital system owns that have Dr. Frederic Lafferty speaking ... Facility fees are necessary to "help cover the costs of hospitals that provide a greater level of advanced technology, research ... Billing at outpatient hospital rates is necessary to pay for the cutting-edge medical technology thats offered and increased ...
Learn more about this Ohio health insurance HMO plan from Medical Mutual and apply online. ... Outpatient Facility Fee:. 30% Coinsurance after deductible. Outpatient Lab/X-Ray Outpatient Lab:. 30% Coinsurance after ... Outpatient Coverage. Outpatient Surgery Outpatient Surgery Physician/Surgical Services:. 30% Coinsurance after deductible. ... Outpatient Substance Abuse. 30% Coinsurance after deductible. Outpatient Rehabilitation Services (PT, OT, ST). 30% Coinsurance ...
... outpatient facility fees. The 589-page medical fee schedule is here. The annual update of the medical fee schedule is required ... as well as durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics and supplies; Appendix III, inpatient facility fees; and Appendix ... Board Releases Latest Medical Fee Schedule. Thursday, December 7, 2017 , 280 , 0 , 4 min read ... The Maine Workers Compensation Board has released its medical fee schedule for dates of service on and after Jan. 1. The ...
Critical access rural hospitals, facilities, Minn. Statutes 2012 144.1483. Medical assistance, surveys, fees, Minn. Statutes ... Medicare, surveys, fees, Minn. Statutes 2012 144.122. Outpatient mental health programs, Minn. Statutes 2012 245.470, 2012 ... Rehabilitation facilities, see Medical assistance under this topic. Religious corporations, trustees, Minn. Statutes 2012 ... Saint Paul-Ramsey Medical Center, see SAINT PAUL-RAMSEY MEDICAL CENTER. Sales to, sales and use taxes, exemption, Minn. ...
Outpatient medical center with 130 physicians representing 30 medical/surgical specialties and primary care. No facility fees ... Business Description: Hillcrest Hospital is a full-service, 496-bed hospital that serves the medical needs of Mayfield Heights ... Business Description: Able & Caring MedPersonnel, is a dedicated full-service medical employment staffing firm. Our goal is to ... Business Description: We are a nonprofit multispecialty academic medical center that integrates clinical and hospital care with ...
Cal/OSHA Issues Citations to Health Care Facilities and Public Safety Employers for COVID-19 Violations ... DWC Posts Adjustments to Official Medical Fee Schedule (DMEPOS) July 2, 2020. DWC Posts Adjustment to Official Medical Fee ... DWC Posts Amendment to Official Medical Fee Schedule (Hospital Outpatient Departments and Ambulatory Surgical Centers). ... DWC Posts Adjustments to Official Medical Fee Schedule (Hospital Outpatient Departments/Ambulatory Surgical Centers) ...
MEDICAL FACILITIES, 34 AND OUTPATIENT CLINIC; 35 iii. ON MEDICAL AND DENTAL SERVICES, DIAGNOSTIC AND 36 LABORATORY FEES IN ALL ... 24 (d) Free medical and dental service, diagnostic and laboratory fees such as, but 25 not limited to x-rays, computerized ... PRIVATE HOSPITALS AND MEDICAL 37 FACILITIES, AND OUTPATIENT CLINIC, IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE 38 RULES AND REGULATIONS TO BE ... engaged in catering, leasing or providing facilities to transients, tourists or 2 travelers. 3 d. Medical services shall ...
International Travel Insurance includes Medical, Evacuation, Accidental Death and Dismemberment, Interruption, Lost Luggage, ... Medical: Includes inpatient and outpatient hospitalization; surgeons, anesthesiologists, radiologists and physicians fees; ... licensed extended care facility upon transfer from acute care hospital, and emergency local ambulance. ... An unexpected illness or accident may result in medical services that are not adequately covered by existing insurance due to ...
Policy on third-party reimbursement of medical fees related to sedation/general anesthesia. Original policy May 1989, Revised ... Anesthesia in Outpatient Facilities; pages ANE/1 through ANE/23; copyright 2001 by the American Association of Oral and ... See Medical Clinical Policy Bulletin:. General Anesthesia and IV Sedation for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Dental ... Copyright 2012 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.. **Copyright 2016 American Dental Association. All rights ...
The California Medical Association (CMA) is a professional organization representing the physicians of the state of California ... Medical Legal Library , June 7, 2017. #5402 - Surgicenters and Other Outpatient Facilities. In 1994, the Legislature passed A.B ... Medical Legal Library , April 3, 2017. #5302 - Clinical Laboratories: Self-Referral and Fee-Splitting Prohibitions. The ... Medical Legal Library , June 7, 2017. #5403 - Mammography Facilities and X-rays. As is summarized below, federal and state laws ...
The Hospital Inpatient, Hospital Outpatient Surgical, and Ambulatory Surgery Center facility fee schedules are all global fee ... Does the fee schedule cover medical reports or copying fees? A provider may not charge a fee for writing a standard report that ... The fee schedule does not apply, for example, to skilled nursing facilities or Section 12 medical exams (also known as ... Does the fee schedule cover medical reports or copying fees? Payment Disputes. * What can the provider do if the payer wont ...
Part B applies to outpatient healthcare and medical supplies. A and B are together called Original Medicare. Part C, or the ... Coverage, add-ons, and fees. "Many drugs are still expensive and deter me from taking treatment that my rheumy prescribes." - ... Part A is for inpatient hospital care and skilled nursing facilities, and some home healthcare. ... as well as those younger than 65 who need coverage due to a medical condition or disability. Currently, almost 57 million ...
... on hospital outpatient facility fees. MHA participated in the briefing alongside representatives from the Attorney Generals ... MHA shared our work with members over the interim to develop a process for uniform facility fee disclosure, which most members ... As you know, consumers cost exposure-not just facility fees but also surprise bills, debt collection, and more-makes daily ... While members appreciated the effort of the field, questions were raised regarding the necessity of facility fees and overall ...
Fees and Insurance. Mercy Center for Pain Medicine is a hospital outpatient clinic at Mercy Medical Center - Des Moines. The ... One bill will come from Mercy Medical Center - Des Moines for a facility charge. A second bill will come from Medical Center ... Medical records are obtained prior to your appointment time. The physician will review all your past medical treatments and ... Mercy Medical Center Mercy West Lakes Mercy Clinics Quick Care Clinics Urgent Care Clinics Iowa Heart Mercy Health Network ...
Learn about the courses you will take during your Medical Transcriptionist training with Penn Foster such as Medical Office ... Describe the Medicare skilled-nursing facility prospective payment system *Discuss the different outpatient prospective payment ... This course introduces the reimbursement process and the various methodologies involved, such as fee for-service and episode-of ... Prepare various types of transcribed medical documents and reports, such as outpatient medical chart notes, daily progress ...
Ohio State Universitys Wexner Medical Center alone collects about $17?million each year in facility fees from payers and ... That s the impetus for charging facility fees.The university health system charges facility fees only in outpatient settings ... Facility fees can range from $140 to $375 at Wexner Medical Center, and from $30 to $200 at Nationwide Children s facilities, ... 50 for facility fees, shesaid.OhioHealth and Mount Carmel Health System say they don t charge facility fees. ...
Inpatient services are those that require you to check in to a facility for multiple days of treatment. Outpatient services are ... including application fees, postage, notary fees, and attorney fees. Some policies also provide fraud loss coverage in case ... This part of Medicare covers outpatient care, preventive services, ambulance rides, and medical equipment.,/p, ,p,Medicare Part ... Medical travel insurance covers medical expenses if you are sick or injured in a foreign country, where your standard health ...
Perhaps unsurprisingly, many of the best medical facilities in this country are based within the major cities of Mexico City, ... including application fees, postage, notary fees, and attorney fees. Some policies also provide fraud loss coverage in case ... This part of Medicare covers outpatient care, preventive services, ambulance rides, and medical equipment.,/p, ,p,Medicare Part ... It helps provide a standardized level of service by only approving and endorsing top quality medical facilities, which should ...
Executives at Mercy Regional Medical Center in Lorain say they arent trying to demonize their competitors, but the nonprofit ... Nationwide, its routine for hospital systems to charge facility fees for visits to outpatient settings, such as doctors ... But consumers arent the only ones noticing the additional costs facility fees add to medical bills. ... stop paying facility fees for some outpatient services.. MedPAC stated that "Medicare should base payment rates on resources ...
It is a government-recognised facility for training house officers and for medical fee reimbursement. Services include family ... Founded in 1921, the original hospital at Nagpur now provides 75 beds and a range of out-patient clinics. ... This institute aims at the Rehabilitation of the children by providing them medical attention & education simultaneously. In ...
Kadlec Regional Medical Center charged the highest facility fees (about $7,000), which created over $39 million in revenue from ... Provider-based, or hospital outpatient, billing is the practice of billing a patient twice; for the cost of the service the ... Reporting these fees would allow policymakers to track facility fee pricing trends, and better analyze if facility fees are ... ERs have facility fee level coding, which determines how much a person is billed for facility fees- in theory (see our last ...
Our Medical Billing and Coding online program costs less than other medical coding programs and offers preparation for AAPCs ... Describe the Medicare skilled-nursing facility prospective payment system *Discuss the different outpatient prospective payment ... This course introduces the reimbursement process and the various methodologies involved, such as fee for-service and episode-of ... Body Systems and Medical Terminology 1 In this course, youll become familiar with the medical terms that youll hear on a ...
... without charge at public outpatient facilities, with a nominal charge for prescription drugs. Overall, the medical assistance ... At public hospitals, small fees were charged to those patients able to meet them, but indigents were treated without cost. ... lesser clinical medical facilities nationwide and coordinated the planning of medical services by the states and the Federal ... There was also a marked increase in the number of medical facilities and personnel offering health care. The rise in the number ...
The estimates may factor in facility fees, as well as associated costs like consultations, outpatient visits, medications and ... Medical Mutual The importance of cost transparency in medical care. In health care, the consumer mentality continues to grow. ... MEDICAL MUTUAL SHARE AWARD Bob Coughlin, Paycor. NONPROFIT EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE YEAR Jennifer Hauck, American Heart Assn. ... If they receive medical services from a doctor who is not in network, the services are usually still covered - they just have ...
  • In 2017, the facility fee range at Washington hospital-owned physicians' offices was $0- $7,000. (cohealthinitiative.org)
  • In response to the 2017 Physician Fee Schedule proposed rule, the Center expressed concerns regarding similar proposed "G" codes, because those were far more limited in scope and were accompanied by cost-sharing. (medicareadvocacy.org)
  • Eight of the Medicaid expansion states ( Arkansas, Arizona, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, New Hampshire and Ohio ) reported plans to use provider taxes or fees to fund all or part of the costs of the ACA Medicaid expansion beginning in January 2017, when states must pay five percent of the costs of the expansion. (ncsl.org)
  • Update by Dr. Orlando Florete, President of AMMPA, Medical Director of Knox Medical, January 29, 2017 As we move forward utilizing medical cannabis as. (absolutesurg.com)
  • For FY 2016-2018 , the number of states with some type of Medicaid-related provider or insurer taxes or fees has remained stable at 49 states and D.C. The single state not using provider taxes is Alaska. (ncsl.org)
  • Additional Policy and Regulatory Revisions in Response to the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency and Delay of Certain Reporting Requirements for the Skilled Nursing Facility Quality Reporting Program. (ca.gov)
  • In the Interim Final Rule, CMS adopts a new COVID-19 specimen collection code, C9803, effective March 1, 2020, to be used by hospital outpatient departments during the public health emergency. (ca.gov)
  • The U.S. government provides health coverage to people who are over 65 years old, as well as those younger than 65 who need coverage due to a medical condition or disability. (healthcentral.com)
  • On Tuesday the Senate Finance Committee and members of the House Health and Operations Committee held a briefing on hospital outpatient facility fees. (constantcontact.com)
  • Executives at Mercy Regional Medical Center in Lorain say they aren't trying to demonize their competitors, but the nonprofit health system's latest advertising campaign isn't pulling any punches. (cleveland.com)
  • Mercy's unprecedented marketing move has drawn attention in health policy circles outside Ohio as a national backlash brews against the fees. (cleveland.com)
  • The health system facilities also must have more comprehensive licensing and accreditation and frequently participate in research and teaching, which is an expense, they say. (cleveland.com)
  • Charitable organizations, especially the Roman Catholic Church, operated some health facilities. (country-studies.com)
  • Immunization campaigns have systematically improved children's health, and regular campaigns to destroy disease-bearing insects and to improve water and sanitary facilities have all boosted Venezuela's health indicators to some of the highest levels in Latin America. (country-studies.com)
  • With many employers moving to high-deductible health plans, employees are being asked to cover more of their medical expenses. (sbnonline.com)
  • Pediatric observation units (OUs) are hospital areas used to provide medical evaluation and/or management for health-related conditions in children, typically for a well-defined, brief period. (aappublications.org)
  • Medical records and health information technicians, commonly referred to as health information technicians, organize and manage health information data to ensure quality, accuracy, accessibility, and security. (howardcc.edu)
  • Most medical facilities are run directly by the Ministry of Health or Ghana Health Service . (wikipedia.org)
  • Professional roles are changing in the face of increasing litigation, widespread availability of medical information via the Internet, and policy directives that favour growth of the private health sector. (mja.com.au)
  • Shereese Hickson, 39, single mother who worked as a health aide and trained as a medical coder, living in Girard, Ohio. (californiahealthline.org)
  • and chief medical officer at Excelerate Strategic Health Sourcing. (healio.com)
  • The service cost is covered by the prepaid Student Health Plan fee. (umassmed.edu)
  • An annual health fee finances the service. (umassmed.edu)
  • Cardiac rehabilitation is described by the U.S. Public Health Service as consisting of 'comprehensive, long-term programs involving medical evaluation, prescribed exercise, cardiac risk factor modification, education, and counseling. (mn.us)
  • The Gulf Coast Mental Health Center in Gulfport offers a short term 12 week outpatient program, followed by a 9 month maintenance program. (methamphetamine-addiction.net)
  • Jersey Shore University Medical Center Behavioral Health Unit is a drug and alcohol rehab program located at 1945 State Route 33 in Neptune, New Jersey. (connectopensource.org)
  • After surviving provider-network instability that threatened the market from 1996 to 2001, medical groups have grown stronger financially with the cooperation of health plans. (hschange.org)
  • Health plans are exploring innovations in product design and quality improvement, such as tiered-provider networks and financial incentives for medical groups to improve quality. (hschange.org)
  • In the late 1990s, flat payments from health plans-whose own premiums were rising slowly-and the financial collapse of national, physician practice management companies (PPMCs) threatened both the solvency of risk-bearing medical groups and the delegated-HMO model, itself. (hschange.org)
  • these health plans also paid the highest average facility fees. (ct.gov)
  • Scripps Health had issues with fees that Novation had collected from medical supply companies. (wikipedia.org)
  • COORDINATION OF BENEFITS - Process for determining the respective responsibilities of two or more health plans that have some financial responsibility for a medical claim. (aarp.org)
  • Even though the cost of the professional component is always lower in a provider-based entity, the hospital usually receives a larger facility payment under the OPPS that more than makes up for the decrease in the professional payment. (hcpro.com)
  • Costs to manage AF in the USA are estimated at $6.65 billion, including $4.88 billion in hospitalization expenses and $1.53 billion in outpatient management costs (in 2005 US$) [ 8 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Instructive information pertaining to the outpatient modifiers that must be reported with the device credits "-FB" and "-FC" is quite plentiful, which makes it all the more confounding why the sixth-and seventh-most common reasons for OIG "hits" during provider audits is the misreporting of these modifiers. (racmonitor.com)
  • Scripps Mercy Hospital's San Diego campus is raising funds to expand and modernize its facility, including the emergency department. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is the policy of JFK to comply with the standards of the Federal Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Transport Act of 1986 ("EMTALA") and the EMTALA regulations in providing a medical screening examination and such further treatment as may be necessary to stabilize an emergency medical condition for any individual coming to the emergency department seeking treatment. (jfkmc.org)
  • Provide non-emergency medical transport to medical appointments, pharmacies, grocery stores or other outings. (montgomerycountymd.gov)
  • Effective 6/28/11 (Section 8.2(a-3) of the Act ), each prescription filled and dispensed outside of a licensed pharmacy shall be reimbursed at or below the Average Wholesale Price (AWP) plus a dispensing fee of $4.18. (illinois.gov)
  • It is our understanding that unlicensed but accredited facilities often initially send in a bill and include a certificate, showing the expiration date of the accreditation, and then the payer will keep track of the certificates. (illinois.gov)
  • In an effort to boost predictability and transparency of its Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) review process, the US Food and Drug Administration has published new guidance explaining key issues the agency uses to assess benefits and risks of IDE submissions for clinical investigations of Class III and some Class II medical devices. (massdevice.com)
  • By including this information in their IDE applications , clinical investigation sponsors and/or medical device manufacturers would directly address many key questions FDA reviewers have when examining submissions, potentially speeding up IDE decisions and avoiding hold-ups. (massdevice.com)
  • As the hospital continued to extend its reach, it began creating new clinical programs and developing innovative medical technology. (nationaljewish.org)
  • The system also includes clinical research and medical education programs. (wikipedia.org)
  • The offices of Medical Education, Student Affairs, Minority Affairs and the Registrar are clustered on the first floor at the north end of the basic sciences wing. (umassmed.edu)