Tissue and Organ Procurement: The administrative procedures involved with acquiring TISSUES or organs for TRANSPLANTATION through various programs, systems, or organizations. These procedures include obtaining consent from TISSUE DONORS and arranging for transportation of donated tissues and organs, after TISSUE HARVESTING, to HOSPITALS for processing and transplantation.Tissue Donors: Individuals supplying living tissue, organs, cells, blood or blood components for transfer or transplantation to histocompatible recipients.Third-Party Consent: Informed consent given by someone other than the patient or research subject.Clergy: Persons ordained for religious duties, who serve as leaders and perform religious services.United States Office of Research Integrity: An office of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE organized in June 1992 to promote research integrity and investigate misconduct in research supported by the Public Health Service. It consolidates the Office of Scientific Integrity of the National Institutes of Health and the Office of Scientific Integrity Review in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health.Brain Death: A state of prolonged irreversible cessation of all brain activity, including lower brain stem function with the complete absence of voluntary movements, responses to stimuli, brain stem reflexes, and spontaneous respirations. Reversible conditions which mimic this clinical state (e.g., sedative overdose, hypothermia, etc.) are excluded prior to making the determination of brain death. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp348-9)Directed Tissue Donation: Tissue, organ, or gamete donation intended for a designated recipient.Awareness: The act of "taking account" of an object or state of affairs. It does not imply assessment of, nor attention to the qualities or nature of the object.Tissue Banks: Centers for acquiring, characterizing, and storing organs or tissue for future use.Organ Transplantation: Transference of an organ between individuals of the same species or between individuals of different species.Presumed Consent: An institutional policy of granting authority to health personnel to perform procedures on patients or to remove organs from cadavers for transplantation unless an objection is registered by family members or by the patient prior to death. This also includes emergency care of minors without prior parental consent.Oocyte Donation: Transfer of preovulatory oocytes from donor to a suitable host. Oocytes are collected, fertilized in vitro, and transferred to a host that can be human or animal.Altruism: Consideration and concern for others, as opposed to self-love or egoism, which can be a motivating influence.Living Donors: Non-cadaveric providers of organs for transplant to related or non-related recipients.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Donor Selection: The procedure established to evaluate the health status and risk factors of the potential DONORS of biological materials. Donors are selected based on the principles that their health will not be compromised in the process, and the donated materials, such as TISSUES or organs, are safe for reuse in the recipients.Gift Giving: The bestowing of tangible or intangible benefits, voluntarily and usually without expectation of anything in return. However, gift giving may be motivated by feelings of ALTRUISM or gratitude, by a sense of obligation, or by the hope of receiving something in return.Tissue and Organ Harvesting: The procedure of removing TISSUES, organs, or specimens from DONORS for reuse, such as TRANSPLANTATION.Death: Irreversible cessation of all bodily functions, manifested by absence of spontaneous breathing and total loss of cardiovascular and cerebral functions.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Blood DonorsReligion and Medicine: The interrelationship of medicine and religion.Human Body: The human being as a non-anatomical and non-zoological entity. The emphasis is on the philosophical or artistic treatment of the human being, and includes lay and social attitudes toward the body in history. (From J. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Kidney Transplantation: The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.Public Opinion: The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.Informed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.Religion: A set of beliefs concerning the nature, cause, and purpose of the universe, especially when considered as the creation of a superhuman agency. It usually involves devotional and ritual observances and often a moral code for the conduct of human affairs. (Random House Collegiate Dictionary, rev. ed.)Waiting Lists: Prospective patient listings for appointments or treatments.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Attitude to Death: Conceptual response of the person to the various aspects of death, which are based on individual psychosocial and cultural experience.Liver Transplantation: The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Transplants: Organs, tissues, or cells taken from the body for grafting into another area of the same body or into another individual.Transplantation: Transference of a tissue or organ from either an alive or deceased donor, within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.QatarIslam: A monotheistic religion promulgated by the Prophet Mohammed with Allah as the deity.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Organ Preservation: The process by which organs are kept viable outside of the organism from which they were removed (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Graft Survival: The survival of a graft in a host, the factors responsible for the survival and the changes occurring within the graft during growth in the host.Professional-Family Relations: The interactions between the professional person and the family.Medical Tourism: Travel to another country for the purpose of medical treatment.Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Saudi ArabiaRefusal to Participate: Refusal to take part in activities or procedures that are requested or expected of an individual. This may include refusal by HEALTH PERSONNEL to participate in specific medical procedures or refusal by PATIENTS or members of the public to take part in clinical trials or health promotion programs.Intraoperative Awareness: Occurence of a patient becoming conscious during a procedure performed under GENERAL ANESTHESIA and subsequently having recall of these events. (From Anesthesiology 2006, 104(4): 847-64.)Intensive Care Units: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.United StatesHealth Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Insurance, Life: Insurance providing for payment of a stipulated sum to a designated beneficiary upon death of the insured.SculptureMoral Obligations: Duties that are based in ETHICS, rather than in law.Great BritainEmbryo Disposition: Utilization or disposal of an embryo that is fertilized but not immediately transplanted and resulting course of action.Cultural Characteristics: Those aspects or characteristics which identify a culture.Persuasive Communication: A mode of communication concerned with inducing or urging the adoption of certain beliefs, theories, or lines of action by others.Heart Transplantation: The transference of a heart from one human or animal to another.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Insemination, Artificial, Heterologous: Human artificial insemination in which the semen used is that of a man other than the woman's husband.Multiple Organ Failure: A progressive condition usually characterized by combined failure of several organs such as the lungs, liver, kidney, along with some clotting mechanisms, usually postinjury or postoperative.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Organ Size: The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.Intention: What a person has in mind to do or bring about.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Heart Arrest: Cessation of heart beat or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. If it is treated within a few minutes, heart arrest can be reversed in most cases to normal cardiac rhythm and effective circulation.Bioethics: A branch of applied ethics that studies the value implications of practices and developments in life sciences, medicine, and health care.Delayed Graft Function: General dysfunction of an organ occurring immediately following its transplantation. The term most frequently refers to renal dysfunction following KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.Organ of Corti: The spiral EPITHELIUM containing sensory AUDITORY HAIR CELLS and supporting cells in the cochlea. Organ of Corti, situated on the BASILAR MEMBRANE and overlaid by a gelatinous TECTORIAL MEMBRANE, converts sound-induced mechanical waves to neural impulses to the brain.Disease Transmission, Infectious: The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens. When transmission is within the same species, the mode can be horizontal or vertical (INFECTIOUS DISEASE TRANSMISSION, VERTICAL).Blood-Borne Pathogens: Infectious organisms in the BLOOD, of which the predominant medical interest is their contamination of blood-soiled linens, towels, gowns, BANDAGES, other items from individuals in risk categories, NEEDLES and other sharp objects, MEDICAL WASTE and DENTAL WASTE, all of which health workers are exposed to. This concept is differentiated from the clinical conditions of BACTEREMIA; VIREMIA; and FUNGEMIA where the organism is present in the blood of a patient as the result of a natural infectious process.Organ Specificity: Characteristic restricted to a particular organ of the body, such as a cell type, metabolic response or expression of a particular protein or antigen.Hinduism: A complex body of social, cultural, and religious beliefs and practices evolved in and largely confined to the Indian subcontinent and marked by a caste system, an outlook tending to view all forms and theories as aspects of one eternal being and truth, and the practice of the way of works, the way of knowledge, or the way of devotion as a means of release from the round of rebirths. (From Webster, 3d ed)Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Radio: The transmission and reception of electric impulses or signals by means of electric waves without a connecting wire, or the use of these waves for the wireless transmission of electric impulses into which sound is converted. (From Webster's 3d)Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Institute of Medicine (U.S.): Identifies, for study and analysis, important issues and problems that relate to health and medicine. The Institute initiates and conducts studies of national policy and planning for health care and health-related education and research; it also responds to requests from the federal government and other agencies for studies and advice.Charities: Social welfare organizations with programs designed to assist individuals in need.Trust: Confidence in or reliance on a person or thing.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Blood Transfusion, Autologous: Reinfusion of blood or blood products derived from the patient's own circulation. (Dorland, 27th ed)Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Corneal Transplantation: Partial or total replacement of the CORNEA from one human or animal to another.Consent Forms: Documents describing a medical treatment or research project, including proposed procedures, risks, and alternatives, that are to be signed by an individual, or the individual's proxy, to indicate his/her understanding of the document and a willingness to undergo the treatment or to participate in the research.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Pancreas Transplantation: The transference of a pancreas from one human or animal to another.Blood Transfusion: The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)Graft Rejection: An immune response with both cellular and humoral components, directed against an allogeneic transplant, whose tissue antigens are not compatible with those of the recipient.Lung Transplantation: The transference of either one or both of the lungs from one human or animal to another.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Information Dissemination: The circulation or wide dispersal of information.Bereavement: Refers to the whole process of grieving and mourning and is associated with a deep sense of loss and sadness.Personnel, Hospital: The individuals employed by the hospital.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Foundations: Organizations established by endowments with provision for future maintenance.Withholding Treatment: Withholding or withdrawal of a particular treatment or treatments, often (but not necessarily) life-prolonging treatment, from a patient or from a research subject as part of a research protocol. The concept is differentiated from REFUSAL TO TREAT, where the emphasis is on the health professional's or health facility's refusal to treat a patient or group of patients when the patient or the patient's representative requests treatment. Withholding of life-prolonging treatment is usually indexed only with EUTHANASIA, PASSIVE, unless the distinction between withholding and withdrawing treatment, or the issue of withholding palliative rather than curative treatment, is discussed.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Transplantation, Homologous: Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Surrogate Mothers: Women who allow themselves to be impregnated with the understanding that the offspring are to be given over to the parents who have commissioned the surrogate.Nephrectomy: Excision of kidney.Internationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Blood Safety: The degree to which the blood supply for BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS is free of harmful substances or infectious agents, and properly typed and crossmatched (BLOOD GROUPING AND CROSSMATCHING) to insure serological compatibility between BLOOD DONORS and recipients.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Deltaretrovirus Infections: Infections caused by the HTLV or BLV deltaretroviruses. They include human T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (LEUKEMIA-LYMPHOMA, T-CELL, ACUTE, HTLV-I-ASSOCIATED).Television: The transmission and reproduction of transient images of fixed or moving objects. An electronic system of transmitting such images together with sound over a wire or through space by apparatus that converts light and sound into electrical waves and reconverts them into visible light rays and audible sound. (From Webster, 3rd ed)Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Physician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Vomeronasal Organ: An accessory chemoreceptor organ that is separated from the main OLFACTORY MUCOSA. It is situated at the base of nasal septum close to the VOMER and NASAL BONES. It forwards chemical signals (such as PHEROMONES) to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, thus influencing reproductive and social behavior. In humans, most of its structures except the vomeronasal duct undergo regression after birth.Hispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Spain: Parliamentary democracy located between France on the northeast and Portugual on the west and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.Hepatitis C: INFLAMMATION of the LIVER in humans caused by HEPATITIS C VIRUS, a single-stranded RNA virus. Its incubation period is 30-90 days. Hepatitis C is transmitted primarily by contaminated blood parenterally, and is often associated with transfusion and intravenous drug abuse. However, in a significant number of cases, the source of hepatitis C infection is unknown.Rabies: Acute VIRAL CNS INFECTION affecting mammals, including humans. It is caused by RABIES VIRUS and usually spread by contamination with virus-laden saliva of bites inflicted by rabid animals. Important animal vectors include the dog, cat, bat, fox, raccoon, skunk, and wolf.Fund Raising: Usually organized community efforts to raise money to promote financial programs of institutions. The funds may include individual gifts.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Pancreas: A nodular organ in the ABDOMEN that contains a mixture of ENDOCRINE GLANDS and EXOCRINE GLANDS. The small endocrine portion consists of the ISLETS OF LANGERHANS secreting a number of hormones into the blood stream. The large exocrine portion (EXOCRINE PANCREAS) is a compound acinar gland that secretes several digestive enzymes into the pancreatic ductal system that empties into the DUODENUM.EuropeKidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Rabies virus: The type species of LYSSAVIRUS causing rabies in humans and other animals. Transmission is mostly by animal bites through saliva. The virus is neurotropic multiplying in neurons and myotubes of vertebrates.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Volition: Voluntary activity without external compulsion.Subfornical Organ: A structure, situated close to the intraventricular foramen, which induces DRINKING BEHAVIOR after stimulation with ANGIOTENSIN II.SwitzerlandNetherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Eye Banks: Centers for storing various parts of the eye for future use.Nurse's Role: The expected function of a member of the nursing profession.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Sampling Studies: Studies in which a number of subjects are selected from all subjects in a defined population. Conclusions based on sample results may be attributed only to the population sampled.Fertilization in Vitro: An assisted reproductive technique that includes the direct handling and manipulation of oocytes and sperm to achieve fertilization in vitro.IranLogistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.TurkeyPelvic Organ Prolapse: Abnormal descent of a pelvic organ resulting in the protrusion of the organ beyond its normal anatomical confines. Symptoms often include vaginal discomfort, DYSPAREUNIA; URINARY STRESS INCONTINENCE; and FECAL INCONTINENCE.Commodification: The social process by which something or someone comes to be regarded and treated as an article of trade or commerce.Cryopreservation: Preservation of cells, tissues, organs, or embryos by freezing. In histological preparations, cryopreservation or cryofixation is used to maintain the existing form, structure, and chemical composition of all the constituent elements of the specimens.Embryo Research: Experimentation on, or using the organs or tissues from, a human or other mammalian conceptus during the prenatal stage of development that is characterized by rapid morphological changes and the differentiation of basic structures. In humans, this includes the period from the time of fertilization to the end of the eighth week after fertilization.Comprehension: The act or fact of grasping the meaning, nature, or importance of; understanding. (American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed) Includes understanding by a patient or research subject of information disclosed orally or in writing.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Histocompatibility Testing: Identification of the major histocompatibility antigens of transplant DONORS and potential recipients, usually by serological tests. Donor and recipient pairs should be of identical ABO blood group, and in addition should be matched as closely as possible for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in order to minimize the likelihood of allograft rejection. (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Embryo Transfer: The transfer of mammalian embryos from an in vivo or in vitro environment to a suitable host to improve pregnancy or gestational outcome in human or animal. In human fertility treatment programs, preimplantation embryos ranging from the 4-cell stage to the blastocyst stage are transferred to the uterine cavity between 3-5 days after FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.Asian Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent.Critical Care Nursing: A nursing specialty that deals specifically with the care of patients who are critically ill.IndiaInfertility: Inability to reproduce after a specified period of unprotected intercourse. Reproductive sterility is permanent infertility.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Volunteers: Persons who donate their services.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Continental Population Groups: Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Consciousness: Sense of awareness of self and of the environment.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Terminal Care: Medical and nursing care of patients in the terminal stage of an illness.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Relief Work: Assistance, such as money, food, or shelter, given to the needy, aged, or victims of disaster. It is usually granted on a temporary basis. (From The American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed)Critical Care: Health care provided to a critically ill patient during a medical emergency or crisis.Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.Warm Ischemia: A tissue or organ remaining at physiological temperature during decreased BLOOD perfusion or in the absence of blood supply. During ORGAN TRANSPLANTATION it begins when the organ reaches physiological temperature before the completion of SURGICAL ANASTOMOSIS and ends with reestablishment of the BLOOD CIRCULATION through the tissue.Reproductive Techniques, Assisted: Clinical and laboratory techniques used to enhance fertility in humans and animals.Medical Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of medical care.Resource Allocation: Societal or individual decisions about the equitable distribution of available resources.Compensation and Redress: Payment, or other means of making amends, for a wrong or injury.
The mission of Students for Organ Donation is to promote organ and tissue donation awareness on campus and in the surrounding ... encouraging individuals to register as organ donors, and giving them the means with which to register. In 2005, the ... Students for Organ Donation is a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting organ donation awareness and registration. ... Students for Organ Donation focuses on providing educational development regarding organ and tissue registration by: educating ...
Kidney Donation, Living Organ Donation, Organ Donation, Organ Transplant, Stem Cell donor and Research, Tissue Donation, ... Green ribbons have been used to promote awareness for many diseases and causes. Donation and transplant: Bone Marrow Donation, ... "Awareness Ribbons Chart: Color & Meaning of Awareness Ribbon Causes". Disabled World. Retrieved 2017-01-25. Attribution This ... Achalasia Awareness - Martin Mueller IV Achalasia Awareness Foundation Mint Green Ribbon: Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney ...
To promote organ and tissue donation by continuous awareness campaigns for the public Introduce organ and tissue donation and ... To retrieve organs and tissues from any donor in all Lebanese regions by a skilled coordinator team available 24 hours a day, 7 ... To implement a Lebanese Model for Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation: Define the criteria of donation and ... To provide locally retrieved organs and tissues to patients in need of organ and tissue transplantation. ...
... which permits Ontarians to make decisions about organ and tissue donation. Providing awareness about the online organ donation ... Other initiatives to promote this registry include to raise awareness and information, ... "Learn About Organ & Tissue Donation: The organ and tissue donation process". Service Ontario. Retrieved 20 July 2011. Social ... Americans can learn about organ donation among other contributions such as tissue donation, cornea donation, and living ...
Representative Swalm, a frequent donor to Bonfils and advocate for organ and tissue donation helped lobby the measure among the ... and created an outreach plan to pair private volunteer groups with the government in order to promote awareness of SNAP and to ... The three stakeholders recognized that blood donations could be increased by as much as 35% if the donation age were lowered ... "Become a blood donor for life". Denver Post. 2008-07-28. Retrieved 2011-01-13. Colorado, Gov (19 March 2009). "Bills signed ...
... of Transplant Recipients in addition to promoting national awareness of the critical need for organ and tissue donation. HRSA ... Stem cells for transplant come from adult volunteer donors and umbilical cord blood units donated to public cord blood banks. ... In FY 2008, HRSA provided $23 million to promote the donation of organs and tissues and improve national procurement, ... HRSA oversees the nation's organ and tissue donation and transplantation systems, poison control and vaccine injury ...
Portal for Organ Donation After Execution Portal for The National Network of Organ Donors Human Tissue Donation - NPR News ... By starting with promoting college students' awareness of organ donation and moving to increasing social support for organ ... "Organ Donation Statistics: Why be an Organ Donor? , organdonor.gov". organdonor.gov. Retrieved 2017-06-22. "Need continues to ... increase in organ donation by creating support and awareness through social media. Australian Organ Donor Register Organ ...
It has also campaigned for 'opt-out' organ donor registers to improve the availability of life-saving organs in the UK; Wales ... "Organ donation". British Humanist Association. Retrieved 13 October 2016. Lennard, Derek (4 April 2014). "Galha's journey to ... "Human tissues". British Humanist Association. Retrieved 20 March 2013. "Homeopathy » British Humanist Association". humanism. ... is a charitable organisation which promotes Humanism and aims to represent "people who seek to live good lives without ...
Other NGO example includes MOHAN Foundation that works for awareness for cadaver donation since 1997 and creating an organ ... With the organ donor rate in the state of Tamil Nadu standing at 1.2 per million population, which is 15 times the national ... The National Institute of Siddha is one of the seven apex national-level educational institutions that promote excellence in ... tissue engineering and nanotechnology, which would also focus on integration of traditional and alternate medicinal ...
... she was appointed the committee member of the Public Awareness Action Committee for Organ and Tissue Donation under the ... she was inspired to sign an organ donation pledge at the age of 13. Since then, she promoted organ donation and later in 2009, ... Regina, Lee (18 January 2012). "Organ donor seeks to inspire others via book". The Star. Retrieved 28 October 2013. Yuk Peng, ... appointed one of the Organ Donation Ambassadors to promote organ donation in Malaysia which registers only about 200,000 people ...
Kidney (deceased-donor and living-donor). *Liver (deceased-donor, which enables donation of a whole liver; and living-donor, ... Organ donors may be living, brain dead, or dead via circulatory death.[1] Tissue may be recovered from donors who die of ... The Live On social awareness movement is also formed to educate Singaporeans on organ donation.[98] ... The World Health Organization argues that transplantations promote health, but the notion of "transplantation tourism" has the ...
"Levin Joins Senate Colleagues, NFL Players to Promote Organ and Tissue Donation" (Press release). Carl Levin, United States ... His own appeals-and after his death, his foundation's-for greater awareness of the need for organ donations are widely credited ... Secretary of State White Joins City Clerk Laski to Increase Organ Donor Participation Illinois Archived March 7, 2005, at the ... and a heightened awareness of the need for organ donations. ... "Jesse White Unveils New Organ Donor License Plate" (Press ...
"Stanley Medical Research Institute organ donation". www.bigclassaction.com.. *^ "Overview Center for Psychiatric Research". ... In 2005, NAMI gave Torrey a tribute on its 25th Anniversary Celebratory Donor Wall, for those who have donated over $25,000. It ... into the illness because the part of the brain for self-awareness has been affected; and that in some who are aware it is due ... SMRI also maintains a collection of postmortem brain tissue from individuals with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major ...
Saá P, Proctor M, Foster G, Krysztof D, et al «Investigational Testing for Zika Virus among U.S. Blood Donors» (en anglès). N ... Galel, SA; Williamson, PC; Busch, MP; Stanek, D; et al «First Zika-positive donations in the continental United States» (en ... Coffey, LL; Pesavento, PA; Keesler, RI; Singapuri, A; et al «Zika Virus Tissue and Blood Compartmentalization in Acute ... Kotton, CN «Zika Virus and Solid Organ Transplantation: Significant Pathogen or Harbinger of Things to Come?» (en anglès). ...
The lung allocation score (LAS) is a numerical value used by the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) to assign relative priority for distributing donated lungs for transplantation within the United States. The lung allocation score takes into account various measures of a patient's health in order to direct donated organs towards the patients who would best benefit from a lung transplant. The LAS system replaces the older method within the United States of allocating donated lungs strictly on a first-come, first-served basis, according to blood type compatibility and distance from the donor hospital. The older method is still used for patients under the age of 12. The LAS system is still being evaluated and revised.[1] The reason for this continuing analysis is the need to balance on one hand the desire to help those patients in direct need, versus the statistical likelihood of the ...
Certain fundamental Jewish law questions arise in issues of organ donation. Donation of an organ from a living person to save another's life, where the donor's health will not appreciably suffer, is permitted and encouraged in Jewish law. Donation of an organ from a dead person is equally permitted for the same purpose: to save a life (pikuach nefesh). This simple statement of the issue belies, however, the complexity of defining death in Jewish law. Thus, although there are side issues regarding mutilation of the body etc., the primary issue that prevents organ donation from the dead amongst Jews, in many cases, is the definition of death, simply because to ...
The Information Services Procurement Library (ISPL) is a best practice library for the management of Information Technology related acquisition processes. It helps both the customer and supplier organization to achieve the desired quality using the corresponded amount of time and money by providing methods and best practices for risk management, contract management, and planning. ISPL focuses on the relationship between the customer and supplier organization: It helps constructing the request for proposal, it helps constructing the contract and delivery plan according to the project situation and risks, and it helps monitoring the delivery phase. ISPL is a unique Information Technology method because where most other Information Technology methods and frameworks focus on development (e.g. DSDM, RUP), ISPL focuses purely on the procurement of information services. The target audience for ISPL consists of ...
The American Journal of Transplantation is a monthly peer-reviewed medical journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons and the American Society of Transplantation. It covers research on all aspects of organ transplantation. Each issue offers continuing medical education in the form of its Images in Transplantation feature, a case-based approach. The journal was established in 2001 with Philip F. Halloran (University of Alberta) as its first editor-in-chief. In 2011, he was succeeded by Allan D. Kirk (Duke University). From 2011 to 2015, a shorter, Czech language-version of the journal was published quarterly, each issue containing five articles originally published in the American Journal of Transplantation. The local editor was Ondrej Viklický (Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague). The journal publishes a yearly supplement, the Organ ...
... (KPD) or Paired Exchange, is an approach to living donor kidney transplantation where patients with incompatible donors swap kidneys to receive a compatible kidney. KPD is used in situations where a potential donor is incompatible. Because better donor HLA and age matching are correlated with lower lifetime mortality and longer lasting kidney transplants, many compatible pairs are also participating in swaps to find better matched kidneys. In the United States, the National Kidney Registry organizes the majority of U.S. KPD transplants, including the largest swaps. The first large swap was a 60 participant chain in 2012 that appeared on the front page of the New York Times and the second, even larger swap, included 70 participants and was completed in 2014. Other KPD programs in the U.S. include the UNOS program which was launched in 2010 and completed its 100th KPD transplant in 2014 ...
Approximately one in three donations in the US, UK, and Israel is now from a live donor.[13][14][15] Potential donors are carefully evaluated on medical and psychological grounds. This ensures that the donor is fit for surgery and has no disease which brings undue risk or likelihood of a poor outcome for either the donor or recipient. The psychological assessment is to ensure the donor gives informed consent and is not coerced. In countries where paying for organs is illegal, the authorities may also seek to ensure that a donation has not resulted from a financial transaction. The relationship the donor has to the recipient has evolved over the years. In the 1950s, the first successful living donor transplants were between identical twins. In the 1960s-1970s, live ...
... (Latin, between the living) is a legal term referring to a transfer or gift made during one's lifetime, as opposed to a testamentary transfer (a gift that takes effect on death) under the subject of trust. The term is often used to describe a trust established during one's lifetime, i.e., an Inter vivos trust as opposed to a Testamentary trust which is established on one's death, usually as part of a will. An Inter vivos trust is often used synonymously with the more common term Living trust, but an Inter vivos trust, by definition, includes both revocable and irrevocable trusts. The term inter vivos is also used to describe living organ donation, in which one patient donates an organ to another while both are alive. Generally, the organs transplanted are either non-vital ...
Payton's legacy continues through the charitable Walter and Connie Payton Foundation. His own appeals-and after his death, his foundation's-for greater awareness of the need for organ donations are widely credited with bringing national attention to the problem.[47] After his appeals, donations in Illinois skyrocketed, and the regional organ bank of Illinois was overwhelmed with calls.[48] In response, the City of Chicago inserted organ donation requests into city-vehicle-registration mailings in early 2000, and by August 2000, 13,000 people had signed on to the program.[49] The foundation continues to run a program that Payton organized to donate toys to underprivileged ...
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The report's allegations of involuntary organ removal from Falun Gong adherents received considerable media coverage, particularly in Canada, Europe, and Australia. Several governments tightened transplant tourism practices and requested more information from the Chinese government. Chinese officials repeatedly and angrily denied the report's organ harvesting allegations.[3][4] Upon release of the initial report, China declared they abided by World Health Organization principles that prohibit the sale of human organs without written consent from donors and denounced the report. Amnesty International in 2006 said it was "continuing to analyze sources of information" about the allegations.[50] David Ownby, a professor of history at the University of Montreal and expert on Falun Gong, wrote in ...
Donating plasma is similar in many ways to whole blood donation, though the end product is used for different purposes. Most plasmapheresis is for fractionation into other products; other blood donations are transfused with relatively minor modifications. Plasma that is collected solely for further manufacturing is called Source Plasma. Plasma donors undergo a screening process to ensure both the donor's safety and the safety of the collected product. Factors monitored include blood pressure, pulse, temperature, total protein, protein electrophoresis, health history screening similar to that for whole blood, as well as an annual physical exam with a licensed physician or an approved physician substitute under the supervision of the physician. Donors are screened at each donation for viral diseases that can be transmitted by blood, sometimes by multiple ...
... (NHSBT) is an executive non-departmental public body of the United Kingdom's Department of Health. It was established on 1 October 2005 to take over the responsibilities of two separate NHS agencies: UK Transplant (now renamed Organ Donation and Transplantation), founded by Dr. Geoffrey Tovey in 1972, and the National Blood Service (now renamed Blood Donation). Its remit is to provide a reliable, efficient supply of blood, organs and associated services to the NHS. Since NHSBT was established, the organisation has maintained or improved the quality of the services delivered to patients, stabilised the rising cost of blood, and centralised a number of corporate services. NHSBT has the responsibility for optimising the supply of blood, ...
Eukariot mangrupa tipeu sél anu wangunanana paling pajeulit nu ditata dina rohangan-rohangan jeroan anu leuwih leutik nu dibungkus ku mémbran lipid. Organél-organél nu leuwih badag kayaning inti sél jeung vakuola bisa katempo ku mikroskop biasa (najan kadang perlu dibantu ku pewarna). Henteu sakabéh sél eukariot miboga organél-organél nu kasebut di handap. ...
1 was National Minority Donor Awareness Day to promote awareness of organ and tissue donation for non-white people. At first ... What can you do to help? Organs and tissues are needed for every ethnicity. Have yourself designated as an organ donor on your ... Medical care for organ donors is identical to nondonors. Nothing is removed until the donor dies and treatment is continued ... Spread the word and sign up to be an organ or tissue donor. ... The Medical Minute: National Minority Donor Awareness. by Gant ...
Living Donor Programme • Organ And Tissue Donation • Palliative Care Role of the community and palliative care nurses in renal ... Supporting students to integrate into new environments and working teams to enhance access to learning ¿ Promoting development ... Awareness of early death • Ethical Issues Inequalities in access to treatments Non-compliance to treatment Withdrawal of ... Social Issues and the Social Workers Role Supporting dialysis patients and carers Advocacy and liaison Promoting patient choice ...
The selfless generosity of organ and tissue donors helps meet a significant and growing need in our country. ... Through the organ donor program, Americans can provide hope to those who face difficult and often life-threatening conditions ... Our Nations organ and tissue donor program is an important part of our healthcare system. ... During this week, we renew our efforts to foster this compassion and to help save lives by promoting organ and tissue donation ...
The Donor Liaison Scheme purpose is:. *To promote organ and tissue donation within the Trust ... Educate and train Trust staff to raise awareness of the potential for and benefits of donation ... Ensure immediate and ongoing donor family support is available.. Increasing the profile of organ and tissue donation within the ... the Donor Liaison Scheme is tasked to facilitate the identification of potential multi organ and tissue donors. The strategy ...
473,000 in Community Awareness Grants to support community-based initiatives to boost the number of registered organ donors and ... or for other targeted community awareness and education activities to promote organ and tissue donation.. "Registration of ... of community-led initiatives in promoting the benefits of organ and tissue donation and the importance of registering donation ... "Targeted community awareness and education projects play an important role in engaging people on the topic of organ and tissue ...
Organ,Donor,Registration,Could,Help,Save,a,Life,medicine,medical news today,latest medical news,medical newsletters,current ... can also support organ donation programs by donating $1 to the Robert P. Casey Memorial Organ and Tissue Donation Awareness ... Proceeds from the fund are used to educate and promote awareness of the organ donor program through non-profit organizations ... for organ and tissue donations begins with the generosity and care of fellow Pennsylvanians who are registered organ donors. ...
to promote organ, tissue and eye donation in Texas. Initially it was called the Donor Education, Awareness, and Registry ... Registering to become an organ, tissue and eye donor helps ensure your wishes will be carried out after you die. Historically, ... Remember to share your decision to become an organ donor with your family and friends so that, should the time come, they will ... while signing a donor card and placing the donor sticker on your driver license served as an important symbol of your intent ...
... a program designed to heighten organ donation awareness among the community it serves. ... Montefiore Medical Center established the Montefiore Organ and Tissue Donation Initiative, ... about donating organs and tissue. For example, there is no age limit for registering as an organ donor. Plus if a donor has a ... "My responsibility is to promote organ and tissue donation in house and in the community," notes Leo Trevino, Manager of the ...
... providing awareness of organ and tissue donation and support of donor families. They promote the positive benefits of organ and ... tissue donation by encouraging families to talk about organ donation.. The Donor Family Network is run by donor families for ... Transplant Sport actively promotes signing on to the NHS Organ Donor Register and increasing the family consent rate, by ... of potential donor families, do not give consent for donation of their loved ones organs. The majority of these families were ...
The sad fact is that some of those individuals will pass away because not enough organs are available. Two new laws recently ... More than fifteen hundred people across Wisconsin are on organ and tissue transplant waiting lists, and that number continues ... The second law creates a new Wisconsin license plate that will help fund and promote organ and tissue donation. These license ... The Organ Procurement Organization urges people interested in becoming donors to register with the Wisconsin Department of ...
The mission of Students for Organ Donation is to promote organ and tissue donation awareness on campus and in the surrounding ... encouraging individuals to register as organ donors, and giving them the means with which to register. In 2005, the ... Students for Organ Donation is a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting organ donation awareness and registration. ... Students for Organ Donation focuses on providing educational development regarding organ and tissue registration by: educating ...
She said organ and tissue donation remained a priority for the ACT Government, with funding in the latest Budget to promote ... "In 2016, the ACT recorded the highest donation rate in Australia but there is still much more we can do to increase awareness ... "We know that families who have discussed organ and tissue donation in advance are 88 per cent more likely to say yes to ... To learn more about organ and tissue donation, phone DonateLife ACT on 6174 5625 or visit www.donatelife.gov.au. ...
The outcome-registry would be a separate website with details of health status of patients who undergo organ transplantation, ... tissue, blood donors. ... for hospitals including a team to promote organ donation ... Organ Donors Across the US Revealed New Option to Increase Kidney Transplantation for Minorities More Organ Donation News ... The Number of Organ Donations and Transplants in China Hit a Record High. In 2014, voluntary donations from Chinese citizens ...
I signed up to be an organ donor. ... Organ donation gives families like Jordans a second chance. ... DonateLife Week (Sunday 24 February-Sunday 3 March) is Australias national awareness week to promote organ and tissue donation ... Almost everyone can help others through organ and tissue donation.. *However the governing factors are where and how a donor ... For more information about organ and tissue donation or to find out how to register, visit www.donatelife.org.au. ...
Awareness - For the 2nd consecutive year, the Transplant Institute of Florida at Largo ... ... Highest Kudos Awarded to Largo Medical Center for Organ Donor Education & ... "This national initiative promotes organ and tissue donation education and is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and ... and tissue donors. By doing so, LMC increased the number of potential donors on the Donate Life Florida state organ and tissue ...
Deana Carter steps up to the plate to serve as Organ and Tissue Donation spokesperson for the National Kidney Foundation. ... including an appearance on ABC-TVs Good Morning America to promote National Organ and Tissue Donor Awareness Week. ... The Organ and Tissue Donation spot features a bit of the soundtrack from Deanas new album, Everythings Gonna Be Alright, ... Deana Carter steps up to the plate to serve as Organ and Tissue Donation spokesperson for the National Kidney Foundation. ...
... a donor mom and Wendys store manager in Ripley, West Virginia. Johnsons daughter Nicole was an organ, tissue and cornea donor ... Donate Life West Virginia teams up with Wendys® to promote organ, tissue and cornea donation awareness during Community Night ... 6, 2016 - Wendys® and Donate Life West Virginia are partnering to promote organ, tissue and cornea donation awareness at 15 ... that are dedicated to promoting and coordinating the donation of organs and tissue for transplantation - Center for Organ ...
To mark this years National Organ and Tissue Donor week, the Social Security System (Caja) is launching a new organ donation ... Arrieta and other liver transplant patients founded the Asociación Nueva Vida (New Life Association) to promote organ donation ... A press conference at the Costa Rican Doctors and Surgeons Association raises awareness for Costa Ricas organ and tissue-donor ... We dont have enough donor organs.". In Spain, the country that is inspiring the new Costa Rican scheme, the donation index is ...
Tissue Donor Program develops a poster contest for students in kindergarten through 12th grade to promote organ/tissue donation ... The Organ/Tissue Donor Program is teaming up with community colleges statewide for the ultimate public awareness campaign. This ... Illinois Organ/Tissue Donor Registry reaches 5 million donors. Other milestones. The Secretary of States Organ/Tissue Donor ... The Secretary of States Organ/Tissue Donor program has made it a priority to educate the public about organ/tissue donation. ...
... promoting awareness, and encouraging registration for organ/tissue donation. Our team includes representatives from: All ... To increase donor awareness and increase the availability and usage of organs and tissues. We accomplish our mission through ... promoting awareness, and encouraging registration for organ/tissue donation. Our team includes representatives from: All ... To increase donor awareness and increase the availability and usage of organs and tissues. We accomplish our mission through ...
If renewing a vehicle registration online, in a branch office, or by mail, donate by checking the Organ and Tissue Donor ... Tax Collector offices will be accepting donations for the nonprofit and promoting the importance of becoming a donor. Donate ... Michael Corrigan and Donate Life Florida have launched their annual April partnership for National Donate Life Awareness Month. ... Lifes mission is to increase the number of designated organ, eye and tissue donors. ...
The Secretary of State organizes social campaigns to promote organ and tissue donation awareness. Every April, it runs the ... National Donate Life campaign and also maintains the Illinois Organ and Tissue Donor Registry. ... and organizing literacy and organ donation programs. The Secretary of State is also in charge of the Court of Claims and the ...
The Life Goes On program promotes and informs the public about organ and tissue donation. To request a member of our staff to ... The Secretary of States office provides information about organ/tissue donation and how to become a potential donor. The ... A traffic safety messages may include bicycle and pedestrian safety, alcohol awareness and drinking and driving, and the ... Life Goes On Organ/Tissue Donor Program. As of Jan. 1, 2018, Illinois residents ages 16 and over are invited to join the ...
Nursing Grand Rounds: "Organ and Tissue Donation: A Collaborative Effort". Errol Gordon, MD, Director, Mount Sinai Donor ... who participate will be given a LiveOnNY t-shirt and run as a group around the reservoir to promote awareness about donation. ... Attendees will receive a free shopping bag with give-aways to help them learn about organ donation and transplantation.. Whole ... Recanati/Miller Transplantation Institute Lecture Series: "The Pharmacological Management of a Deceased Organ Donor in the ICU" ...
Mission: To be a resource for transplant information; to be an advocate for organ & tissue donation awareness; to promote ... Visit www.transplant.bc.ca to register to become an organ donor. To learn more about the living anonymous donor program, visit ... Organ & Tissue Donation. *Trillium Gift of Life Network (Ontario, Canada). *United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS-United ... "I just want to encourage all Canadians to get on the list," he said of the organ donation list. "It is possible to make a ...
  • It also includes the development of a national forum on donor registries, a new model donor card, and increased cooperation between HHS, other Federal agencies, and State governments to promote donor awareness. (archives.gov)
  • Since the inception of this national hospital campaign in 2001 more than 400,000 people have registered their donation decision on state organ and tissue donor registries. (largomedical.com)
  • Halifax Health - Medical Center of Daytona Beach is among a select group of hospitals nationwide recognized by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) for achievement by conducting activities that promoted enrollment in state organ donor registries. (halifaxhealth.org)
  • Hopefully this leads to an increase in enrollment in Florida's organ donor registries, which will allow more lives to be saved," explains Michael Mulrooney, manager of Halifax Health - Center for Transplant Services. (halifaxhealth.org)
  • More than 350,000 donor enrollments on state donor registries have been stimulated by the WPFL Hospital Campaign since it was launched in June 2011 with the support of the American Hospital Association and numerous other national partners. (halifaxhealth.org)
  • It is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) resulting in the addition of 400,000 donor enrollments to state registries nationwide since 2011. (carolinadonorservices.org)
  • Federally designated to serve 40 counties in northern California and Nevada, Donor Network West partners with the Department of Motor Vehicles and the state-authorized donor registries. (prweb.com)
  • These Principles were the outcome of a process that began in 1987 when the Health Assembly first expressed concern, in resolution WHA40.13, about the commercial trade in human organs. (who.int)
  • States to take appropriate measures to prevent the purchase and sale of human organs for transplantation (resolution WHA42.5). (who.int)
  • The critical shortage of donated organs is attributed to approximately 300 deaths in our state each year. (ilsos.net)
  • Every year two weekends before Thanksgiving in November, the Secretary of State's office joins clergy and health-care professionals across the country in celebrating National Donor Sabbath, an annual donor awareness observance in faith communities. (lifegoeson.com)
  • Clergy encouraged to speak to worshipers about donation the second weekend in November is celebrated as National Donor Sabbath. (lifegoeson.com)
  • During National Donor Sabbath, we share positive stories about transplantation with the religious community, especially letting individuals know that all major eastern and western religions embrace donation," said Secretary of State Jesse White. (lifegoeson.com)