... is a British orthopaedic surgeon and inventor who practises in Birmingham, United Kingdom at the BMI Edgbaston Hospital. Mr. McMinn developed the first successful modern metal-on-metal hip resurfacing and the instrumentation and surgical technique to implant it. Hip resurfacing is a bone-conserving, less invasive alternative to total hip replacement (THR) for young patients, markedly improves the health-related quality of life measures and currently makes up around a tenth of all hip arthroplasty (artificial joint) procedures performed in the United Kingdom. McMinn is also the inventor of several other prostheses for the hip and knee.[citation needed] Derek McMinn is the author of Modern Hip Resurfacing (ISBN 978-1848000872), published in 2009. BIRMINGHAM HIP RESURFACING (BHR) Mr. McMinn first began performing hip resurfacing procedures in 1991 using the McMinn Resurfacing. The rationale behind the procedure was that it would be a bone-conserving alternative to THR for patients with ...
In vertebrate anatomy, hip (or "coxa" in medical terminology) refers to either an anatomical region or a joint. The hip region is located lateral and anterior to the gluteal region (i.e., the buttock), inferior to the iliac crest, and overlying the greater trochanter of the femur, or "thigh bone". In adults, three of the bones of the pelvis have fused into the hip bone or acetabulum which forms part of the hip region. The hip joint, scientifically referred to as the acetabulofemoral joint (art. coxae), is the joint between the femur and acetabulum of the pelvis and its primary function is to support the weight of the body in both static (e.g. standing) and dynamic (e.g. walking or running) postures. The hip joints are the most important part in retaining balance. The pelvic inclination angle, which is the single most important element of human body posture, is mostly adjusted at the hips.[citation needed] Pain of the hip may be the result of numerous causes including nervous, osteoarthritic, ...
R. Cohen (2006). Applications of porous tantalum in total hip arthroplasty. Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 14:646-655 ...
Smart Toe is a memory implant used in arthroplasty procedures to correct hammer toe, claw toe and mallet toe deformities. Available in the U.S. since 2007, the implant provides orthopedics and podiatric surgeons a new treatment option because it corrects the failure and implantation problems associated with K-wires and previous generations of implants, delivering highly positive outcomes with faster healing and few complications.[citation needed] The goal of corrective hammer toe surgery is to straighten and align the afflicted toe, ensuring the bones fuse in the right position. Different procedures to straighten the toe and allow for natural flexibility may involve cutting or re-aligning tendons, re-balancing muscle, and/or removing small portions of bone. When bone is removed, the repaired bones may be: Temporarily fixed in place with a pin or K-wire during healing Fused together with screws or an implant The most common device used in the surgical correction of hammer toes is the K-wire. ...
In the early- to-mid 1980s, there was no established hip hop music industry, as exists in the 2010s, with record labels, record producers, managers and Artists and Repertoire staff. Politicians and businesspeople maligned and ignored the hip hop movement. Most hip hop artists performed in their local communities and recorded in underground scenes. However, in the late 1980s, music industry executives realized that they could capitalize on the success of "gangsta rap." They made a formula that created "a titillating buffet of hypermasculinity and glorified violence." This type of rap was marketed to the new fanbase: white males. They ignored the depictions of a harsh reality to focus on the sex and violence involved.[79] In an article for The Village Voice, Greg Tate argues that the commercialization of hip hop is a negative and pervasive phenomenon, writing that "what we call hiphop is now inseparable from what we call the hip hop industry, in which the nouveau riche and the super-rich employers ...
The acetabular branch is an artery in the hip that arises from the medial circumflex femoral artery opposite the acetabular notch and enters the hip-joint beneath the transverse ligament in company with an articular branch from the obturator artery. It supplies the fat in the bottom of the acetabulum, and is continued along the ligament to the head of the femur. This article incorporates text in the public domain from the 20th edition of Gray's Anatomy (1918 ...
A tingible body macrophage is a type of macrophage predominantly found in germinal centers, containing many phagocytized, apoptotic cells in various states of degradation, referred to as tingible bodies (tingible meaning stainable). Tingible body macrophages contain condensed chromatin fragments. It is thought that they may play a role in downregulating the germinal center reaction by the release of prostaglandins and hence a reduced B-cell induction of IL-2. Macrophages that contain debris from ingested lymphocytes are characteristic of a reactive follicular center in benign reactive lymphadenitis. Other accompanying signs of a benign follicular hyperplasia are well developed germinal centers with dark and light zones, in addition to numerous mitotic figures. Horst Ibelgaufts' COPE: Cytokines & Cells Online Pathfinder Encyclopaedia > tingible body macrophages Retrieved on June 27, 2010 MacLennan I.C.M (1994). "Germinal Centers". Annual Review of Immunology. ...
... (SMZL) is a type of cancer (specifically a lymphoma) made up of B-cells that replace the normal architecture of the white pulp of the spleen. The neoplastic cells are both small lymphocytes and larger, transformed lymphoblasts, and they invade the mantle zone of splenic follicles and erode the marginal zone, ultimately invading the red pulp of the spleen. Frequently, the bone marrow and splenic hilar lymph nodes are involved along with the peripheral blood. The neoplastic cells circulating in the peripheral blood are termed villous lymphocytes due to their characteristic appearance. Under older classification systems, the following names were used: The cell of origin is postulated to be a post-germinal center B-cell with an unknown degree of differentiation. SMZL is a form of cancer known to be associated with Hepatitis C virus infection.[citation needed] Enlargement of the spleen is a requirement for the diagnosis of SMZL and is seen in nearly all people affected ...
ADAM-like, decysin 1 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ADAMDEC1 gene. This encoded protein is thought to be a secreted protein belonging to the disintegrin metalloproteinase family. Its expression is upregulated during the maturation of dendritic cells. This protein may play an important role in dendritic cell function and their interactions with germinal center T cells. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008]. "Entrez Gene: ADAM-like, decysin 1". Retrieved 2014-08-16. Mueller, C. G.; Rissoan, M. C.; Salinas, B; Ait-Yahia, S; Ravel, O; Bridon, J. M.; Briere, F; Lebecque, S; Liu, Y. J. (1997). "Polymerase chain reaction selects a novel disintegrin proteinase from CD40-activated germinal center dendritic cells". The Journal of Experimental Medicine. 186 (5): 655-63. doi:10.1084/jem.186.5.655. PMC 2199019 . PMID 9271581. Bates, E. E.; Fridman, W. H.; Mueller, C. G. (2002). "The ADAMDEC1 (decysin) gene structure: Evolution by duplication in a metalloprotease gene cluster on chromosome 8p12". ...
... , also called CD40 ligand or CD40L, is a protein that is primarily expressed on activated T cells[5] and is a member of the TNF superfamily of molecules. It binds to CD40 (protein) on antigen-presenting cells (APC), which leads to many effects depending on the target cell type. In total CD40L has three binding partners: CD40, α5β1 integrin and αIIbβ3. CD154 acts as a costimulatory molecule and is particularly important on a subset of T cells called T follicular helper cells (TFH cells).[6] On TFH cells, CD154 promotes B cell maturation and function by engaging CD40 on the B cell surface and therefore facilitating cell-cell communication.[7] A defect in this gene results in an inability to undergo immunoglobulin class switching and is associated with hyper IgM syndrome.[8] Absence of CD154 also stops the formation of germinal centers and therefore prohibiting antibody affinity maturation, an important process in the adaptive immune system. ...
... (MCL) is a type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), comprising about 6% of NHL cases. There are only about 15,000 patients presently in the U.S. MCL is a subtype of B-cell lymphoma, due to CD5 positive antigen-naive pregerminal center B-cell within the mantle zone that surrounds normal germinal center follicles. MCL cells generally over-express cyclin D1 due to a t(11:14) chromosomal translocation in the DNA. Specifically, the translocation is at t(11;14)(q13;q32). At diagnosis, patients typically are in their 60s and present to their physician with advanced disease. About half have either fever, night sweats, or unexplained weight loss (over 10% of body weight). Enlarged lymph nodes (for example, a "bump" on the neck, armpits or groin) or splenomegaly are usually present. Bone marrow, liver and GI tract involvement occurs relatively early in the course of the disease. MCL, like most malignancies, results from the acquisition of a combination of (non-inherited) genetic ...
Pratama A، Ramiscal RR، Silva DG، Das SK، Athanasopoulos V، Fitch J، Botelho NK، Chang PP، Hu X، Hogan JJ، Maña P، Bernal D، Korner H، Yu D، Goodnow CC، Cook MC، Vinuesa CG (April 2013). "Roquin-2 shares functions with its paralog Roquin-1 in the repression of mRNAs controlling T follicular helper cells and systemic inflammation". Immunity. 38 (4): 669-80. PMID 23583642. doi:10.1016/j.immuni.2013.01.011. ...
After the process of affinity maturation in germinal centers, plasma cells have an indeterminate lifespan, ranging from days to months. Recently they have been shown to reside for much longer periods in the bone marrow as long-lived plasma cells (LLPC). They secrete high levels of antibodies, ranging from hundreds to thousands of antibodies per second per cell.[5] Unlike their precursors, they cannot switch antibody classes, cannot act as antigen-presenting cells because they no longer display MHC-II, and do not take up antigen because they no longer display significant quantities of immunoglobulin on the cell surface.[4] However, continued exposure to antigen through those low levels of immunoglobulin is important, as it partly determines the cell's lifespan.[4]. The lifespan, class of antibodies produced, and the location that the plasma cell moves to also depends on signals, such as cytokines, received from the T cell during differentiation.[6] Differentiation through a T cell-independent ...

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