Diseases of the bony orbit and contents except the eyeball.
Bony cavity that holds the eyeball and its associated tissues and appendages.
Neoplasms of the bony orbit and contents except the eyeball.
Absent or reduced sensitivity to cutaneous stimulation.
Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.
Prolonged shortening of the muscle or other soft tissue around a joint, preventing movement of the joint.
Fractures of the bones in the orbit, which include parts of the frontal, ethmoidal, lacrimal, and sphenoid bones and the maxilla and zygoma.
A nonspecific tumor-like inflammatory lesion in the ORBIT of the eye. It is usually composed of mature LYMPHOCYTES; PLASMA CELLS; MACROPHAGES; LEUKOCYTES with varying degrees of FIBROSIS. Orbital pseudotumors are often associated with inflammation of the extraocular muscles (ORBITAL MYOSITIS) or inflammation of the lacrimal glands (DACRYOADENITIS).
Inflammation of the loose connective tissues around the ORBIT, bony structure around the eyeball. It is characterized by PAIN; EDEMA of the CONJUNCTIVA; swelling of the EYELIDS; EXOPHTHALMOS; limited eye movement; and loss of vision.
Abnormal protrusion of both eyes; may be caused by endocrine gland malfunction, malignancy, injury, or paralysis of the extrinsic muscles of the eye.
An autoimmune disorder of the EYE, occurring in patients with Graves disease. Subtypes include congestive (inflammation of the orbital connective tissue), myopathic (swelling and dysfunction of the extraocular muscles), and mixed congestive-myopathic ophthalmopathy.
A ready-made or custom-made prosthesis of glass or plastic shaped and colored to resemble the anterior portion of a normal eye and used for cosmetic reasons. It is attached to the anterior portion of an orbital implant (ORBITAL IMPLANTS) which is placed in the socket of an enucleated or eviscerated eye. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
An idiopathic syndrome characterized by the formation of granulation tissue in the anterior cavernous sinus or superior orbital fissure, producing a painful ophthalmoplegia. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p271)
The compartment containing the anterior extremities and half the inferior surface of the temporal lobes (TEMPORAL LOBE) of the cerebral hemispheres. Lying posterior and inferior to the anterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, ANTERIOR), it is formed by part of the TEMPORAL BONE and SPHENOID BONE. It is separated from the posterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR) by crests formed by the superior borders of the petrous parts of the temporal bones.
Inflammation of the extraocular muscle of the eye. It is characterized by swelling which can lead to ischemia, fibrosis, or ORBITAL PSEUDOTUMOR.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)

Orbital dirofilariasis: MR findings. (1/276)

Dirofilariasis is a helminthic zoonosis occurring in many parts of the world. We report the findings in a 61-year-old woman who had painless right exophthalmos caused by orbital dirofilariasis. A vivid worm was embedded inside an inflammatory nodule in the right orbit. On T1-weighted MR images, the parasite was visible as a discrete, low-intensity, tubular signal in the center of the nodule surrounded by contrast-enhancing inflammatory tissue.  (+info)

Significance of serum antibodies reactive with flavoprotein subunit of succinate dehydrogenase in thyroid associated orbitopathy. (2/276)

AIMS: Thyroid associated orbitopathy (TAO) is an autoimmune disorder of extraocular muscles and orbital connective tissue. Identification of the principal target antigens would help the understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease and possibly lead to the development of specific therapies in the future. The purpose of this study was to measure serum antibodies against the flavoprotein subunit of succinate dehydrogenase in patients with TAO and correlate their presence with factors of TAO. METHODS: Sera of patients with active TAO of 6 months' duration or less were tested for antibodies against the flavoprotein subunit of succinate dehydrogenase. Clinical data were obtained by retrospective review of patients' charts. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to test sera for serum antibodies against purified succinate dehydrogenase. RESULTS: 38 patients with TAO and 32 healthy age and sex matched controls were included in the study. Anti-flavoprotein antibodies were detected in 24 out of 38 patients with TAO (63.16%) and in five out of 32 healthy controls (15.63%) (p<0.01). Neither age, sex, duration of thyroid disease, thyroid status, treatment of thyroid disease, smoking history, duration of orbitopathy, activity of orbitopathy, nor the presence of lid retraction were significantly associated with the presence of serum anti-flavoprotein antibodies (p>0.05). However, the total number of rectus muscles affected in both eyes of the patients was significantly correlated with the finding of a positive antibody test (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Serum antibodies reactive with the flavoprotein subunit of succinate dehydrogenase are associated with extraocular muscle involvement in active TAO of recent onset.  (+info)

Idiopathic sclerotic inflammation of the orbit with left optic nerve compression in a patient with multifocal fibrosclerosis. (3/276)

We present the MR imaging findings in a 43-year-old male patient with bilateral idiopathic sclerosing inflammation of the orbit. Bilateral enhancing retrobulbar masses, with concentric compression of the retrobulbar segment of the left optic nerve, were seen. MR imaging proved to be the only means to distinguish between the different intraorbital structures and to determine the exact site of optic nerve compression. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of MR imaging findings of this entity.  (+info)

Radiological and clinicopathological features of orbital xanthogranuloma. (4/276)

BACKGROUND: Orbital xanthogranuloma, a diagnosis confirmed histologically, occurs rarely in adults and children. With its characteristic macroscopic appearance the adult form may be associated with a spectrum of biochemical and haematological abnormalities including lymphoproliferative malignancies. METHOD: The clinicopathological features and imaging appearances on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of this condition are described in eight adults and a child. RESULTS: Radiological evidence of proptosis was present in seven patients. In all nine patients an abnormal infiltrative soft tissue mass was seen, with increased fat in six cases. All patients had associated enlargement of extraocular muscles suggestive of infiltration and five had lacrimal gland involvement. Encasement of the optic nerve, bone destruction, and intracranial extension was present only in the child with juvenile xanthogranuloma. Haematological and/or biochemical abnormalities were detected in seven patients and seven patients had other systemic diseases which were considered to have an immune basis. One patient subsequently developed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. CONCLUSION: The investigation and management of orbital xanthogranulomas requires a multidisciplinary approach even though the diagnosis may be suspected clinically. Imaging delineates the extent of disease and involvement of local structures and may influence the differential diagnosis. The juvenile form may be more locally aggressive, causing bone destruction with consequent intracranial extension.  (+info)

Chronic, traumatic intraconal hematic cyst of the orbit removed through the fronto-orbital approach--case report. (5/276)

A 22-year-old male presented with a chronic encapsulated intraorbital hematoma 3 months after blunt trauma to his left eyeball. Ophthalmological examination found the best corrected visual acuity was 4/20 in the left eye, and 20/20 in the right eye. The orbit exhibited exophthalmus and inability of the eye to move above the horizontal level. Orbital magnetic resonance imaging showed a fairly well-demarcated area in the medial aspect of the orbit appearing as hyperintense on T1-weighted images and isoto hyperintense on T2-weighted images. This area was believed to be hemorrhage. No other abnormalities were found. The diagnosis was hematic cyst. The cyst was approached through a left fronto-orbital route and its location identified within the periorbita and orbital fat. The cyst was removed partially. Histological examination demonstrated cystic accumulation of blood and breakdown products in a non-epithelium-lined fibrous capsule, compatible with hematic cyst. The presence of hemosiderin in the cyst wall suggested that the cyst was a chronically enlarging lesion. Hematic cysts of the orbit usually present as subperiosteal mass months to years after trauma. Surgical removal of the cyst wall rather than needle aspiration is recommended to prevent recurrence.  (+info)

Adipogenesis in thyroid eye disease. (6/276)

PURPOSE: Adipogenesis contributes to the pathogenesis of thyroid eye disease (TED). Thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) transcripts are present in orbital fat. This study was conducted to determine whether they are expressed as functional protein, and if so, whether this is restricted to TED orbits or to a particular stage in adipocyte differentiation. METHODS: Samples of fat were obtained from 18 TED-affected orbits and 4 normal orbits, and 9 were obtained from nonorbital locations. Frozen sections were examined by immunocytochemistry using monoclonal antibodies specific for the human TSHR. Samples were disaggregated and the preadipocytes separated from the mature by differential centrifugation and cultured in serum-free or DM and examined for morphologic changes, oil red O and TSHR staining, and TSH-induced cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production. RESULTS: Marked immunoreactivity was observed in frozen sections from all three TED samples and faint staining in both normal orbital fat samples. In vitro, 1% to 5% of preadipocytes displayed TSHR immunoreactivity in five of six TED and two of three normal orbital samples and in three of five nonorbital samples. Differentiation, was induced in all 14 orbital samples. Three of four nonorbital samples contained occasional differentiated cells. Fifty percent to 70% of differentiating cells demonstrated receptor immunoreactivity. Two of three TED and four of four nonorbital preadipocytes in DM and/or mature adipocytes displayed a TSH-mediated increase in cAMP. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that orbital fat TSHR transcripts are expressed as protein, which can be functional. This is not aberrant in TED orbits, although expression may be upregulated. The majority of preadipocytes undergoing differentiation express the receptor, indicating a key role for this population in one mechanism for increasing orbital volume.  (+info)

MRI dynamic color mapping: a new quantitative technique for imaging soft tissue motion in the orbit. (7/276)

PURPOSE: To investigate both feasibility and clinical potential of magnetic resonance imaging-dynamic color mapping (MRI-DCM) in measuring the motion of soft tissues in the orbit and in the diagnosis of orbital disorders by detecting changes in motion. METHODS: Sequences of MRI scans were acquired (acquisition time, 5 seconds) in a shoot-stop manner, while the patient fixated at a sequence of 13 gaze positions (8 degrees intervals). Motion was quantified off-line (in millimeters per degree of gaze change) using an optical flow algorithm. The motion was displayed in a color-coded image in which color saturation of a pixel shows the displacement and the hue the displacement's orientation. Six healthy volunteers and four patients (two with an orbital mass and two with acrylic ball implant after enucleation) were studied. RESULTS: The technique was found to be clinically feasible. For a gaze change of 1 degrees, orbital tissues moved between 0.0 and 0.25 mm/deg, depending on the type of tissue and location in the orbit. In the patients with an orbital mass, motion of the mass was similar to that of the medial rectus muscle, suggesting disease of muscular origin. In the enucleated orbits, soft tissue motion was decreased. One eye showed attachment of the optic nerve to the implant, which could be verified by biopsy. CONCLUSIONS: MRI-DCM allows noninvasive and quantitative measurement of soft tissue motion and the changes in motion due to pathologic conditions. In cases in which the diagnosis of a tumor in the apex is in doubt, it may reduce the need for biopsy. In contrast to static computed tomographic (CT) scans and MRIs, it can differentiate between juxtaposition and continuity and may be a new and promising tool in the differential diagnosis of intraorbital lesions.  (+info)

Anaerobic orbital abscess/cellulitis in a Yorkshire Terrier dog. (8/276)

A retrobulbar abscess/cellulitis occurred in a Yorkshire Terrier dog. The clinical signs were exophthalmos, prolapsed nictitating membrane and purulent ocular discharge. Ultrasonography showed a marked soft tissue swelling of the retrobulbar tissues as well as echogenic parallel lines between the globe and the medial orbital rim. Surgical exploration of the orbit was performed and no foreign body was found. The pterygopalatine fossa was incised and therapeutic retrobulbar drainage attempted. A drain was placed to encourage ventral drainage of the abscess. Anaerobic cultures revealed heavy growth of gram negative rods (prevotella bivia and prevotella buccae were isolated). Recovery was successful but subsequent treatment for keratoconjunctivitis sicca was necessary. A full recovery of tear production occurred after several weeks.  (+info)

Orbital diseases refer to a group of medical conditions that affect the orbit, which is the bony cavity in the skull that contains the eye, muscles, nerves, fat, and blood vessels. These diseases can cause various symptoms such as eyelid swelling, protrusion or displacement of the eyeball, double vision, pain, and limited extraocular muscle movement.

Orbital diseases can be broadly classified into inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic (benign or malignant), vascular, traumatic, and congenital categories. Some examples of orbital diseases include:

* Orbital cellulitis: a bacterial or fungal infection that causes swelling and inflammation in the orbit
* Graves' disease: an autoimmune disorder that affects the thyroid gland and can cause protrusion of the eyeballs (exophthalmos)
* Orbital tumors: benign or malignant growths that develop in the orbit, such as optic nerve gliomas, lacrimal gland tumors, and lymphomas
* Carotid-cavernous fistulas: abnormal connections between the carotid artery and cavernous sinus, leading to pulsatile proptosis and other symptoms
* Orbital fractures: breaks in the bones surrounding the orbit, often caused by trauma
* Congenital anomalies: structural abnormalities present at birth, such as craniofacial syndromes or dermoid cysts.

Proper diagnosis and management of orbital diseases require a multidisciplinary approach involving ophthalmologists, neurologists, radiologists, and other specialists.

In medical terms, the orbit refers to the bony cavity or socket in the skull that contains and protects the eye (eyeball) and its associated structures, including muscles, nerves, blood vessels, fat, and the lacrimal gland. The orbit is made up of several bones: the frontal bone, sphenoid bone, zygomatic bone, maxilla bone, and palatine bone. These bones form a pyramid-like shape that provides protection for the eye while also allowing for a range of movements.

Orbital neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the orbit, which is the bony cavity that contains the eyeball, muscles, nerves, fat, and blood vessels. These neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous), and they can arise from various types of cells within the orbit.

Orbital neoplasms can cause a variety of symptoms depending on their size, location, and rate of growth. Common symptoms include protrusion or displacement of the eyeball, double vision, limited eye movement, pain, swelling, and numbness in the face. In some cases, orbital neoplasms may not cause any noticeable symptoms, especially if they are small and slow-growing.

There are many different types of orbital neoplasms, including:

1. Optic nerve glioma: a rare tumor that arises from the optic nerve's supportive tissue.
2. Orbital meningioma: a tumor that originates from the membranes covering the brain and extends into the orbit.
3. Lacrimal gland tumors: benign or malignant growths that develop in the lacrimal gland, which produces tears.
4. Orbital lymphangioma: a non-cancerous tumor that arises from the lymphatic vessels in the orbit.
5. Rhabdomyosarcoma: a malignant tumor that develops from the skeletal muscle cells in the orbit.
6. Metastatic tumors: cancerous growths that spread to the orbit from other parts of the body, such as the breast, lung, or prostate.

The diagnosis and treatment of orbital neoplasms depend on several factors, including the type, size, location, and extent of the tumor. Imaging tests, such as CT scans and MRI, are often used to visualize the tumor and determine its extent. A biopsy may also be performed to confirm the diagnosis and determine the tumor's type and grade. Treatment options include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

Hyperesthesia is a medical term that refers to an increased sensitivity to sensory stimuli, including touch, pain, or temperature. It can affect various parts of the body and can be caused by different conditions, such as nerve damage, multiple sclerosis, or complex regional pain syndrome. Hyperesthesia can manifest as a heightened awareness of sensations, which can be painful or uncomfortable, and may interfere with daily activities. It is essential to consult a healthcare professional for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment if experiencing symptoms of hyperesthesia.

Cranial nerve diseases refer to conditions that affect the cranial nerves, which are a set of 12 pairs of nerves that originate from the brainstem and control various functions in the head and neck. These functions include vision, hearing, taste, smell, movement of the eyes and face, and sensation in the face.

Diseases of the cranial nerves can result from a variety of causes, including injury, infection, inflammation, tumors, or degenerative conditions. The specific symptoms that a person experiences will depend on which cranial nerve is affected and how severely it is damaged.

For example, damage to the optic nerve (cranial nerve II) can cause vision loss or visual disturbances, while damage to the facial nerve (cranial nerve VII) can result in weakness or paralysis of the face. Other common symptoms of cranial nerve diseases include pain, numbness, tingling, and hearing loss.

Treatment for cranial nerve diseases varies depending on the underlying cause and severity of the condition. In some cases, medication or surgery may be necessary to treat the underlying cause and relieve symptoms. Physical therapy or rehabilitation may also be recommended to help individuals regain function and improve their quality of life.

A contracture, in a medical context, refers to the abnormal shortening and hardening of muscles, tendons, or other tissue, which can result in limited mobility and deformity of joints. This condition can occur due to various reasons such as injury, prolonged immobilization, scarring, neurological disorders, or genetic conditions.

Contractures can cause significant impairment in daily activities and quality of life, making it difficult for individuals to perform routine tasks like dressing, bathing, or walking. Treatment options may include physical therapy, splinting, casting, medications, surgery, or a combination of these approaches, depending on the severity and underlying cause of the contracture.

Orbital fractures refer to breaks in the bones that make up the eye socket, also known as the orbit. These bones include the maxilla, zygoma, frontal bone, and palatine bone. Orbital fractures can occur due to trauma, such as a blunt force injury or a penetrating wound.

There are several types of orbital fractures, including:

1. Blowout fracture: This occurs when the thin bone of the orbital floor is broken, often due to a direct blow to the eye. The force of the impact can cause the eyeball to move backward, breaking the bone and sometimes trapping the muscle that moves the eye (the inferior rectus).
2. Blow-in fracture: This type of fracture involves the breakage of the orbital roof, which is the bone that forms the upper boundary of the orbit. It typically occurs due to high-impact trauma, such as a car accident or a fall from a significant height.
3. Direct fracture: A direct fracture happens when there is a break in one or more of the bones that form the walls of the orbit. This type of fracture can result from a variety of traumas, including motor vehicle accidents, sports injuries, and assaults.
4. Indirect fracture: An indirect fracture occurs when the force of an injury is transmitted to the orbit through tissues surrounding it, causing the bone to break. The most common type of indirect orbital fracture is a blowout fracture.

Orbital fractures can cause various symptoms, including pain, swelling, bruising, and double vision. In some cases, the fracture may also lead to enophthalmos (sinking of the eye into the orbit) or telecanthus (increased distance between the inner corners of the eyes). Imaging tests, such as CT scans, are often used to diagnose orbital fractures and determine the best course of treatment. Treatment may include observation, pain management, and in some cases, surgery to repair the fracture and restore normal function.

Orbital pseudotumor, also known as orbital inflammatory syndrome or idiopathic orbital inflammation, is a non-specific term used to describe a group of conditions characterized by inflammation in the orbit (the bony cavity surrounding the eye) without any identifiable cause. It is not a true tumor, but rather an inflammatory reaction that can mimic the symptoms and signs of a tumor.

The condition can affect people of any age, although it is more common in middle-aged adults. The exact cause of orbital pseudotumor is unknown, but it is believed to be related to an abnormal immune response or inflammation triggered by various factors such as infections, trauma, or autoimmune disorders.

Symptoms of orbital pseudotumor may include eye pain, redness, swelling, protrusion of the eyeball (proptosis), double vision, and decreased vision. Diagnostic tests such as imaging studies (CT or MRI scans) and biopsy may be used to rule out other causes of orbital inflammation. Treatment typically involves corticosteroids to reduce inflammation, although other immunosuppressive medications may be necessary in severe cases. In some cases, the condition may resolve on its own without treatment.

Orbital cellulitis is a serious infection involving the soft tissues within the orbit (the bony cavity containing the eye). This condition can cause symptoms such as eyelid swelling, redness, warmth, pain, and impaired eye movement. It may also be accompanied by fever, decreased vision, or altered mental status in severe cases. Orbital cellulitis often results from the spread of infection from nearby structures, such as the sinuses. Immediate medical attention is required to prevent potential complications like vision loss or intracranial infections. Treatment typically involves antibiotics and, in some cases, surgical intervention.

Exophthalmos is a medical condition that refers to the abnormal protrusion or bulging of one or both eyes beyond the normal orbit (eye socket). This condition is also known as proptosis. Exophthalmos can be caused by various factors, including thyroid eye disease (Graves' ophthalmopathy), tumors, inflammation, trauma, or congenital abnormalities. It can lead to various symptoms such as double vision, eye discomfort, redness, and difficulty closing the eyes. Treatment of exophthalmos depends on the underlying cause and may include medications, surgery, or radiation therapy.

Graves' ophthalmopathy, also known as Graves' eye disease or thyroid eye disease, is an autoimmune condition that affects the eyes. It often occurs in individuals with Graves' disease, an autoimmune disorder that causes hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid gland). However, it can also occur in people without Graves' disease.

In Graves' ophthalmopathy, the immune system attacks the tissue behind the eyes, causing inflammation and enlargement of the muscles, fatty tissue, and connective tissue within the orbit (eye socket). This leads to symptoms such as:

1. Protrusion or bulging of the eyes (exophthalmos)
2. Redness and swelling of the eyelids
3. Double vision (diplopia) due to restricted eye movement
4. Pain and discomfort, especially when looking up, down, or sideways
5. Light sensitivity (photophobia)
6. Tearing and dryness in the eyes
7. Vision loss in severe cases

The treatment for Graves' ophthalmopathy depends on the severity of the symptoms and may include medications to manage inflammation, eye drops or ointments for dryness, prisms to correct double vision, or surgery for severe cases.

An artificial eye, also known as a prosthetic eye, is a type of medical device that is used to replace a natural eye that has been removed or is not functional due to injury, disease, or congenital abnormalities. It is typically made of acrylic or glass and is custom-made to match the size, shape, and color of the patient's other eye as closely as possible.

The artificial eye is designed to fit over the eye socket and rest on the eyelids, allowing the person to have a more natural appearance and improve their ability to blink and close their eye. It does not restore vision, but it can help protect the eye socket and improve the patient's self-esteem and quality of life.

The process of fitting an artificial eye typically involves several appointments with an ocularist, who is a healthcare professional trained in the measurement, design, and fabrication of prosthetic eyes. The ocularist will take impressions of the eye socket, create a model, and then use that model to make the artificial eye. Once the artificial eye is made, the ocularist will fit it and make any necessary adjustments to ensure that it is comfortable and looks natural.

Tolosa-Hunt syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the inflammation of the nerve structures (including the fifth and sixth cranial nerves) within the cavernous sinus, a venous space near the base of the skull. This inflammation can lead to various symptoms such as:

1. Unilateral or bilateral orbital pain, which may be severe and deep, often radiating around the eye and temple.
2. Ophthalmoplegia (paralysis of the eye muscles), causing double vision (diplopia) and limited eye movement in specific directions.
3. Ptosis (drooping of the eyelid).
4. Other possible symptoms include decreased sensation around the forehead, cheek, or upper jaw, and loss of taste on the anterior part of the tongue.

The exact cause of Tolosa-Hunt syndrome is unknown, but it's believed to be related to an autoimmune response or a non-specific inflammatory process. It can also occur in conjunction with other medical conditions like neoplasms (tumors) or infections. The diagnosis typically involves imaging studies such as MRI and CT scans, along with blood tests and a thorough neurological examination.

Treatment usually includes corticosteroids to reduce inflammation and alleviate symptoms. In some cases, immunosuppressive medications or radiation therapy may be necessary. If left untreated, Tolosa-Hunt syndrome can lead to permanent visual impairment or other neurological deficits.

The middle cranial fossa is a depression or hollow in the skull that forms the upper and central portion of the cranial cavity. It is located between the anterior cranial fossa (which lies anteriorly) and the posterior cranial fossa (which lies posteriorly). The middle cranial fossa contains several important structures, including the temporal lobes of the brain, the pituitary gland, the optic chiasm, and the cavernous sinuses. It is also where many of the cranial nerves pass through on their way to the brain.

The middle cranial fossa can be further divided into two parts: the anterior and posterior fossae. The anterior fossa contains the optic chiasm and the pituitary gland, while the posterior fossa contains the temporal lobes of the brain and the cavernous sinuses.

The middle cranial fossa is formed by several bones of the skull, including the sphenoid bone, the temporal bone, and the parietal bone. The shape and size of the middle cranial fossa can vary from person to person, and abnormalities in its structure can be associated with various medical conditions, such as pituitary tumors or aneurysms.

Orbital myositis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the extraocular muscles, which are the muscles responsible for eye movement. These muscles are located within the orbit, the bony cavity that contains and protects the eye. Orbital myositis can cause symptoms such as painful eye movements, double vision, redness, swelling, and decreased visual acuity.

The condition is often associated with other systemic inflammatory or autoimmune disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis, granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), and sarcoidosis. However, it can also occur as an isolated phenomenon, known as idiopathic orbital myositis.

Diagnosis of orbital myositis typically involves a combination of clinical examination, imaging studies such as MRI or CT scans, and blood tests to evaluate for underlying systemic conditions. Treatment usually includes corticosteroids to reduce inflammation and alleviate symptoms, as well as addressing any underlying systemic disorders if present.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

150(4):460-463, 2010 Wirostko E, Johnson L, Wirostko B. Chronic orbital inflammatory disease: parasitisation of orbital ... orbital cellulitis and carotid-cavernous fistula. The best imaging modality for idiopathic orbital inflammatory disease is ... Idiopathic orbital inflammatory (IOI) disease refers to a marginated mass-like enhancing soft tissue involving any area of the ... Orbital pseudotumor has also been observed in association with Crohn's disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid ...
"Orbital Tenonitis disease: Malacards - Research Articles, Drugs, Genes, Clinical Trials". www.malacards.org. Retrieved 2020-11- ... "Inflammatory Orbital Disease - Eye Disorders". Merck Manuals Professional Edition. Retrieved 2020-12-15. Dubey, Suneeta; Singh ... Tenon's capsule may have inflammation from a disease called idiopathic orbital inflammation syndrome. There is no history of ... Although this may not be a lethal disease, it will progressively get worse over time. Depending on the severity of the disease ...
"Treatment of Orbital Diseases in Small Animals". Proceedings of the 27th World Congress of the World Small Animal Veterinary ... The disease is usually bilateral. MMM is caused by the presence of 2M fibers in the muscles of the jaw. 2M fibers are not found ... The disease mainly affects large breed dogs. German Shepherd Dogs and Cavalier King Charles Spaniels may be predisposed. There ... Masticatory muscle myositis (MMM) is an inflammatory disease in dogs affecting the muscles of mastication (chewing). It is also ...
... can be either bilateral (as is often seen in Graves' disease) or unilateral (as is often seen in an orbital tumor ... Gelatt, Kirk (2002). Treatment of Orbital Diseases in Small Animals. Proceedings of the 27th World Congress of the World Small ... Dacryoadenitis Erdheim-Chester disease Mucormycosis Orbital pseudotumor - presents with acute, usually unilateral proptosis ... Inflammatory/Infection: Graves' ophthalmopathy due to Graves' disease, usually causes bilateral proptosis. Orbital cellulitis ...
Colegrove, Jeffrey (February 2002). "Practical Diagnosis and Management of Orbital Disease. : Optometry & Vision Science". ... ISBN 9781591201823 Practice Diagnosis and Management of Orbital Disease Kennerdell JS, Cockerham KP, Maroon JC, Rothfus WE. ( ... pioneered the radical orbital decompression procedure for severe dysthyroid exophthalmos. In 1985, they were the first to ... Kennerdell, J. S.; Maroon, J. C.; Garrity, J. A.; Abla, A. A. (1986-09-15). "Surgical management of orbital lymphangioma with ...
Diagnosis is difficult due to its gradual onset and the fact that the symptoms are the same as other diseases. PCNSLO is ... Orbital lymphoma accounts for 55% of malignant orbital tumors in adults. In one study, this was 10% of patients presenting with ... Orbital lymphoma is a common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that occurs near or on the eye. Common symptoms include decreased ... Orbital lymphoma can be diagnosed via a biopsy of the eye and is usually treated with radiotherapy or in combination with ...
"Orbital plasmablastic lymphoma: a clinico-pathological correlation of a rare disease and review of literature". Clin Ophthalmol ... "Clinicopathologic features of orbital immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD): a case series and literature review". ... adjuvant therapy to mitigate the high risk of metastasis and multimodal management of orbital affection of the disease and he ... "Orbital immunoglobulin-G4-related disease: case series and literature review". Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology. 42 (7): ...
Examples include sarcoidosis, thyroid eye disease, and orbital pseudotumor. Dacryoadenitis can be diagnosed by examination of ... For other causes, the treatment is specific to the causative disease. Most patients will fully recover from dacryoadenitis. For ... cite journal}}: Cite journal requires ,journal= (help) Source (NIH/Medline) eMedicine Diseases Database (DDB): 3430 (CS1 errors ...
TAO is an orbital autoimmune disease. The thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSH-R) is an antigen found in orbital fat and ... The orbital fat or the stretching of the nerve due to increased orbital volume may also lead to optic nerve damage. The patient ... Cigarette smoking, which is associated with many autoimmune diseases, raises the incidence 7.7-fold. Mild disease will often ... "Radiologic Parameters of Orbital Bone Remodeling in Thyroid Eye Disease". Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science. 58 (5 ...
Givner LB (December 2002). "Periorbital versus orbital cellulitis". The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal. 21 (12): 1157- ... Orbital cellulitis Cellulitis "Orbital and periorbital cellulitis". HealthAtoZ.com. East Windsor, NJ: OptumHealth. Archived ... Periorbital cellulitis, or preseptal cellulitis (not to be confused with orbital cellulitis, which is posterior to the orbital ... and post-septal peri-orbital infections are different diseases. A retrospective review of 262 cases". International Journal of ...
"Application of tele-ophthalmology in remote diagnosis and management of adnexal and orbital diseases". Indian Journal of ... Telehealth networks are growing in number, and advancements are being made in automated detection methods for diseases such as ... Today, applications of teleophthalmology encompass access to eye specialists for patients in remote areas, ophthalmic disease ... strabismus and adnexal eye diseases. Less common conditions that can be revealed using retinal images are arterial and vein ...
US and color Doppler imaging of ocular and orbital disease in the pediatric age group. RadioGraphics 1996; 16(2): 251-272. ... Coats' disease results in a gradual loss of vision. Blood leaks from the abnormal vessels into the back of the eye, leaving ... Coats' disease itself is painless. Pain may occur if fluid is unable to drain from the eye properly, causing the internal ... Coats' disease can also fall under glaucoma. It can have a similar presentation to that of retinoblastoma. The most common sign ...
Balasubramanian K (May 2006). "Molecular orbital basis for yellow curry spice curcumin's prevention of Alzheimer's disease". ... Structural Insights and Their Application to Alzheimer's Disease Models". International Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. 2012: ... In animal models with Alzheimer disease, it has anti-destructive effect of beta amyloid in the brain, and recently it shows ... This is why GSK-3β is associated with the pathogenesis and progression of many diseases, such as diabetes, obesity, cancer, and ...
May 2010). "Cerebral, facial, and orbital involvement in Erdheim-Chester disease: CT and MR imaging findings". Radiology. 255 ( ... Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is an extremely rare disease characterized by the abnormal multiplication of a specific type of ... "Erdheim-Chester Disease". ECD Global Alliance. Retrieved 2009-05-08. "Erdheim Chester disease". NORD (National Organization for ... Erdheim-Chester Disease, Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis, and Rosai-Dorfman Disease". Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 94 (10): 2054-2071 ...
He has also worked and published on optic neuropathies, orbital disease, and the basic science underlying problems in neuro- ... Sadun has focused his research on diseases of the optic nerve, diseases of mitochondrial impairment, optic nerve regeneration, ... In these and other studies, he has also investigated the role of mitochondria in aging and disease in the brain, optic nerve ... Sadun has received recognition for his work in neuro-ophthalmology and especially in diseases of the optic nerve. He has ...
The disease is also known as orbital inflammatory pseudotumor, and sometimes may only affect the lacrimal gland or the ... Tenon's capsule may be affected by a disease called idiopathic orbital inflammation, a condition of unknown etiology that is ... Mitchell RN (8 April 2011). "Eye, Orbit". Pocket companion to Robbins and Cotran pathologic basis of disease (8th ed.). ... separating it from the orbital fat and forming a socket in which it moves. The inner surface of Tenon's capsule is smooth and ...
Wald, ER (June 2007). "Periorbital and orbital infections". Infectious Disease Clinics of North America. 21 (2): 393-408, vi. ... Orbital venography is difficult to perform, but it is excellent in diagnosing occlusion of the cavernous sinus. Orbital ... Both acute, fulminant disease, and indolent, subacute presentations have been reported in the literature. The most common signs ... Brismar, G; Brismar, J (February 1977). "Aseptic thrombosis of orbital veins and cavernous sinus. Clinical symptomatology". ...
It is often a multi-organ disease affecting pancreas, liver, kidney, salivary and orbital tissues and retroperitoneum. The ... IgG4-related disease, Steroid-responsive inflammatory conditions, Thyroid disease). ... IgG4-related autoimmune diseases are characterized by excessive fibrosis. In case of Riedel's thyroiditis, fibrosis extends ... It is now believed that Riedel's thyroiditis is one manifestation of a systemic disease that can affect many organ systems ...
He completed his residency at Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital, and his fellowship in ocular tumor, orbital disease and ... orbital disease and ophthalmic radiation therapy). Finger is a Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology at the New York University ... orbital disease and ophthalmic radiation therapy with Samuel Packer, MD (inventor of iodine-125 plaque brachytherapy). Dr. ... metastatic cancer to the eye and orbital tumors. He has helped produce multiple medical textbooks and chapters on eye cancer. ...
Sihota, Ramanjit; Tandon, Radhika (2011). "Diseases of the Orbit". Parsons' Diseases of the Eye. New Delhi: Elsevier India. p. ... Orbital x-ray or orbital radiography is an x-ray of both left and right eye sockets, to include the Frontal Sinuses and ... An orbital x-ray usually requires only one view unless the requester is looking for evidence of metallic fragments, in which ... It is useful for detecting fractures of the surrounding bone arising from injury or disease. It is also commonly used for ...
A variety of pathologies and diseases can present similarly to orbital cellulitis, including: Inflammatory causes (thyroid eye ... Orbital cellulitis is inflammation of eye tissues behind the orbital septum. It is most commonly caused by an acute spread of ... Death Rates for Orbital Cellulitis Pub Med Health - Orbital Cellulitis (CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list, Articles with ... orbital fracture, retrobulbar hemorrhage, orbital foreign body, carotid cavernous fistula) Malformation (congenital, vascular) ...
Orbital disease is the most common manifestation, and may result in proptosis, restrictive ophthalmopathy, chronic orbital pain ... Hyperthyroidism Hypothyroidism Alcoholism Crohn's disease Liver disease Malnutrition Peptic ulcer disease Pancreatic disease ... Carotid artery disease Arterial spasm (TIA) Diabetes mellitus Collagen diseases Venous occlusive disease Thrombosis Use of ... An ocular manifestation of a systemic disease is an eye condition that directly or indirectly results from a disease process in ...
Although IgG4-related ophthalmic disease is the recommended name for all orbital manifestations of IgG4-related disease, more ... IgG4-related orbital inflammation (orbital soft tissue) IgG4-related pan-orbital inflammation (all of the various types of ... IgG4-related ophthalmic disease (IgG4-ROD) is the recommended term to describe orbital (eye socket) manifestations of the ... Idiopathic orbital inflammatory disease Masayuki Takahira; Yoshiaki Ozawa; Mitsuhiro Kawano; Yoh Zen; Shoko Hamaoka; Kazunori ...
Manson, P., Manson-Bahr, P., and Wilcocks, C. Manson's Tropical Diseases: A Manual of the Diseases. New York: William Wood and ... orbital cellulitis, exophthalmos (protrusion of the eyeball), and/or an exposed cornea ulcer. The most common sign at ... Public health interventions should focus on water and dietary sanitation, as well as education about the disease in rural areas ... The early stages of disease in humans are often asymptomatic, but the spargana typically cause a painful inflammatory reaction ...
... on its own is a mild and self-limiting disease. The majority of cases of orbital emphysema are self-resolving ... true orbital emphysema, and orbitopalpebral emphysema. Orbital emphysema on its own is a mild and self-limiting disease, and ... However, when orbital soft tissues, such as fat, falls back on the sino-orbital communication, a one-way ball valve will be ... Orbital emphysema is a common result of certain types of surgery, in particular the ones that involve orbital medial wall. It ...
... may refer to: Idiopathic orbital inflammatory disease International Olympiad in Informatics Interonset interval Indication ...
... orbital compressive disease, a steal phenomenon, and blood hyperviscosity or hypercoagulability." With respect to embolic and ... Newman NJ (1998). "Cerebrovascular disease". In Hoyt WG, Miller N, Walsh F, Newman NJ (eds.). Walsh and Hoyt's Clinical Neuro- ... If the diagnostic workup reveals a systemic disease process, directed therapies to treat the underlying cause are required. If ... "Unilateral visual loss in bright light may indicate ipsilateral carotid artery occlusive disease and may reflect the inability ...
Specialising in eyelid, orbital and thyroid eye disease surgery, Dr. Nair was one of the first clinicians to report and study ... Amphotericin-B which has helped improve outcomes in rhino-orbital mucormycosis, a disease traditionally known to have high ... "Neurological Diseases", Retinal and Choroidal Imaging in Systemic Diseases, Singapore: Springer, pp. 1-14, doi:10.1007/978-981- ... Notably, in 2021 Nair and Dave proposed a novel protocol for case selection of patients suitable for orbital injection of the ...
... ophthalmic oncology and orbital diseases specialist, surgeon Behram Kurşunoğlu, physicist, co-founder of the Center for ... Microbial Diseases) at Yale University Ian F. Akyildiz, Chair Professor in Telecommunications Ilkay Altintas, Chief data ...
Rhinologic Evaluation in Orbital and Lacrimal Disease", Endoscopic Surgery of the Orbit, Philadelphia: Elsevier, pp. 36-40, ... The posterior lacrimal crest is a vertical bony ridge on the orbital surface of the lacrimal bone. It divides the bone into two ... The posterior lacrimal crest is a vertical bony ridge on the orbital (lateral) surface of the lacrimal bone. It divides the ...
150(4):460-463, 2010 Wirostko E, Johnson L, Wirostko B. Chronic orbital inflammatory disease: parasitisation of orbital ... orbital cellulitis and carotid-cavernous fistula. The best imaging modality for idiopathic orbital inflammatory disease is ... Idiopathic orbital inflammatory (IOI) disease refers to a marginated mass-like enhancing soft tissue involving any area of the ... Orbital pseudotumor has also been observed in association with Crohns disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid ...
... originally called Graves-Basedow disease, was first described as the triad of hyperthyroidism, goiter, and exophthalmos in 1835 ... encoded search term (Orbital Decompression for Graves Disease) and Orbital Decompression for Graves Disease What to Read Next ... Severe orbital manifestations of Graves disease early in the disease course often respond to high-dose corticosteroid therapy. ... The orbital plate of the maxilla joins the orbital plate of the zygoma and the orbital plate of the palatine bones to form the ...
Acute Chagas Disease Manifesting as Orbital Cellulitis, Texas, USA F. Parker Hudson. , Natalie Homer, Aliza Epstein, and ... Results of next-generation sequencing on a plasma sample of a patient with acute Chagas disease manifesting as orbital ... Acute Chagas Disease Manifesting as Orbital Cellulitis, Texas, USA. ... The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website. ...
Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a very rare, typically septic thrombosis of the cavernous sinus, usually caused by nasal furuncles or bacterial sinusitis. Symptoms and signs include pain, proptosis, ophthalmoplegia, vision loss, papilledema, and fever. Diagnosis is confirmed by CT or MRI. Treatment is with IV antibiotics. Complications are common, and prognosis is guarded.
Orbital Decompression post surgery numbnessAnonymous2000-04-30T18:20:44-07:00 Search for:. ... Graves Disease and Thyroid Foundation. P.O. Box 2793, Rancho Santa Fe, CA 92067. Toll-Free National: 1-877-643-3123. Email: ...
Although TB rates are decreasing in the United States, the disease is becoming more common in many parts of the world. ... is the most common cause of infectious disease-related mortality worldwide. ... a multisystemic disease with myriad presentations and manifestations, ... Adnexal or orbital disease may be seen with preauricular lymphadenopathy. Because of the wide variability in the disease ...
Source: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Division of Bacterial Diseases ... Edema (often pronounced facial and orbital edema, especially on arising in the morning) ... Committee on Infectious Diseases. Group A streptococcal infections. In Kimberlin DW, Barnett ED, Lynfield R, Sawyer MH, editors ... The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website. ...
Sterile subperiosteal fluid collections accompanying orbital wall infarction in sickle-cell disease. J AAPOS. 2014 Oct; 18(5): ...
Exenteration for benign orbital disease. (1 January, 1994) G E Rose, J E Wright ... Pseudomonas conjunctival ulcer and secondary orbital cellulitis in a patient with AIDS. (1 January, 1994) J Cano-Parra, E ...
Orbital cellulitis is an infection of the fat and muscles around the eye. It affects the eyelids, eyebrows, and cheeks. It may ... Orbital cellulitis is an infection of the fat and muscles around the eye. It affects the eyelids, eyebrows, and cheeks. It may ... Mandell, Douglas, and Bennetts Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap ... Orbital cellulitis is a dangerous infection, which can cause lasting problems. Orbital cellulitis is different than periorbital ...
Restrictive or paralytic forms due to orbital fractures, inflammatory disease, congenital anomalies, central nervous system ... Our pediatric ophthalmologists are trained to recognize and manage eye diseases and disorders in children whose vision is still ... We are also among the few centers that manage infantile glaucoma, another rare but very serious eye disease. ...
Botting AM, McIntosh D, Mahadevan M. Paediatric pre- and post-septal peri-orbital infections are different diseases. A ... Periorbital and orbital infections. Infect Dis Clin North Am. 2007 Jun. 21(2):393-408, vi. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. ... Periorbital and orbital infections. Pediatr Rev. 2004 Sep. 25(9):312-20. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. ... Thomas E Herchline, MD is a member of the following medical societies: Alpha Omega Alpha, Infectious Diseases Society of ...
Orbital Tumors, Retinal Diseases, Skin Cancer, Tear Duct Exploration, Tearing Problems, Thyroid Eye Disease Language(s). ...
Ptosis may be associated with neurologic or orbital diseases such as stroke and/or cerebral aneurysm, Horner syndrome, ... orbital infection and orbital masses. Consideration should be given to these conditions in the presence of ptosis with ... Advise UPNEEQ patients with cardiovascular disease, orthostatic hypotension, and/or uncontrolled hypertension or hypotension to ... be exercised in patients receiving alpha adrenergic receptor antagonists such as in the treatment of cardiovascular disease, or ...
Orbital inflammatory disease (pseudotumor) usually is treated medically with systemic steroids. Capillary hemangiomas also can ... Surgical approaches to orbital disease. Ophthalmol Clin North Am. 1996. 9(4):581-591. ... encoded search term (Orbital Tumors) and Orbital Tumors What to Read Next on Medscape ... The transconjunctival approach to the orbital floor and orbital fat. A prospective study. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg. 1990. 6( ...
Orbital infections are diseases that require special attention and care. The main risk factors are associated with paranasal ... REBOUCAS, Deyvid da Silva et al. Orbital infeccion: experience on the management of six cases. Rev. cir. traumatol. buco-maxilo ... This paper presents and discusses the management of six patients admitted with orbital infection by service Oral and ...
ORBITAL INVOLVEMENT IN SINONASAL DISEASES Zia-us-Salam Qazi, Sarfraz Latif, Sadia Maqsood Awan ... EALES DISEASE Mohammad Naeem Khan, Syed Shahmeer Raza, Shayan Qadir, Hana Rehman, Amer Kamal Hussain, Muhammad Daniyal Nadeem, ... C-REACTIVE PROTEIN LEVEL IN CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE AND ITS CORRELATION WITH SERUM D-DIMER Chaman Gul, Zahid Irfan Marwat, ... CELIAC CRISIS: A RARE OR RARELY RECOGNIZED DISEASE Nadia Waheed, Huma Arshad Cheema, Hassan Suleman, Zafar Fayyaz, Iqra Mushtaq ...
Mandell, Douglas, and Bennetts Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap ... Orbital cellulitis is a dangerous infection, which can cause lasting problems. Orbital cellulitis is different than periorbital ... Orbital cellulitis is an infection of the fat and muscles around the eye. It affects the eyelids, eyebrows, and cheeks. It may ... Orbital infections. In: Kliegman RM, St. Geme JW, Blum NJ, Shah SS, Tasker RC, Wilson KM, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. ...
Rituximab for the treatment of IgG4-related orbital disease: experience from five cases. Wu, A., Andrew, N. H., Tsirbas, A., ...
Other commonly reported symptoms include myalgia, headache, retro-orbital pain and vomiting. The disease is usually mild with ... A viral disease transmitted by the bite of Aedes mosquitoes infected with Zika Virus. Its mild Dengue-like symptoms include ... The severe version of the disease, that requires hospitalization, is unusual and it is shows low lethality. Based on the ...
This is called orbital decompression surgery. This can only be done when the endocrine orbitopathy has come to rest. We will do ... Graves Disease is an autoimmune disease that affects the thyroid, and is the most common cause of hypothyroidism (an ... As the disease progresses, diplopia (seeing double) can start to occur.. The endocrine orbitopathy often extends over months to ... This doesnt just apply to lasers on the cornea and robots in the retina: it applies to orbital surgery too. ...
Lateral orbital decompression for Graves orbitopathy. Indication, surgical technique, and treatment success]. Ophthalmologe. ... Autoimmune thyroid disease in systemic lupus erythematosus and Sj?grens syndrome. Clin Exp Rheumatol. 1996 May-Jun; 14(3):321- ... "Graves Disease" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject ... This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Graves Disease" by people in this website by year, and whether ...
Neurofibromatosis is a systemic disease that often produces striking disfigurement. Orbital manifestations are common and ... 0.001). The average orbital relapse rate was 1.64 mm. Conclusion: Hypertelorbitism correction allows the orbital mobilization ... Orbital plexiform neurofibroma is characterized by pulsatile exophthalmos, orbital neurofibromwas, sphenoid wing dysplasia, ... Orbital relapse after hypertelorbitism correction. Cássio Eduardo Raposo do Amaral, César Augusto Raposo do Amaral, James P. ...
Oculoplastics/Orbital Disease. Professor of Ophthalmology for the University of Queensland; Practising at the Orbital Clinic at ...
Eye and eyelid disease. *Corneal and orbital diseases. *Myopia and hyperopia. *Cataract and glaucoma ...
... on their molecule orbitals. The products had remarkable direct pulmonary toxicity. ... Weissman is a pulmonary diseases physician. He is the Director of NIOSH Division of Respiratory Disease Studies and Manager of ... Pleuropulmonary disease in a polyacrylate facility. Posted on July 26, 2011. by Vladimir Murashov, PhD, Charles L Geraci, PhD, ... The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website. ...
Townsend then went on to fulfill a residency in ophthalmology and a fellowship in oculoplastic/orbital disease at the ... Townsend specializes in surgical procedures involving the eyelids, the tear duct system, and the orbital bone around the eye. ...
Orbital Diseases (1) * Orbital Fractures (1) * Pharmacies (1) * Propylene Glycols (1) * Radiology (1) ... Orbital Vascular Malformations: Relationship Between Enophthalmos and Clinically Apparent Distensibility with Valsalva. Cheng, ...
Orbital Disease in Neuro-Ophthalmology. abstract::Many abnormalities of the orbit present with neuro-ophthalmic findings, such ... Prion Diseases. abstract::Prions diseases are uniformly fatal neurodegenerative diseases that occur in sporadic, genetic, and ... Current Infectious Disease Reports CURRENT OPINION IN INFECTIOUS DISEASES JAPANESE JOURNAL OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES Journal of ... INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY Journal of Digestive Diseases DIGESTIVE DISEASES AND SCIENCES ...
62 99 00 Disease, orbit, type specified NEC 62 99 00 Herniation, orbital fat *Codes for surgical and nonsurgical therapy were ... disease 76 27 00 Disease, Coats 76 28 00 Disease, Eales 76 28 00 Eales disease 76 30 00 Retinopathy, central serous NOS 76 ... 77 00 72 Disease, optic nerve, type not specified, associated with demyelinating disease 77 00 72 Disease, optic nerve, type ... secondary to other eye disease. /Code also precipitating disease/ 74 89 56 Opacity, lens, diabetic (snowflake) 74 99 00 Disease ...
  • A differential diagnosis includes lymphoproliferative lesions, thyroid ophthalmopathy, IgG4-related ophthalmic disease, sarcoidosis, granulomatosis with polyangiitis, orbital cellulitis and carotid-cavernous fistula. (wikipedia.org)
  • Results of next-generation sequencing on a plasma sample of a patient with acute Chagas disease manifesting as orbital cellulitis, Texas, USA, showing the very high detection of Trypanosoma cruzi (505.61 MPM) (right). (cdc.gov)
  • Pseudomonas conjunctival ulcer and secondary orbital cellulitis in a patient with AIDS. (bmj.com)
  • Orbital cellulitis is an infection of the fat and muscles around the eye. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Orbital cellulitis is a dangerous infection, which can cause lasting problems. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Orbital cellulitis is different than periorbital cellulitis , which is an infection of the eyelid or skin around the eye. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The bacteria Staphylococcus aureus , Streptococcus pneumoniae , and beta-hemolytic streptococci may also cause orbital cellulitis. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Orbital cellulitis infections in children may get worse very quickly and can lead to visual difficulties or blindness. (medlineplus.gov)
  • An orbital cellulitis infection can get worse very quickly. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Orbital cellulitis is a medical emergency that needs to be treated right away. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Prompt treatment of a sinus or dental infection may prevent it from spreading and becoming orbital cellulitis. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Conditions such as orbital cellulitis often are treated medically with various antimicrobial agents. (medscape.com)
  • Ioannis Mavrikakis is an award-winning oculoplastic, lacrimal and orbital surgeon ( oculoplastic surgeon ) with international recognition. (ioannismavrikakis.com)
  • As an oculoplastic and lacrimal surgeon, Dr. Townsend specializes in surgical procedures involving the eyelids, the tear duct system, and the orbital bone around the eye. (eyehealthvision.com)
  • Dr. Townsend then went on to fulfill a residency in ophthalmology and a fellowship in oculoplastic/orbital disease at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. (eyehealthvision.com)
  • Transcranial approaches can be used for tumors involving the orbital-cranial regions. (medscape.com)
  • Adult ptosis may also occur as a complication of other diseases involving the levator muscle or its nerve supply, such as neurologic and muscular diseases and, in rare cases, orbital tumors. (ioannismavrikakis.com)
  • Idiopathic orbital inflammatory syndrome, also known as orbital pseudotumor, was first described by Gleason in 1903 and by Busse and Hochheim. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its former name, orbital pseudotumor, is derived due to resemblance to a neoplasm. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several studies have described cases where onset of orbital pseudotumor was seen simultaneously or several weeks after upper respiratory infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • Orbital pseudotumor has also been observed in association with Crohn's disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes mellitus, myasthenia gravis, and ankylosing spondylitis all of which strengthen the basis of IOI being an immune-mediated disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Trauma has also been seen to precede some cases of orbital pseudotumor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Orbital inflammatory disease (pseudotumor) usually is treated medically with systemic steroids. (medscape.com)
  • It is a benign, nongranulomatous orbital inflammatory process characterized by extraocular orbital and adnexal inflammation with no known local or systemic cause. (wikipedia.org)
  • Idiopathic orbital inflammation has a varied clinical presentation depending on the involved tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • It can range from a diffuse inflammatory process to a more localized inflammation of muscle, lacrimal gland or orbital fat. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pediatric IOI accounts for about 17% of cases idiopathic orbital inflammation. (wikipedia.org)
  • proposes that organisms resembling Mollicutes cause orbital inflammation by destroying the cytoplasmic organelles of parasitized cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The histopathology of idiopathic orbital inflammation is described as nondiagnostic and diverse. (wikipedia.org)
  • They include inflammation of the extraocular muscles (myositis) with tendinous involvement, orbital fat stranding, lacrimal gland inflammation and enlargement (dacryoadenitis), involvement of the optic sheath complex, uvea, and sclera, a focal intraorbital mass or even diffuse orbital involvement. (wikipedia.org)
  • Orbital findings result from an increase in the volume of orbital tissues secondary to inflammation, edema, and congestion. (medscape.com)
  • Orbital infection and inflammation. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In more severe disease, one may experience redness, inflammation, foreign body sensation in the eyes and blurring of vision. (polyhealth.com.hk)
  • Graves disease, originally called Graves-Basedow disease, was first described as the triad of hyperthyroidism , goiter , and exophthalmos in 1835. (medscape.com)
  • Severe ophthalmopathy is an uncommon but problematic manifestation of Graves disease. (medscape.com)
  • Only 5-6% of patients with Graves disease develop problems severe enough to warrant surgical decompression on a functional basis. (medscape.com)
  • Orbitopathy associated with Graves disease may severely compromise a patient's vision. (medscape.com)
  • Graves' Disease is an autoimmune disease that affects the thyroid, and is the most common cause of hypothyroidism (an underactive thyroid). (elza-institute.com)
  • Most people with Graves' Disease go on to have eye problems, particularly exophthalmos (eye bulging). (elza-institute.com)
  • Sometimes endocrine orbitopathy occurs at the same time, sometimes it is the first sign of Graves' disease, and sometimes it occurs only after some time after other thyroid dysfunction symptoms manifest. (elza-institute.com)
  • Graves Disease" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (ouhsc.edu)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Graves Disease" by people in this website by year, and whether "Graves Disease" was a major or minor topic of these publications. (ouhsc.edu)
  • Below are the most recent publications written about "Graves Disease" by people in Profiles. (ouhsc.edu)
  • Lateral orbital decompression for Graves' orbitopathy. (ouhsc.edu)
  • There have been few studies to evaluate with Graves disease will develop GO and the prevalence and severity of GO in Iranian severe forms affect 3% to 5% of patients. (who.int)
  • The onset of the ophthalmopathy is in aimed to investigate the prevalence and most cases concomitant with the onset severity of ophthalmopathy in Graves of hyperthyroidism, but eye disease may patients in our area (north-east of the precede or follow hyperthyroidism [ 3 ]. (who.int)
  • All patients with regarding the pathogenesis, pathophysio- confirmed diagnosis of Graves disease logy, and management of this disease attending the endocrine clinics of the [ 6,7 ]. (who.int)
  • Introduction: Treatment of Graves´ disease (GD) with radioiodine increases the risk of developing Graves´ ophthalmopathy (GO), and the link between thyroid and orbital tissue may be the presence of TSH-receptors. (lu.se)
  • The best imaging modality for idiopathic orbital inflammatory disease is contrast-enhanced thin section magnetic resonance with fat suppression. (wikipedia.org)
  • Endocrine orbitopathy (EO) usually occurs in both eyes at the same time, but its time of onset does not necessarily coincide with the start of thyroid disease. (elza-institute.com)
  • Autoimmune thyroid disease in systemic lupus erythematosus and Sj?gren's syndrome. (ouhsc.edu)
  • In addition, severe forms of GO can lead to and thyroid disease was first recognized sight-threatening complications. (who.int)
  • Regardless, the processes show a predilection for the orbital tissues, the extraocular muscles, and periorbital structures. (medscape.com)
  • Exenteration for benign orbital disease. (bmj.com)
  • This doesn't just apply to lasers on the cornea and robots in the retina: it applies to orbital surgery too. (elza-institute.com)
  • Macular degeneration is a degenerative disease of the central retina, which causes the photoreceptor cells in the macula to be damaged and unable to function normally. (polyhealth.com.hk)
  • Orbital infections. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Orbital infections are diseases that require special attention and care. (bvsalud.org)
  • It is important to note that this is a disease condition code, not intended for asymptomatic infections. (cdc.gov)
  • Other commonly reported symptoms include myalgia, headache, retro-orbital pain and vomiting. (bvsalud.org)
  • The disease is usually mild with symptoms that last from several days to a week. (bvsalud.org)
  • Treatment of Nonmotor Symptoms Associated with Parkinson Disease. (shengsci.com)
  • However, PD is also characterized by a myriad of nonmotor symptoms, which may occur even before motor symptoms, early in the course of disease, and throughout the advancing disease. (shengsci.com)
  • 1) describe the epidemiology, clinical manifestation, management and prevention of Zika virus disease, 2) discuss diagnostic testing for Zika virus infection and interpretation of test results, 3) articulate the importance of early recognition and reporting of cases, 4) state the recommendations for pregnant women and possible Zika virus exposure, and 5) discuss evaluation of infants with microcephaly and relationship of Zika in microcephaly. (cdc.gov)
  • In her career at CDC, she has focused on the development of evidence-based clinical guidelines for infectious diseases. (cdc.gov)
  • If the available epidemiological and clinical information are not adequate to permit a best guess for reporting purposes, then report the case as Flavivirus disease, not otherwise specified (Flavivirus NOS) using condition code 50237. (cdc.gov)
  • It is the most common painful orbital mass in the adult population, and is associated with proptosis, cranial nerve palsy (Tolosa-Hunt syndrome), uveitis, and retinal detachment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Glaucoma is an eye disease that involves damage to the optic nerve (connecting the eye to the brain) and retinal nerve fibers (the light-sensitive nerve tissue at the bottom of the eye). (polyhealth.com.hk)
  • For medially located lesions, such as those encroaching on the nasal orbital apex, this approach is possible. (medscape.com)
  • Transnasal, transantral, and transethmoidal endoscopic approaches are being used more frequently to gain access to orbital lesions. (medscape.com)
  • Modern TCD head frames allow continuous hands-free emboli detection for risk stratification and assessment of treatment efficacy in several cardiovascular diseases. (shengsci.com)
  • Bilateral presentation may have a higher incidence of systemic disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Our pediatric ophthalmologists are trained to recognize and manage eye diseases and disorders in children whose vision is still developing. (childrensnational.org)
  • Idiopathic orbital inflammatory (IOI) disease refers to a marginated mass-like enhancing soft tissue involving any area of the orbit. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the setting of extensive sclerosis there may be restriction, compression, and destruction of orbital tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • She has 5 years of subject matter expertise in applied epidemiology in arboviral disease surveillance. (cdc.gov)
  • however we are also interested in knowing about other arboviral diseases occurring in your jurisdiction. (cdc.gov)
  • Tuberculosis (TB) (see the image below), a multisystemic disease with myriad presentations and manifestations, is the most common cause of infectious disease-related mortality worldwide. (medscape.com)
  • See 11 Travel Diseases to Consider Before and After the Trip , a Critical Images slideshow, to help identify and manage infectious travel diseases. (medscape.com)
  • Dr. Dana Meaney-Delman is a senior medical advisor in the National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • A viral disease transmitted by the bite of Aedes mosquitoes infected with Zika Virus. (bvsalud.org)
  • Questions are limited to clinicians who would like information related to Zika virus disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Zika virus disease case counts are updated on the CDC website the first Thursday of each month. (cdc.gov)
  • Zika disease cases reported and published to ArboNET by close of business on Tuesday of the posting week are included in the monthly update. (cdc.gov)
  • The CDC Disease maps for Zika virus disease cases are also updated on the same monthly schedule. (cdc.gov)
  • We use the specific example of Zika virus disease and dengue below, but the concepts apply to other endemic flavivirus diseases with cross-reactivity (e.g. (cdc.gov)
  • For cases meeting the case definition criteria for both Zika virus disease and dengue it may be difficult to distinguish between the two diseases for reporting purposes. (cdc.gov)
  • For these cases, we request that you do not report the case twice as both a Zika virus disease case and a dengue case. (cdc.gov)
  • We are also among the few centers that manage infantile glaucoma, another rare but very serious eye disease. (childrensnational.org)
  • The severe version of the disease, that requires hospitalization, is unusual and it is shows low lethality. (bvsalud.org)
  • It reports a cluster of five cases of workers with severe pleural and pulmonary disease, which developed within 10-12 months of working at a factory that manufactures and processes polyacrylate and other polymers for use in pharmaceuticals. (cdc.gov)
  • Overall, radiographic features for idiopathic orbital inflammatory syndrome vary widely. (wikipedia.org)
  • This discussion is not meant to be a comprehensive tome on orbital surgery but merely an overview of commonly described orbitotomies. (medscape.com)
  • This paper presents and discusses the management of six patients admitted with orbital infection by service Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery General Hospital Roberto Santos in Salvador, Bahia. (bvsalud.org)
  • Case Disease Imported Code: This variable is intended to collect the most likely location of infection, not the patient's recent travel history. (cdc.gov)
  • Maximal operative exposure of the lesion with ginger and minimal manipulation of the orbital contents must be well orchestrated for successful surgical outcomes. (medscape.com)
  • In the later stage of the disease, the peripheral vision of the patient may gradually shrink, leaving only the central vision. (polyhealth.com.hk)
  • Survivin Dendritic Cell Vaccine Safely Induces Immune Responses and Is Associated with Durable Disease Control after Autologous Transplant in Patients with Myeloma. (cdc.gov)
  • The thinnest portion of the anterior wall is above the canine tooth, called the canine fossa, which is an ideal entry site for addressing various disease processes of the maxillary sinus. (medscape.com)
  • Deep brain stimulation is a safe and effective therapy for the management of a variety of neurologic conditions with Food and Drug Administration or humanitarian exception approval for Parkinson disease, dystonia, tremor, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. (shengsci.com)
  • Unfortunately, if a person with EO stops taking steroid therapy, the disease recommences. (elza-institute.com)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. (cdc.gov)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website. (cdc.gov)
  • I'm Loretta Jackson Brown and I'm representing the Clinician Outreach and Communication Activity - COCA - with the Emergency Risk Communication Branch at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • Dr. Cynthia Moore is a director of the Division of Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)

No images available that match "orbital diseases"