Intestine, Small: The portion of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT between the PYLORUS of the STOMACH and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE. It is divisible into three portions: the DUODENUM, the JEJUNUM, and the ILEUM.Intestines: The section of the alimentary canal from the STOMACH to the ANAL CANAL. It includes the LARGE INTESTINE and SMALL INTESTINE.Intestine, Large: A segment of the LOWER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT that includes the CECUM; the COLON; and the RECTUM.Intestinal Mucosa: Lining of the INTESTINES, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. In the SMALL INTESTINE, the mucosa is characterized by a series of folds and abundance of absorptive cells (ENTEROCYTES) with MICROVILLI.Jejunum: The middle portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between DUODENUM and ILEUM. It represents about 2/5 of the remaining portion of the small intestine below duodenum.Organ Transplantation: Transference of an organ between individuals of the same species or between individuals of different species.Tissue and Organ Procurement: The administrative procedures involved with acquiring TISSUES or organs for TRANSPLANTATION through various programs, systems, or organizations. These procedures include obtaining consent from TISSUE DONORS and arranging for transportation of donated tissues and organs, after TISSUE HARVESTING, to HOSPITALS for processing and transplantation.Intestinal Absorption: Uptake of substances through the lining of the INTESTINES.Ileum: The distal and narrowest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between the JEJUNUM and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE.Organ Specificity: Characteristic restricted to a particular organ of the body, such as a cell type, metabolic response or expression of a particular protein or antigen.Organ Size: The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.Multiple Organ Failure: A progressive condition usually characterized by combined failure of several organs such as the lungs, liver, kidney, along with some clotting mechanisms, usually postinjury or postoperative.Duodenum: The shortest and widest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE adjacent to the PYLORUS of the STOMACH. It is named for having the length equal to about the width of 12 fingers.Organ of Corti: The spiral EPITHELIUM containing sensory AUDITORY HAIR CELLS and supporting cells in the cochlea. Organ of Corti, situated on the BASILAR MEMBRANE and overlaid by a gelatinous TECTORIAL MEMBRANE, converts sound-induced mechanical waves to neural impulses to the brain.Colon: The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between the CECUM and the RECTUM. It includes the ASCENDING COLON; the TRANSVERSE COLON; the DESCENDING COLON; and the SIGMOID COLON.Digestive System: A group of organs stretching from the MOUTH to the ANUS, serving to breakdown foods, assimilate nutrients, and eliminate waste. In humans, the digestive system includes the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT and the accessory glands (LIVER; BILIARY TRACT; PANCREAS).Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Intestinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the INTESTINES.Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Microvilli: Minute projections of cell membranes which greatly increase the surface area of the cell.Intestinal Diseases: Pathological processes in any segment of the INTESTINE from DUODENUM to RECTUM.Enterocytes: Absorptive cells in the lining of the INTESTINAL MUCOSA. They are differentiated EPITHELIAL CELLS with apical MICROVILLI facing the intestinal lumen. Enterocytes are more abundant in the SMALL INTESTINE than in the LARGE INTESTINE. Their microvilli greatly increase the luminal surface area of the cell by 14- to 40 fold.Cecum: The blind sac or outpouching area of the LARGE INTESTINE that is below the entrance of the SMALL INTESTINE. It has a worm-like extension, the vermiform APPENDIX.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Mice, Inbred C57BLMolecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Stomach: An organ of digestion situated in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen between the termination of the ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of the DUODENUM.Germ-Free Life: Animals not contaminated by or associated with any foreign organisms.Vomeronasal Organ: An accessory chemoreceptor organ that is separated from the main OLFACTORY MUCOSA. It is situated at the base of nasal septum close to the VOMER and NASAL BONES. It forwards chemical signals (such as PHEROMONES) to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, thus influencing reproductive and social behavior. In humans, most of its structures except the vomeronasal duct undergo regression after birth.Epithelium: One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.Gastrointestinal Motility: The motor activity of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Subfornical Organ: A structure, situated close to the intraventricular foramen, which induces DRINKING BEHAVIOR after stimulation with ANGIOTENSIN II.Serous Membrane: A thin lining of closed cavities of the body, consisting of a single layer of squamous epithelial cells (MESOTHELIUM) resting on a thin layer of CONNECTIVE TISSUE, and covered with secreted clear fluid from blood and lymph vessels. Major serous membranes in the body include PERICARDIUM; PERITONEUM; and PLEURA.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Gastrointestinal Tract: Generally refers to the digestive structures stretching from the MOUTH to ANUS, but does not include the accessory glandular organs (LIVER; BILIARY TRACT; PANCREAS).Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Caco-2 Cells: Human colonic ADENOCARCINOMA cells that are able to express differentiation features characteristic of mature intestinal cells, such as ENTEROCYTES. These cells are valuable in vitro tools for studies related to intestinal cell function and differentiation.Pelvic Organ Prolapse: Abnormal descent of a pelvic organ resulting in the protrusion of the organ beyond its normal anatomical confines. Symptoms often include vaginal discomfort, DYSPAREUNIA; URINARY STRESS INCONTINENCE; and FECAL INCONTINENCE.Tissue Donors: Individuals supplying living tissue, organs, cells, blood or blood components for transfer or transplantation to histocompatible recipients.Enteritis: Inflammation of any segment of the SMALL INTESTINE.Intestinal Secretions: Fluids originating from the epithelial lining of the intestines, adjoining exocrine glands and from organs such as the liver, which empty into the cavity of the intestines.Paneth Cells: Differentiated epithelial cells of the INTESTINAL MUCOSA, found in the basal part of the intestinal crypts of Lieberkuhn. Paneth cells secrete GROWTH FACTORS, digestive enzymes such as LYSOZYME and antimicrobial peptides such as cryptdins (ALPHA-DEFENSINS) into the crypt lumen.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Animals, Suckling: Young, unweaned mammals. Refers to nursing animals whether nourished by their biological mother, foster mother, or bottle fed.SucraseAmino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Digestive System Physiological Phenomena: Properties and processes of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM as a whole or of any of its parts.Gastrointestinal Contents: The contents included in all or any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Epithelial Cells: Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.Myenteric Plexus: One of two ganglionated neural networks which together form the ENTERIC NERVOUS SYSTEM. The myenteric (Auerbach's) plexus is located between the longitudinal and circular muscle layers of the gut. Its neurons project to the circular muscle, to other myenteric ganglia, to submucosal ganglia, or directly to the epithelium, and play an important role in regulating and patterning gut motility. (From FASEB J 1989;3:127-38)Animals, Newborn: Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.Spleen: An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.DisaccharidasesLymphoid Tissue: Specialized tissues that are components of the lymphatic system. They provide fixed locations within the body where a variety of LYMPHOCYTES can form, mature and multiply. The lymphoid tissues are connected by a network of LYMPHATIC VESSELS.Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Mesentery: A layer of the peritoneum which attaches the abdominal viscera to the ABDOMINAL WALL and conveys their blood vessels and nerves.Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.Enteric Nervous System: Two ganglionated neural plexuses in the gut wall which form one of the three major divisions of the autonomic nervous system. The enteric nervous system innervates the gastrointestinal tract, the pancreas, and the gallbladder. It contains sensory neurons, interneurons, and motor neurons. Thus the circuitry can autonomously sense the tension and the chemical environment in the gut and regulate blood vessel tone, motility, secretions, and fluid transport. The system is itself governed by the central nervous system and receives both parasympathetic and sympathetic innervation. (From Kandel, Schwartz, and Jessel, Principles of Neural Science, 3d ed, p766)Gastrointestinal Transit: Passage of food (sometimes in the form of a test meal) through the gastrointestinal tract as measured in minutes or hours. The rate of passage through the intestine is an indicator of small bowel function.Peyer's Patches: Lymphoid tissue on the mucosa of the small intestine.Digestion: The process of breakdown of food for metabolism and use by the body.Mice, Inbred BALB CTissue and Organ Harvesting: The procedure of removing TISSUES, organs, or specimens from DONORS for reuse, such as TRANSPLANTATION.In Situ Hybridization: A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Brain Death: A state of prolonged irreversible cessation of all brain activity, including lower brain stem function with the complete absence of voluntary movements, responses to stimuli, brain stem reflexes, and spontaneous respirations. Reversible conditions which mimic this clinical state (e.g., sedative overdose, hypothermia, etc.) are excluded prior to making the determination of brain death. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp348-9)Pancreas: A nodular organ in the ABDOMEN that contains a mixture of ENDOCRINE GLANDS and EXOCRINE GLANDS. The small endocrine portion consists of the ISLETS OF LANGERHANS secreting a number of hormones into the blood stream. The large exocrine portion (EXOCRINE PANCREAS) is a compound acinar gland that secretes several digestive enzymes into the pancreatic ductal system that empties into the DUODENUM.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Gastrointestinal Hormones: HORMONES secreted by the gastrointestinal mucosa that affect the timing or the quality of secretion of digestive enzymes, and regulate the motor activity of the digestive system organs.Animal Structures: Organs and other anatomical structures of non-human vertebrate and invertebrate animals.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Viscera: Any of the large interior organs in any one of the three great cavities of the body, especially in the abdomen.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Muscle, Smooth: Unstriated and unstriped muscle, one of the muscles of the internal organs, blood vessels, hair follicles, etc. Contractile elements are elongated, usually spindle-shaped cells with centrally located nuclei. Smooth muscle fibers are bound together into sheets or bundles by reticular fibers and frequently elastic nets are also abundant. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Jejunal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer in the JEJUNUM region of the small intestine (INTESTINE, SMALL).Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Fetus: The unborn young of a viviparous mammal, in the postembryonic period, after the major structures have been outlined. In humans, the unborn young from the end of the eighth week after CONCEPTION until BIRTH, as distinguished from the earlier EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Guinea Pigs: A common name used for the genus Cavia. The most common species is Cavia porcellus which is the domesticated guinea pig used for pets and biomedical research.Enamel Organ: Epithelial cells surrounding the dental papilla and differentiated into three layers: the inner enamel epithelium, consisting of ameloblasts which eventually form the enamel, and the enamel pulp and external enamel epithelium, both of which atrophy and disappear before and upon eruption of the tooth, respectively.Ileal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer in the ILEUM region of the small intestine (INTESTINE, SMALL).Peristalsis: A movement, caused by sequential muscle contraction, that pushes the contents of the intestines or other tubular organs in one direction.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Chickens: Common name for the species Gallus gallus, the domestic fowl, in the family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. It is descended from the red jungle fowl of SOUTHEAST ASIA.DNA, Complementary: Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.Mice, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations, or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. All animals within an inbred strain trace back to a common ancestor in the twentieth generation.Enteroendocrine Cells: Cells found throughout the lining of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT that contain and secrete regulatory PEPTIDE HORMONES and/or BIOGENIC AMINES.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Submucous Plexus: One of two ganglionated neural networks which together form the enteric nervous system. The submucous (Meissner's) plexus is in the connective tissue of the submucosa. Its neurons innervate the epithelium, blood vessels, endocrine cells, other submucosal ganglia, and myenteric ganglia, and play an important role in regulating ion and water transport. (From FASEB J 1989;3:127-38)Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Sodium-Glucose Transporter 1: The founding member of the sodium glucose transport proteins. It is predominately expressed in the INTESTINAL MUCOSA of the SMALL INTESTINE.Perfusion: Treatment process involving the injection of fluid into an organ or tissue.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Bile: An emulsifying agent produced in the LIVER and secreted into the DUODENUM. Its composition includes BILE ACIDS AND SALTS; CHOLESTEROL; and ELECTROLYTES. It aids DIGESTION of fats in the duodenum.Organogenesis: Formation of differentiated cells and complicated tissue organization to provide specialized functions.Bile Acids and Salts: Steroid acids and salts. The primary bile acids are derived from cholesterol in the liver and usually conjugated with glycine or taurine. The secondary bile acids are further modified by bacteria in the intestine. They play an important role in the digestion and absorption of fat. They have also been used pharmacologically, especially in the treatment of gallstones.Glucose Transporter Type 5: A hexose transporter that mediates FRUCTOSE transport in SKELETAL MUSCLE and ADIPOCYTES and is responsible for luminal uptake of dietary fructose in the SMALL INTESTINE.Immunity, Mucosal: Nonsusceptibility to the pathogenic effects of foreign microorganisms or antigenic substances as a result of antibody secretions of the mucous membranes. Mucosal epithelia in the gastrointestinal, respiratory, and reproductive tracts produce a form of IgA (IMMUNOGLOBULIN A, SECRETORY) that serves to protect these ports of entry into the body.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Mucins: High molecular weight mucoproteins that protect the surface of EPITHELIAL CELLS by providing a barrier to particulate matter and microorganisms. Membrane-anchored mucins may have additional roles concerned with protein interactions at the cell surface.Animal Feed: Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.Goblet Cells: A glandular epithelial cell or a unicellular gland. Goblet cells secrete MUCUS. They are scattered in the epithelial linings of many organs, especially the SMALL INTESTINE and the RESPIRATORY TRACT.Lymph: The interstitial fluid that is in the LYMPHATIC SYSTEM.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Myoelectric Complex, Migrating: A pattern of gastrointestinal muscle contraction and depolarizing myoelectric activity that moves from the stomach to the ILEOCECAL VALVE at regular frequency during the interdigestive period. The complex and its accompanying motor activity periodically cleanse the bowel of interdigestive secretion and debris in preparation for the next meal.Reperfusion Injury: Adverse functional, metabolic, or structural changes in ischemic tissues resulting from the restoration of blood flow to the tissue (REPERFUSION), including swelling; HEMORRHAGE; NECROSIS; and damage from FREE RADICALS. The most common instance is MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.Histocytochemistry: Study of intracellular distribution of chemicals, reaction sites, enzymes, etc., by means of staining reactions, radioactive isotope uptake, selective metal distribution in electron microscopy, or other methods.Trichinellosis: An infection with TRICHINELLA. It is caused by eating raw or undercooked meat that is infected with larvae of nematode worms TRICHINELLA genus. All members of the TRICHINELLA genus can infect human in addition to TRICHINELLA SPIRALIS, the traditional etiological agent. It is distributed throughout much of the world and is re-emerging in some parts as a public health hazard and a food safety problem.Homeostasis: The processes whereby the internal environment of an organism tends to remain balanced and stable.PhlorhizinPolymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Glucose: A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.Absorption: The physical or physiological processes by which substances, tissue, cells, etc. take up or take in other substances or energy.Intestinal Polyps: Discrete abnormal tissue masses that protrude into the lumen of the INTESTINE. A polyp is attached to the intestinal wall either by a stalk, pedunculus, or by a broad base.Subcommissural Organ: Ependymal derivative located at the junction of the THIRD VENTRICLE and the CEREBRAL AQUEDUCT; and the SOMATOSTATIN SECRETING CELLS.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Lymph Nodes: They are oval or bean shaped bodies (1 - 30 mm in diameter) located along the lymphatic system.Sodium: A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.Organs at Risk: Organs which might be damaged during exposure to a toxin or to some form of therapy. It most frequently refers to healthy organs located in the radiation field during radiation therapy.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Starch: Any of a group of polysaccharides of the general formula (C6-H10-O5)n, composed of a long-chain polymer of glucose in the form of amylose and amylopectin. It is the chief storage form of energy reserve (carbohydrates) in plants.Blotting, Northern: Detection of RNA that has been electrophoretically separated and immobilized by blotting on nitrocellulose or other type of paper or nylon membrane followed by hybridization with labeled NUCLEIC ACID PROBES.Sucrase-Isomaltase Complex: An enzyme complex found in the brush border membranes of the small intestine. It is believed to be an enzyme complex with different catalytic sites. Its absence is manifested by an inherited disease called sucrase-isomaltase deficiency.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Transplants: Organs, tissues, or cells taken from the body for grafting into another area of the same body or into another individual.Receptors, CCR: Chemokine receptors that are specific for CC CHEMOKINES.Biological Transport, Active: The movement of materials across cell membranes and epithelial layers against an electrochemical gradient, requiring the expenditure of metabolic energy.Interstitial Cells of Cajal: c-Kit positive cells related to SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS that are intercalated between the autonomic nerves and the effector smooth muscle cells of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT. Different phenotypic classes play roles as pacemakers, mediators of neural inputs, and mechanosensors.Cholecystokinin: A peptide, of about 33 amino acids, secreted by the upper INTESTINAL MUCOSA and also found in the central nervous system. It causes gallbladder contraction, release of pancreatic exocrine (or digestive) enzymes, and affects other gastrointestinal functions. Cholecystokinin may be the mediator of satiety.Symporters: Membrane transporters that co-transport two or more dissimilar molecules in the same direction across a membrane. Usually the transport of one ion or molecule is against its electrochemical gradient and is "powered" by the movement of another ion or molecule with its electrochemical gradient.Intestinal Obstruction: Any impairment, arrest, or reversal of the normal flow of INTESTINAL CONTENTS toward the ANAL CANAL.Alkaline Phosphatase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of an orthophosphoric monoester and water to an alcohol and orthophosphate. EC 3.1.3.1.Colitis: Inflammation of the COLON section of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE), usually with symptoms such as DIARRHEA (often with blood and mucus), ABDOMINAL PAIN, and FEVER.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Thymus Gland: A single, unpaired primary lymphoid organ situated in the MEDIASTINUM, extending superiorly into the neck to the lower edge of the THYROID GLAND and inferiorly to the fourth costal cartilage. It is necessary for normal development of immunologic function early in life. By puberty, it begins to involute and much of the tissue is replaced by fat.Jejunal Diseases: Pathological development in the JEJUNUM region of the SMALL INTESTINE.Transplantation: Transference of a tissue or organ from either an alive or deceased donor, within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Morphogenesis: The development of anatomical structures to create the form of a single- or multi-cell organism. Morphogenesis provides form changes of a part, parts, or the whole organism.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Celiac Disease: A malabsorption syndrome that is precipitated by the ingestion of foods containing GLUTEN, such as wheat, rye, and barley. It is characterized by INFLAMMATION of the SMALL INTESTINE, loss of MICROVILLI structure, failed INTESTINAL ABSORPTION, and MALNUTRITION.Mucus: The viscous secretion of mucous membranes. It contains mucin, white blood cells, water, inorganic salts, and exfoliated cells.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.Biological Availability: The extent to which the active ingredient of a drug dosage form becomes available at the site of drug action or in a biological medium believed to reflect accessibility to a site of action.Microsomes: Artifactual vesicles formed from the endoplasmic reticulum when cells are disrupted. They are isolated by differential centrifugation and are composed of three structural features: rough vesicles, smooth vesicles, and ribosomes. Numerous enzyme activities are associated with the microsomal fraction. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990; from Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)Lactase-Phlorizin Hydrolase: The multifunctional protein that contains two enzyme domains. The first domain (EC 3.2.1.62) hydrolyzes glycosyl-N-acylsphingosine to a sugar and N-acylsphingosine. The second domain (EC 3.2.1.108) hydrolyzes LACTOSE and is found in the intestinal brush border membrane. Loss of activity for this enzyme in humans results in LACTOSE INTOLERANCE.Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Intubation, Gastrointestinal: The insertion of a tube into the stomach, intestines, or other portion of the gastrointestinal tract to allow for the passage of food products, etc.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Ileitis: Inflammation of any segment of the ILEUM and the ILEOCECAL VALVE.Liver Transplantation: The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.Mucin-2: A gel-forming mucin found predominantly in SMALL INTESTINE and variety of mucous membrane-containing organs. It provides a protective, lubricating barrier against particles and infectious agents.Enterocolitis, Necrotizing: ENTEROCOLITIS with extensive ulceration (ULCER) and NECROSIS. It is observed primarily in LOW BIRTH WEIGHT INFANT.Models, Animal: Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Weaning: Permanent deprivation of breast milk and commencement of nourishment with other food. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Inflammation: A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Lactase: An enzyme which catalyzes the hydrolysis of LACTOSE to D-GALACTOSE and D-GLUCOSE. Defects in the enzyme cause LACTOSE INTOLERANCE.Amino Acids: Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.Glucagon-Like Peptide 2: A 33-amino acid peptide derived from the C-terminal of PROGLUCAGON and mainly produced by the INTESTINAL L CELLS. It stimulates intestinal mucosal growth and decreased apoptosis of ENTEROCYTES. GLP-2 enhances gastrointestinal function and plays an important role in nutrient homeostasis.Radiation Dosage: The amount of radiation energy that is deposited in a unit mass of material, such as tissues of plants or animal. In RADIOTHERAPY, radiation dosage is expressed in gray units (Gy). In RADIOLOGIC HEALTH, the dosage is expressed by the product of absorbed dose (Gy) and quality factor (a function of linear energy transfer), and is called radiation dose equivalent in sievert units (Sv).Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Immunoglobulin A: Represents 15-20% of the human serum immunoglobulins, mostly as the 4-chain polymer in humans or dimer in other mammals. Secretory IgA (IMMUNOGLOBULIN A, SECRETORY) is the main immunoglobulin in secretions.Swine Diseases: Diseases of domestic swine and of the wild boar of the genus Sus.Eating: The consumption of edible substances.Mice, Mutant Strains: Mice bearing mutant genes which are phenotypically expressed in the animals.Trematode Infections: Infections caused by infestation with worms of the class Trematoda.Stem Cells: Relatively undifferentiated cells that retain the ability to divide and proliferate throughout postnatal life to provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.Natriuretic Peptides: Peptides that regulate the WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE in the body, also known as natriuretic peptide hormones. Several have been sequenced (ATRIAL NATRIURETIC FACTOR; BRAIN NATRIURETIC PEPTIDE; C-TYPE NATRIURETIC PEPTIDE).Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Presumed Consent: An institutional policy of granting authority to health personnel to perform procedures on patients or to remove organs from cadavers for transplantation unless an objection is registered by family members or by the patient prior to death. This also includes emergency care of minors without prior parental consent.Mice, Inbred ICR
1985). "The digestive organs of the finless porpoise Neophocaena asiaeorientalis. II. Intestines, liver and pancreas". Acta ... 1984). "The digestive organs of the finless porpoise (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis). I. Tongue, oesophagus and stomach". Acta ... The stomach has three chambers, with no caecum, and no distinct difference between the small and large intestines. Sexual ...
reconnection of organs, tissues, etc., particularly if severed. Resection of organs such as intestines involves reconnection. ... By body part: When surgery is performed on one organ system or structure, it may be classed by the organ, organ system or ... Resection is the removal of all of an internal organ or body part, or a key part (lung lobe; liver quadrant) of such an organ ... This work may involve: excision - cutting out an organ, tumor, or other tissue. resection - partial removal of an organ or ...
RHD causes rapid development of blood clot formation in major organs such as the heart, lungs and kidneys. The clots block ... Enteritis of the small intestine and swollen meninges may also occur. Laboratory tests such as reverse transcription polymerase ... Haemorrhages will also be seen many other organs and tissues. The trachea may present a foamy, bloody mucous. ... spleen or other organs. RHD is extremely hard to locate in the wild since about 75% of rabbits with RHD will die in their ...
... stomach and intestine, with mesentery; gall bladder; uterus and Fallopian tube; [19-20] non-cavitary organs: lungs and pleura ... in many organs from human and rodents. TC and Tp, and also podoms and podomeres were found in: cavitary organs: heart (endo-, ... Hence, TC could be key-players in regenerating and repair of some organs. The tandem TC-SC could be a better option for therapy ... of a given organ. TC establish via Tp homo- and heterocellular junctions and release shed vesicles and exosomes. TC and SC make ...
Its associated yang organ is the Small Intestine. Both Heart and Small Intestine are attributed to the Fire element. Regarding ... The Heart (心, pinyin: xīn) is one of the zàng organs stipulated by Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). It is a functionally ... As a zàng, the Heart is considered to be a yin organ. ... defined entity and not equivalent to the anatomical organ of ...
These organs include the esophagus, stomach, small and large intestines. Mesenteries serve to connect the organs of the fetal ... From the oral cavity, the esophagus leads to the stomach, small intestine, and large intestine. Other organs developing during ... and the reproductive organs. By day 20, most of the major organs are visible, and the last half of gestation focuses greatly on ... The first lymphatic organ to become present is the thymus. Lymphocyte builds up in the spleen on the 70th day. By day 77, the ...
In disseminated cases organs which might become infected includes; the gallbladder, diaphragm, esophagus, and small intestine ...
Any or all of the organs may be displaced downward. When the intestines are involved, the condition is known as enteroptosis; ... The symptoms may be alleviated by supporting the organs with a properly applied bandage, or other similar device. Rest in bed, ... Visceroptosis (or enteroptosis) is a prolapse or a sinking of the abdominal viscera (internal organs) below their natural ... Glénard's theory - The theory that abdominal ptosis is a nutritional disease with atrophy and prolapse of the intestine. ...
Pancreas an abdominal organ with multiple functions. It is a ducted organ which produces chemicals used in the intestines for ... It produces considerable quantities of bile acids for use in the intestines; these are carried to the intestines via ducts and ... Kidneys organs which produce urine by excreting blood plasma and then resorbing important chemicals. Glucose and proteins are ... In another, there is a wider reaction, involving the blood or other organs. This is called a systemic allergy. The result can ...
"The forms are inspired by internal organs, intestines, breast, stomachs, brains; their colorful, mottled, crumpled, broken ...
The man had a perforated small intestine, large intestine and bowel. Goodfellow sutured six holes in the man's organs. ... Goodfellow removed a .45-calibre bullet, washed out the cavity with hot water, folded the intestines back into position, ... Most patients presenting to trauma centers have multiple injuries involving different organ systems, and so the care of such ...
The intestine after leaving the gizzard bears three small, almost spherical, diverticula, one behind the base of each of the ... When extracted therefrom it is an almost cylindrical organ with two coils, or constrictions, in its course, bluntly pointed at ... The wall of the intestine is thin and its structure simple; it has a single closely adpressed bend. Reproductive system: The ... male intromittent organ is provided with an elongate chitinous stylet. The penis is enclosed in an oval sack. ...
Most critical organs are housed within the torso. In the upper chest, the heart and lungs are protected by the rib cage, and ... the large and small intestines, which extract nutrients from food; the anus, from which fecal wastes are egested; the rectum, ... Some organs also receive a nerve supply from the vagus nerve. The sensation to the skin is provided by: Lateral cutaneous ... Finally, the pelvic region houses both the male and female reproductive organs. The torso also harbours many of the main groups ...
They are also known as mirrorbellies, in reference to the bioluminescent organ in their intestines. There are currently 3 ...
It is made from beef, cow's intestines and other cow's internal organs. The sauce for sate ampet is hot and spicy, which is no ... and intestines. Usually gizzard is placed on the bottom, intestine on the center and liver or heart on the top. After seasoning ... Sate Usus Chicken Intestine satay. This mildly marinated satay is usually fried, also as a side-dish to accompany bubur ayam. ... The most popular are made from chicken or pork intestines known as isaw. Other variants use liver, tripe, lungs, chicken heads ...
They tested diets based on different organs: spleen, lung, liver, intestines, etc. They found that dogs fed a diet of liver ... "Eating organs to cure a disease". Tacomed.com. Retrieved 15 June 2017. Robscheit-Robbins, F.; Elden, C.A.; Sperry, W.M.; ...
2)The Large Intestine, a Yang organ, controls the removal of waste and feces. Imbalance in the Large Intestine leads to ... 1)The Heart, (2)Small Intestine are the organs that fire controls. (3)Heart Protector, (4)Triple Heater are organs that ... 2)The Small Intestine, a Yang organ, separates pure food and fluid essences from the polluted. The pure essences are ... Metal controls the Lungs(1) and the Large Intestine(2). (1)The Lungs, a Yin organ, draws in pure chi by inhalation and ...
The combined treatment of large intestine cancer is well known in China. There are 2905 beds in the other four non-affiliated ... Allogeneic organ transplantation is a speciality of HMU. Allogeneic spleen transplantation, allogeneic both-hands ...
For these animals to become infected they must eat the organs of an animal that contains the cysts such as sheep or rodents. ... An adult worm resides in the small intestine of a definitive host. Gravid proglottids release eggs that are passed in the feces ... The egg then hatches in the small intestine of the intermediate host and releases an oncosphere that penetrates the intestinal ... After ingestion, the protoscolices attach to the intestine. They then develop into adult worms and the cycle starts all over ...
... allowing normally intra-abdominal organs (particularly the stomach and intestines) to protrude into the thoracic cavity. In the ... If the intestines are trapped within the lungs, then the lungs and intestines may not be receiving the amount of blood they ... A chest x-ray can also be done to examine the abnormalities of not only the lungs but also the diaphragm and the intestine. In ... After the baby is stable and his or her state has improved, the diaphragm can be fixed and the misplaced organs can be ...
If left untreated, serious staph infections can result in organ failure and death. Enterococcus are normally present in the ... human intestines, female genital tract and often within the environment. When these bacteria cause infections, usually within ...
The stomach is the organ most commonly affected, followed by the small intestine and the colon. As a part of host defense ... shown to have an integral role in regulating the homing of eosinophils into the lamina propria of stomach and small intestine. ...
Second, the liver is the first organ to absorb nutrients just taken in by the intestines. After draining into the liver ...
The radiopharmaceutical then goes into the bile ducts, the gallbladder, and the intestines. The gamma camera is placed on the ... where radioisotopes attached to drugs that travel to a specific organ or tissue (radiopharmaceuticals) are taken internally and ... abdomen to picture these perfused organs. Other scintigraphic tests are done similarly. The most common indication for lung ...
An isolated distended loop of bowel is seen near the site of injured viscus or inflamed organ. This loop is called a "sentinel ... Simply put, it is the dilatation of a segment of small intestine. to be differentiated from colonic cutoff sign which is a ...
"Section 30.2Each Organ Has a Unique Metabolic Profile". Biochemistry 5th Edition. W H Freeman. Retrieved 29 April 2012.. ... Peptide YY 3-36 is a hormone released by the small intestine and it is also used as a satiety signal to the brain.[24] Insulin ... The intestines also contain receptors that send satiety signals to the brain. The hormone cholecystokinin is secreted by the ... There are short-term signals of satiety that arise from the head, the stomach, the intestines, and the liver. The long-term ...
Pelvic organ prolapse occurs when a pelvic organ-such as your bladder-drops (prolapses) from its normal place in your lower ... This can happen when the muscles that hold your pelvic organs in place get weak or stretched from childbirth or... ... Pelvic Organ Prolapse. Topic Overview. What is pelvic organ prolapse?. Pelvic organ prolapse occurs when a pelvic organ-such as ... Organs that can be involved when you have pelvic prolapse include the:. *Bladder. This is the most common kind of pelvic organ ...
Shop Vintage Frohse Anatomy Intestines Organs Poster created by AcupunctureProducts. Personalize it with photos & text or ... Vintage Frohse Anatomy Intestines Organs Poster. Plate from the 1906 atlas of human anatomy. Illustration by Frohse. Edited to ...
Most absorption of nutrients and water happen in the intestines. The intestines include the small ... ... Stock video footage The intestines are a long, continuous tube running from the stomach to the anus. ... Most absorption of nutrients and water happen in the intestines. The intestines include the small intestine, large intestine, ... intestine, intestines, large, liver, male, man, medical, medicine, organ, pain, science, small, stomach, surgery, system, tract ...
... 10.08.2011 ... how organs form from a single tube to the rotating structure of intestines," said Natasza Kurpios, assistant professor of ... Further reports about: , Groundbreaking research , Kurpios , Medicine , gastric torsion , key organs , molecular medicine , ... How do the intestines in tiny birds or large mammals form intricate looping patterns? How do hearts and vascular systems form? ...
... organ icon in .PNG or .ICO format. Icon designed by Chameleon Design found in the icon set Medical ... Anatomy, care, health, internal, intestine, medical, organ icon. * Basic license · Categories: Healthcare & medical Styles: ...
Most absorption of nutrients and water happen in the intestines. The intestines include the small ... ... Stock video footage The intestines are a long, continuous tube running from the stomach to the anus. ... Most absorption of nutrients and water happen in the intestines. The intestines include the small intestine, large intestine, ... Description: The intestines are a long, continuous tube running from the stomach to the anus. ...
Other embryonic organs, esophagus, stomach, liver, pancreas, lung, skin, and muscle, did not produce CaBP in response to ... Duodena from 20-day-old chick embryos can be maintained in large scale organ culture on specially designed stainless-steel ... Although mitotic rate was subnormal, several other factors attest to the essential viability of the cultured intestine: L- ... and the electropotential gradient across the intestine was maintained throughout the culture period as was a concentration ...
Lung (Yin Organ) Large Intestine (Yang Organ) Stomach (Yang Organ) Spleen (Yin Organ) Heart (Yin Organ) Small Intestine (Yang ... Organ) Bladder (Yang Organ) Kidney (Yin Organ) Pericardium (Yin Organ) Gallbladder (Yang Organ) Liver (Yin Organ) Zang Fu Organ ... Small Intestine (Fu/Yang) - Internal TCM Organs. Functions of the Small Intestine. The Small Intestine Controls Receiving and ... Small Intestines Relationship with the Heart. in pathology: Heart Fire can be transmitted to Small Intestine, which then ...
Organ Transplant in Pyrmont, Australia with our help. PlacidWay offer you the list of top doctors. ... Top Surgeons for Intestine Transplant, Organ Transplant in Pyrmont, Australia Find the best surgeons for Intestine Transplant, ... Organ Transplant in Pyrmont, Australia Top Intestine Transplant procedures in Pyrmont. Bone Marrow Transplant. Cornea ... Organ Transplant in Australia Top Organ Transplant Cities in Australia. Melbourne. Sydney. Perth. Woolloongabba. ...
Organ-Transplant in Hobart, Australia. PlacidWay is helping patients reach best treatment possible. ... Top Packages for Intestine-Transplant, Organ-Transplant in Hobart, Australia Find the best packages for Intestine-Transplant, ... a substance responsible for breaking down fats in the small intestine. In Turkey, there is a law that indicates that the donor ... Organ-Transplant in Hobart, Australia. PlacidWay is helping patients reach best treatment possible. ...
Organ health sheets take patient education to a whole new level.. Each colorful sheet focuses on a specific meridian system ... On each sheet, in clear, easy to understand language, your patients will discover the functions of specific organs according to ... NEW & IMPROVED ORGAN HEALTH SHEETS NOW AVAILABLE IN PRINT OR DIGITAL FORMAT! ... Western and Eastern medicine, along with information describing the physical and emotional symptoms when a particular organ ...
Most deaths are due to the malfunction or failure of the internal organs. foods and exercises for that.. Your internal organs ... Most deaths are due to the malfunction or failure of the internal organs. foods and exercises for that.. ... Your internal organs are the foundation of your health. ... Strengthening of internal organs, from brain to intestine! ... Let us learn about the means of strengthening our body, especially the internal organs, using natural products that we commonly ...
IMPROVED ORGAN HEALTH SHEETS NOW AVAILABLE IN PRINT OR DIGITAL FORMAT!Organ health sheets take patient education to a whole new ... Lung & Large Intestine Organ Sheet - Print Version. Default Title - $22.99 USD. $22.99 ... NEW & IMPROVED ORGAN HEALTH SHEETS NOW AVAILABLE IN PRINT OR DIGITAL FORMAT!. Organ health sheets take patient education to a ... Would you like a set of all 5 Organ Sheets? Click here.. Would you prefer to purchase a digital version only? Click Here ...
Download this Free Vector about Cartoon woman body organs composition with brain stomach lungs kidneys heart liver spleen ... intestine female reproductive system, and discover more than 9 Million Professional Graphic Resources on Freepik ... Cartoon woman body organs composition with brain stomach lungs kidneys heart liver spleen intestine female reproductive system ... Cartoon human body organs composition with liver kidneys lungs brain heart stomach intestine female reproductive system and ...
A258 MULTIPLE ORGAN FAILURE AND PLATELET TRAPPING IN THE INTESTINE IN CRITICALLY ILL PATIENTS. Anesthesiology 9 1990, Vol.73, ... G H. Sigurdsson, J T. Christenson, M Bader, S Sadek; A258 MULTIPLE ORGAN FAILURE AND PLATELET TRAPPING IN THE INTESTINE IN ... A258 MULTIPLE ORGAN FAILURE AND PLATELET TRAPPING IN THE INTESTINE IN CRITICALLY ILL PATIENTS ... A258 MULTIPLE ORGAN FAILURE AND PLATELET TRAPPING IN THE INTESTINE IN CRITICALLY ILL PATIENTS ...
Stomach and Intestines,Medical Illustration database of the best portfolios and stock images now features General and ... Image shows the organs inside the skeleton structure. Inset shows the digestive organs, stomach, intestines, liver, pancreas ... Organs of Thorax (Chest) and Abdomen - Lungs, Stomach and Intestines. #130N-02258. ... Child (Pediatric) Anatomy - Organs of the Head, Thorax and Abdomen. Includes brain, heart, lungs and large intestine (bowel ...
... heart/small intestine/liver/rectum/stomach/adrenal gland/thyroid gland/spleen/skin/bone/brain/testis/lung/muscle/ gallbladder/ ... Human Fetus Multiple organ (normal) tissue array (25 normal fetus tissues: ... Home » Tissue Slides » Human Fetus Multiple organ (normal) tissue array (25 normal fetus tissues: heart/small intestine/liver/ ... EC01-01-003 Human Fetus Multiple organ (normal) tissue array (25 normal fetus tissues: heart/small intestine/liver/rectum/ ...
... heart/esophagus/small intestine/stomach/thymus/ spleen/lung/skin/brain/muscle/bladder/kidney) tissue array, 6 x 12 . ... Home » Tissue Slides » Human Multiple 12 normal fetus organs (heart/esophagus/small intestine/stomach/thymus/ spleen/lung/skin/ ... EC01-01-007 Human Multiple 12 normal fetus organs (heart/esophagus/small intestine/stomach/thymus/ spleen/lung/skin/brain/ ... Properties for Human Multiple 12 normal fetus organs (heart/esophagus/small intestine/stomach/thymus/ spleen/lung/skin/brain/ ...
... intestines and vas deferens. Individual solutions can be used for intraluminal perfusion and extraluminal superfusion. Two ... pressure transducer is used to measure the intraluminal pressure difference at the proximal and distal end of the organ. ... This Tissue Bath has been designed for the studying of perfused tubular organs such as trachea, blood vessels, ... This Tissue Bath has been designed for the studying of perfused tubular organs such as trachea, blood vessels, intestines and ...
The little and enormous intestinal tract are vital internal organs with regard to digestive function. The small intestine ... household , digestive complaints centre , digestive complaints any-zed number , picture variety gallery listing , intestines ... Waste product goes in to the big intestine, and this is referred to as digestive tract. The large intestinal tract soaks in ... attaches this tummy towards the big intestine. Its made up of three parts: the duodenum, jejunum, as well as ileum. After the ...
... Teacher says exercise effective for demonstrating how long, tough organ is. By ... A video that has surfaced online of several North East Independent School District high schoolers using a cats intestines as a ... posted to SnapChat shows several Churchill High School students playing jump rope with what appears to be the intestines of a ...
Organ culture of mucosal biopsies of human small intestine. Small duodenal specimens from a total of seven Caucasian patients ( ... Human small intestine tissues were exposed to PCSK (20 μg/ml) and/or MTX (10 μM) in an ex vivo Matrigel-based culture model of ... 1A). Severe inflammation was histologically evident in all areas of the small intestine of MTX-TLR2 KO mice, with a mean ... TLR Signaling Modulates Side Effects of Anticancer Therapy in the Small Intestine. Magdalena Frank, Eva Maria Hennenberg, ...
Determination of Salmonella Dissemination in Internal Organs. Using 5-mm glass beads and a tissue homogenizer (Thomas ... Infantis could translocate from the intestine into the liver (Figure 5D). Decreased recovery of viable S. Infantis in the liver ... 2013). The genomic landscape of small intestine neuroendocrine tumors. J. Clin. Invest. 123, 2502-2508. doi: 10.1172/JCI67963 ... Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Affects Microbiota and Suppresses Autophagy in the Intestines of Pigs Challenged with Salmonella ...
... mRNAs as Differentiation Markers for the Three Major Endodermal Organs: Liver, Intestine, and Exocrine Pancreas. Developmental ... mRNAs as Differentiation Markers for the Three Major Endodermal Organs: Liver, Intestine, and Exocrine Pancreas. ... intestine, and exocrine pancreas. transferrin and ifabp mRNAs exhibit a biphasic expression pattern during early development. ... and appeared in the intestine rudiment at ∼36 hpf. In contrast to the transferrin and ifabp mRNAs, elastaseB mRNAs were not ...
Small intestine. Fresh organ mass is expressed relative to body mass. We observed considerable differences in relative organ ... Organ size changes. Small intestine. Size differences of the small intestinal mucosa between fasting and digesting snakes were ... The muscle layer of the small intestine did not respond to feeding. This indicates that organ size changes are specific and ... Small intestine mass was lowest in fasting snakes (3.11±0.22 %). Two days after feeding, the fresh mass of the small intestine ...
  • Pelvic organ prolapse occurs when a pelvic organ-such as your bladder-drops (prolapses) from its normal place in your lower belly and pushes against the walls of your vagina. (afwomensmed.com)
  • We care for patients who require intestine transplants. (uhn.ca)
  • While the increasing use of organs previously considered marginal, such as those from expanded criteria donors (ECD) or donors after cardiac death (DCD) has increased the number of transplants from deceased donors, these transplants are often associated with inferior outcomes and higher costs. (wiley.com)
  • On each sheet, in clear, easy to understand language, your patients will discover the functions of specific organs according to Western and Eastern medicine, along with information describing the physical and emotional symptoms when a particular organ system is out of balance. (goldenneedleonline.com)
  • On the following pages, read more about syndromes that affect specific organs and the various conditions of imbalance that make up the foundation for an effective traditional treatment plan. (howstuffworks.com)
  • This information has led, for example, to the cloning of specific organs for medical purposes. (princeton.edu)
  • In vitro data showed that there existed a dose-dependent relationship in the range of concentration between 5 and 50 μM, and even 5 μM NOVO could decrease intestinal permeability of CAP across the intestine. (frontiersin.org)
  • it also could lead to better diagnosis of veterinary and human maladies such as malrotation of the intestines in babies and gastric torsion in large-breed dogs such as Labrador retrievers. (innovations-report.com)
  • CHICAGO--A new study helps explain changes in the intestines that may be responsible for the reversal of diabetes in people who undergo a type of bariatric surgery known as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB). (eurekalert.org)
  • To investigate why this happens, Stylopoulos and his team spent one year studying rats, and observed that after gastric bypass surgery, the small intestine changes the way it processes glucose. (biospace.com)
  • Before gastric bypass, intestines typically do not contain a specific transporter called GLUT-1, which is responsible for removing glucose from circulation and utilizing it within the organ. (biospace.com)
  • After gastric bypass, the researchers found that the intestine reprograms itself to contain GLUT-1, taking glucose from circulation and disposing of it, swiftly stabilizing blood glucose levels in the rest of the body. (biospace.com)
  • The absorption of water and alcohol can be slowed if the stomach contains foodstuffs and especially fats, probably because gastric emptying is delayed by fats, and most water in any situation is absorbed from the small intestine. (britannica.com)
  • For example, Norwegian researchers have shown that in the intestines of depressed patients some bacterial species are more common, while others are almost completely absent. (vitalstoffmedizin.ch)
  • Stefater is spearheading a study investigating whether changes in the intestine of human patients who undergo the surgery could lead to weight loss and diabetes improvement. (eurekalert.org)
  • Thus, the transcriptome analysis showed the protecting functions of IMB patients against hypoxia-induced oxidative injury in the intestine of Tibetans via affecting GRB2/EGFR/PTPN11 pathways. (hindawi.com)
  • Life-saving organ replacement therapy has been offered to an increasingly complex population of patients with an increasing success rate. (wiley.com)