Osteoporotic Fractures: Breaks in bones resulting from low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration characteristic of OSTEOPOROSIS.Fractures, Bone: Breaks in bones.Hip Fractures: Fractures of the FEMUR HEAD; the FEMUR NECK; (FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES); the trochanters; or the inter- or subtrochanteric region. Excludes fractures of the acetabulum and fractures of the femoral shaft below the subtrochanteric region (FEMORAL FRACTURES).Fracture Healing: The physiological restoration of bone tissue and function after a fracture. It includes BONY CALLUS formation and normal replacement of bone tissue.Spinal Fractures: Broken bones in the vertebral column.Osteoporosis: Reduction of bone mass without alteration in the composition of bone, leading to fractures. Primary osteoporosis can be of two major types: postmenopausal osteoporosis (OSTEOPOROSIS, POSTMENOPAUSAL) and age-related or senile osteoporosis.Fractures, Spontaneous: Fractures occurring as a result of disease of a bone or from some undiscoverable cause, and not due to trauma. (Dorland, 27th ed)Femoral Fractures: Fractures of the femur.Fracture Fixation, Internal: The use of internal devices (metal plates, nails, rods, etc.) to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment.Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Fracture Fixation: The use of metallic devices inserted into or through bone to hold a fracture in a set position and alignment while it heals.Fractures, Comminuted: A fracture in which the bone is splintered or crushed. (Dorland, 27th ed)Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal: Metabolic disorder associated with fractures of the femoral neck, vertebrae, and distal forearm. It occurs commonly in women within 15-20 years after menopause, and is caused by factors associated with menopause including estrogen deficiency.Radius FracturesFractures, Compression: Crumbling or smashing of cancellous BONE by forces acting parallel to the long axis of bone. It is applied particularly to vertebral body fractures (SPINAL FRACTURES). (Blauvelt and Nelson, A Manual of Orthopedic Terminology, 1994, p4)Femoral Neck Fractures: Fractures of the short, constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters. It excludes intertrochanteric fractures which are HIP FRACTURES.Rib FracturesFractures, Stress: Fractures due to the strain caused by repetitive exercise. They are thought to arise from a combination of MUSCLE FATIGUE and bone failure, and occur in situations where BONE REMODELING predominates over repair. The most common sites of stress fractures are the METATARSUS; FIBULA; TIBIA; and FEMORAL NECK.Ulna Fractures: Fractures of the larger bone of the forearm.Fracture Fixation, Intramedullary: The use of nails that are inserted into bone cavities in order to keep fractured bones together.Vertebroplasty: Procedures to repair or stabilize vertebral fractures, especially compression fractures accomplished by injecting BONE CEMENTS into the fractured VERTEBRAE.Bone Density Conservation Agents: Agents that inhibit BONE RESORPTION and/or favor BONE MINERALIZATION and BONE REGENERATION. They are used to heal BONE FRACTURES and to treat METABOLIC BONE DISEASES such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Femur Neck: The constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters.Wrist Injuries: Injuries to the wrist or the wrist joint.Skull Fractures: Fractures of the skull which may result from penetrating or nonpenetrating head injuries or rarely BONE DISEASES (see also FRACTURES, SPONTANEOUS). Skull fractures may be classified by location (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, BASILAR), radiographic appearance (e.g., linear), or based upon cranial integrity (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, DEPRESSED).Absorptiometry, Photon: A noninvasive method for assessing BODY COMPOSITION. It is based on the differential absorption of X-RAYS (or GAMMA RAYS) by different tissues such as bone, fat and other soft tissues. The source of (X-ray or gamma-ray) photon beam is generated either from radioisotopes such as GADOLINIUM 153, IODINE 125, or Americanium 241 which emit GAMMA RAYS in the appropriate range; or from an X-ray tube which produces X-RAYS in the desired range. It is primarily used for quantitating BONE MINERAL CONTENT, especially for the diagnosis of OSTEOPOROSIS, and also in measuring BONE MINERALIZATION.Mandibular Fractures: Fractures of the lower jaw.Colles' Fracture: Fracture of the lower end of the radius in which the lower fragment is displaced posteriorly.Accidental Falls: Falls due to slipping or tripping which may result in injury.Tooth Fractures: Break or rupture of a tooth or tooth root.Forearm Injuries: Injuries to the part of the upper limb of the body between the wrist and elbow.Polymethyl Methacrylate: Polymerized methyl methacrylate monomers which are used as sheets, moulding, extrusion powders, surface coating resins, emulsion polymers, fibers, inks, and films (From International Labor Organization, 1983). This material is also used in tooth implants, bone cements, and hard corneal contact lenses.Alendronate: A nonhormonal medication for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis in women. This drug builds healthy bone, restoring some of the bone loss as a result of osteoporosis.Lumbar Vertebrae: VERTEBRAE in the region of the lower BACK below the THORACIC VERTEBRAE and above the SACRAL VERTEBRAE.Hip: The projecting part on each side of the body, formed by the side of the pelvis and the top portion of the femur.Bone Plates: Implantable fracture fixation devices attached to bone fragments with screws to bridge the fracture gap and shield the fracture site from stress as bone heals. (UMDNS, 1999)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Intra-Articular Fractures: Fractures of the articular surface of a bone.Bone Cements: Adhesives used to fix prosthetic devices to bones and to cement bone to bone in difficult fractures. Synthetic resins are commonly used as cements. A mixture of monocalcium phosphate, monohydrate, alpha-tricalcium phosphate, and calcium carbonate with a sodium phosphate solution is also a useful bone paste.Bone Nails: Rods of bone, metal, or other material used for fixation of the fragments or ends of fractured bones.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Diphosphonates: Organic compounds which contain P-C-P bonds, where P stands for phosphonates or phosphonic acids. These compounds affect calcium metabolism. They inhibit ectopic calcification and slow down bone resorption and bone turnover. Technetium complexes of diphosphonates have been used successfully as bone scanning agents.Calcaneus: The largest of the TARSAL BONES which is situated at the lower and back part of the FOOT, forming the HEEL.Kyphoplasty: Procedures to restore vertebrae to their original shape following vertebral compression fractures by inflating a balloon inserted into the vertebrae, followed by removal of the balloon and injection of BONE CEMENTS to fill the cavity.Radius: The outer shorter of the two bones of the FOREARM, lying parallel to the ULNA and partially revolving around it.Spine: The spinal or vertebral column.Orbital Fractures: Fractures of the bones in the orbit, which include parts of the frontal, ethmoidal, lacrimal, and sphenoid bones and the maxilla and zygoma.Bony Callus: The bony deposit formed between and around the broken ends of BONE FRACTURES during normal healing.Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Bone Screws: Specialized devices used in ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY to repair bone fractures.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Thoracic Vertebrae: A group of twelve VERTEBRAE connected to the ribs that support the upper trunk region.Hip Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the hip.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Bone Remodeling: The continuous turnover of BONE MATRIX and mineral that involves first an increase in BONE RESORPTION (osteoclastic activity) and later, reactive BONE FORMATION (osteoblastic activity). The process of bone remodeling takes place in the adult skeleton at discrete foci. The process ensures the mechanical integrity of the skeleton throughout life and plays an important role in calcium HOMEOSTASIS. An imbalance in the regulation of bone remodeling's two contrasting events, bone resorption and bone formation, results in many of the metabolic bone diseases, such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Etidronic Acid: A diphosphonate which affects calcium metabolism. It inhibits ectopic calcification and slows down bone resorption and bone turnover.Periprosthetic Fractures: Fractures around joint replacement prosthetics or implants. They can occur intraoperatively or postoperatively.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Bone Wires: Steel wires, often threaded through the skin, soft tissues, and bone, used to fix broken bones. Kirschner wires or apparatus also includes the application of traction to the healing bones through the wires.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Casts, Surgical: Dressings made of fiberglass, plastic, or bandage impregnated with plaster of paris used for immobilization of various parts of the body in cases of fractures, dislocations, and infected wounds. In comparison with plaster casts, casts made of fiberglass or plastic are lightweight, radiolucent, able to withstand moisture, and less rigid.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Teriparatide: A polypeptide that consists of the 1-34 amino-acid fragment of human PARATHYROID HORMONE, the biologically active N-terminal region. The acetate form is given by intravenous infusion in the differential diagnosis of HYPOPARATHYROIDISM and PSEUDOHYPOPARATHYROIDISM. (Reynolds JEF(Ed): Martindale: The Extra Pharmacopoeia (electronic version). Micromedex, Inc, Englewood, CO, 1995)Diaphyses: The shaft of long bones.Bone Diseases, MetabolicVitamin D: A vitamin that includes both CHOLECALCIFEROLS and ERGOCALCIFEROLS, which have the common effect of preventing or curing RICKETS in animals. It can also be viewed as a hormone since it can be formed in SKIN by action of ULTRAVIOLET RAYS upon the precursors, 7-dehydrocholesterol and ERGOSTEROL, and acts on VITAMIN D RECEPTORS to regulate CALCIUM in opposition to PARATHYROID HORMONE.Maxillary Fractures: Fractures of the upper jaw.External Fixators: External devices which hold wires or pins that are placed through one or both cortices of bone in order to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment. These devices allow easy access to wounds, adjustment during the course of healing, and more functional use of the limbs involved.Zygomatic Fractures: Fractures of the zygoma.Osteophyte: Bony outgrowth usually found around joints and often seen in conditions such as ARTHRITIS.Osteoarthritis, Hip: Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the hip joint which usually appears in late middle or old age. It is characterized by growth or maturational disturbances in the femoral neck and head, as well as acetabular dysplasia. A dominant symptom is pain on weight-bearing or motion.Postmenopause: The physiological period following the MENOPAUSE, the permanent cessation of the menstrual life.Calcium, Dietary: Calcium compounds used as food supplements or in food to supply the body with calcium. Dietary calcium is needed during growth for bone development and for maintenance of skeletal integrity later in life to prevent osteoporosis.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Clavicle: A bone on the ventral side of the shoulder girdle, which in humans is commonly called the collar bone.Raloxifene: A second generation selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) used to prevent osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. It has estrogen agonist effects on bone and cholesterol metabolism but behaves as a complete estrogen antagonist on mammary gland and uterine tissue.Bone Resorption: Bone loss due to osteoclastic activity.Tibia: The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Pubic Bone: A bone that forms the lower and anterior part of each side of the hip bone.Spinal Injuries: Injuries involving the vertebral column.Pelvic Bones: Bones that constitute each half of the pelvic girdle in VERTEBRATES, formed by fusion of the ILIUM; ISCHIUM; and PUBIC BONE.Kyphosis: Deformities of the SPINE characterized by an exaggerated convexity of the vertebral column. The forward bending of the thoracic region usually is more than 40 degrees. This deformity sometimes is called round back or hunchback.Ankle Injuries: Harm or hurt to the ankle or ankle joint usually inflicted by an external source.Internal Fixators: Internal devices used in osteosynthesis to hold the position of the fracture in proper alignment. By applying the principles of biomedical engineering, the surgeon uses metal plates, nails, rods, etc., for the correction of skeletal defects.Multiple Trauma: Multiple physical insults or injuries occurring simultaneously.Densitometry: The measurement of the density of a material by measuring the amount of light or radiation passing through (or absorbed by) the material.Fibula: The bone of the lower leg lateral to and smaller than the tibia. In proportion to its length, it is the most slender of the long bones.United StatesTraction: The pull on a limb or a part thereof. Skin traction (indirect traction) is applied by using a bandage to pull on the skin and fascia where light traction is required. Skeletal traction (direct traction), however, uses pins or wires inserted through bone and is attached to weights, pulleys, and ropes. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed)Estrogen Replacement Therapy: The use of hormonal agents with estrogen-like activity in postmenopausal or other estrogen-deficient women to alleviate effects of hormone deficiency, such as vasomotor symptoms, DYSPAREUNIA, and progressive development of OSTEOPOROSIS. This may also include the use of progestational agents in combination therapy.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.DislocationsPostoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Vitamin D Deficiency: A nutritional condition produced by a deficiency of VITAMIN D in the diet, insufficient production of vitamin D in the skin, inadequate absorption of vitamin D from the diet, or abnormal conversion of vitamin D to its bioactive metabolites. It is manifested clinically as RICKETS in children and OSTEOMALACIA in adults. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1406)Manitoba: A province of Canada, lying between the provinces of Saskatchewan and Ontario. Its capital is Winnipeg. Taking its name from Lake Manitoba, itself named for one of its islands, the name derived from Algonquian Manitou, great spirit. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p724 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p332)Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Carpal Bones: The eight bones of the wrist: SCAPHOID BONE; LUNATE BONE; TRIQUETRUM BONE; PISIFORM BONE; TRAPEZIUM BONE; TRAPEZOID BONE; CAPITATE BONE; and HAMATE BONE.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Compressive Strength: The maximum compression a material can withstand without failure. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p427)Odontoid Process: The toothlike process on the upper surface of the axis, which articulates with the CERVICAL ATLAS above.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Hip Joint: The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.Back Pain: Acute or chronic pain located in the posterior regions of the THORAX; LUMBOSACRAL REGION; or the adjacent regions.Weight-Bearing: The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Frail Elderly: Older adults or aged individuals who are lacking in general strength and are unusually susceptible to disease or to other infirmity.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Parathyroid Hormone: A polypeptide hormone (84 amino acid residues) secreted by the PARATHYROID GLANDS which performs the essential role of maintaining intracellular CALCIUM levels in the body. Parathyroid hormone increases intracellular calcium by promoting the release of CALCIUM from BONE, increases the intestinal absorption of calcium, increases the renal tubular reabsorption of calcium, and increases the renal excretion of phosphates.Hand Strength: Force exerted when gripping or grasping.Elbow Joint: A hinge joint connecting the FOREARM to the ARM.Injury Severity Score: An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.Scaphoid Bone: The bone which is located most lateral in the proximal row of CARPAL BONES.Tarsal Bones: The seven bones which form the tarsus - namely, CALCANEUS; TALUS; cuboid, navicular, and the internal, middle, and external cuneiforms.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Collagen Type I: The most common form of fibrillar collagen. It is a major constituent of bone (BONE AND BONES) and SKIN and consists of a heterotrimer of two alpha1(I) and one alpha2(I) chains.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Jaw Fractures: Fractures of the upper or lower jaw.Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Femur Head: The hemispheric articular surface at the upper extremity of the thigh bone. (Stedman, 26th ed)Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Skull Fracture, Basilar: Fractures which extend through the base of the SKULL, usually involving the PETROUS BONE. Battle's sign (characterized by skin discoloration due to extravasation of blood into the subcutaneous tissue behind the ear and over the mastoid process), CRANIAL NEUROPATHIES, TRAUMATIC; CAROTID-CAVERNOUS SINUS FISTULA; and CEREBROSPINAL FLUID OTORRHEA are relatively frequent sequelae of this condition. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p876)X-Ray Microtomography: X-RAY COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY with resolution in the micrometer range.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Finite Element Analysis: A computer based method of simulating or analyzing the behavior of structures or components.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip: Replacement of the hip joint.Trauma Severity Indices: Systems for assessing, classifying, and coding injuries. These systems are used in medical records, surveillance systems, and state and national registries to aid in the collection and reporting of trauma.Spain: Parliamentary democracy located between France on the northeast and Portugual on the west and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.Fractures, Cartilage: Breaks in CARTILAGE.Foot Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the foot.Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Osteotomy: The surgical cutting of a bone. (Dorland, 28th ed)Accidents, Traffic: Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.Tensile Strength: The maximum stress a material subjected to a stretching load can withstand without tearing. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p2001)Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Orthopedic Fixation Devices: Devices which are used in the treatment of orthopedic injuries and diseases.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Orthopedics: A surgical specialty which utilizes medical, surgical, and physical methods to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the skeletal system, its articulations, and associated structures.Humerus: Bone in humans and primates extending from the SHOULDER JOINT to the ELBOW JOINT.Epidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.Spinal Fusion: Operative immobilization or ankylosis of two or more vertebrae by fusion of the vertebral bodies with a short bone graft or often with diskectomy or laminectomy. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p236; Dorland, 28th ed)Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Ilium: The largest of three bones that make up each half of the pelvic girdle.Great BritainLeg Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the leg.Arm Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the arm.Splints: Rigid or flexible appliances used to maintain in position a displaced or movable part or to keep in place and protect an injured part. (Dorland, 28th ed)Geriatric Assessment: Evaluation of the level of physical, physiological, or mental functioning in the older population group.Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Hong Kong: The former British crown colony located off the southeast coast of China, comprised of Hong Kong Island, Kowloon Peninsula, and New Territories. The three sites were ceded to the British by the Chinese respectively in 1841, 1860, and 1898. Hong Kong reverted to China in July 1997. The name represents the Cantonese pronunciation of the Chinese xianggang, fragrant port, from xiang, perfume and gang, port or harbor, with reference to its currents sweetened by fresh water from a river west of it.Glucocorticoids: A group of CORTICOSTEROIDS that affect carbohydrate metabolism (GLUCONEOGENESIS, liver glycogen deposition, elevation of BLOOD SUGAR), inhibit ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE secretion, and possess pronounced anti-inflammatory activity. They also play a role in fat and protein metabolism, maintenance of arterial blood pressure, alteration of the connective tissue response to injury, reduction in the number of circulating lymphocytes, and functioning of the central nervous system.Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Osteogenesis: The process of bone formation. Histogenesis of bone including ossification.Immobilization: The restriction of the MOVEMENT of whole or part of the body by physical means (RESTRAINT, PHYSICAL) or chemically by ANALGESIA, or the use of TRANQUILIZING AGENTS or NEUROMUSCULAR NONDEPOLARIZING AGENTS. It includes experimental protocols used to evaluate the physiologic effects of immobility.Metacarpal Bones: The five cylindrical bones of the METACARPUS, articulating with the CARPAL BONES proximally and the PHALANGES OF FINGERS distally.Soft Tissue Injuries: Injuries of tissue other than bone. The concept is usually general and does not customarily refer to internal organs or viscera. It is meaningful with reference to regions or organs where soft tissue (muscle, fat, skin) should be differentiated from bones or bone tissue, as "soft tissue injuries of the hand".Talus: The second largest of the TARSAL BONES. It articulates with the TIBIA and FIBULA to form the ANKLE JOINT.Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin: A glycoprotein migrating as a beta-globulin. Its molecular weight, 52,000 or 95,000-115,000, indicates that it exists as a dimer. The protein binds testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, and estradiol in the plasma. Sex hormone-binding protein has the same amino acid sequence as ANDROGEN-BINDING PROTEIN. They differ by their sites of synthesis and post-translational oligosaccharide modifications.Anthropometry: The technique that deals with the measurement of the size, weight, and proportions of the human or other primate body.Spinal Curvatures: Deformities of the SPINE characterized by abnormal bending or flexure in the vertebral column. They may be bending forward (KYPHOSIS), backward (LORDOSIS), or sideway (SCOLIOSIS).Dental Restoration Failure: Inability or inadequacy of a dental restoration or prosthesis to perform as expected.AxisEuropean Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Hemiarthroplasty: A partial joint replacement in which only one surface of the joint is replaced with a PROSTHESIS.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Monteggia's Fracture: Fracture in the proximal half of the shaft of the ulna, with dislocation of the head of the radius.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Walking: An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.Spinal NeoplasmsDental Stress Analysis: The description and measurement of the various factors that produce physical stress upon dental restorations, prostheses, or appliances, materials associated with them, or the natural oral structures.Extravasation of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Materials: The escape of diagnostic or therapeutic material from the vessel into which it is introduced into the surrounding tissue or body cavity.France: A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.Gonadal Steroid Hormones: Steroid hormones produced by the GONADS. They stimulate reproductive organs, germ cell maturation, and the secondary sex characteristics in the males and the females. The major sex steroid hormones include ESTRADIOL; PROGESTERONE; and TESTOSTERONE.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Scapula: Also called the shoulder blade, it is a flat triangular bone, a pair of which form the back part of the shoulder girdle.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Braces: Orthopedic appliances used to support, align, or hold parts of the body in correct position. (Dorland, 28th ed)Radiography: Examination of any part of the body for diagnostic purposes by means of X-RAYS or GAMMA RAYS, recording the image on a sensitized surface (such as photographic film).Equipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.ROC Curve: A graphic means for assessing the ability of a screening test to discriminate between healthy and diseased persons; may also be used in other studies, e.g., distinguishing stimuli responses as to a faint stimuli or nonstimuli.Finger Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the fingers.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.
Barker ME, Blumsohn A (November 2003). "Is vitamin A consumption a risk factor for osteoporotic fracture?". The Proceedings of ... Lips P (January 2003). "Hypervitaminosis A and fractures". The New England Journal of Medicine. 348 (4): 347-9. doi:10.1056/ ... Wick JY (February 2009). "Spontaneous fracture: multiple causes". The Consultant Pharmacist. 24 (2): 100-2, 105-8, 110-2. doi: ... itching Spontaneous fracture Yellow discoloration of the skin (aurantiasis cutis) Uremic pruritus Vision changes Vomiting ...
Study of Osteoporotic Fractures Research Group". The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 73 (1): 118-22. PMID 11124760. ... Other sources estimate up to 1.5 million Americans will have an osteoporotic-related fracture each year. The cost of treating ... Study of Osteoporotic Fractures Research Group". American Journal of Epidemiology. 148 (1): 22-9. doi:10.1093/oxfordjournals. ... In 2010, over 258,000 people aged 65 and older were admitted to the hospital for hip fractures. Incidence of hip fractures is ...
... in those with osteoporotic fractures is only recommended as an option if there is severe ongoing pain from a recent fracture ... August 2009). "A randomized trial of vertebroplasty for osteoporotic spinal fractures". N. Engl. J. Med. 361 (6): 569-79. doi: ... August 2009). "A randomized trial of vertebroplasty for painful osteoporotic vertebral fractures". N. Engl. J. Med. 361 (6): ... September 2010), The Treatment of Symptomatic Osteoporotic Spinal Compression Fractures: Guideline and Evidence Report (PDF), ...
... of cohort studies such as the Study of Osteoporotic Fracture (SOF) and the Osteoporotic Fracture Risk in Older Men (MrOS). She ... Cauley, JA; Chalhoub, D; Kassem, AM; Fuleihan, Gel-H (June 2014). "Geographic and ethnic disparities in osteoporotic fractures ... and fractures: results from the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study". The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 99 ...
Homocysteine levels and the risk of osteoporotic fracture. N Engl J Med 2004;350:2033-41. Vermeer SE, Prins ND, den Heijer T, ... Relation of alleles of the collagen type 11 gene to bone density and the risk of osteoporotic fractures in postmenopausal women ... PLS3 mutations in X-linked osteoporosis with fractures. N Engl J Med. 2013 Oct 17;369(16):1529-36. Jonsson T, et al. Variant of ...
"Homocysteine Levels and the Risk of Osteoporotic Fracture". New England Journal of Medicine. 350 (20): 2033-41. doi:10.1056/ ... Elevated levels of homocysteine have also been linked to increased fractures in elderly persons. Homocysteine auto-oxidizes and ... "Homocysteine as a Predictive Factor for Hip Fracture in Older Persons". New England Journal of Medicine. 350 (20): 2042-9. doi: ...
"Homocysteine levels and the risk of osteoporotic fracture". The New England Journal of Medicine. 350 (20): 2033-41. doi:10.1056 ... and fractures. It is also found to be associated with microalbuminuria which is a strong indicator of the risk of future ... "Homocysteine as a predictive factor for hip fracture in older persons". The New England Journal of Medicine. 350 (20): 2042-9. ...
Other osteoporotic fracturesc. 0.77 (0.69-0.86). 170. 131 WHI = Women's Health Initiative. CEEs = Conjugated estrogens. MPA = ... Hip fracturesEdit. Estrogen prevents the activity of osteoclasts, and improves bone mineral density. Hip fracture is a leading ... Estrogen is the only medical therapy that has been shown to prevent hip fractures in women that are not osteoporotic, with ... The study also found statistically significant decreases in rates of hip fracture and colorectal cancer. "A year after the ...
Risk factors for hip fracture in white women. Study of Osteoporotic Fractures Research Group, N Engl J Med. 1995 Mar 23;332(12 ...
Gage BF, Birman-Deych E, Radford MJ, Nilasena DS, Binder EF (2006). "Risk of osteoporotic fracture in elderly patients taking ... Pilon D, Castilloux AM, Dorais M, LeLorier J (2004). "Oral anticoagulants and the risk of osteoporotic fractures among elderly ... risk of vertebral fracture and rib fracture was increased; other fracture types did not occur more commonly. A 2002 study ... looking at a randomly selected selection of 1523 patients with osteoporotic fracture found no increased exposure to ...
A Not-So-Rare Complication of Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fractures". The Journal of the American Board of Family ... Avascular necrosis of a vertebral body after a vertebral compression fracture is called Kümmel's disease. A variety of methods ... The main risk factors are bone fractures, joint dislocations, alcoholism, and the use of high dose steroids. Other risk factors ... Risk factors include bone fractures, joint dislocations, alcoholism, and the use of high dose steroids. The condition may also ...
"Osteoporosis influences the early period of fracture healing in a rat osteoporotic model". Bone. 28 (1): 80-6. doi:10.1016/ ... to the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis in general as well as studies relating to the healing of osteoporotic fractures ... Both small animals and large animals are used depending on which aspects of the osteoporotic condition are being studied. Such ... The Healing of Osteoporotic Bone Defects Osteoporosis Australia. ...
Raloxifene prevents vertebral fractures in postmenopausal, osteoporotic women and reduces the risk of invasive breast cancer. ... It also appears effective for preventing bone loss and osteoporotic fracture, but it is generally recommended only for women at ... "Alendronate for the primary and secondary prevention of osteoporotic fractures in postmenopausal women". Cochrane Database of ... The bisphosphate drug alendronate may decrease the risk of a fracture, in women that have both bone loss and a previous ...
... is a risk factor for osteoporotic fractures in general, as well as for upper arm fractures. Urge, stress, and mixed ... "A Meta-Analysis of the Association of Fracture Risk and Body Mass Index in Women". Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 29 (1 ...
Single-Site Experience with Radiofrequency-Targeted Vertebral Augmentation for Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fracture". ... As of 2014, the system has been used to treat more than 15,000 spinal fractures worldwide. RF-TVA was first developed by DFINE ... Robertson, Scott C. (2011). "Percutaneous Vertebral Augmentation: StabilitiT A New Delivery System for Vertebral Fractures". ... "Radiofrequency-Targeted Vertebral Augmentation for the Treatment of Vertebral Compression Fractures as a Result of Multiple ...
A meta-analysis study in 2007 assessed whether calcium supplementation can reduce osteoporotic fractures. The meta-analysis ... was used to prevent fracture and osteoporotic bone loss. In total, 63 897 individuals were analysed, most of whom were women (n ... risk reduction in fractures of all types. In trials that reported bone-mineral density as an outcome (23 trials, n=41 419), the ... which in prolonged states can lead to osteoporosis and or bone fractures. Conversely, if there is an adequate level of Ca++ in ...
Barker ME, Blumsohn A (November 2003). "Is vitamin A consumption a risk factor for osteoporotic fracture?". The Proceedings of ... Lips P (January 2003). "Hypervitaminosis A and fractures". The New England Journal of Medicine. 348 (4): 347-9. doi:10.1056/ ... Wick JY (February 2009). "Spontaneous fracture: multiple causes". The Consultant Pharmacist. 24 (2): 100-2, 105-8, 110-2. doi: ... spontaneous bone fractures, altered skeletal development in children, skeletal pain, radiographic changes,[20][23] and bone ...
"Influence of polymorphisms in VDR and COLIA1 genes on the risk of osteoporotic fractures in aged men". Kidney Int Suppl. 63 (85 ... "Meta-analysis of COL1A1 Sp1 polymorphism in relation to bone mineral density and osteoporotic fracture". Bone. 32 (6): 711-7. ... A specific variation at Sp1 binding site is shown to be associated with increased risk of low bone mass and vertebral fracture ... Osteoporosis: Osteoporosis is a condition that makes bones progressively more brittle and prone to fracturing. A particular ...
All these studies have shown that TBS can be used as a clinical risk factor for osteoporotic fracture since it is reversible ( ... biological markers and clinical factors of fracture risk, many not detected patients are at risk and many fractures are not ... "Bone microarchitecture assessed by TBS predicts osteoporotic fractures independent of bone density: The manitoba study". ... Osteoporotic bone is called "porous".[citation needed] The trabecular bone score is a textural parameter that can be applied to ...
"Comparison of the efficacy and safety of 3 treatments for patients with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures: A network ... X-rays are often used to visualize pathology of bones and can be ordered when a vertebral fracture is suspected. CT scans ... Although the majority of vertebral fractures go undiagnosed, the annual cost related to treatment of vertebral fractures is ... Vertebral fractures in children or elderly individuals can be related to the development or health of their spine. The most ...
... there are anti-osteoporotic functional food ingredients that can help decrease the risk of osteoporosis fractures. In terms of ... Symptoms such as fractured hips in the elderly or brittle and weak bones are caused due to fluorine deficiency in the body. ... Thus fluoride therapy results in large increases in bone mineral density but the effect on fracture rates, while positive, is ... "Effect of fluoride treatment on the fracture rate in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis". The New England Journal of ...
... is used in the treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women at high risk of osteoporotic fractures. A significant ... Compared to the placbo group, there was a 61% relative risk reduction of a new vertebral fracture at month 18 for the women in ... To prevent one or more new vertebral fractures, 48 women had to be treated for a median of 18 months for the total population. ... Approximately 19% of patients had a prevalent vertebral fracture at baseline and the mean lumbar T-score of -3.0 in both active ...
... the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures". Statistics in Medicine. 34: 652-663. doi:10.1002/sim.6356. Hou, W.-H.; Chuang, H.-Y.; Lee ... He, X.; Whitmore, G. A.; Loo, G. Y.; Hochberg, M. C.; Lee, M.-L. T. (2015). "A model for time to fracture with a shock stream ...
Study of Osteoporotic Fractures Research Group (May 2005). "Postmenopausal bilateral oophorectomy is not associated with ... Melton, L. J.; Khosla, S.; Malkasian, G. D.; Achenbach, S. J.; Oberg, A. L.; Riggs, B. L. (2003). "Fracture Risk After ... Oophorectomy is associated with an increased risk of osteoporosis and bone fractures.[30][31][32][33][34] A potential risk for ... osteoporosis and bone fractures, decline in psychological well-being,[21] and decline in sexual function. Hormone replacement ...
Currently,[when?] candidates for therapy include those at the highest risk of osteoporotic bone fracture based on bone mineral ... March 2008). "Strontium ranelate reduces the risk of vertebral fractures in patients with osteopenia". J. Bone Miner. Res. 23 ( ... 2.5 at the femoral neck or spine and a 10-year probability of hip fracture ≥3% or a 10-year probability of major osteoporotic ... "FRAX - WHO Fracture Risk Assessment Tool". Retrieved 2010-01-16. "National Osteoporosis Foundation - NOF's Clinician's Guide to ...
Study of Osteoporotic Fractures Research Group". Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 73 (1): 118-22. PMID 11124760.. Unknown parameter ,month=. ... "A high ratio of dietary animal to vegetable protein increases the rate of bone loss and the risk of fracture in postmenopausal ...
Purpose of Review This review examines recent literature regarding the clinical management of fragility fractures, provides ... Management of osteoporotic fractures via a multidisciplinary team reduces secondary fracture incidence and improves overall ... Population-based study of survival after osteoporotic fractures. Am J Epidemiol. 1993;137(9):1001-5.PubMedCrossRefGoogle ... Biomechanical characteristics of osteoporotic fracture healing in ovariectomized rats: a systematic review. PLoS One. 2016;11(4 ...
Jarvinen et al are to be commended for their comprehensive analysis of fragility fracture evaluation in hip fracture prevention ... Fragility Fractures are not always Osteoporotic Fractures. Analysis Too Much Medicine Overdiagnosis of bone fragility in the ... this is that osteoporotic fractures are often thought to be synonymous with fragility (low energy) fractures. Hence there is ... The authors correctly identify that most fragility fractures occur in those who are not osteoporotic. They also note that the ...
A new study in the October issue of Radiology says that a mathematical formula can predict the risk of osteoporotic fractures ... Fracture. A fracture is a condition where the continuity of the bone is lost. Majority of bone fractures occur because of high ... FractureColle s FractureFracture Neck of FemurScreening for OsteoporosisInjuries Related to SportsScaphoid Fracture of The ... Colle s Fracture. Colles fracture or broken wrist is a wrist fracture, which occurs within an inch of the wrist joint. Colles ...
... the distal and proximal femur and the vertebral bodies can predict the development of the major types of osteoporotic fractures ... Adjacent vertebral fractures after percutaneous vertebral augmentation of osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture: a ... Hip and other osteoporotic fractures increase the risk of subsequent fractures in nursing home residents. Osteoporos Int. 2008 ... Vertebral fractures and mortality in older women: a prospective study. Study of Osteoporotic Fractures Research Group. Arch ...
A fracture risk score for osteoporotic women may help clinicians decide how to proceed when multiple-site bone mineral density ... The following predictors of minimal trauma fracture (fractures from a fall from less than standing height, spontaneous fracture ... 26 -- A fracture risk score for osteoporotic women may help clinicians decide how to proceed when multiple-site bone mineral ... The study included 231 women 60 or older who had a minimal traumatic fracture of the hip, spine, humerus or a Colles fracture ( ...
... which renders the bones susceptible to fractures. Bone fracture healing is a complex process consisting of four overlapping ... Role of Medicinal Plants and Natural Products on Osteoporotic Fracture Healing. Mohd Azri Abd Jalil,1,2 Ahmad Nazrun Shuid,1 ... This paper focuses on the use of natural products for treating fracture as a result of osteoporosis and expediting its healing. ... use of natural products in bone fractures means that phytochemicals can be developed as potential therapy for reducing fracture ...
It is estimated that 1 in 3 women and 1 in 5 men over that age of 50 will suffer an osteoporotic fracture. The risk of death in ... New Study Published on Nature Medicine Unveils the Power of AI in Predicting Osteoporotic Fractures English * English ... New Study Published on Nature Medicine Unveils the Power of AI in Predicting Osteoporotic Fractures. News provided by ... The study, titled Automated opportunistic osteoporotic fracture risk assessment using computed tomography scans to aid in FRAX ...
The researchers conclude that womens risk of osteoporotic fractures (as determined by a multiple risk factor algorithm, such ... High osteoporotic fracture risk and CVD risk co-exist in postmenopausal women. [published online ahead of print September 26, ... For Professionals › News And Research › Osteoporosis › The Concurrent Risks of Osteoporotic Fracture and Cardiovasc... ... It is titled, "High osteoporotic fracture risk and CVD risk co-exist in postmenopausal women." The study was published online ...
Common Osteoporotic Fractures. 12/18/2018; 1 minutes. Gina Woods, MD, a board-certified endocrinologist lists the fractures ...
We studied 1918 patients with fractures at these sites identified from the... ... The aim of this study was to examine the pattern of fracture risk following a prior fracture at the spine, shoulder or hip. ... hip fracture after a spine fracture, and hip and spine fractures after a hip fracture. We conclude that the risk of a ... spine or hip fell with time after the first fracture, a fall that was significant for all fractures after a shoulder fracture, ...
... anti-osteoporosis therapies for the prevention of additional fractures in patients who had experienced osteoporotic fractures, ... A National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)-funded analysis of hip fracture patients indicates that publication of the NICE ... Considering only hip fractures, there was a 22% reduction in fractures.. "It is clear that the guidance coupled with the ... Study examines trends related to osteoporotic fractures in England and Wales. Wiley ...
Trials of vertebroplasty for vertebral fractures. [N Engl J Med. 2009]. *Vertebroplasty for osteoporotic fracture? Think twice. ... A randomized trial of vertebroplasty for painful osteoporotic vertebral fractures.. Buchbinder R1, Osborne RH, Ebeling PR, Wark ... Vertebroplasty--are osteoporotic vertebral fractures now excluded from vertebroplasty?]. [Z Orthop Unfall. 2010] ... Vertebroplasty has become a common treatment for painful osteoporotic vertebral fractures, but there is limited evidence to ...
"As the average age of the population increases, the number of fractures attributable to osteoporosis is set to increase ... Osteoporotic fracture treatment. Researchers have developed a mathematic formula to predict a womans risk of osteoporotic ... A total of 231 elderly women who had sustained a low-trauma fracture of the hip, spine, humerus or forearm during a two-year ... Findings of most previous studies indicated that lighter body weight led to increased risk of fracture, due to lower bone mass. ...
Predictions were compared to outcomes of major osteoporotic fractures and hip fractures during 2012-2017 (follow-up period). ... the major osteoporotic fracture CT-based predictor presented better receiver operating characteristic area under curve (AUC), ... of existing computed tomography scans shows the feasibility of an automated process for evaluating osteoporotic fracture risk ... We assessed the feasibility of automatic, opportunistic fracture risk evaluation based on routine abdomen or chest computed ...
Fracture pattern in osteoporotic bone is often similar to fracture in normal, young bone. The quality of osteoporotic bone, ... One method for fracture reduction in comminuted, osteoporotic distal fibula fractures, is as follows: fix the distal aspect of ... In a periprosthetic distal femur fracture, for example, the use of a roll at the fracture site can reduce the fracture and ... Operative Fixation of Osteoporotic Fractures. Julie A. Switzer, M.D. Assistant Professor, University of Minnesota Director of ...
... distance between the C7 plumb line and the center of the fractured vertebra (DSVA) ≥ 60 mm, pelvic incidence outside of the ... and outcomes of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCF). Patients with vertebral compression fractures seen at our ... Factors Predicting the Surgical Risk of Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fractures Fu-Cheng Kao †, Yu-Jui Huang †, Ping-Yeh ... and outcomes of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCF). Patients with vertebral compression fractures seen at our ...
... and folate on the prevalence of asymptomatic osteoporotic vertebral fractures in postmenopausal women. ... Homocysteine, Vitamin B12, and Folate: Do They Affect Osteoporotic Vertebral Fracture Risk?. ... and folate levels are important factors when it comes to the prevalence of asymptomatic osteoporotic vertebral fractures in ... and folate on the prevalence of asymptomatic osteoporotic vertebral fractures (VFs) in postmenopausal women. ...
Osteoporotic Fractures: Breaks in bones resulting from low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration characteristic of ... we analyzed statin use and fracture rates in 4 large prospective studies (the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures, the Fracture ... Osteoporotic Fractures. Subscribe to New Research on Osteoporotic Fractures Breaks in bones resulting from low bone mass and ... Prevent Recurrence of Osteoporotic Fractures) study. ". 09/01/2003 - "The Prevent Recurrence Of Osteoporotic Fractures (PROOF) ...
Pre-existing fractures and bone mass predict vertebral fracture incidence in women. Ann Intern Med 1991; 114: 919-23. ... Meta-analysis of how well measures of bone mineral density predict occurrence of osteoporotic fractures BMJ 1996; 312 :1254 ... Prediction of osteoporotic fractures by postural instability and bone density. BMJ 1993; 307: 1111-5. ... Meta-analysis of how well measures of bone mineral density predict occurrence of osteoporotic fractures. BMJ 1996; 312 doi: ...
Patients with three or more recent fractures are excluded.. *Clinical history verifies that patients fracture occurred in the ... Fractures, Bone. Spinal Fractures. Fractures, Compression. Osteoporotic Fractures. Wounds and Injuries. Spinal Injuries. Back ... Vertebral Compression Fractures Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fractures Acute Vertebral Fractures Procedure: ... A Controlled Trial of Vertebroplasty for Acute Painful Osteoporotic Fractures. The safety and scientific validity of this study ...
The standard care in patients with a painful osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture (VCF) is conservative therapy. ... A Trial of Vertebroplasty for Painful Acute Osteoporotic Vertebral Fractures (VertosIV). This study has been completed. ... A randomised sham controlled trial of vertebroplasty for painful acute osteoporotic vertebral fractures (VERTOS IV). Trials. ... Fractures, Bone. Osteoporosis. Spinal Fractures. Wounds and Injuries. Bone Diseases, Metabolic. Bone Diseases. Musculoskeletal ...
Osteoporosis affects about 200 million subjects in the world and is responsible for 8.9 million fractures each year. The ... Social Impact of Osteoporotic Fractures: Early Diagnosis and Possible Therapies: 10.4018/IJMTIE.2014040104: ... China spent around 1.5 billion of dollars treating hip fracture in 2006. It is estimated that this will rise to 12.5 billion of ... Osteoporotic fractures are a major contributor to medical care costs in many countries of the world (Table 1). The total annual ...
... significantly decreases their risk of suffering a fracture, latest study results suggest. ... Trauma fractures linked with osteoporosis. 29 November, 2007Richard Staines. Fractures caused by major trauma, such as ... less likely to suffer a hip fracture, and 20% less likely to suffer a non-vertebral fracture, than those in the placebo group. ... A nurse-led fracture liaison service has significantly improved the care of patients with osteoporosis at a south east London ...
Osteoporotic fractures, especially hip fractures, are associated with higher mortality rate despite the advances in the ... osteoporotic fracture patients are faced with higher morbidity, subsequent fractures, and mortality. Keywords: osteoporosis; ... Vertebral fracture caused the greatest health burden, but hip fracture patients were the main users of informal care after ... There was an increased risk of a subsequent fracture after a primary fracture compared with the control group, a cohort ...
1 in 3 women and 1 in 5 men globally are at risk of an osteoporotic fracture. The most commonly occurring fractures related to ... Men More at Risk After Suffering Osteoporotic Fracture. Health, Mens Health, Wellness October 20, 2014. 0 RateMDs ... These fractures lead to higher death rates in men when compared to women as data has found that fewer than 20% of men are not ... The number of hip fractures in men in the U.S. is estimated to increase by over 50% from 2010 to 2030 and for women it is ...
  • Notably, the investigators reported increasing fracture risk with increasing body weight after adjustment for bone mineral density, which may be due to increased force applied to the skeleton during a fall. (medpagetoday.com)
  • 1.4 People currently receiving denosumab for the primary or secondary prevention of osteoporotic fragility fractures who do not meet the criteria specified in recommendations 1.1 or 1.2 should have the option to continue treatment until they and their clinician consider it appropriate to stop. (mims.co.uk)
  • Anabolic agents (abaloparatide and teriparatide) are effective adjuvants to fracture repair, and have shown positive results in cases of re-fracture in spite of medical management (i.e., bisphosphonates). (springer.com)
  • The longer bisphosphonates are used, the more the cases of delayed union and the more frequent the development of bilateral fractures following unilateral fractures. (springermedizin.de)
  • Increasing numbers of atypical femoral fractures have been reported among long-term bisphosphonate users. (springermedizin.de)
  • Careful observation is required for contra-lateral femurs due to a high incidence of bilateral atypical femoral fractures. (springermedizin.de)
  • https://doi.org/10.1007/s00402-006-0265-8 (p16) Von der Linden P, Gisep A, Boner V, Windolf M, Appelt A, Suhm N: Biomechanical evaluation of a new augmentation method for enhanced screw fixation in osteoporotic proximal femoral fractures. (uni-ulm.de)