Lens, Crystalline: A transparent, biconvex structure of the EYE, enclosed in a capsule and situated behind the IRIS and in front of the vitreous humor (VITREOUS BODY). It is slightly overlapped at its margin by the ciliary processes. Adaptation by the CILIARY BODY is crucial for OCULAR ACCOMMODATION.Cornea: The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins: Proteins isolated from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria.Corneal Stroma: The lamellated connective tissue constituting the thickest layer of the cornea between the Bowman and Descemet membranes.Epithelium, Corneal: Stratified squamous epithelium that covers the outer surface of the CORNEA. It is smooth and contains many free nerve endings.Endothelium, Corneal: Single layer of large flattened cells covering the surface of the cornea.Keratitis: Inflammation of the cornea.Keratoconus: A noninflammatory, usually bilateral protrusion of the cornea, the apex being displaced downward and nasally. It occurs most commonly in females at about puberty. The cause is unknown but hereditary factors may play a role. The -conus refers to the cone shape of the corneal protrusion. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Corneal Opacity: Disorder occurring in the central or peripheral area of the cornea. The usual degree of transparency becomes relatively opaque.Rod Cell Outer Segment: The portion of a retinal rod cell situated between the ROD INNER SEGMENT and the RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIUM. It contains a stack of photosensitive disk membranes laden with RHODOPSIN.Eye Burns: Injury to any part of the eye by extreme heat, chemical agents, or ultraviolet radiation.Corneal Neovascularization: New blood vessels originating from the corneal veins and extending from the limbus into the adjacent CORNEAL STROMA. Neovascularization in the superficial and/or deep corneal stroma is a sequel to numerous inflammatory diseases of the ocular anterior segment, such as TRACHOMA, viral interstitial KERATITIS, microbial KERATOCONJUNCTIVITIS, and the immune response elicited by CORNEAL TRANSPLANTATION.Corneal Ulcer: Loss of epithelial tissue from the surface of the cornea due to progressive erosion and necrosis of the tissue; usually caused by bacterial, fungal, or viral infection.Eye Banks: Centers for storing various parts of the eye for future use.Keratoplasty, Penetrating: Partial or total replacement of all layers of a central portion of the cornea.Corneal Edema: An excessive amount of fluid in the cornea due to damage of the epithelium or endothelium causing decreased visual acuity.Descemet Membrane: A layer of the cornea. It is the basal lamina of the CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM (from which it is secreted) separating it from the CORNEAL STROMA. It is a homogeneous structure composed of fine collagenous filaments, and slowly increases in thickness with age.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Corneal Keratocytes: Fibroblasts which occur in the CORNEAL STROMA.Ophthalmic Nerve: A sensory branch of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The ophthalmic nerve carries general afferents from the superficial division of the face including the eyeball, conjunctiva, upper eyelid, upper nose, nasal mucosa, and scalp.Corneal Topography: The measurement of curvature and shape of the anterior surface of the cornea using techniques such as keratometry, keratoscopy, photokeratoscopy, profile photography, computer-assisted image processing and videokeratography. This measurement is often applied in the fitting of contact lenses and in diagnosing corneal diseases or corneal changes including keratoconus, which occur after keratotomy and keratoplasty.Keratitis, Herpetic: A superficial, epithelial Herpesvirus hominis infection of the cornea, characterized by the presence of small vesicles which may break down and coalesce to form dendritic ulcers (KERATITIS, DENDRITIC). (Dictionary of Visual Science, 3d ed)Limbus Corneae: An annular transitional zone, approximately 1 mm wide, between the cornea and the bulbar conjunctiva and sclera. It is highly vascular and is involved in the metabolism of the cornea. It is ophthalmologically significant in that it appears on the outer surface of the eyeball as a slight furrow, marking the line between the clear cornea and the sclera. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 3d ed)Conjunctiva: The mucous membrane that covers the posterior surface of the eyelids and the anterior pericorneal surface of the eyeball.Keratan Sulfate: A sulfated mucopolysaccharide initially isolated from bovine cornea. At least two types are known. Type I, found mostly in the cornea, contains D-galactose and D-glucosamine-6-O-sulfate as the repeating unit; type II, found in skeletal tissues, contains D-galactose and D-galactosamine-6-O-sulfate as the repeating unit.Lasers, Excimer: Gas lasers with excited dimers (i.e., excimers) as the active medium. The most commonly used are rare gas monohalides (e.g., argon fluoride, xenon chloride). Their principal emission wavelengths are in the ultraviolet range and depend on the monohalide used (e.g., 193 nm for ArF, 308 nm for Xe Cl). These lasers are operated in pulsed and Q-switched modes and used in photoablative decomposition involving actual removal of tissue. (UMDNS, 2005)Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect: A form of fluorescent antibody technique commonly used to detect serum antibodies and immune complexes in tissues and microorganisms in specimens from patients with infectious diseases. The technique involves formation of an antigen-antibody complex which is labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody. (From Bennington, Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984)Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Tissue Preservation: The process by which a tissue or aggregate of cells is kept alive outside of the organism from which it was derived (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).Photorefractive Keratectomy: A type of refractive surgery of the CORNEA to correct MYOPIA and ASTIGMATISM. An EXCIMER LASER is used directly on the surface of the EYE to remove some of the CORNEAL EPITHELIUM thus reshaping the anterior curvature of the cornea.Retinal Photoreceptor Cell Outer Segment: The light sensitive outer portion of a retinal rod or a cone photoreceptor cell. The outer segment contains a stack of disk membranes laden with photoreceptive pigments (RETINAL PIGMENTS). The outer segment is connected to the inner segment by a PHOTORECEPTOR CONNECTING CILIUM.Corneal Dystrophies, Hereditary: Bilateral hereditary disorders of the cornea, usually autosomal dominant, which may be present at birth but more frequently develop during adolescence and progress slowly throughout life. Central macular dystrophy is transmitted as an autosomal recessive defect.Eye Injuries: Damage or trauma inflicted to the eye by external means. The concept includes both surface injuries and intraocular injuries.Ophthalmic Solutions: Sterile solutions that are intended for instillation into the eye. It does not include solutions for cleaning eyeglasses or CONTACT LENS SOLUTIONS.Sodium Hydroxide: A highly caustic substance that is used to neutralize acids and make sodium salts. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Eye: The organ of sight constituting a pair of globular organs made up of a three-layered roughly spherical structure specialized for receiving and responding to light.Fuchs' Endothelial Dystrophy: Disorder caused by loss of endothelium of the central cornea. It is characterized by hyaline endothelial outgrowths on Descemet's membrane, epithelial blisters, reduced vision, and pain.Organ Culture Techniques: A technique for maintenance or growth of animal organs in vitro. It refers to three-dimensional cultures of undisaggregated tissue retaining some or all of the histological features of the tissue in vivo. (Freshney, Culture of Animal Cells, 3d ed, p1)Eye ProteinsTears: The fluid secreted by the lacrimal glands. This fluid moistens the CONJUNCTIVA and CORNEA.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Contact Lenses: Lenses designed to be worn on the front surface of the eyeball. (UMDNS, 1999)Artificial Organs: Devices intended to replace non-functioning organs. They may be temporary or permanent. Since they are intended always to function as the natural organs they are replacing, they should be differentiated from PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS and specific types of prostheses which, though also replacements for body parts, are frequently cosmetic (EYE, ARTIFICIAL) as well as functional (ARTIFICIAL LIMBS).Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Retina: The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.Photoreceptor Cells: Specialized cells that detect and transduce light. They are classified into two types based on their light reception structure, the ciliary photoreceptors and the rhabdomeric photoreceptors with MICROVILLI. Ciliary photoreceptor cells use OPSINS that activate a PHOSPHODIESTERASE phosphodiesterase cascade. Rhabdomeric photoreceptor cells use opsins that activate a PHOSPHOLIPASE C cascade.Microscopy, Confocal: A light microscopic technique in which only a small spot is illuminated and observed at a time. An image is constructed through point-by-point scanning of the field in this manner. Light sources may be conventional or laser, and fluorescence or transmitted observations are possible.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Alkalies: Usually a hydroxide of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium or cesium, but also the carbonates of these metals, ammonia, and the amines. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Administration, Topical: The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Epithelium: One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.Bowman Membrane: A layer of acellular matrix that lies beneath the CORNEAL EPITHELIUM and above the CORNEAL STROMA. It consists of randomly arranged COLLAGEN fibers in a condensed bed of intercellular substance. It provides stability and strength to the cornea.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Keratomileusis, Laser In Situ: A surgical procedure to correct MYOPIA by CORNEAL STROMA subtraction. It involves the use of a microkeratome to make a lamellar dissection of the CORNEA creating a flap with intact CORNEAL EPITHELIUM. After the flap is lifted, the underlying midstroma is reshaped with an EXCIMER LASER and the flap is returned to its original position.Anterior Eye Segment: The front third of the eyeball that includes the structures between the front surface of the cornea and the front of the VITREOUS BODY.Eye Infections, Fungal: Infection by a variety of fungi, usually through four possible mechanisms: superficial infection producing conjunctivitis, keratitis, or lacrimal obstruction; extension of infection from neighboring structures - skin, paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx; direct introduction during surgery or accidental penetrating trauma; or via the blood or lymphatic routes in patients with underlying mycoses.Collagen: A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).Sclera: The white, opaque, fibrous, outer tunic of the eyeball, covering it entirely excepting the segment covered anteriorly by the cornea. It is essentially avascular but contains apertures for vessels, lymphatics, and nerves. It receives the tendons of insertion of the extraocular muscles and at the corneoscleral junction contains the canal of Schlemm. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Keratitis, Dendritic: A form of herpetic keratitis characterized by the formation of small vesicles which break down and coalesce to form recurring dendritic ulcers, characteristically irregular, linear, branching, and ending in knoblike extremities. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 3d ed)Keratin-12: A type I keratin that is found associated with the KERATIN-3 in the CORNEA and is regarded as a marker for corneal-type epithelial differentiation. Mutations in the gene for keratin-12 have been associated with MEESMANN CORNEAL EPITHELIAL DYSTROPHY.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Cell Count: The number of CELLS of a specific kind, usually measured per unit volume or area of sample.Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A species of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria commonly isolated from clinical specimens (wound, burn, and urinary tract infections). It is also found widely distributed in soil and water. P. aeruginosa is a major agent of nosocomial infection.Fluorophotometry: Measurement of light given off by fluorescein in order to assess the integrity of various ocular barriers. The method is used to investigate the blood-aqueous barrier, blood-retinal barrier, aqueous flow measurements, corneal endothelial permeability, and tear flow dynamics.Aqueous Humor: The clear, watery fluid which fills the anterior and posterior chambers of the eye. It has a refractive index lower than the crystalline lens, which it surrounds, and is involved in the metabolism of the cornea and the crystalline lens. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed, p319)Organ Preservation: The process by which organs are kept viable outside of the organism from which they were removed (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).Corneal Perforation: A puncture or hole through the CORNEAL STROMA resulting from various diseases or trauma.Eye Injuries, Penetrating: Deeply perforating or puncturing type intraocular injuries.Iris: The most anterior portion of the uveal layer, separating the anterior chamber from the posterior. It consists of two layers - the stroma and the pigmented epithelium. Color of the iris depends on the amount of melanin in the stroma on reflection from the pigmented epithelium.Immunoenzyme Techniques: Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Descemet Stripping Endothelial Keratoplasty: A surgical procedure or KERATOPLASTY involving selective stripping and replacement of diseased host DESCEMET MEMBRANE and CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM with a suitable and healthy donor posterior lamella. The advantage to this procedure is that the normal corneal surface of the recipient is retained, thereby avoiding corneal surface incisions and sutures.Mice, Inbred C57BLAnterior Chamber: The space in the eye, filled with aqueous humor, bounded anteriorly by the cornea and a small portion of the sclera and posteriorly by a small portion of the ciliary body, the iris, and that part of the crystalline lens which presents through the pupil. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed, p109)Mitochondrial Membranes: The two lipoprotein layers in the MITOCHONDRION. The outer membrane encloses the entire mitochondrion and contains channels with TRANSPORT PROTEINS to move molecules and ions in and out of the organelle. The inner membrane folds into cristae and contains many ENZYMES important to cell METABOLISM and energy production (MITOCHONDRIAL ATP SYNTHASE).Eye Diseases: Diseases affecting the eye.Intracellular Membranes: Thin structures that encapsulate subcellular structures or ORGANELLES in EUKARYOTIC CELLS. They include a variety of membranes associated with the CELL NUCLEUS; the MITOCHONDRIA; the GOLGI APPARATUS; the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM; LYSOSOMES; PLASTIDS; and VACUOLES.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Onchocerciasis, Ocular: Filarial infection of the eyes transmitted from person to person by bites of Onchocerca volvulus-infected black flies. The microfilariae of Onchocerca are thus deposited beneath the skin. They migrate through various tissues including the eye. Those persons infected have impaired vision and up to 20% are blind. The incidence of eye lesions has been reported to be as high as 30% in Central America and parts of Africa.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Contact Lenses, Hydrophilic: Soft, supple contact lenses made of plastic polymers which interact readily with water molecules. Many types are available, including continuous and extended-wear versions, which are gas-permeable and easily sterilized.Fibrillar Collagens: A family of structurally related collagens that form the characteristic collagen fibril bundles seen in CONNECTIVE TISSUE.Eyelids: Each of the upper and lower folds of SKIN which cover the EYE when closed.Mice, Inbred BALB CMutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Light: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.Cell Membrane Permeability: A quality of cell membranes which permits the passage of solvents and solutes into and out of cells.Pseudomonas Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus PSEUDOMONAS.Fluorescein: A phthalic indicator dye that appears yellow-green in normal tear film and bright green in a more alkaline medium such as the aqueous humor.
The outer layer of the cornea, or epithelium, is a soft, rapidly regrowing layer in contact with the tear film that can ... The deeper layers of the cornea, as opposed to the outer epithelium, are laid down early in life and have very limited ... The outer layer of the cornea is removed prior to the ablation. ... The test maps a patient's cornea for raised areas and surface ... LASEK and PRK permanently change the shape of the anterior central cornea using an excimer laser to ablate (remove by ...
The cornea is a transparent structure that is part of the outer layer of the eye. It refracts light and protects the contents ... A corneal ulcer, or ulcerative keratitis, is an inflammatory condition of the cornea involving loss of its outer layer. It is ... The cornea is about one-half to one millimeter thick in the dog and cat.[1] The trigeminal nerve supplies the cornea via the ... There are four important layers in the dog and cat cornea. The outer layer is the epithelium, which is 25 to 40 micrometers and ...
Fibrous tunic (outer). Sclera. *Episcleral layer. *Schlemm's canal. *Trabecular meshwork. Cornea. *Limbus ...
Inner segment / outer segment layer - inner segments and outer segments of rods and cones. The outer segments contain a highly ... Outer half) Outer nuclear layer (ONL) The photoreceptor cell bodies 9. External limiting membrane (ELM) Made of zonulae ... Photoreceptor outer segments (OS). The photoreceptor outer segments (OS) which contain disks filled with opsin, the molecule ... The neuropil layers are the outer plexiform layer and the inner plexiform layer. In the outer neuropil layer, the rods and ...
Fibrous tunic (outer). Sclera. *Episcleral layer. *Schlemm's canal. *Trabecular meshwork. Cornea. *Limbus ...
Byzov AL, Shura-Bura TM (1986). "Electrical feedback mechanism in the processing of signals in the outer plexiform layer of the ... "Hemichannel-mediated inhibition in the outer retina". Science. 292 (5519): 1178-80. doi:10.1126/science.1060101.. CS1 maint: ... "Lateral interactions in the outer retina". Prog Retin Eye Res. 31 (5): 407-441. doi:10.1016/j.preteyeres.2012.04.003. PMC ...
OFF bipolar cells synapse in the outer layer of the inner plexiform layer of the retina, and ON bipolar cells terminate in the ...
Fibrous tunic (outer). Sclera. *Episcleral layer. *Schlemm's canal. *Trabecular meshwork. Cornea. *Limbus ...
Fibrous tunic (outer). Sclera. *Episcleral layer. *Schlemm's canal. *Trabecular meshwork. Cornea. *Limbus ...
At the outer surface there is a cornea, below which is a pseudocone that acts to further focus the light. The cornea and ... The outer part of the ommatidium is overlaid with a transparent cornea. Each ommatidium is innervated by one axon bundle ( ... pseudocone form the outer ten percent of the length of the ommatidium. The inner 90% of the ommatidium contains 6 to 9 ( ...
The outer layer of the cornea is removed prior to the ablation. A computer system tracks the patient's eye position 60 to 4,000 ... Lenses now have a slight bluish tint which is a thin UV coating; this reduces glare and cornea damage much like a pair of ... A contact lens (also known simply as a contact) is a corrective, cosmetic, or therapeutic lens usually placed on the cornea of ... LASEK and PRK permanently change the shape of the anterior central cornea using an excimer laser to ablate (remove by ...
They also have glands on the eyelids and outer corneal layer that act as protection for the cornea.[53][54] ... Instead of sound passing through the outer ear to the middle ear, whales receive sound through the throat, from which it passes ... When belugas surface, their lens and cornea correct the nearsightedness that results from the refraction of light; they contain ... In whales, and other marine mammals, there is no great difference between the outer and inner environments. ...
They also have glands on the eyelids and outer corneal layer that act as protection for the cornea.[16][25]:505-519 ... Instead of sound passing through the outer ear to the middle ear, whales receive sound through the throat, from which it passes ... When a beluga surfaces, its lenses and corneas correct the nearsightedness that results from the refraction of light; they ... In whales, and other marine mammals, no great difference exists between the outer and inner environments. ...
The outer surface of the cornea is covered with fast-growing, easily regenerated epithelial cells. A specialised form of ... Tight junctions are a pair of trans-membrane protein fused on outer plasma membrane. Adherens junctions are a plaque (protein ... an outer covering of chitin the rigidity of which varies as per its chemical composition. Epithelial tissue rests on a basement ...
The first Purkinje image (P1) is the reflection from the outer surface of the cornea. The second Purkinje image (P2) is the ... The cornea reflection (P1 image) used in this measurement is generally known as glint. The brightness of the Purkinje images ... Light reflected away from the surfaces of the lens can in turn reflect back into the eye from the rear surface of the cornea. ... reflection from the inner surface of the cornea. The third Purkinje image (P3) is the reflection from the outer (anterior) ...
In some people, these abnormal protein fibers can accumulate under the cornea's outer layer-the epithelium. This can cause ... The vision may be blurred, both from any swelling of the cornea and from excess tears. Crusty buildup from excess tears may ... Corneal abrasion is a scratch to the surface of the cornea of the eye. Symptoms include pain, redness, light sensitivity, and a ... In addition, if the cornea becomes excessively dry, it may become more brittle and easily damaged by movement across the ...
A corneal ulcer is an inflammatory condition of the cornea involving loss of its outer layer. It is very common in dogs and is ...
In some people, these abnormal protein fibers can accumulate under the cornea's outer layer-the epithelium. This can cause ... In case of corneal erosion, a doctor may prescribe eye drops and ointments to reduce the friction on the eroded cornea. In some ... They will also gradually converge, giving the cornea a cloudiness that may also reduce vision. The disease is bilateral, ... These erosions alter the cornea's normal curvature, resulting in temporary vision problems, and expose the nerves that line the ...
In the male, the outer layer of the cover scales are long and narrow (250 um x 50 um), 2 um apart, and parallel to the wing ... The 'pupil' of the eye has a sparkle that mimics the natural reflection of the cornea. These eyes are thought to deflect a ... The eyespots are usually dark circles surrounded by a brighter outer layer. ...
In some people, these abnormal protein fibers can accumulate under the cornea's outer layer-the epithelium. This can cause ... Corneal abrasion is a scratch to the surface of the cornea of the eye.[3] Symptoms include pain, redness, light sensitivity, ... Smolin, Gilbert; Foster, Charles Stephen; Azar, Dimitri T.; Dohlman, Claes H. (2005). Smolin and Thoft's The Cornea: Scientific ... The vision may be blurred, both from any swelling of the cornea and from excess tears. Crusty buildup from excess tears may ...
The cornea, the outer covering of the eye, is relative flat and so of low refractive power. In a diurnal bird like the pigeon, ... The outer layer of the eye consists of the transparent cornea at the front, and two layers of sclera - a tough white collagen ... The ratio of refraction by the lens to that by the cornea is 1.6 for the shearwater and 0.4 for the pigeon; the figure for the ... Although the cornea is flat and adapted to swimming underwater, the lens is very strong and can compensate for the reduced ...
The cornea, the outer covering of the eye, is relative flat and so of low refractive power. In a diurnal bird like a pigeon, ... The ratio of refraction by the lens to that by the cornea is 1.6 for the shearwater and 0.4 for the pigeon. The shorter focal ... the reverse is true; the cornea is highly curved and is the principal refractive component. ...
The outer surface of the cornea is covered with fast-growing, easily regenerated epithelial cells. A specialised form of ... Epithelial tissues line the outer surfaces of organs and blood vessels throughout the body, as well as the inner surfaces of ... Tight junctions are a pair of trans-membrane protein fused on outer plasma membrane. Adherens junctions are a plaque (protein ... an outer covering of chitin the rigidity of which varies as per its chemical composition. ...
Corneal ulcer, or ulcerative keratitis, is an inflammatory condition of the cornea involving loss of its outer layer. They are ... Symptoms include eye redness, a yellow or greenish discharge, ulceration of the cornea, pigmented cornea, and blood vessels on ... However, it can lead to keratitis secondary to exposure of the cornea. Ear infections are common in dogs, particularly breeds ... It appears as grayish white lines, circles, or clouding of the cornea. Corneal dystrophy can also have a crystalline appearance ...
... an anatomical line located on the posterior surface of the eye's cornea. an editor of the Jahresberichte für Anatomie und ... which is a circular ridge consisting of collagenous fibers surrounding the outer margin of Descemet's membrane; and "Schwalbe's ...
Pvt Ielias managed to jump clear and landed in a bush of thorns which lacerated his outer cornea. The enemy, numbering around ...
The cornea is formed from a translucent epidermal layer and the slit-shaped pupil forms a hole in the iris and lies just behind ... Each sucker is usually circular and bowl-like and has two distinct parts: an outer shallow cavity called an infundibulum and a ... The skin consists of a thin outer epidermis with mucous cells and sensory cells, and a connective tissue dermis consisting ...
Pat Garber (2006). "Phantoms in the Surf: Ghost Crabs". Ocracoke Wild: A Naturalist's Year on an Outer Banks Island. Parkway ... The eyestalks are large and swollen with the cornea occupying most of the bottom half. The eyestalks exhibit prolongations ( ... The upper margins of the eye sockets slant forwards on the inner half and backwards for the outer half. The edges of the eye ...
Histochemical and electron microscopical preparations identified oxytalan fibres within the outer layers of the nodules. These ... Scrolls of Descemets membrane as unusual giant nodules on the posterior cornea: histochemical and ultrastructural findings. ... Scrolls of Descemets membrane as unusual giant nodules on the posterior cornea: histochemical and ultrastructural findings. ...
Shaare Zedeks Cornea and Outer Eye Unit treats the range of cornea-related problems, including severe dryness in the eye, ... keratoconus (progressive thinning of the cornea), corneal lacerations, pinguecula (yellow bumps), pterygium (growth of fleshy ...
I had a badly scratched cornea in that eye thats still healing from 3 - Answered by a verified Eye Doctor ... I have a pressure feeling on outer corner of eye. ... I have a pressure feeling on outer corner of eye. I had a…. ... I have a pressure feeling on outer corner of eye. I had a badly scratched cornea in that eye thats still healing from 3 yrs ...
The cornea is the protector of the eye, shielding its sensitive parts from damage. Learn how each of its layers has an ... Home , Whats New , The Cornea: The Outer Shell Protector of the Eye ... In many ways, the cornea is to the eye what the shell is to a turtle - the protective shield. Heres how it works, and why its ... When you consider your eyes, you may not immediately think of your cornea-after all, despite the fact that its the outermost ...
Cornea. 1993 May. 12(3):261-5. [Medline]. *. Holland GN. AIDS and ophthalmology: the first quarter century. Am J Ophthalmol. ... The progressive outer retinal necrosis syndrome. A variant of necrotizing herpetic retinopathy in patients with AIDS. ... How is acute retinal necrosis and progressive outer retinal necrosis in HIV infection treated?. Updated: Jun 12, 2019 ... encoded search term (How is acute retinal necrosis and progressive outer retinal necrosis in HIV infection treated?) and How is ...
Outer plexiform layer. *Outer nuclear layer. *External limiting membrane. *Layer of rods and cones ... Stroma of cornea. Vertical section of human cornea from near the margin. (Waldeyer.) Magnified. 1. Epithelium. 2. Anterior ... Light entering the cornea is scattered by each fibril. The arrangement and the diameter of the fibrils is such that scattered ... In corneas we can find two different types of proteoglycans: Chondroitin sulphate/dermatan sulphate (CD/DS) and keratan ...
A. cornea B. lens C. pupil D. iris ... is a transparent outer coating of the eye. ... The ____________ is a transparent outer coating of the eye. A. cornea B. lens C. pupil D. iris. ... The ____________ is a transparent outer coating of the eye. A. cornea B. lens C. pupil D. iris ...
Angles of all histologically assessed mice with high IOP at 6 to 12 months were open (n = 3). Co, cornea; Ir, iris. (K to N) At ... INL, inner nuclear layer; ONL, outer nuclear layer. Scale bars: [(F) and (G)] 500 μm; [(I) and (J)] 50 μm; [(K) and (L)] 100 μm ... Iris strands that attach to the cornea are common in mice (arrow) but are not continuous around the angle and do not block ...
The outer layer of the cornea (of the eye).. Corticosteroid. Any of the steroid hormones produced by the adrenal cortex or ... Swelling of the outer membranes of the eye.. Chemotherapeutic agent. A chemical agent or drug used in the treatment of disease ... Cornea. The transparent part of the coat of the eyeball that covers the iris and pupil and admits light to the interior.. ... Tissue damage (e.g., of the cornea, airway lining, stomach or intestine lining).. ...
A cloudy cornea is a loss of transparency of the cornea. ... The outer surface of the eye appears cloudy.. *You have trouble ... The cornea makes up the front wall of the eye. It is normally clear. It helps focus the light entering the eye. ... Clouding may affect all or part of the cornea. It leads to different amounts of vision loss. You may not have any symptoms in ...
Cornea- The transparent outer layer of the eye. It covers the iris and lens. ... This greatly reduces the chance that immune cells will come in contact with the cornea and recognize it as foreign. For this ... In the case of corneal transplants, tissue typing is not needed because cornea do not have their own blood supply. ... reason, corneas can be transplant from any person, and there is little chance of rejection. ...
The _____ includes the cornea and the sclera.. outer tunic. ____ is the outer transparent covering of the eye. It is primarily ... Cornea. The _____ is the white portion of the eye, which is made of a tough fibrous tissue that is resistant to stretching and ... The outer portion of the eye is covered by two protective flaps (the upper and lower eyelids) comprised of ____, ____, ____, ... This chamber is filled with a watery fluid called "_______." ______ also fills the space between the cornea and the lens to ...
Cornea. The outer, transparent, dome-like structure that covers the iris, pupil, and anterior chamber; part of eyes focusing ... The tough, white, outer layer (coat) of the eyeball; with the cornea, it protects the entire eyeball. ... Damage to the outer parts of the eye, such as, the outer sclera is undesirable because it presents a risk of pain, thinning, or ... Outer treatment zone 1 ranges from about 300 microns to 1.3 mm internal to the outer sclera; as such it generally receives ...
The cornea is the crystal clear (transparent) tissue that covers the front of the eye. It works with the lens of the eye to ... Corneal injury is a wound to the part of the eye known as the cornea. ... Injuries to the cornea are common.. Injuries to the outer surface may be due to:. *Abrasions: Includes scratches or scrapes on ... Corneal injury is a wound to the part of the eye known as the cornea. The cornea is the crystal clear (transparent) tissue that ...
Cornea- Transparent film that covers the iris and pupil.. Iris- Colored part of the eye, which is suspended in aqueous humor ... Sclera- White, outer coating of the eyeball.. Trabeculoplasty- Laser surgery that creates perforations in the trabeculum, to ... If the cornea is not clear during surgery, the surgeon may accidentally sever the iris from the ciliary body or separate the ... Along with that tiny piece of cornea and sclera comes a piece of the iris. The whole area is called the trabeculum. Fluid can ...
The electrode does not penetrate the cornea of the eye but is inserted through the adjacent cuticle and tissue. (C) Top view of ... outer segments of photoreceptors; pl, perikaryal layer of photoreceptors; sp, slime papilla; tr, trunk; vb, vitreous body (= ... Abbreviations: an, antenna; co, cornea; ct, connective tissue; dp, dermal papilla; ey, eye; le, leg; og, optic ganglion cells; ... Abbreviations: at, antennal tract; br, brain; cn, central brain neuropil; cc, connecting cord; co, cornea; de, deutocerebrum; ...
The outer layer of the cornea, or epithelium, is a soft, rapidly regrowing layer in contact with the tear film that can ... The deeper layers of the cornea, as opposed to the outer epithelium, are laid down early in life and have very limited ... The outer layer of the cornea is removed prior to the ablation. ... The test maps a patients cornea for raised areas and surface ... LASEK and PRK permanently change the shape of the anterior central cornea using an excimer laser to ablate (remove by ...
wounds; corner; outer. wounds; conjunctiva (external lining of eye); oozing pus (including cornea) ...
Eyelid surgery: This works by protecting the cornea and outer eyeball from damage. ... If left untreated, the eyelids may fail to close during sleep, resulting in the cornea drying and being damage. If the cornea ... in which the area above the cornea becomes inflamed due abnormal tearing and blinking. ... Cornea and external diseases. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://dro.hs.columbia.edu/slk.htm ...
Two sutures were placed at the 3 oclock and 9 oclock positions of the cornea, respectively. Outer circle: limbus. Inner ... Two sutures were placed at the 3 oclock and 9 oclock positions of the cornea, respectively. Outer circle: limbus. Inner ... Two sutures were placed at the 3 oclock and 9 oclock positions of the cornea, respectively. Outer circle: limbus. Inner ... Two sutures were placed at the 3 oclock and 9 oclock positions of the cornea, respectively. Outer circle: limbus. Inner ...
outer layer of the cornea. Prefix/Suffix (mostly suffix) ectomy (-tomy). excision. ...
What you see: Theres a whitish-colored ring along the outer edge of your cornea. ... That white line is cholesterol lodging in the fine tissues of your corneas. As we age, we all get this a little bit--but ...
An ulcer is damage to the outer layer of the cornea. Untreated, this can erode deeper and if it eats through one of the inner ... Understand what a corneal ulcer is. The cornea is a clear membrane made up of layers in the eye that lets light pass unimpeded ... Another sign is that the normally clear surface of the cornea may take on a cloudy or milky appearance.[4] This might look like ... If a corneal ulcer is present, the smooth surface of the cornea will have a disruption. This may be visible in good light and ...
Corneal ulcers are open sores in the outer layer of the cornea. They are usually caused by infections. To reduce your chances ...
CORNEA-The outer, transparent, domelike structure that covers the iris, pupil, and anterior chamber; part of the eyes focusing ... SCLERA-The tough, white, outer layer (coat) of the eyeball; with the cornea, it protects the entire eyeball. ... and mice with corneas purged of antigenpresenting cells develop a milder keratitis than animals with normal corneas. ... The cornea is the transparent tissue at the front of the eye that serves two specialized functions: it forms a protective ...
  • Rarely, it can present in the eye by a white painless ring around the outer edge of the cornea, called an arcus, which is a buildup of fat particles (not to be confused with an arcus senilis , which affects the elderly and is not necessarily associated with cholesterol). (pacificeyecare.net)
  • Outer retinal pathology may contribute to vascular permeability by release of atRAL, which can act directly on vascular endothelial cells to alter barrier properties and induce cell death. (arvojournals.org)
  • The human cornea is composed of three layers, the outer or epithelial layer, the middle or stromal layer (which comprises about 90% of the total corneal thickness), and the inner or endothelial layer. (sacramentoeyeconsultants.com)
  • Meanwhile, the percentage of medial thickness to outer diameter of the small pulmonary arterioles, right ventricular myocardial cell cross-sectional area and RVHI were also significantly decreased in the operation group compared to sham operation group(all P40.01). (bvsalud.org)
  • The structure of tear film contains three relatively distinct layers with a total thickness ranging from 1.5 to 4.7 microns at the centre over the cornea. (atlasofscience.org)
  • Collection of cream or yellow lipids that contain cholesterol, neutral fats, and glycoproteins deposited on the superficial or deep cornea, commonly in an area of ​​vascularized corneal scars. (notesread.com)
  • Psychiatric variables are signs of lipid-filled macrophages, and outer fornix. (bookzseo.com)
  • According to the Vision Center of Excellence, sleeping with one's eyes open, or nocturnal lagophthalmos, can be caused by a number of factors, including a cone-shaped cornea and prior eye injuries. (reference.com)
  • This may appear as a dark shadow at the outer field of vision. (vrssurgery.com)
  • The symptoms of entropion result from the friction of your eyelashes and outer eyelid against the surface of your eye. (bestonlinemd.com)
  • Symptoms of Herpes Zoster include blisters or lesions on the cornea, fever, and pain from inflamed nerve fibers. (annearundeleyecenter.com)
  • Previously we could show increased numbers and densities of dendritic-like cells (DLCs) in the subbasal nerve plexus of the central cornea in patients with herpetic anterior uveitis (HAU). (statescale.tk)
  • In severe cases, scarring (appearance of a circular structures) is observed within the cornea. (diseasefix.com)
  • Degeneration characterized by peripheral white opacities, affecting the temporal and nasal cornea. (notesread.com)
  • In the SCUBA technique, we keep the donor cornea submerged in a viewing chamber and score the peripheral edge of Descemet's near the trabecular meshwork. (reviewofophthalmology.com)
  • In the interstitium between the genioglossus and hyoglossus muscles, the branches of the lingual nerve (LN) and the medial trunk of the hypoglossal nerve (HN) had a layered disposition of the outer and inner side, respectively, of the lingual artery with its periarterial plexus. (pianolarge.gq)
  • Whatever is happening with your eyes or if you suffer or even suspect that a foreign body has penetrated the outer eye layer better go without delay to the nearest treatment center. (sighteyecaretx.com)