Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Pregnancy Outcome: Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Advance Directives: Declarations by patients, made in advance of a situation in which they may be incompetent to decide about their own care, stating their treatment preferences or authorizing a third party to make decisions for them. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Amnion: The innermost membranous sac that surrounds and protects the developing embryo which is bathed in the AMNIOTIC FLUID. Amnion cells are secretory EPITHELIAL CELLS and contribute to the amniotic fluid.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Advance Care Planning: Discussions with patients and/or their representatives about the goals and desired direction of the patient's care, particularly end-of-life care, in the event that the patient is or becomes incompetent to make decisions.Attitude to Death: Conceptual response of the person to the various aspects of death, which are based on individual psychosocial and cultural experience.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Right to Die: The right of the patient or the patient's representative to make decisions with regard to the patient's dying.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.United StatesAdvance Directive Adherence: Compliance by health personnel or proxies with the stipulations of ADVANCE DIRECTIVES (or similar directives such as RESUSCITATION ORDERS) when patients are unable to direct their own care.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Resuscitation Orders: Instructions issued by a physician pertaining to the institution, continuation, or withdrawal of life support measures. The concept includes policies, laws, statutes, decisions, guidelines, and discussions that may affect the issuance of such orders.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Terminal Care: Medical and nursing care of patients in the terminal stage of an illness.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Glasgow Outcome Scale: A scale that assesses the outcome of serious craniocerebral injuries, based on the level of regained social functioning.Life Support Care: Care provided patients requiring extraordinary therapeutic measures in order to sustain and prolong life.Mental Competency: The ability to understand the nature and effect of the act in which the individual is engaged. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 6th ed).Withholding Treatment: Withholding or withdrawal of a particular treatment or treatments, often (but not necessarily) life-prolonging treatment, from a patient or from a research subject as part of a research protocol. The concept is differentiated from REFUSAL TO TREAT, where the emphasis is on the health professional's or health facility's refusal to treat a patient or group of patients when the patient or the patient's representative requests treatment. Withholding of life-prolonging treatment is usually indexed only with EUTHANASIA, PASSIVE, unless the distinction between withholding and withdrawing treatment, or the issue of withholding palliative rather than curative treatment, is discussed.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Euthanasia, Passive: Failing to prevent death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy by the withdrawal or withholding of life-prolonging treatment.Living Wills: Written, witnessed declarations in which persons request that if they become disabled beyond reasonable expectation of recovery, they be allowed to die rather than be kept alive by extraordinary means. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Paternalism: Interference with the FREEDOM or PERSONAL AUTONOMY of another person, with justifications referring to the promotion of the person's good or the prevention of harm to the person. (from Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, 1995); more generally, not allowing a person to make decisions on his or her own behalf.Patient Outcome AssessmentGreat BritainLongitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Patient Rights: Fundamental claims of patients, as expressed in statutes, declarations, or generally accepted moral principles. (Bioethics Thesaurus) The term is used for discussions of patient rights as a group of many rights, as in a hospital's posting of a list of patient rights.Projective Techniques: Techniques to reveal personality attributes by responses to relatively unstructured or ambiguous stimuli.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Third-Party Consent: Informed consent given by someone other than the patient or research subject.Dissent and Disputes: Differences of opinion or disagreements that may arise, for example, between health professionals and patients or their families, or against a political regime.Euthanasia, Active, Voluntary: Active euthanasia of a patient at the patient's request and/or with the patient's consent.Informed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.Pregnancy Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Patient Advocacy: Promotion and protection of the rights of patients, frequently through a legal process.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Hospital Mortality: A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.Patient Preference: Individual's expression of desirability or value of one course of action, outcome, or selection in contrast to others.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Terminally Ill: Persons with an incurable or irreversible illness at the end stage that will result in death within a short time. (From O'Leary et al., Lexikon: Dictionary of Health Care Terms, Organizations, and Acronyms for the Era of Reform, 1994, p780)Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Persistent Vegetative State: Vegetative state refers to the neurocognitive status of individuals with severe brain damage, in whom physiologic functions (sleep-wake cycles, autonomic control, and breathing) persist, but awareness (including all cognitive function and emotion) is abolished.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Proxy: A person authorized to decide or act for another person, for example, a person having durable power of attorney.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Medical Futility: The absence of a useful purpose or useful result in a diagnostic procedure or therapeutic intervention. The situation of a patient whose condition will not be improved by treatment or instances in which treatment preserves permanent unconsciousness or cannot end dependence on intensive medical care. (From Ann Intern Med 1990 Jun 15;112(12):949)Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.EnglandPatient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Time-to-Pregnancy: Time interval, or number of non-contraceptive menstrual cycles that it takes for a couple to conceive.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Truth Disclosure: Truthful revelation of information, specifically when the information disclosed is likely to be psychologically painful ("bad news") to the recipient (e.g., revelation to a patient or a patient's family of the patient's DIAGNOSIS or PROGNOSIS) or embarrassing to the teller (e.g., revelation of medical errors).Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Suicide, Assisted: Provision (by a physician or other health professional, or by a family member or friend) of support and/or means that gives a patient the power to terminate his or her own life. (from APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed).Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Presumed Consent: An institutional policy of granting authority to health personnel to perform procedures on patients or to remove organs from cadavers for transplantation unless an objection is registered by family members or by the patient prior to death. This also includes emergency care of minors without prior parental consent.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Palliative Care: Care alleviating symptoms without curing the underlying disease. (Stedman, 25th ed)Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Treatment Failure: A measure of the quality of health care by assessment of unsuccessful results of management and procedures used in combating disease, in individual cases or series.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: The artificial substitution of heart and lung action as indicated for HEART ARREST resulting from electric shock, DROWNING, respiratory arrest, or other causes. The two major components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation are artificial ventilation (RESPIRATION, ARTIFICIAL) and closed-chest CARDIAC MASSAGE.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Intensive Care Units: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Patient Care Planning: Usually a written medical and nursing care program designed for a particular patient.Euthanasia, Active: The act or practice of killing for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person or animal from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Tissue and Organ Procurement: The administrative procedures involved with acquiring TISSUES or organs for TRANSPLANTATION through various programs, systems, or organizations. These procedures include obtaining consent from TISSUE DONORS and arranging for transportation of donated tissues and organs, after TISSUE HARVESTING, to HOSPITALS for processing and transplantation.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Fertilization in Vitro: An assisted reproductive technique that includes the direct handling and manipulation of oocytes and sperm to achieve fertilization in vitro.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Data Interpretation, Statistical: Application of statistical procedures to analyze specific observed or assumed facts from a particular study.Refusal to Treat: Refusal of the health professional to initiate or continue treatment of a patient or group of patients. The refusal can be based on any reason. The concept is differentiated from PATIENT REFUSAL OF TREATMENT see TREATMENT REFUSAL which originates with the patient and not the health professional.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Clinical Protocols: Precise and detailed plans for the study of a medical or biomedical problem and/or plans for a regimen of therapy.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Single-Blind Method: A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.Freedom: The rights of individuals to act and make decisions without external constraints.Caregivers: Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.Legal Guardians: A legal concept for individuals who are designated to act on behalf of persons who are considered incapable of acting in their own behalf, e.g., minors and persons found to be not mentally competent.SwitzerlandBelgiumInfertility: Inability to reproduce after a specified period of unprotected intercourse. Reproductive sterility is permanent infertility.Value of Life: The intrinsic moral worth ascribed to a living being. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Physician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Developmental Disabilities: Disorders in which there is a delay in development based on that expected for a given age level or stage of development. These impairments or disabilities originate before age 18, may be expected to continue indefinitely, and constitute a substantial impairment. Biological and nonbiological factors are involved in these disorders. (From American Psychiatric Glossary, 6th ed)Goals: The end-result or objective, which may be specified or required in advance.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Professional-Family Relations: The interactions between the professional person and the family.Neurosurgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.Patient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.Premature Birth: CHILDBIRTH before 37 weeks of PREGNANCY (259 days from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period, or 245 days after FERTILIZATION).Beneficence: The state or quality of being kind, charitable, or beneficial. (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). The ethical principle of BENEFICENCE requires producing net benefit over harm. (Bioethics Thesaurus)GermanyFeasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Tissue Donors: Individuals supplying living tissue, organs, cells, blood or blood components for transfer or transplantation to histocompatible recipients.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Counseling: The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.Glasgow Coma Scale: A scale that assesses the response to stimuli in patients with craniocerebral injuries. The parameters are eye opening, motor response, and verbal response.Child Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological maturing of an individual from birth up to but not including ADOLESCENCE.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Abortion, Spontaneous: Expulsion of the product of FERTILIZATION before completing the term of GESTATION and without deliberate interference.Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary: Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Brain Ischemia: Localized reduction of blood flow to brain tissue due to arterial obstruction or systemic hypoperfusion. This frequently occurs in conjunction with brain hypoxia (HYPOXIA, BRAIN). Prolonged ischemia is associated with BRAIN INFARCTION.Infant, Low Birth Weight: An infant having a birth weight of 2500 gm. (5.5 lb.) or less but INFANT, VERY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT is available for infants having a birth weight of 1500 grams (3.3 lb.) or less.Brain Injuries: Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.Jurisprudence: The science or philosophy of law. Also, the application of the principles of law and justice to health and medicine.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Infertility, Female: Diminished or absent ability of a female to achieve conception.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Neoplasm Recurrence, Local: The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.Birth Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual at BIRTH. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Ethics Committees, Clinical: Hospital or other institutional ethics committees established to consider the ethical dimensions of patient care. Distinguish from ETHICS COMMITTEES, RESEARCH, which are established to monitor the welfare of patients or healthy volunteers participating in research studies.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Internationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Kidney Failure, Chronic: The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.Visual Acuity: Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.Graft Survival: The survival of a graft in a host, the factors responsible for the survival and the changes occurring within the graft during growth in the host.Home Care Services: Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Patient-Centered Care: Design of patient care wherein institutional resources and personnel are organized around patients rather than around specialized departments. (From Hospitals 1993 Feb 5;67(3):14)
  • Reproductive and birth outcomes may be different across geographic areas due to access to care, level of care and a woman's personal and behavioral characteristics, and environmental exposures. (cdc.gov)
  • Understand the geographic distribution and trends in reproductive and birth outcomes. (cdc.gov)
  • Remarkable survey data from the Central Asian nation of Kyrgyzstan enable exploration of differential birth outcomes for women in kidnap-based and other types of marriage using both OLS and IV estimation. (springer.com)
  • Learn about adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes (e.g., miscarriage, fetal death, preterm birth, and low birthweight), and EHIB's activities to address these issues. (ca.gov)
  • After birth, the recommended interval to next pregnancy is at least 18 months and no longer than 60 months in order to reduce the risk of adverse [birth] outcomes," Conde-Agudelo tells WebMD. (webmd.com)
  • A unique study found that sanitation practices such as open defecation are associated with elevated risk of adverse birth outcomes in rural India. (nih.gov)
  • Also, the significance of early treatment of RA in order to optimise long-term outcomes has a relatively short history . (google.com)
  • We have been focussed on the disease processes as surrogates for long term outcomes. (google.com)
  • Outside the perioperative period, the neurosurgical spine literature shows substantial evidence of worse long-term outcomes among smokers, including delayed spine fusion, lower rates of spine fusion, and abnormal bone fusion. (eurekalert.org)
  • In the paper, the Parkinson Study Group CALM Cohort Investigators report on the long-term outcomes of the Comparison of the Agonist Pramipexole With Levodopa on Motor Complications of Parkinson's Disease (CALM-PD trial). (psychcentral.com)
  • For patients with CML, adhering to treatment is associated with the probability of achieving and improving long-term outcomes, including achieving a major molecular response and improved survival. (lls.org)
  • Overall, about 58 percent of patients had so-called spontaneous circulation restored, with a pulse returning for at least 20 minutes during the cardiac arrest, and roughly 18 percent survived until being discharged from the hospital, the authors reported in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes. (yahoo.com)
  • SOURCE: http://bit.ly/1HAB89r Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, online March 24, 2015. (yahoo.com)
  • My colleagues and I hope that more fully investigating how meniscus tears heal will lead to improved clinical outcomes for our patients," said Pepe. (prweb.com)
  • Although intensive glucose control had no benefit on the rate of major cardiovascular events in previous studies, our data suggest that strict glucose control after PCI (heart catheterization) can improve long-term clinical outcomes in diabetic patients," Dr. Joo-Yong Hahn from Samsung Medical Center in Seoul told Reuters Health. (reuters.com)
  • The researchers write that more study is needed before they can conclude strict glucose control after stenting will improve long-term clinical outcomes in people with diabetes. (reuters.com)
  • OBJECTIVE: This study explores the relationships between therapist variables (cognitive behavioral therapy [CBT] competence, and CBT adherence) and clinical outcomes of computer-assisted CBT for anxiety disorders delivered by novice therapists in a primary care setting. (rand.org)
  • RESULTS: Higher CBT competence was associated with better clinical outcomes whereas CBT adherence was not. (rand.org)
  • CONCLUSIONS: Therapist competence was related to improved clinical outcomes when CBT for anxiety disorders was delivered by novice clinicians with technology assistance. (rand.org)
  • Ethnic Networks and Employment Outcomes ," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1202, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London. (repec.org)
  • The Centre for Musculoskeletal Outcomes Research aims to conduct and disseminate research addressing decision-making and outcomes for patients with musculoskeletal disorders. (otago.ac.nz)
  • They include potential outcomes identified (1) in career development theory, (2) the content of career assessment instruments, (3) dependent variables that have been used in research studies of the effects of career guidance services, (4) goal statements specified in descriptions of particular models of career guidance, and (5) what clients say they need from career guidance services. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • The DNP Essentials identifies standard foundational curriculum content and outcomes-based competencies essential for all DNP graduates. (shepherd.edu)
  • A new study published in Seizure gives insight into the short-term outcome of patients treated for status epilepticus in Kuopio University Hospital in Finland. (sciencecodex.com)
  • The Cross-Academy/Section COVID-19 Core Outcome Measure Task Force identified a core set of outcome measures for patients diagnosed with COVID-19, across the continuum of care and in all settings. (apta.org)
  • Mass General's outcomes are exemplary, given the high number of very ill and extremely complex patients we serve, as compared to the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) norms. (massgeneral.org)
  • In the overall group of 980 patients, the risk of all bad outcomes was 25 percent lower with good blood glucose control than with poor blood glucose control. (reuters.com)
  • In the matched comparison, some 37 percent of patients with poor control had bad outcomes (heart attack, stroke, and so on) over the next seven years, versus less than 28 percent of patients with good control. (reuters.com)
  • In patients with PCI there is evidence to support better outcomes and need for fewer interventions," Zaman said by email. (reuters.com)
  • To clarify, we conducted a study of dietary and developmental outcomes in 206 children with DG (case patients) and 144 controls, all of whom were 6 to 12 years old. (aappublications.org)
  • We also tested these same 10 outcomes for possible association with milk exposure in infancy among case patients in the validation set. (aappublications.org)
  • Through our results, we demonstrated that there were no significant differences in outcomes tested between case patients and controls or among case patients as a function of milk exposure in infancy. (aappublications.org)
  • ICHOM is a non-profit organization who works with a variety of stakeholders to define what outcomes matter the most to patients. (jdrf.org)
  • Six of eight psychosocial outcomes were better in the intervention patients than in the comparison group (AHRQ, 2012). (hhs.gov)
  • enhancing care for patients with complex chronic needs and high need, seriously ill patients, reducing administrative burden, and focusing financial rewards on improved health outcomes. (cms.gov)
  • The prognosis (likely outcome of a disease) varies widely in patients with myelofibrosis (MF). (lls.org)
  • A team of researchers at the Westmead Institute for Medical Research, in New South Wales, Australia, has established a technique for helping to improve transplant outcomes for patients with diabetes undergoing islet transplantation. (news-medical.net)
  • Through our work with payers and providers globally, we developed a set of principles to help clinicians and leaders measure the outcomes that really matter to patients. (bcg.com)
  • Porter defines outcomes as "the results of care in terms of patients' health over time. (bcg.com)
  • Developed by leading clinicians, registry leaders, and patients around the world, ICHOM's metrics for major medical conditions focus on the outcomes that matter to patients. (bcg.com)
  • We agree with ICHOM's definition and believe that outcomes must put patients at the center, focusing on what they experience while coping with a health condition. (bcg.com)
  • For this reason, it is important to distinguish between conventional measures and the outcomes that matter to patients. (bcg.com)
  • Patients were assessed at baseline and at 6-, 12-, and 18-month follow-ups on measures of anxiety, depression, and functioning, and an average Reliable Change Index was calculated as a composite measure of outcome. (rand.org)
  • The use of the system with patients in the three disease categories improved both regimen adherence and outcomes. (rwjf.org)
  • The study examined cardiac arrest outcomes for 41,568 patients treated at 252 U.S. hospitals from January 2007 through September 2010. (yahoo.com)
  • The outcomes paradox is one of the terms for the observation that patients with schizophrenia in developing countries benefit much more from therapy than those in Western countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Outcomes research is a branch of public health research, which studies the end results (outcomes) of the structure and processes of the health care system on the health and well-being of patients and populations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Like clinical trials, outcomes research seeks to provide evidence about which interventions work best for which types of patients and under what circumstances. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients also have a significant stake in outcomes research because it facilitates their decision-making, both in deciding what intervention is best for them given their circumstances, and as members of the public who have ultimately to pay for medical services. (wikipedia.org)
  • The framework of the LIS Program curriculum is based on our Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs), which are aligned with the ALA Core Competencies , but also reflect regular feedback from our students, alumni, faculty and other stakeholders, and the curricular components of our strategic plan. (hawaii.edu)
  • An opportunity for Hocking College to focus on this task was provided through its participation in the 21st Century Learning Outcomes Project sponsored by The League for Innovation in the Community College. (jhu.edu)
  • The following year, The League for Innovation invited Hocking College to participate in the League's 21st Century Learning Outcomes Project. (jhu.edu)
  • The goal of the 21st Century Learning Outcomes Project was to increase the capacity of community colleges to define and document the acquisition of critical competencies that learners need to succeed in the workplace, in transfer education, and in today's society (Wilson, Miles, Baker, & Schoenberger, 2000). (jhu.edu)
  • New results from the Whitehall II imaging substudy show that moderate alcohol intake is associated with increased risk of adverse brain outcomes and slightly steeper cognitive decline. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • What are the main learning outcomes for the course? (queensu.ca)
  • The course design model presented below is a useful tool for ensuring that your assessments are aligned with your main learning outcomes and help students demonstrate their achievement of the outcomes. (queensu.ca)
  • To return to the main thrust of this meta element of Theme 5, it is difficult to be definitive about what outcomes policymakers should expect from career guidance services because of the differences in purposes for which policies are written, and the differences in the definitions, language, and meaning of career guidance services within and among nations. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • Until the short-term process measures are validated as surrogates of long-term effects we should also turn our attention to outcomes of disease and the impact of our management on those outcomes [2). (google.com)
  • During World War I, intense efforts to improve the outcomes of care for battle casualties, with careful attention to outcomes led to major advances in orthopedic surgery, plastic surgery, blood transfusion and the prevention of tetanus and gangrene. (wikipedia.org)
  • Methodological challenges to produce evidence on policy outcomes present a significant barrier to mobilising policy actions for health equities. (ijhpm.com)
  • Even more fundamental to policy outcomes is the meaning of career. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • Potential applicants may also be interested in the FOA "Preclinical Research on Model Organisms to Predict Treatment Outcomes for Disorders Associated with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (R01). (nih.gov)
  • Secondary outcomes were delivery before 37 weeks of gestation, shoulder dystocia or birth injury, need for intensive neonatal care, hyperbilirubinemia, and preeclampsia. (nih.gov)
  • Significant associations were also observed for secondary outcomes, although these tended to be weaker. (nih.gov)
  • The core of the seminar's discussions then centered on the link between growth, employment outcomes and inequality in three of the OECD enhanced engagement countries: Brazil, China and India. (oecd.org)
  • Ethnic Networks and Employment Outcomes ," IZA Discussion Papers 3331, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA). (repec.org)
  • Mayo Clinic doctors' experience and integrated team approach results in transplant outcomes that compare favorably with national averages. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Outcomes are important in direct management of individual patient care and for the opportunity they provide the profession in collectively comparing care and determining effectiveness. (apta.org)
  • As part of a constant endeavor to measure the effectiveness of educational programs delivered by National Jewish Health and to share our experiences with others, we place our program outcomes on our website. (nationaljewish.org)
  • Recent advancements in T1D research suggest that other outcomes, in addition to HbA1c, can be used to measure the effectiveness of a T1D therapy. (jdrf.org)
  • The Project ALERT - GTO study assesses the effectiveness of the Project Alert substance use prevention program alone and in combination with implementation support through a system called Getting to Outcomes (GTO). (rand.org)
  • Alumni Analytics helps schools analyze alumni outcomes and helps alumni find out how much they should be earning, resulting in higher response rates and richer data. (payscale.com)
  • In this review, researchers from the University of California San Francisco and Yale University examined the surgical literature and, specifically, the neurosurgical literature to characterize the impact of active smoking on neurosurgical outcomes. (eurekalert.org)
  • Details on the researchers' findings are discussed in "The impact of smoking on neurosurgical outcomes. (eurekalert.org)
  • In their examination of relationships between cigarette smoking and the risks of neurosurgery specifically, the researchers focus on three articles that demonstrate clear adverse effects of smoking on perioperative outcomes and supplement these data with additional information on later post-neurosurgery outcomes in smokers. (eurekalert.org)
  • Adding to the uncertainty, researchers in 2 previous studies in which the question of developmental outcomes in DG was addressed reported seemingly contradictory results. (aappublications.org)
  • Researchers analyzed the health outcomes of 6,400 people who won the lottery and gained Medicaid coverage compared to 5,800 who remained uninsured. (forbes.com)
  • Getting To Outcomes (GTO), a collaboration between researchers at the RAND Corporation and the University of South Carolina, is a toolkit organized around a 10-step process to help communities plan, implement, and evaluate the impact of their programs that attempt to prevent these negative behaviors. (rand.org)
  • CMOR is a multidisciplinary community of researchers and clinicians policy makers and educators dedicated to improving patient health outcomes. (otago.ac.nz)
  • Reproductive and birth outcome data on the Tracking Network are provided by CDC's National Vital Statistics System from local and state vital statistics systems (birth, death, and fetal death records) and the U.S. Census Bureau external icon . (cdc.gov)
  • however, little is known about the relationship between auto accidents and specific fetal outcomes. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • That would overwhelm the medical system, delay care, and lead to worse health outcomes. (forbes.com)
  • Hospitals that have been hesitant to set policies that allow families to be in the room during resuscitation should be encouraged that this didn't lead to worse outcomes or errors," said Dr. Zachary Goldberger, the study's lead author from the University of Washington Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. (yahoo.com)
  • The T1D Outcomes Program Steering Committee believes these outcomes can have an important impact on the way new diabetes treatments and therapies are evaluated. (jdrf.org)
  • The new technologies for the testing and treatment of diabetes in the past few decades have been astounding and are making a major difference in improving the outcomes. (aamc.org)
  • The demand for high-quality diabetes care and improved outcomes is growing. (aamc.org)
  • Better information about the predictors of poorer worker outcomes may allow payors and doctors in Tennessee to better target health care and return-to-work interventions to those most at risk," said Dr. Richard Victor, WCRI's executive director. (prweb.com)
  • These process measurements can be used to monitor adherence to clinical guidelines and help shed light on how different methods lead to different outcomes-some better than others. (bcg.com)
  • CBT competence and CBT adherence were entered as predictors of outcome, after controlling for baseline covariates. (rand.org)
  • There was no effect on categorical diagnostic outcome or formal language measures. (nih.gov)
  • This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) encourages applications from institutions/organizations that propose to develop informative outcome measures for use in clinical trials for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). (nih.gov)
  • Gallup goes beyond these baseline measures, assessing graduates' employment, professions, workplace engagement and well-being, and then connecting these outcomes with key student experiences to help institutions create a rigorous process for continuous improvement. (gallup.com)
  • What Is the PROMISe of Global Outcome Measures? (apta.org)
  • Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are pivotal to assessing and achieving high-quality care. (apta.org)
  • A few tests and outcome measures can help shed light on the chances of a nonsurgical approach leading to success for athletes with ACL injuries. (apta.org)
  • Directness is the extent to which study participants, measures, and outcomes are similar to the population of interest. (medscape.com)
  • Of those currently offering outcomes-based programs, 54 percent tie incentives both to achieving specific outcomes-based measures (i.e., a body-mass index of 25) and improvements in outcomes (i.e., a percentage reduction in body-mass index). (shrm.org)
  • developmental outcomes were assessed in 5 domains, yielding 73 outcome measures for each child. (aappublications.org)
  • We tested the discovery set to order the 73 outcome measures by ascending P values and tested the 10 outcomes with the lowest P values for possible association with DG in the validation set. (aappublications.org)
  • A transparent process that shows the impact of increased public health spending on performance measures related to the health outcomes in subsection (2) of this section is of great value to the state and its residents. (wa.gov)
  • Building on this framework, ICHOM, a nonprofit organization, has defined outcomes as "the results people care about most when seeking treatment, including functional improvement and the ability to live normal, productive lives. (bcg.com)
  • Much like businesses have come to rely on third-party accounting firms to audit their financial health, college and university presidents and boards have come to rely on Gallup -- the world's most trusted research organization -- to measure the vital outcomes that affect the lives of their graduates. (gallup.com)
  • The outcome was assessed at one month after hospital discharge by means of a phone interview and a patient record review. (sciencecodex.com)
  • The payment options test whether delivery of advanced primary care can reduce total cost of care, accommodating practices at multiple stages of readiness to assume accountability for patient outcomes. (cms.gov)
  • More specifically, for a patient with prostate cancer, for instance, the immediate outcomes that matter may be overall survival and progression to metastasis. (bcg.com)
  • When patient cohorts are compared, the baseline reflects differences in patient mix and should be used to adjust outcomes on the basis of risk. (bcg.com)
  • While these metrics may highlight areas of relative weakness or risk, they typically do not reflect patient outcomes. (bcg.com)
  • Lead inter-professional teams in efforts for improving patient and population health outcomes for vulnerable populations. (shepherd.edu)
  • The study, Predictors of Worker Outcomes in Tennessee, found trust in the workplace to be one of the more important predictors that has not been examined before. (prweb.com)
  • Determination of strongest study designs is outcome dependent. (medscape.com)
  • We aimed to describe the clinical features and outcome of human parechovirus (HPeV) encephalitis cases identified by the Australian Childhood Encephalitis (ACE) study. (aappublications.org)
  • Before this study, it was unknown whether children with Duarte galactosemia (DG) were at an increased risk for long-term developmental complications and whether exposure to milk in infancy, including breast milk, might contribute to those outcomes. (aappublications.org)
  • This isn't the first study to poke holes in the supposed link between government health insurance and improved health outcomes. (forbes.com)
  • The study concluded the Medicaid beneficiaries showed "no significant improvements in measured physical health outcomes in the first two years. (forbes.com)
  • The study also lacks specific details about the policies in place at individual hospitals, making it hard to draw conclusions about which provisions might have the biggest impact on outcomes. (yahoo.com)
  • Primary outcomes were birth weight above the 90th percentile for gestational age, primary cesarean delivery, clinically diagnosed neonatal hypoglycemia, and cord-blood serum C-peptide level above the 90th percentile. (nih.gov)
  • Primary Care First rewards participants with additional revenue for taking on limited risk based on easily understood, actionable outcomes. (cms.gov)
  • Nightingale studied death as her primary outcome, recording the cause of death, including wounds, infections, and other causes. (wikipedia.org)