Conditions which produce injury or dysfunction of the second cranial or optic nerve, which is generally considered a component of the central nervous system. Damage to optic nerve fibers may occur at or near their origin in the retina, at the optic disk, or in the nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract, or lateral geniculate nuclei. Clinical manifestations may include decreased visual acuity and contrast sensitivity, impaired color vision, and an afferent pupillary defect.
Filarial infection of the eyes transmitted from person to person by bites of Onchocerca volvulus-infected black flies. The microfilariae of Onchocerca are thus deposited beneath the skin. They migrate through various tissues including the eye. Those persons infected have impaired vision and up to 20% are blind. The incidence of eye lesions has been reported to be as high as 30% in Central America and parts of Africa.
The 2nd cranial nerve which conveys visual information from the RETINA to the brain. The nerve carries the axons of the RETINAL GANGLION CELLS which sort at the OPTIC CHIASM and continue via the OPTIC TRACTS to the brain. The largest projection is to the lateral geniculate nuclei; other targets include the SUPERIOR COLLICULI and the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEI. Though known as the second cranial nerve, it is considered part of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
Inflammation of the optic nerve. Commonly associated conditions include autoimmune disorders such as MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, infections, and granulomatous diseases. Clinical features include retro-orbital pain that is aggravated by eye movement, loss of color vision, and contrast sensitivity that may progress to severe visual loss, an afferent pupillary defect (Marcus-Gunn pupil), and in some instances optic disc hyperemia and swelling. Inflammation may occur in the portion of the nerve within the globe (neuropapillitis or anterior optic neuritis) or the portion behind the globe (retrobulbar neuritis or posterior optic neuritis).
Diseases of the first cranial (olfactory) nerve, which usually feature anosmia or other alterations in the sense of smell and taste. Anosmia may be associated with NEOPLASMS; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; inherited conditions; toxins; METABOLIC DISEASES; tobacco abuse; and other conditions. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp229-31)
Diseases of the tenth cranial nerve, including brain stem lesions involving its nuclei (solitary, ambiguus, and dorsal motor), nerve fascicles, and intracranial and extracranial course. Clinical manifestations may include dysphagia, vocal cord weakness, and alterations of parasympathetic tone in the thorax and abdomen.
Injuries to the optic nerve induced by a trauma to the face or head. These may occur with closed or penetrating injuries. Relatively minor compression of the superior aspect of orbit may also result in trauma to the optic nerve. Clinical manifestations may include visual loss, PAPILLEDEMA, and an afferent pupillary defect.
The portion of the optic nerve seen in the fundus with the ophthalmoscope. It is formed by the meeting of all the retinal ganglion cell axons as they enter the optic nerve.
Diseases of the twelfth cranial (hypoglossal) nerve or nuclei. The nuclei and fascicles of the nerve are located in the medulla, and the nerve exits the skull via the hypoglossal foramen and innervates the muscles of the tongue. Lower brain stem diseases, including ischemia and MOTOR NEURON DISEASES may affect the nuclei or nerve fascicles. The nerve may also be injured by diseases of the posterior fossa or skull base. Clinical manifestations include unilateral weakness of tongue musculature and lingual dysarthria, with deviation of the tongue towards the side of weakness upon attempted protrusion.
Pathological processes of the VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE, including the branches of COCHLEAR NERVE and VESTIBULAR NERVE. Common examples are VESTIBULAR NEURITIS, cochlear neuritis, and ACOUSTIC NEUROMA. Clinical signs are varying degree of HEARING LOSS; VERTIGO; and TINNITUS.
Diseases of the ninth cranial (glossopharyngeal) nerve or its nuclei in the medulla. The nerve may be injured by diseases affecting the lower brain stem, floor of the posterior fossa, jugular foramen, or the nerve's extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include loss of sensation from the pharynx, decreased salivation, and syncope. Glossopharyngeal neuralgia refers to a condition that features recurrent unilateral sharp pain in the tongue, angle of the jaw, external auditory meatus and throat that may be associated with SYNCOPE. Episodes may be triggered by cough, sneeze, swallowing, or pressure on the tragus of the ear. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1390)
Diseases of the trigeminal nerve or its nuclei, which are located in the pons and medulla. The nerve is composed of three divisions: ophthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular, which provide sensory innervation to structures of the face, sinuses, and portions of the cranial vault. The mandibular nerve also innervates muscles of mastication. Clinical features include loss of facial and intra-oral sensation and weakness of jaw closure. Common conditions affecting the nerve include brain stem ischemia, INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS, and TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA.
Diseases of the eleventh cranial (spinal accessory) nerve. This nerve originates from motor neurons in the lower medulla (accessory portion of nerve) and upper spinal cord (spinal portion of nerve). The two components of the nerve join and exit the skull via the jugular foramen, innervating the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles, which become weak or paralyzed if the nerve is injured. The nerve is commonly involved in MOTOR NEURON DISEASE, and may be injured by trauma to the posterior triangle of the neck.
Diseases of the facial nerve or nuclei. Pontine disorders may affect the facial nuclei or nerve fascicle. The nerve may be involved intracranially, along its course through the petrous portion of the temporal bone, or along its extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include facial muscle weakness, loss of taste from the anterior tongue, hyperacusis, and decreased lacrimation.
Diseases of the sixth cranial (abducens) nerve or its nucleus in the pons. The nerve may be injured along its course in the pons, intracranially as it travels along the base of the brain, in the cavernous sinus, or at the level of superior orbital fissure or orbit. Dysfunction of the nerve causes lateral rectus muscle weakness, resulting in horizontal diplopia that is maximal when the affected eye is abducted and ESOTROPIA. Common conditions associated with nerve injury include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ISCHEMIA; and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.
The X-shaped structure formed by the meeting of the two optic nerves. At the optic chiasm the fibers from the medial part of each retina cross to project to the other side of the brain while the lateral retinal fibers continue on the same side. As a result each half of the brain receives information about the contralateral visual field from both eyes.
Diseases of the fourth cranial (trochlear) nerve or its nucleus in the midbrain. The nerve crosses as it exits the midbrain dorsally and may be injured along its course through the intracranial space, cavernous sinus, superior orbital fissure, or orbit. Clinical manifestations include weakness of the superior oblique muscle which causes vertical DIPLOPIA that is maximal when the affected eye is adducted and directed inferiorly. Head tilt may be seen as a compensatory mechanism for diplopia and rotation of the visual axis. Common etiologies include CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.
Atrophy of the optic disk which may be congenital or acquired. This condition indicates a deficiency in the number of nerve fibers which arise in the RETINA and converge to form the OPTIC DISK; OPTIC NERVE; OPTIC CHIASM; and optic tracts. GLAUCOMA; ISCHEMIA; inflammation, a chronic elevation of intracranial pressure, toxins, optic nerve compression, and inherited conditions (see OPTIC ATROPHIES, HEREDITARY) are relatively common causes of this condition.
Benign and malignant neoplasms that arise from the optic nerve or its sheath. OPTIC NERVE GLIOMA is the most common histologic type. Optic nerve neoplasms tend to cause unilateral visual loss and an afferent pupillary defect and may spread via neural pathways to the brain.
Neurons of the innermost layer of the retina, the internal plexiform layer. They are of variable sizes and shapes, and their axons project via the OPTIC NERVE to the brain. A small subset of these cells act as photoreceptors with projections to the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEUS, the center for regulating CIRCADIAN RHYTHM.
Slender processes of NEURONS, including the AXONS and their glial envelopes (MYELIN SHEATH). Nerve fibers conduct nerve impulses to and from the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
Diseases of the oculomotor nerve or nucleus that result in weakness or paralysis of the superior rectus, inferior rectus, medial rectus, inferior oblique, or levator palpebrae muscles, or impaired parasympathetic innervation to the pupil. With a complete oculomotor palsy, the eyelid will be paralyzed, the eye will be in an abducted and inferior position, and the pupil will be markedly dilated. Commonly associated conditions include neoplasms, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, ischemia (especially in association with DIABETES MELLITUS), and aneurysmal compression. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p270)
Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.
A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.
Treatment of muscles and nerves under pressure as a result of crush injuries.
Renewal or physiological repair of damaged nerve tissue.
Glial cell derived tumors arising from the optic nerve, usually presenting in childhood.
The nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord, including the autonomic, cranial, and spinal nerves. Peripheral nerves contain non-neuronal cells and connective tissue as well as axons. The connective tissue layers include, from the outside to the inside, the epineurium, the perineurium, and the endoneurium.
Ischemic injury to the OPTIC NERVE which usually affects the OPTIC DISK (optic neuropathy, anterior ischemic) and less frequently the retrobulbar portion of the nerve (optic neuropathy, posterior ischemic). The injury results from occlusion of arterial blood supply which may result from TEMPORAL ARTERITIS; ATHEROSCLEROSIS; COLLAGEN DISEASES; EMBOLISM; DIABETES MELLITUS; and other conditions. The disease primarily occurs in the sixth decade or later and presents with the sudden onset of painless and usually severe monocular visual loss. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy also features optic disk edema with microhemorrhages. The optic disk appears normal in posterior ischemic optic neuropathy. (Glaser, Neuro-Ophthalmology, 2nd ed, p135)
Nerve fibers that are capable of rapidly conducting impulses away from the neuron cell body.
The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.
The pressure of the fluids in the eye.
An ocular disease, occurring in many forms, having as its primary characteristics an unstable or a sustained increase in the intraocular pressure which the eye cannot withstand without damage to its structure or impairment of its function. The consequences of the increased pressure may be manifested in a variety of symptoms, depending upon type and severity, such as excavation of the optic disk, hardness of the eyeball, corneal anesthesia, reduced visual acuity, seeing of colored halos around lights, disturbed dark adaptation, visual field defects, and headaches. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
Swelling of the OPTIC DISK, usually in association with increased intracranial pressure, characterized by hyperemia, blurring of the disk margins, microhemorrhages, blind spot enlargement, and engorgement of retinal veins. Chronic papilledema may cause OPTIC ATROPHY and visual loss. (Miller et al., Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, p175)
In invertebrate zoology, a lateral lobe of the FOREBRAIN in certain ARTHROPODS. In vertebrate zoology, either of the corpora bigemina of non-mammalian VERTEBRATES. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1329)
Hereditary conditions that feature progressive visual loss in association with optic atrophy. Relatively common forms include autosomal dominant optic atrophy (OPTIC ATROPHY, AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT) and Leber hereditary optic atrophy (OPTIC ATROPHY, HEREDITARY, LEBER).
The continuous visual field seen by a subject through space and time.
Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.
The organ of sight constituting a pair of globular organs made up of a three-layered roughly spherical structure specialized for receiving and responding to light.
Benign and malignant neoplasms that arise from one or more of the twelve cranial nerves.
Branch-like terminations of NERVE FIBERS, sensory or motor NEURONS. Endings of sensory neurons are the beginnings of afferent pathway to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Endings of motor neurons are the terminals of axons at the muscle cells. Nerve endings which release neurotransmitters are called PRESYNAPTIC TERMINALS.
A maternally linked genetic disorder that presents in mid-life as acute or subacute central vision loss leading to central scotoma and blindness. The disease has been associated with missense mutations in the mtDNA, in genes for Complex I, III, and IV polypeptides, that can act autonomously or in association with each other to cause the disease. (from Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Omim/, MIM#535000 (April 17, 2001))
A specialized field of physics and engineering involved in studying the behavior and properties of light and the technology of analyzing, generating, transmitting, and manipulating ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION in the visible, infrared, and ultraviolet range.
A branch of the tibial nerve which supplies sensory innervation to parts of the lower leg and foot.
A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans, the fibers of the median nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C6 to T1), travel via the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to parts of the forearm and hand.
Glaucoma in which the angle of the anterior chamber is open and the trabecular meshwork does not encroach on the base of the iris.
A surgical specialty concerned with the structure and function of the eye and the medical and surgical treatment of its defects and diseases.
A plant species of the genus PINUS which is the source of pinosylvin. It is sometimes called Scotch pine or Scots pine, which is also a common name for other species of this genus.
Relatively undifferentiated cells that retain the ability to divide and proliferate throughout postnatal life to provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.
A condition resulting from congenital malformations involving the brain. The syndrome of septo-optic dysplasia combines hypoplasia or agenesis of the SEPTUM PELLUCIDUM and the OPTIC NERVE. The extent of the abnormalities can vary. Septo-optic dysplasia is often associated with abnormalities of the hypothalamic and other diencephalic structures, and HYPOPITUITARISM.
A triangular double membrane separating the anterior horns of the LATERAL VENTRICLES of the brain. It is situated in the median plane and bounded by the CORPUS CALLOSUM and the body and columns of the FORNIX (BRAIN).
Diminution or cessation of secretion of one or more hormones from the anterior pituitary gland (including LH; FOLLICLE STIMULATING HORMONE; SOMATOTROPIN; and CORTICOTROPIN). This may result from surgical or radiation ablation, non-secretory PITUITARY NEOPLASMS, metastatic tumors, infarction, PITUITARY APOPLEXY, infiltrative or granulomatous processes, and other conditions.
A clear, colorless liquid rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and distributed throughout the body. It has bactericidal activity and is used often as a topical disinfectant. It is widely used as a solvent and preservative in pharmaceutical preparations as well as serving as the primary ingredient in ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.
The consequences of exposing the FETUS in utero to certain factors, such as NUTRITION PHYSIOLOGICAL PHENOMENA; PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS; DRUGS; RADIATION; and other physical or chemical factors. These consequences are observed later in the offspring after BIRTH.
An umbrella term used to describe a pattern of disabilities and abnormalities that result from fetal exposure to ETHANOL during pregnancy. It encompasses a phenotypic range that can vary greatly between individuals, but reliably includes one or more of the following: characteristic facial dysmorphism, FETAL GROWTH RETARDATION, central nervous system abnormalities, cognitive and/or behavioral dysfunction, BIRTH DEFECTS. The level of maternal alcohol consumption does not necessarily correlate directly with disease severity.

Evaluation of focal defects of the nerve fiber layer using optical coherence tomography. (1/852)

OBJECTIVE: To analyze glaucomatous eyes with known focal defects of the nerve fiber layer (NFL), relating optical coherence tomography (OCT) findings to clinical examination, NFL and stereoscopic optic nerve head (ONH) photography, and Humphrey 24-2 visual fields. DESIGN: Cross-sectional prevalence study. PARTICIPANTS: The authors followed 19 patients in the study group and 14 patients in the control group. INTERVENTION: Imaging with OCT was performed circumferentially around the ONH with a circle diameter of 3.4 mm using an internal fixation technique. One hundred OCT scan points taken within 2.5 seconds were analyzed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Measurements of NFL thickness using OCT were performed. RESULTS: In most eyes with focal NFL defects, OCTs showed significant thinning of the NFL in areas closely corresponding to focal defects visible on clinical examination, to red-free photographs, and to defects on the Humphrey visual fields. Optical coherence tomography enabled the detection of focal defects in the NFL with a sensitivity of 65% and a specificity of 81%. CONCLUSION: Analysis of NFL thickness in eyes with focal defects showed good structural and functional correlation with clinical parameters. Optical coherence tomography contributes to the identification of focal defects in the NFL that occur in early stages of glaucoma.  (+info)

Ophthalmic abnormalities in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. (2/852)

PURPOSE: To determine the frequency of ophthalmic abnormalities in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome) and T-cell lymphoma involving the skin and to describe the clinical course of the disease with selected examples. METHODS: A computerized diagnostic retrieval system was used to identify all patients with T-cell lymphoma involving the skin who were examined at the Mayo Clinic (Rochester, Minnesota) between January 1, 1976 and December 31, 1990. The medical records of affected patients were reviewed. RESULTS: During the 15-year interval from 1976 through 1990, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma was diagnosed in 2,155 patients. Of these 2,155 patients, 42 (1.95%; 26 male and 16 female) had at least 1 ophthalmic abnormality attributable to the disease. The diagnoses in these 42 patients were mycosis fungoides in 19, clinical variants of T-cell lymphoma of the skin (most commonly, peripheral T-cell lymphoma) in 11, and Sezary syndrome in 12. Cicatricial eyelid ectropion was the most common finding, affecting 17 (40.4%) of the 42 patients. Thirty-seven patients had findings that, although probably not a direct consequence of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, have been cataloged in previous studies. CONCLUSION: Although ophthalmic abnormalities in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma are relatively uncommon, the manifestations of the disease are diverse and frequently difficult to treat.  (+info)

Acquired mitochondrial impairment as a cause of optic nerve disease. (3/852)

BACKGROUND: Blindness from an optic neuropathy recently occurred as an epidemic affecting 50,000 patients in Cuba (CEON) and had clinical features reminiscent of both tobacco-alcohol amblyopia (TAA) and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (Leber's; LHON). Selective damage to the papillomacular bundle was characteristic, and many patients also developed a peripheral neuropathy. Identified risk factors included vitamin deficiencies as well as exposure to methanol and cyanide. In all 3 syndromes, there is evidence that singular or combined insults to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are associated with a clinically characteristic optic neuropathy. PURPOSE: First, to test the hypothesis that a common pathophysiologic mechanism involving impairment of mitochondria function and, consequently, axonal transport underlies both genetic optic nerve diseases such as Leber's and acquired toxic and nutritional deficiency optic neuropathies. According to this hypothesis, ATP depletion below a certain threshold leads to a blockage of orthograde axonal transport of mitochondria, which, in turn, leads to total ATP depletion and subsequent cell death. Second, to address several related questions, including (1) How does impaired energy production lead to optic neuropathy, particularly since it seems to relatively spare other metabolically active tissues, such as liver and heart? (2) Within the nervous system, why is the optic nerve, and most particularly the papillomacular bundle, so highly sensitive? Although there have been previous publications on the clinical features of the Cuban epidemic of blindness, the present hypothesis and the subsequent questions have not been previously addressed. METHODS: Patients in Cuba with epidemic optic neuropathy were personally evaluated through a comprehensive neuro-ophthalmologic examination. In addition, serum, lymphocytes for DNA analysis, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), sural nerves, and eyes with attached optic nerves were obtained from Cuban patients, as well as from Leber's patients, for study. Finally, we developed an animal model to match the low serum folic acid and high serum formate levels found in the CEON patients, by administering to rats low doses of methanol after several months of a folic acid-deficient diet. Optic nerves and other tissues obtained from these rats were analyzed and compared with those from the Cuban patients. RESULTS: Patients from the Cuban epidemic of optic neuropathy with clinical evidence of a selective loss of the papillomacular bundle did much better once their nutritional status was corrected and exposure to toxins ceased. Patients with CEON often demonstrated low levels of folic acid and high levels of formate in their blood. Histopathologic studies demonstrated losses of the longest fibers (in the sural nerve) and those of smallest caliber (papillomacular bundle) in the optic nerve, with intra-axonal accumulations just anterior to the lamina cribrosa. Our animal model duplicated the serologic changes (low folic acid, high formate) as well as these histopathologic changes. Furthermore, ultrastructural examination of rat tissues demonstrated mitochondrial changes that further matched those seen on ultrastructural examination of tissues from patients with Leber's. CONCLUSION: Mitochondria can be impaired either genetically (as in Leber's) or through acquired insults (such as nutritional or toxic factors). Either may challenge energy production in all cells of the body. While this challenge may be met through certain compensatory mechanisms (such as in the size, shape, or number of the mitochondria), there exists in neurons a threshold which, once passed, leads to catastrophic changes. This threshold may be that point at which mitochondrial derangement leads to such ATP depletion that axonal transport is compromised, and decreased mitochondrial transport results in even further ATP depletion. Neurons are singularly dependent on the axonal transport of mitochondria. (  (+info)

Diabetes mellitus: a risk factor in patients with Graves' orbitopathy. (4/852)

AIMS: To assess the prevalence of dysthyroid optic neuropathy (DON) in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and Graves' orbitopathy (GO) and to investigate the complications of surgery for GO in these patients. METHODS: The records of 482 consecutive patients with GO referred in a 5 year period were studied. Those patients who also had DM were selected for further study. The prevalence of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) was registered, as well as the prevalence and course of DON. In the patients who underwent surgery for GO the postoperative complications were recorded. RESULTS: Out of 482 patients with GO, 15 (3.1%) also had DM. Eight (1.7%) had IDDM, 7 (1.4%) had NIDDM. Five patients (33.3%) three with IDDM and two with NIDDM developed DON with 50% improvement of visual acuity after treatment, whereas in the whole population of 482 GO patients 19 had DON (3.9%), showing 69.4% improvement of vision after treatment. 10 patients with GO and DM were operated for GO; in one of them an optic atrophy developed as a result of a postoperative haemorrhage directly after a three wall orbital decompression by coronal approach. No other postoperative complications occurred. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of IDDM in patients with GO is higher than in the normal population. DON occurs much more frequently in patients with GO and DM than in the total group of GO patients and seems to have a worse visual prognosis.  (+info)

Dysgenesis of the internal carotid artery associated with transsphenoidal encephalocele: a neural crest syndrome? (5/852)

We describe two original cases of internal carotid artery dysgenesis associated with a malformative spectrum, which includes transsphenoidal encephalocele, optic nerve coloboma, hypopituitarism, and hypertelorism. Cephalic neural crest cells migrate to various regions in the head and neck where they contribute to the development of structures as diverse as the anterior skull base, the walls of the craniofacial arteries, the forebrain, and the face. Data suggest that the link between these rare malformations is abnormal neural crest development.  (+info)

Visual function and brain organization in non-decussating retinal-fugal fibre syndrome. (6/852)

Functional neuroimaging, psychophysical and electrophysiological investigations were performed in a patient with non-decussating retinal-fugal fibre syndrome, an inborn achiasmatic state in which the retinal projections of each eye map entirely to the ipsilateral primary visual cortex. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies showed that for monocularly presented simple visual stimuli, only the ipsilateral striate cortex was activated. Within each hemisphere's striate cortex, the representation of the two hemifields overlapped extensively. Despite this gross miswiring, visual functions that require precise geometrical information (such as vernier acuity) were normal, and there was no evidence for the confounding of visual information between the overlapping ipsi-lateral and contralateral representations. Contrast sensitivity and velocity judgments were abnormal, but their dependence on the orientation and velocity of the targets suggests that this deficit was due to ocular instabilities, rather than the miswiring per se. There were no asymmetries in performance observed in visual search, visual naming or illusory contour perception. fMRI analysis of the latter two tasks under monocular viewing conditions indicated extensive bilateral activation of striate and prestriate areas. Thus, the remarkably normal visual behavior achieved by this patient is a result of both the plasticity of visual pathways, and efficient transfer of information between the hemispheres.  (+info)

Surgical management of symptomatic intrasellar arachnoid cysts--two case reports. (7/852)

Two patients with symptomatic intrasellar arachnoid cyst were successfully treated. A 67-year-old female with a cyst 20 mm in diameter developed headache and visual disturbance. She was treated by transsphenoidal surgery. A 59-year-old male with a cyst measuring 35 x 30 x 50 mm causing headache, visual disturbance, and deterioration of consciousness was managed by wide resection of the cyst wall via craniotomy. Postoperative courses in both patients were uneventful. Transsphenoidal surgery may be suitable for small to medium-sized cysts, although tight packing of the sella is mandatory to prevent leakage of cerebrospinal fluid. However, craniotomy is recommended for large intra- and suprasellar arachnoid cysts to avoid this complication, and to achieve sufficient communication between the cyst and the subarachnoid cistern.  (+info)

Idiopathic sclerotic inflammation of the orbit with left optic nerve compression in a patient with multifocal fibrosclerosis. (8/852)

We present the MR imaging findings in a 43-year-old male patient with bilateral idiopathic sclerosing inflammation of the orbit. Bilateral enhancing retrobulbar masses, with concentric compression of the retrobulbar segment of the left optic nerve, were seen. MR imaging proved to be the only means to distinguish between the different intraorbital structures and to determine the exact site of optic nerve compression. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of MR imaging findings of this entity.  (+info)

Definition of optic nerve diseases in the Definitions.net dictionary. Meaning of optic nerve diseases. What does optic nerve diseases mean? Information and translations of optic nerve diseases in the most comprehensive dictionary definitions resource on the web.
Purpose : Inability to drive is a major concern for patients with glaucoma. The purpose of this study was to examine the longitudinal relationship between rate of change in RNFL thickness and change in ability to divide attention during a simulated driving task. Methods : 152 glaucoma patients were followed for an average of 3.7 years. At each visit investigations included visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, perimetry and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Ability to divide attention was assessed using a driving simulator to measure reaction times to stimuli presented simultaneously during two central tasks 1) curve negotiation and 2) car following. A joint longitudinal multivariate mixed model was used to investigate the association between rates of change in driving performance and RNFL thickness over time. Reaction time values were positively skewed therefore natural logarithms were calculated. The effect of potentially confounding variables including integrated binocular visual field ...
Optic Nerve Diseases symptoms, causes, diagnosis, and treatment information for Optic Nerve Diseases (Optic nerve disorder) with alternative diagnoses, full-text book chapters, misdiagnosis, research treatments, prevention, and prognosis.
• To evaluate the usefulness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (NFL) appearance in the estimation of glaucomatous optic nerve damage, we examined 335 eyes of nor
Optic Nerve Diseases: Conditions which produce injury or dysfunction of the second cranial or optic nerve, which is generally considered a component of the central nervous system. Damage to optic nerve fibres may occur at or near their origin in the retina, at the optic disk, or in the nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract, or lateral geniculate nuclei. Clinical manifestations may include decreased visual acuity and contrast sensitivity, impaired color vision, and an afferent papillary defect. primary out put of clinical study is to measures Improvement in visual loss and improvement in idiopathic intra cranial.This is a Single arm, Single centre trial to check the safety and efficacy of bone marrow derived autologous mono nuclear cell(100 millions per dose )clinical trial to be conducted for 36 months ...
Read Vascular Aspects in the Pathophysiology of Glaucomatous Optic Neuropathy, Survey of Ophthalmology on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips.
Purpose: : To evaluate whether screening with FDT-perimetry is of predictive value for progression of optic nerve damage in glaucoma suspects and early glaucomas. Progression was defined morphometrically (2D), results were compared to HRT measurements. Methods: : The longitudinal observational clinical study includes 438 preperimetric patients, OHT patients, and glaucoma suspects from the Erlangen Glaucoma Registry. Inclusion criteria at baseline: visual acuity better 20/40, refractive error between -8 and +6 D, age: 30-72 years. All subjects had normal white-on-white perimetry at baseline (Octopus, mean defect less than 2dB). Two or more annual visual field examinations using FDT-screening were performed. FDT evaluation used a published method with casewise calculation of an FDT-score, including missed localized probability levels in all stimulus fields and in quadrants. For prospective analysis of the predictive value of FDT, the first measurement was always discarded because of learning ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - MR of vasculitis-induced optic neuropathy. AU - Sklar, Evelyn M.L.. AU - Schatz, Norman J.. AU - Glaser, Joel S.. AU - Judith Donovan Post, M.. AU - Ten Hove, Martin. PY - 1996/1/29. Y1 - 1996/1/29. N2 - PURPOSE: To describe the MR characteristics of optic neuropathy caused by vasculitis. METHODS: Nine cases of optic neuropathy with diagnosis of vasculitis (six with systemic lupus erythematosis and one each with rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren disease, and radiation vasculitis) were reviewed retrospectively. Patients were 31 to 62 years old, and all but one were women. All patients had MR imaging through the orbits and anterior visual pathways, five with fat suppression, with and without gadopentetate dimeglumine. Five patients also had MR imaging of the entire brain. The size and enhancement of various segments of the optic nerve and anterior visual pathways were studied. RESULTS: MR imaging with contrast material showed enhancement and enlargement of segments of the optic nerves ...
Dr John Leaney is a glaucoma specialist, neuro-ophthalmologist and cataract surgeon. John is a dual fellowship trained ophthalmologist specialising in glaucoma and neuro-ophthalmology. He performs cataract and glaucoma surgery with experience in a wide range of glaucoma surgical treatments including trabeculectomy, Baerveldt tube insertion and Xen implantation.. John undertook his medical training at Sydney University followed by internship and residency at Prince of Wales Hospital. This was followed by a PhD looking at early detection of glaucoma using electrical impulses from the brain at Macquarie University under Professor Stuart Graham.. John commenced ophthalmology training at Sydney Eye Hospital in 2012, completing training in 2016. He then undertook a neuro-ophthalmology fellowship at the prestigious Moorfields eye hospital where he was involved in research dealing with the differentiation of glaucoma from other optic nerve diseases. Following this he spent a year at Addenbrookes ...
Annual eye exams are vital to maintaining your vision and overall health. We offer the Eyescape Digital Imaging System which allows us to take unprecedented high-resolution images of the interior of the eyes. These unique images provide us with a wide view to look at the health of your retina.. Doctor Gates is concerned about retinal problems including macular degeneration, retinal holes or detachments, glaucoma, optic nerve disease, and systemic diseases such as diabetes, stroke, high blood pressure, side effects to various medications, etc. These conditions can lead to serious health problems, including partial vision loss or blindness, and often develop without warning and progress with no symptoms until significant damage has already been done. It is very important to find and diagnose these problems as early as possible in order to protect and preserve vision.. EyeScape Digital Imaging System provides:. ...
Neuro Ophthalmology deals with neurological & optic nerve diseases of the eye. Meet the best Neuro Ophthalmologists at Dr. Agarwals Eye Hospital, today!
Glaucoma, an optic nerve disease that leads to progressive damage, is scary because it usually does not cause any symptoms until its too late to bring back the lost vision.
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IVD (in vitro diagnostics) and imaging technology enable early diagnosis, allow effective treatment, and support fast recovery. This helps patients and reduces costs for the healthcare system.
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A serum-glycoprotein szint változása lynestrenollal kezelt patkányokban mellékvese-, gonád-, pajzsmirigy- és hypophysis-irtás után. Kolligátum. pp. 1-5. (1971 ...
Relative afferent pupillary defect Differential diagnosis of relative afferent pupillary defect / causes of relative afferent pupillary defect are : -optic nerve compression
Purpose: To investigate whether the prevalence GSTT1 and GSTM1 deletion genotypes (T0M1, T1M0, and T0M0) are increased in certain spontaneous optic neuropathies.. Methods: We compared the prevalence of GSTT1 and GSTM1 deletion genotypes in 108 Arab patients with optic neuritis (ON, 26 patients), LHON-like optic neuropathy (LLON, 35 patients), sporadic bilateral optic neuropathy in children (SBON, 21 patients), and non-arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION, 26 patients) to 120 ethnicity matched controls. Genotypes were determined by multiplex polymerase chain reaction.. Results: All three GST deletion genotypes were significantly more prevalent in the entire optic neuropathy group than in controls. When patients were stratified by optic neuropathy type, the prevalence of at least one deletion genotype was significantly increased in each type of optic neuropathy.. Conclusions: These results imply that GST malfunction in the setting of GST deletion genotypes may interfere with metabolism of ...
In myopic eyes, it is believed that the assessment of RNFL thickness by SLP should be conducted with caution because of the incidence of ARP. However, there is a paucity of reports that describe the details of SLP assessment of myopic glaucomatous eyes. In the study described herein, we conducted RNFL measurement using both GDx VCC and GDx ECC, and have shown the results of SLP assessment of myopic glaucomatous eyes. As is expected in myopic eyes, we noted that with GDx VCC, myopic glaucomatous eyes, especially highly myopic eyes, showed an ARP in many cases. Although the definition of ARP was not identical between studies, the prevalence of ARP (TSS less than 80) in our study, 14/40 (35.0%) of the moderately and 19/35 (54.3%) of the highly myopic eyes, was higher than that in previous studies, most of which were conducted in populations without highly myopic eyes. According to previous reports, the prevalence of ARP was between 7 and 51%,13 16 17 19 and TSS values were between 71.2 and ...
We describe a patient with a left trochlear nerve paresis and a left relative afferent pupillary defect despite normal visual acuity, color vision, visual fields, and fundus examination. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lesion in the right dorsal midbrain extending from the brachium of the supe …
The swinging light test is used to detect a relative afferent pupil defect (RAPD): a means of detecting differences between the two eyes in how they respond to a light shone in one eye at a time. The test can be very useful for detecting unilateral or asymmetrical disease of the retina or optic nerve (but only optic nerve disease that occurs in front of the optic chiasm).
In this report, we present the results of a single patient with optic neuropathy treated within the Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study (SCOTS). SCOTS is an Institutional Review Board approved clinical trial and is the largest ophthalmology stem cell study registered at the National Institutes o …
Offering authoritative, concise coverage of todays neuro-ophthalmology, Walsh & Hoyts Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology: The Essentials distills the most vital information from the esteemed three-volume parent text, Walsh & Hoyts Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology , into a convenient, single-volume resource.
The optic nerve contains retinal ganglion cell axons that extend posteriorly from the globe, through the orbit and optic canal, to reach the optic chiasm. The total length of the optic nerve averages 50 mm: 1 mm for the intraocular segment, 25 mm for the intraorbital segment, 10 mm for the intracanalicular segment, and 14 mm for the intracran...
Looking for online definition of Degenerative Nerve Disease in the Medical Dictionary? Degenerative Nerve Disease explanation free. What is Degenerative Nerve Disease? Meaning of Degenerative Nerve Disease medical term. What does Degenerative Nerve Disease mean?
Neuro-ophthalmology is a field of medicine that touches on every subspecialty in neurology, but has an undeserved reputation as a branch of knowledge that is difficult to learn and practice. Many neurologists and ophthalmologists do not receive sufficient exposure to neuro-ophthalmology during their residencies, and are uncomfortable diagnosing and treating patients with neuro-ophthalmic problems.
Doctor answers on Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, and More: Dr. Machanic on treatment for optic nerve damage in the eye: A thorough exam can help determine the extent of the damage in many cases along with visual field and oct testing. A neuroophthalmic exam may be required in addition to an MRI or ct scan in some cases. for topic: Treatment For Optic Nerve Damage In The Eye
The UC Davis Health System Eye Centers Neuro-ophthalmology service provides highly specialized consultations in the diagnosis and treatment of complex unexplained neurological abnormalities affecting visual pathways.. The typical case is a patient who experiences unexplained vision loss. In responding to such cases, the UC Davis Eye Center conducts routine diagnostic tests and a thorough evaluation by ophthalmologists, neurologists and other appropriate sub specialists. Less complicated cases can often be resolved with a telephone consultation.. Facilitating the services hallmark diagnostic capabilities is a full complement of the most sophisticated diagnostic tools and technology, including computerized visual field testing, the latest in 3-D digital imaging and electrophysiological testing, including VEP, ERG and MFERG.. The departments neuro-ophthalmology service accepts referrals statewide, nationally and internationally from ophthalmologists, neurologists, neurosurgeons and other ...
Journal of Neuro-Ophthalmology keeps pace with important advances in all spheres of the neurologic and ophthalmologic sciences. Clinicians and researchers worldwide report on recent developments in diagnosing and treating ophthalmologic, neurologic, endocrine, inflammatory, and neoplastic conditions affecting the oculomotor and visual systems. The Journal publishes original, peer-reviewed articles on both clinical and basic aspects of neuro-ophthalmology. Other regular features include reviews, Viewpoints, Photoessays, editorials, letters, and special features including interviews, historical vignettes, and NANOS news.
Journal of Neuro-Ophthalmology keeps pace with important advances in all spheres of the neurologic and ophthalmologic sciences. Clinicians and researchers worldwide report on recent developments in diagnosing and treating ophthalmologic, neurologic, endocrine, inflammatory, and neoplastic conditions affecting the oculomotor and visual systems. The Journal publishes original, peer-reviewed articles on both clinical and basic aspects of neuro-ophthalmology. Other regular features include reviews, Viewpoints, Photoessays, editorials, letters, and special features including interviews, historical vignettes, and NANOS news.
Download Neuro-Ophthalmology of Texas 3.0 for Android. Neuro-Ophthalmology deals with diagnostically challenging cases. Dr. Rosa Tang examines patients with rheumatologic,
Healthy optic nerve head. The National Eye Institute has awarded a $5 million research grant to UC Davis ophthalmologist John S. Werner and researchers at three other universities to continue the development of technology for three-dimensional imaging of cells in the living eye.. The studies, part of the next, five-year phase of the Bioengineering Research Partnership, could benefit the approximately 20 percent of Americans above the age of 60 suffering from the sight-threatening consequences of age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. It would provide significant advances in understanding the origins of retinal and optic nerve disease and in evaluating novel therapies for a wide spectrum of human blinding diseases.. Our project has been described as the Hubble telescope of the eye, said Werner, the projects principal investigator and a professor at the UC Davis Health System Eye Center.. Vision and visual disorders begin at the cellular and molecular levels, yet the ability to ...
Glaucoma is a heterogeneous group of optic nerve diseases sharing an accelerated degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that, if untreated, leads to progressive and irreversible loss of visual function. Worldwide, glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness. Of the many types of glaucoma, primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is probably the most common one in Western countries. Probably less than half of all people who have the disease are aware of it.. ...
Following initial tests and their purpose are summarized below. Vision. A Snellen chart is used to measure distance vision with your distance glasses.. It is helpful to bring your current glasses and prescription if available.. Colour vision. A specialized chart called Ishihara chart is used to check the colour vision. This is useful to differentiate causes of vision loss due to glaucoma and other optic nerve diseases. In glaucoma colour vision is preserved till late in the course of the disease.. Visual fields. This tests the periphery of the vision. Head is placed inside a large bowl and lights are flashed in the periphery. You then press a button when you see the lights while looking at the central fixation light. The same process is repeated with the other eye.. Slit lamp examination. This is the microscope like instrument that is used in all routine eye examinations. It shines a light in to the eye and the doctor looks at the front and the back of the eye through it. This gives a magnified ...
This webinar will explore common clinical problems in neuro-ophthalmology, and the diagnosis and management of these conditions. There will also be an interactive video session with presentations of clinical cases and diagnosis. Book your place today.
Part of the What Do I Do Now? series, Neuro-Ophthalmology uses a case-based approach to cover common and important topics in the examination, investigation, and management of afferent visual, efferent eye movement, eyelid, pupil, and orbital disorders. Each chapter provides a discussion of the diagnosis, key points to remember, and selected references for further reading.
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North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society is a professional organization with more than 400 members who are fully trained neurologists
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Neuro-ophthalmology There are many neurological conditions and disorders which have an impact on our eyesight. It is from this connection between the ne...
North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society is a professional organization with more than 400 members who are fully trained neurologists
The Neuro-Ophthalmology Research Disease Investigator Consortium (NORDIC) is an organization composed of neuro-ophthalmologists and other doctors, structured to...
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I am from India. I have gone thru all the postings and my case is similar to some. I met with an accident around 15 years back in which the Optic nerve of my right eye got damaged and as a result I am ...
118. Is treatment by stopping the toxic agent or replacing a missing vitamin that is causing an optic neuropathy usually effective in improving visual function ...
Professor Keith Martin Researchers from CERA and the University of Cambridge are investigating a new technique that could help heal and regrow damaged...
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Assuming that the observations are from normal distribution we obtain de distribution of the maximum likelihood ratio test if there is a change in the parameters at an unknown time and we find the maximum likehood estimators of the time change too.. ...
Diabetic neuropathy is long-term damage to the nerve fibres caused by constant high blood suger levels over a long period of time. The condition usually appears as reduced sensation in the feet.
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Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Science.. NOTE: We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it, and that it is not junk mail. We do not capture any email address.. ...
Background Impairment in instrumental actions of daily living (IADL) begins as individuals with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) transition to Alzheimers disease (AD) dementia. to three years and baseline FDG PET. The subjective, informant-based Functional Activities Questionnaire was used to assess IADL. General linear models and mixed effects models were used, covarying for demographics, cogniton, and behavior. Results The cross-sectional analysis revealed middle frontal and orbitofrontal hypometabolism were significantly associated with greater IADL impairment. Additionally, the interaction of diagnosis with posterior cingulate and with parahippocampal hypometabolism showed a greater decline in IADL performance as metabolism decreased for the AD dementia relative to the MCI group, and the MCI group relative to the CN group. The longitudinal analysis showed that baseline middle frontal and posterior cingulate hypometabolism were significantly associated with greater rate of increase ...
"Auditory evoked phosphenes in optic nerve disease". J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatry. 45 (1): 7-12. doi:10.1136/jnnp.45.1.7. ... phosphenes can also be caused by some diseases of the retina and nerves, such as multiple sclerosis. The British National ... "Movement phosphenes in optic neuritis: a new clinical sign". Neurology. 26 (11): 1100-4. doi:10.1212/wnl.26.11.1100. PMID ... Phosphenes that are induced by movement or sound may be associated with optic neuritis. Phosphenes can be directly induced by ...
"An Introduction to Diseases of the Optic nerve". Retrieved 30 May 2014. Quah, BL; Hamilton J; Blaser S; et al. (2005). "Morning ... pigmentary changes surrounding the optic disc excavation a central glial tuft overlying the optic disc Coloboma of optic nerve ... The term was coined in 1970 by Kindler, noting a resemblance of the malformed optic nerve to the morning glory flower. The ... The morning glory disc anomaly (MGDA) is a congenital deformity resulting from failure of the optic nerve to completely form in ...
"Graves' Disease: Proptosis, Lid Retraction, Strabismus, Optic Nerve Compression". The Eyes Have It. University of Michigan ... Many different illnesses can cause an increase in metabolic activity as the body combats illness and disease in order to heal ... Graves' disease: Manifestation: Excess hypermetabolically-induced thyroid hormone activates sympathetic pathways, causing the ... Some of the most prevalent diseases characterized by hypermetabolism are listed below. Hyperthyroidism: Manifestation: An ...
Pressure on the optic nerve behind the globe can lead to visual field defects and vision loss, as well. Prolonged untreated ... Begbie's disease, Flajani's disease, Flajani-Basedow syndrome, and Marsh's disease.[39] These names for the disease were ... a b c d e f g Basedow's syndrome or disease at Who Named It? - the history and naming of the disease ... Graves' disease[39][40] has also been called exophthalmic goiter.[40] Less commonly, it has been known as Parry's disease,[39][ ...
"FDA Approves New Therapy for Rare Disease Affecting Optic Nerve, Spinal Cord". U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (Press ... NMOSD is a rare autoimmune disorder in which immune system cells and autoantibodies attack and damage the optic nerves and ... Clinically, the disease is manifested with attacks/relapses that result in neurological impairment such as blindness, ... making NMOSD a chronically debilitating and potentially life-threatening disease. The label for inebilizumab includes a warning ...
The second most common initial manifestation of the disease is inflammation of the optic nerve and/or optic chiasm (optic ... "FDA Approves New Therapy for Rare Disease Affecting Optic Nerve, Spinal Cord". U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (Press ... "FDA Approves Treatment for Rare Disease Affecting Optic Nerves, Spinal Cord". U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 17 ... Longitudinally extensive myelitis or optic neuritis associated with systemic autoimmune disease Optic neuritis or myelitis ...
"Reduction of optic nerve fibers in patients with Alzheimer disease identified by laser imaging." Neurology 67, no. 10 (2006): ... Evaluation of optic nerve morphology in non-glaucomatous optic neuropathies with quantitative optic nerve imaging modalities' ... Evaluation of optic nerve morphology in non-glaucomatous optic neuropathies with quantitative optic nerve imaging modalities : ... "THESIS : The evaluation of diagnostic procedures, visual outcome and optic nerve morphology in giant cell arteritis : Helen V ...
1993). "Reduction in incidence of optic nerve disease with annual ivermectin to control onchocerciasis". The Lancet. 341 (8838 ... CLINICAL AND OTHER FINDINGS PRELIMINARY REPORT". British Journal of Venereal Diseases. 40 (1): 33-42. doi:10.1136/sti.40.1.33. ...
NMOSD is a rare autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that mainly affects the optic nerves and spinal cord. In ... "FDA Approves Treatment for Rare Disease Affecting Optic Nerves, Spinal Cord". U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 17 ... most often those in the optic nerves and spinal cord. Individuals with NMOSD typically have attacks of optic neuritis, which ... Patients with NMO and NMOSD have elevated levels of IL-6 in cerebro-spinal fluid and serum during periods of active disease. ...
"FDA Approves Treatment for Rare Disease Affecting Optic Nerves, Spinal Cord". U.S. Food and Drug Administration. 17 August 2020 ... 2020 - FDA approved satralizumab (Enspryng) for treatment of the orphan disease neuromyelitis optica. Biotech and ...
His research interests were to find the causes of inherited diseases of the retina and optic nerve. "A Montpellier, les 10 ... of sensory and motor systems with the ultimate goal of finding treatments for degeneration of the retina and optic nerve. Hamel ... Cai, Xue; Conley, Shannon M.; Naash, Muna I. (2009). "RPE65: Role in the visual cycle, human retinal disease, and gene therapy ...
Recovery time is more in macular diseases (50 seconds or more) than postretinal (e.g.optic nerve) diseases. Elevated PSRT has ... e.g.optic nerve) disease. The photo stress test is clinically useful in diabetes, glaucoma, macular degeneration etc. Diabetic ...
Wood-Smith D, Epstein F, Morello D. Transcranial decompression of the optic nerve in the osseous canal in Crouzon's disease. ... Dental disease - Cutaneous manifestations. N Y State J Med. 1974;74(9):1612-4. Converse JM, Wood-Smith D, McCarthy JG, Coccaro ...
... loss may occur due to many disease or disorders of the eye, optic nerve, or brain. For the eye, e.g., Glaucoma ... The type of field defect can help localize where the lesion is located (see figure). A lesion in the optic nerve of one eye ... A lesion at the proximal part of optic nerve of one eye cause, central field defect in one eye and temporal half-field defect ... "Optic neuritis: Pathophysiology, clinical features, and diagnosis". www.uptodate.com. "Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy". NORD ...
This rare disease destroys the optic nerve in the eye typically resulting in sudden vision loss which was the case for Chaz. ... Shortly after completing his inaugural running season, Davis was diagnosed with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON). ...
Glaucoma: Glaucoma is a combination of diseases that cause damage to the optic nerve and may result in vision loss and ... This is a useful database as it has information and data on some of the rarest diseases such as PWS. According to HPO, the ... It is dependent on the extent of the disease and overgrowth, condition of the patient's heart, if the blood vessels are ... PWS is often confused with Klippel-Trénaunay syndrome (KTS). These two diseases are similar, but they are distinct. PWS occurs ...
Glaucoma is a group of diseases affecting the optic nerve that results in vision loss and is frequently characterized by raised ... A cataract is an opacification or cloudiness of the eye's crystalline lens due to aging, disease, or trauma that typically ... A ciliotomy is a surgical section of the ciliary nerves. A conjunctivoanstrostomy is an opening made from the inferior ... Since the eye is heavily supplied by nerves, anesthesia is essential. Local anesthesia is most commonly used. Topical ...
... or diseases of the optic-nerve, such as glaucoma. The following week, Mr. Jackson, with Prof. MacLaren, operated on Robin ... The doctorate was for his work on optic-nerve regeneration. As an undergraduate, he also attended courses at Yale University, ... research is undertaken to improve outcomes for conditions relating to the lens and to the optic nerve, such as improved intra- ... It addressed the progress of the disease choroideremia, or choroideraemia, in which a faulty gene, CHM, leads to a loss of REP1 ...
In 1994 Lapthisophon suffered a major deterioration of his vision because of an optic nerve disease, and became legally blind ...
Glaucoma is a group of diseases affecting the optic nerve that results in vision loss and is frequently characterized by raised ...
This provides a simple diagnostic test by which to identify LHON, a maternally inherited disease that results in optic nerve ... Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) correlates with a mutation in the MT-ND4 gene in multiple families. The mutation at ... Genome analysis has never been used in MTLE cases and could provide another diagnostic method in the disease. MT-ND4 is ... Variations in the MT-ND4 gene are associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy ( ...
... translocation and optic nerve coloboma-renal disease". Journal of Medical Genetics. 34 (3): 213-6. doi:10.1136/jmg.34.3.213. ... optic chiasma development. • optic nerve development. • positive regulation of transcription from RNA polymerase II promoter. • ... positive regulation of optic nerve formation. • positive regulation of cell proliferation. • optic cup morphogenesis involved ... optic nerve structural organization. • positive regulation of transcription, DNA-templated. • cellular response to epidermal ...
... retinal and optic nerve pathology, corneal diseases and deals with daily examinations of 1200 patients. "EEBA". ...
Whilst serving in 1997, he lost his sight after contracting a rare disease which destroyed both of his optic nerves. On 2 ...
... optic nerve disease, and to boost the immune system. In animals, Semax rapidly elevates the levels and expression of brain- ... "Semax in the treatment of glaucomatous optic neuropathy in patients with normalized ophthalmic tone". Vestnik Oftalmologii. 117 ...
... devoted to the clinical and physiological methods of vision correction of retina and optic nerve diseases, became widely known ... Since 2001 till 2011 she was a head of the Eye Disease Department of Pediatrics at Russian State Medical University (now ... Since 1998 till 2001 Nisan was a Head Lecturer of Optometry and Contact Vision correction Course of Vision disease Department ...
Optic nerve diseases such as optic neuritis or retrobulbar neuritis lead to dysfunction in the afferent nerve pathway once the ... Two significant causes of vision loss due to sensory failures include media opacity and optic nerve diseases, although hypoxia ... especially damage to the lingual nerve and the glossopharyngeal nerve. The lingual nerve passes taste for the front two-thirds ... as well as multiple diseases, such as CMV or meningitis, which damage the cochlea and auditory nerve, respectively. Hearing ...
She studied the pathology of diseases affecting the optic nerve, spleen, brain, and spinal cord, and she examined cases of ... She was one of the first female pathologists and is best known for publishing a description of Canavan disease in 1931. Born in ... Canavan died of Parkinson's disease in 1953. Canavan's research focused on the effects of nervous system damage on the mind and ... "Canavan Disease." List of pathologists Dr. Myrtelle Canavan, M.D. HMS/HSDM Joint Committee on the Status of Women (JCSW) ...
Additionally, double CDON knock out mice display optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH), a prominent feature of septo-optic dysplasia ( ... Disease Models & Mechanisms. 10 (1): 29-37. doi:10.1242/dmm.026195. PMC 5278523. PMID 27935818. Jeong MH, Kim HJ, Pyun JH, Choi ... "Prenatal ethanol exposure in mice phenocopies Cdon mutation by impeding Shh function in the etiology of optic nerve hypoplasia ... CDON was shown important in restraining the size of the optic stalk and ventral retina in chick embryos. ...
Adaszewski S1, Dukart J, Kherif F, Frackowiak R, Draganski B; Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (2013). "How early ... "A quantitative description of membrane current and its application to conduction and excitation in nerve". J. Physiol. 117 (4 ... can we predict Alzheimer's disease using computational anatomy?". Neurobiol Aging. 34 (12): 2815-26. doi:10.1016/j. ... sciences and computational modeling to quantitatively define and investigate problems in neurological and psychiatric diseases ...
Optic nerve. Optic disc. *Optic neuritis *optic papillitis. *Papilledema *Foster Kennedy syndrome ... List of systemic diseases with ocular manifestations. References[edit]. *^ a b c Matejcek, A; Goldman, RD (November 2013). " ... The disease incidence varies widely depending on the geographical location. The most extensive epidemiological survey on this ... "Red Book-Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases, 29th Edition. The American Academy of Pediatrics". Retrieved 2007-07- ...
Wells, Martin J.; Wells, J. (1972). "Optic glands and the state of the testis in Octopus". Marine Behaviour and Physiology. 1 ( ... Coccidians in the genus Aggregata living in the gut cause severe disease to the host. Octopuses have an innate immune system, ... It contains tetrodotoxin, which causes paralysis by blocking the transmission of nerve impulses to the muscles. This causes ... The gonocoel is connected by the gonoduct to the mantle cavity, which it enters at the gonopore.[22] An optic gland creates ...
No photoreceptors are found at the blind spot, the area where ganglion cell fibers are collected into the optic nerve and leave ... The workers had tracked down patients with rare diseases wiping out classic rod and cone photoreceptor function but preserving ... The axons of ganglion cells form the two optic nerves. Photoreceptor cells are typically arranged in an irregular but ... ultimately leads to either the transmittance or inhibition of a neural signal that will be fed to the brain via the optic nerve ...
Optic nerve sheath meningioma, Pediatric ependymoma, Pilocytic astrocytoma, Pinealoblastoma, Pineocytoma, Pleomorphic ... Hourigan CS (2006). "The molecular basis of coeliac disease". Clin Exp Med (Review). 6 (2): 53-59. doi:10.1007/s10238-006-0095- ... A bilateral temporal visual field defect (due to compression of the optic chiasm) or dilation of the pupil, and the occurrence ... GBD 2015 Disease and Injury Incidence and Prevalence, Collaborators. (8 October 2016). "Global, regional, and national ...
"Biomedical Optics Express (ഭാഷ: ഇംഗ്ലീഷ്). 7 (7): 2597-2606. doi:10.1364/BOE.7.002597. ISSN 2156-7085. PMC 4948616. PMID ... "Table 1: Summary of sensory nerve supply". മൂലതാളിൽ നിന്നും February 14, 2013-ന് ആർക്കൈവ് ചെയ്തത്. ശേഖരിച്ചത് July 31, 2016.. ... "Anatomical and physiological aspects of the capillary bed in the bulbar conjunctiva of man in health and disease". Angiology. 6 ... "Human bulbar conjunctival hemodynamics in hemoglobin SS and SC disease". American Journal of Hematology (ഭാഷ: ഇംഗ്ലീഷ്). 88 (8 ...
Injuries and cataracts affect the eye itself, while abnormalities such as optic nerve hypoplasia affect the nerve bundle that ... Stargardt's disease. *Uveitis: is a group of 30 intraocular inflammatory diseases[44] caused by infections, systemic diseases, ... Glaucoma causes visual field loss as well as severs the optic nerve.[35] Early diagnosis and treatment of glaucoma in patients ... to the occipital lobe of the brain that prevent the brain from correctly receiving or interpreting signals from the optic nerve ...
Immunodeficiency Diseases (8th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill Medical. ISBN 9780071621519.. *^ a b Grimbacher B, Holland S, Gallin ... Coloboma of optic nerve. *PAX8 *Congenital hypothyroidism 2. *PAX9 *STHAG3. 3.3. *FOXC1 *Axenfeld syndrome 3 ... Abnormal neutrophil chemotaxis due to decreased production of interferon gamma by T lymphocytes is thought to cause the disease ... U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH): Clinical Research Studies: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases ( ...
Optic nerve. Optic disc. *Optic neuritis *optic papillitis. *Papilledema *Foster Kennedy syndrome ...
Sensory cranial and spinal nerves. *Optic (II). *Vestibulocochlear (VIII). *Olfactory (I). *Facial (VII) ... The Merkel nerve endings (also known as Merkel discs) detect sustained pressure. The lamellar corpuscles (also known as ... Mechanosensory free nerve endings detect touch, pressure, stretching, as well as the tickle and itch sensations. Itch ... They are all innervated by Aβ fibers, except the mechanorecepting free nerve endings, which are innervated by Aδ fibers. ...
Sensory cranial and spinal nerves. *Optic (II). *Vestibulocochlear (VIII). *Olfactory (I). *Facial (VII) ... or neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. These conditions can cause anosmia. In ... These diseases have more moderate effects on the olfactory system than Alzheimer's or Parkinson's diseases.[39] Furthermore, ... Other neurodegenerative diseases that affect olfactory dysfunction include Huntington's disease, multi-infarct dementia, ...
Coloboma (Coloboma of optic nerve). *Hydrophthalmos. *Norrie disease. Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php? ...
The drug is associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-ulcerative colitis, but not Crohn's disease.[51] There are also ... It is also used for treatment of neuroblastoma, a form of nerve cancer. ... swelling of the optic disk (papilloedema, associated with IIH), photophobia and other visual disturbances.[6] ... It is used to treat harlequin-type ichthyosis, a usually lethal skin disease, and lamellar ichthyosis. It is a retinoid, ...
Eye disease. *Refractive error. *Accommodation. *Physiological Optics. *Visual perception. Authority control *TA98: A12.3. ... Nerve fiber layer. *Ganglion cell layer. *Inner plexiform layer. *Inner nuclear layer ...
"I think it [religion] is a contagious mental disease. . . . The brain has a need to believe it knows a reason for things.. ... Rapport, Richard L. Nerve Endings: The Discovery of the Synapse. New York: W.W. Norton, 2005. Print. ... Together with Otto Schott and Carl Zeiss, he laid the foundation of modern optics. Abbe developed numerous optical instruments ... Emil du Bois-Reymond (1818-1896): German physician and physiologist, the discoverer of nerve action potential, and the father ...
Optic nerve. Optic disc. *Optic neuritis *optic papillitis. *Papilledema *Foster Kennedy syndrome ... Fabry disease, cystinosis, tyrosine transaminase deficiency, systemic lysosomal storage diseases, and several skin diseases (X- ... Basic&Clinical Science Course; External disease and cornea (2011-2012 ed.). American Academy of Ophthalmology. 2012. ISBN ... Most do not affect other parts of the body, nor are they related to diseases affecting other parts of the eye or body. ...
Neurology works with diseases of the central and peripheral nervous systems, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and ... specialized to conduct nerve impulses called action potentials) - and somas (the cell bodies of the neurons containing the ... The scientific study of the biological mechanisms that underlie the disorders and diseases of the nervous system. ... Neurosurgery and psychosurgery work primarily with surgical treatment of diseases of the central and peripheral nervous systems ...
"What have we learned about GPER function in physiology and disease from knockout mice?". J. Steroid Biochem. Mol. Biol. 153: ... Coloboma of optic nerve. *PAX8 *Congenital hypothyroidism 2. *PAX9 *STHAG3. 3.3. *FOXC1 *Axenfeld syndrome 3 ...
Steve Quinn 02:36, 31 March 2010 (UTC) Optics, Electromagnetism, and Physics. ... 2019-08-11: Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease. *2019-07-27: Catalogue of scientific papers ... 2018-10-02: Muscle & Nerve. *2018-10-02: Genes & Immunity. *2018-09-28: Journal of Gambling Studies ...
Large deep orbital dermoid cysts can cause pressure effects on the muscles and optic nerve, leading to diplopia and loss of ... but a white/yellow dot instead of the red eye reflex can indicate a tumor or some other kind of eye disease. Any photos of a ... helping to spare healthy tissue and the sensible optic nerves.[18]. *Enucleation of the Eye - Removal of the eye, but the ...
Decreased space may also lead to abnormal or missing tear ducts and nerve damage. Reconstructive surgery is usually required in ... Furthermore, this is only possible if the mutation causing the disease has already been identified within the family genome. ... Optic atrophy Refractory errors Small, low-set ears that may be rotated somewhat backwards and has a prominent (bulging) pinna ... or some other disease because the symptoms are so closely related, they literally had no way of differentiating between all of ...
Optic nerve. Optic disc. *Optic neuritis *optic papillitis. *Papilledema *Foster Kennedy syndrome ... They are due to copper deposition in part of the cornea (Descemet's membrane) as a result of particular liver diseases.[1] They ... The combination of neurological symptoms, a low blood ceruloplasmin level and KF rings is diagnostic of Wilson's disease.[1] ... Kayser-Fleischer rings are a sign of Wilson's disease, which involves abnormal copper handling by the liver resulting in copper ...
Optic nerve. Optic disc. *Optic neuritis *optic papillitis. *Papilledema *Foster Kennedy syndrome ... 2015). Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases. U.S. Dept. of Health & Human Services, Centers for Disease ... Conjunctivitis is the most common eye disease.[34] Rates of disease is related to the underlying cause which varies by the age ... "Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 2018-12-07.. *^ "Allergic Conjunctivitis". familydoctor.org. Archived ...
Similar to hypertensive retinopathy, evidence of nerve fiber infarcts due to ischemia (cotton-wool spots) can be seen on ... The risks of developing a life-threatening disease affecting the heart or brain increase as the blood flow increases. Commonly ... In the brain, hypertensive encephalopathy - characterized by hypertension, altered mental status, and swelling of the optic ... Other common causes of hypertensive crises are autonomic hyperactivity such as pheochromocytoma, collagen-vascular diseases, ...
C.J.R. Sheppard, A. Choudhury: Image Formation in the Scanning Microscope. In: Optica Acta: International Journal of Optics. 24 ... It used epi-Illumination-reflection microscopy for the observation of nerve tissue. A 5 mW Helium-Neon-Laser with 633 nm light ... Clinically, CLSM is used in the evaluation of various eye diseases, and is particularly useful for imaging, qualitative ... Optics and crystallography[edit]. CLSM is used as the data retrieval mechanism in some 3D optical data storage systems and has ...
... optic nerves and the spine but unfortunately his later discovered notes were disorganized and difficult to decipher due to his ... A simple autopsy of a cadaver can help determine origins of deadly diseases or disorders. Autopsies also can provide ... identification of seven pairs of cranial nerves, the difference between sensory and motor nerves, and the discovery of the ... identify disease sites, determine causes of death, and provide tissue to repair a defect in a living human being. Students in ...
The orbicularis oculi is a facial muscle; therefore its actions are translated by the facial nerve root. The levator palpebrae ... Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics. 26 (3): 318-25. doi:10.1111/j.1475-1313.2006.00350.x. PMID 16684158.. ... and disease. The blinking rate is determined by the "blinking center", but it can also be affected by external stimulus. ... Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics. 28 (4): 345-53. doi:10.1111/j.1475-1313.2008.00577.x. PMID 18565090.. ...
Various parts of the cerebrum process sensory input, such as smell in the olfactory lobe and sight in the optic lobe, and it is ... The brain sends signals through the spinal cord and nerves to regulate activity in the rest of the body. The pineal body, known ... Venturi, Sebastiano (2014). "Iodine, PUFAs and Iodolipids in Health and Disease: An Evolutionary Perspective". Human Evolution- ... The nervous system is basically the same as in other vertebrates, with a central brain, a spinal cord, and nerves throughout ...
... whose axons form the optic nerve, are at the front of the retina; therefore the optic nerve must cross through the retina en ... Further information: List of eye diseases and disorders. There are many inherited and acquired diseases or disorders that may ... It has three layers of nerve cells and two of synapses, including the unique ribbon synapse. The optic nerve carries the ... Nerve fiber layer (NFL) Ganglion cell axons travelling towards the optic nerve ...
... because the demyelinating inflammation can affect the optic nerve or spinal cord. Many are idiopathic. Both myelinoclastic and ... A demyelinating disease is any disease of the nervous system in which the myelin sheath of neurons is damaged.[1] This damage ... Demyelinating diseases are traditionally classified in two kinds: demyelinating myelinoclastic diseases and demyelinating ... Alzheimer's disease, depression, and other diseases affecting the brain. It has also been used to study the metabolism of other ...
... physiology and diseases of the eye. Submissions should focus on focusing on new diagnostic and surgical techniques, instrument ... Clinical Applications of the Photopic Negative Response to Optic Nerve and Retinal Diseases. Shigeki Machida ... Y. Gotoh, S. Machida, and Y. Tazawa, "Selective loss of the photopic negative response in patients with optic nerve atrophy," ... "Photopic negative response of full-field and focal macular electroretinograms in patients with optic nerve atrophy," Japanese ...
Also Known As: Optic Neuropathy; Optic Nerve Disease; Cranial Nerve II Disorder; Neural-Optical Lesion; Disk Disorder, Optic ... Damage to optic nerve fibers may occur at or near their origin in the retina, at the optic disk, or in the nerve, optic chiasm ... Optic Neuritis (Retrobulbar Neuritis) Show All ,, Key Therapies for Optic Nerve Diseases. Efficacy Chart ,, * Decompression : ... Optic Nerve Diseases (Optic Neuropathy) Summary Description: Conditions which produce injury or dysfunction of the second ...
... and treatment information for Optic Nerve Diseases (Optic nerve disorder) with alternative diagnoses, full-text book chapters, ... Optic Nerve *Optic Nerve diseases *Optic Nerve disorder *Nerve Diseases *Optic *Nerve *Nerve symptoms (9132 causes) *Nerve ... Treatments for Optic nerve disorder Optic Nerve Diseases: Related Diseases. Optic Nerve Diseases: Optic Nerve Diseases is ... Optic nerve disorder). Treatments for Optic Nerve Diseases (Optic nerve disorder) Treatments for Optic Nerve Diseases (Optic ...
... we present the results of a single patient with optic neuropathy treated within the Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study ( ... Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study (SCOTS) for retinal and optic nerve diseases: a preliminary report Neural Regen Res. ... SCOTS utilizes autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells in the treatment of optic nerve and retinal diseases. Pre- and post- ... Keywords: blindness; bone marrow-derived stem cells; ophthalmology; optic nerve; optic neuropathy; stem cells; visual loss. ...
Nervous System Diseases. Optic Atrophy. Optic Nerve Diseases. Pathological Conditions, Anatomical. Cranial Nerve Diseases. Eye ... Optic Nerve Diseases: Conditions which produce injury or dysfunction of the second cranial or optic nerve, which is generally ... Damage to optic nerve fibres may occur at or near their origin in the retina, at the optic disk, or in the nerve, optic chiasm ... Study the Safety and Efficacy of Bone Marrow Derived Autologous Cells for the Treatment of Optic Nerve Disease (OND). The ...
... optic nerve, and nerve fiber layer (NFL) differently from other instruments.1Newer... ... Optic Nerve Optical Coherence Tomography Optic Disc Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Optic Nerve Head These keywords were added by ... because some optic nerve pathologies have macular complications, but also because many retinal conditions may mimic optic nerve ... Karam E.Z., Hedges T.R., Mendoza C.E. (2009) Clinical Applications of Optical Coherence Tomography in Optic Nerve Disease. In: ...
Examination of optic nerve peripapillary vasculature in uveitic disease through optical coherence tomography angiography. ... Examination of optic nerve peripapillary vasculature in uveitic disease through optical coherence tomography angiography. ... 2015;122(3):511-7]. The primary aim of this study was to analyze optic nerve peripapillary vasculature in uveitic disease using ... Conclusions : OCTA provides useful information about optic nerve health in uveitic disease. Future studies aim to compare ...
NMOSD is a rare autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that mainly affects the optic ... FDA Approves New Therapy for Rare Disease Affecting Optic Nerve, Spinal Cord Second FDA Approved Therapy for Neuromyelitis ... Thread: FDA Approves New Therapy for Rare Disease Affecting Optic Nerve, Spinal Cord ... NMOSD is a rare autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that mainly affects the optic nerves and spinal cord. Uplizna ...
B. D. Lima, J. D. Perry, C. Lewis; CT Scan Evidence of Optic Nerve Dysfunction in Patients with Thyroid Eye Disease. Invest. ... CT Scan Evidence of Optic Nerve Dysfunction in Patients with Thyroid Eye Disease ... CT Scan Evidence of Optic Nerve Dysfunction in Patients with Thyroid Eye Disease ... specificity for the presence of optic nerve dysfunction. Increased muscle index was also related to optic neuropathy (mean 57.9 ...
Your Name) has sent you a message from Disease Models & Mechanisms Message Body (Your Name) thought you would like to see the ... The optic nerve exits the eye through the optic disc, which forms at the juncture of the optic stalk and cup. ONH can arise ... E-H) Quantification of (E) optic nerve diameter, (F) axial length of eye, (G) axial width of eye, and (H) optic nerve diameter ... To assess the embryos for ONH, the diameter of the optic nerve was measured at the level of the optic disc. Cdon−/− embryos ...
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases" on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of ... "Retinal and optic nerve degeneration in α-mannosidosis, ... 2). optic nerve atrophy. Two patients had partial optic nerve ... 1); of these, two with nerve head (Fig. 2). optic nerve atrophy. Two patients had partial optic nerve atrophy with no retinal ... Retinal and optic nerve degeneration in α-mannosidosis. Retinal and optic nerve degeneration in α-mannosidosis Matlach, Juliane ...
... optic nerve atrophy was seen in six patients (18.8%); of these, four with partial atrophy. Two patients had partial optic nerve ... However, retinal and optic nerve degeneration have been rarely described. We report ocular findings of 32 patients with α- ... two with optic nerve atrophy. Eight retinal images could be obtained by OCT or fundus photography; of these, six showed ... to opacities of the cornea and lens or strabismus and ocular motility disorders but tapeto-retinal degeneration and optic nerve ...
The International Foundation for Optic Nerve Disease. P. O. Box 777, Cornwall NY 12518, USA.. Phone/Fax: (845)5348606. Email: ... IFOND is registered service mark of The International Foundation for Optic Nerve Disease, est. October 1995.. Copyright 1999- ... IFOND does not publish all information from all available sources on optic nerve disease. IFOND is not responsible for the ... This research helped stimulate a cascade of broad research on mitochondrial and optic nerve disease. ...
Particularly in patients over 40 years of age, disturbances of perfusion at the optic nerve head and retina are a frequent ... As the most important disease entities, we must distinguish between ischemic optic neuropathy and arterial and venous perfusion ... PURPOSE: Primary open angle glaucoma is a chronic optic neuropathy affecting millions of people worldwide and represents a ...
Optic atrophy is seen as early as 5 years of age but may be congenital in origin as hypoplasia of the optic nerve was present ... Cortical visual impairment has been diagnosed although atrophic optic fundi and hypotrophic optic nerves and fovea have also ... The optic nerves and chiasm are frequently absent or hypoplastic as seen on the MRI. ERG and VEP responses are inconsistent but ... A brain MRI showed hypoplasia of the optic nerves and chiasm. A 9 month old female from another family had severe ...
Diseases Of The Optic Nerve Diseases Of The Optic Nerve.. By HAROLD GIFFORD, M. D.,. OF OMAHA, NEB. IN this section it is not ... Hyperemia of the Optic Nerve. A congestion of the optic nerve can only be diagnosed with any approach to accuracy when the ... Tumors of the Optic Nerve. The primary tumors of the optic nerve trunk are most frequently of the sarcomatous type, with a ... Atrophy of the Optic Nerve. By atrophy of the optic nerve is meant, strictly speaking, the disappearance of a larger or smaller ...
There has been recent interest in the potential use of gene therapy techniques to treat ocular disease. In this article, we ... In this article, we consider the optic nerve diseases that are potentially most amenable to gene therapy. METHODS: We discuss ... and optic nerve transection, and we assess the possibility of using similar techniques to treat human disease in the future. ... PURPOSE: There has been recent interest in the potential use of gene therapy techniques to treat ocular disease. ...
Ischemic Optic Neuropathy, Papilledema, Optic Neuropathy, Optic Atrophy in Gurgaon, Delhi-NCR. ... Dr Digvijay Singh is best eye specialist for optic nerve disease in children like Optic Neuritis, ... Optic nerve disease in children. What is the optic nerve?. Optic nerve is a group of nerve fibres which carry signal from the ... What are the acquired optic nerve diseases in children?. - Optic neuritis refers to inflammation of the optic nerve often in ...
Description: The optic nerves of a child can present in a variety of morphologies and disease states. The clinician is often ... Course Title: Pediatric Optic Nerve Diseases and Abnormalities. Category: Trt/Mngmnt Posterior Segment ... Clinical analysis of the abnormal optic nerve is crucial to formulating the correct clinical plan. This course presents a ...
Lebers Optic Neuropathy Explains the hereditary nature of the disease, and provides FAQ and details of current research. ... Lebers Optic Neuropathy The Scottish Sensory Centre provides an outline of the condition, as well as explaining how affected ... Leber Optic Atrophy The National Center for Biotechnology Information provides details of the genetic components, and a ... Lebers Optic Neuropathy. 3. Address directorium Health Conditions and Diseases Eye Disorders Optic Nerve. ...
The 22-kDa antigen in optic nerve and retinal diseases. Together they form a unique fingerprint. * Optic Nerve Diseases ... Keltner, JL & Thirkill, CE 1999, The 22-kDa antigen in optic nerve and retinal diseases, Journal of Neuro-Ophthalmology, vol ... Keltner, John L ; Thirkill, Charles E. / The 22-kDa antigen in optic nerve and retinal diseases. In: Journal of Neuro- ... Keltner, J. L., & Thirkill, C. E. (1999). The 22-kDa antigen in optic nerve and retinal diseases. Journal of Neuro- ...
... and related phenotypes are optic nerve hypoplasia and optic disc hypoplasia Disease Ontology : 12 An optic nerve disease ... Optic Nerve Hypoplasia, Bilateral (BONH) Categories: Eye diseases, Fetal diseases, Genetic diseases, Neuronal diseases, Rare ... Genetic diseases Rare diseases Fetal diseases Anatomical: Eye diseases Neuronal diseases See all MalaCards categories (disease ... MalaCards integrated aliases for Optic Nerve Hypoplasia, Bilateral:. Name: Optic Nerve Hypoplasia, Bilateral 57 29 6 70 ...
Large diameter optic nerve axon fibres in Alzheimers disease. Together they form a unique fingerprint. * Optic Nerve Medicine ... Large diameter optic nerve axon fibres in Alzheimers disease. / Syed, Anila B.; Armstrong, Richard A.; Smith, Christopher U.M. ... Large diameter optic nerve axon fibres in Alzheimers disease. 1992. Poster session presented at Meeting of the Society for ... title = "Large diameter optic nerve axon fibres in Alzheimers disease",. abstract = "A variety of visual symptoms have been ...
... some optic nerve diseases but neuro-ophthalmologists are often best suited to diagnose and treat diseases of the optic nerve. ... Other optic nerve problems are less common. Optic nerve hypoplasia is the underdevelopment of the optic nerve resulting in ... Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy is commonly known as "stroke of the optic nerve" and affects the optic nerve head (where the ... Disease[edit]. Main article: List of eye diseases and disorders. Damage to the optic nerve typically causes permanent and ...
The role of the Met98Lys optineurin variant in inherited optic nerve diseases.. Craig JE1, Hewitt AW, Dimasi DP, Howell N, ... The role of the Met98Lys optineurin variant in inherited optic nerve diseases ... autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) and Lebers hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). ...
... resources and questions answered by our Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Specialists for Coloboma of optic nerve ... Coloboma of optic nerve Title Other Names:. Optic nerve head pits, bilateral congenital; Congenital coloboma of the optic nerve ... Diseases expand submenu for Diseases * Browse A-Z * Find Diseases By Category expand submenu for Find Diseases By Category * ... Coloboma of the optic nerve is a congenital. eye abnormality in which the optic nerve (which carries images of what the eye ...
Simultaneous central retinal artery occlusion and optic nerve vasculitis in Crohn disease By Razek Georges Coussa, Andre Ali- ... this is the first case of unilateral CRAO and bilateral optic nerve occlusive vasculitis in Crohn disease, which should be ... It is important for ophthalmologists to be aware of the ophthalmic risks associated with Crohn disease as aggressive treatment ... optic neuropathy in the fellow eye.ObservationsAn 18-year-old patient recently diagnosed with biopsy-proven Crohn disease ...
... and optic nerve. Glaucoma is a common degenerative disease affecting (RGC) and optic nerve axons, with modern and chronic ... RGC) and the optic nerve axons, with progressive and chronic course. It is one of the most important reasons of blindness in ... influencing the optic nerve and its retinal materials and leading to a intensifying reduction of eyesight if neglected. ... Five medicinal classes are presently used in the treatment of this disease: beta-blockers, prostanoid analogs, alpha-agonists, ...
Optic nerve diseases (2). * Risk factors (2). * Adipocytes (1). Date ​ Choose a date option to show results from those dates ... Cell Death & Disease 7 , e2101-e2101 Rights & permissionsfor article Angiopoietin 2 induces astrocyte apoptosis via ,i,α,/i,v,i ... Predicting the risk of parafoveal scotoma in myopic normal tension glaucoma: role of optic disc tilt and rotation *M S Sung ... Retinal ganglion cell and axonal loss in optic neuritis: risk factors and visual functions *T H Lee ...
Retinal and optic nerve diseases are degenerative ocular pathologies which lead to irreversible visual loss. Since the advanced ... This paper reviews the latest progress of MSCs in human clinical trials for retinal and optic nerve diseases. ... Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in retinal and optic nerve diseases: An update of clinical trials. ... have been taken regarding the use of cell therapy in patients with neurodegenerative pathologies of optic nerve and retina. ...
  • For neuro-ophthalmology, OCT methods employed for retinal as well as glaucoma analysis are used, because some optic nerve pathologies have macular complications, but also because many retinal conditions may mimic optic nerve disease. (springer.com)
  • Jaffe GJ, Caprioli J. Optical coherence tomography to detect and manage retinal disease and glaucoma. (springer.com)
  • Roh S, Noecker RJ, Schumman J. Evaluation of coexisting optic nerve head drusen and glaucoma with optical coherence tomography. (springer.com)
  • Parisi V. Correlation between morphological and functional retinal impairment in patients affected by ocular hypertension, glaucoma, demyelinating optic neuritis and Alzheimer's disease. (springer.com)
  • Future studies aim to compare peripapillary vascular density in known uveitic eyes with glaucoma and non-glaucomatous uveitic eyes, and to determine whether OCTA can used reliably to assess optic nerve health as an alternate method to OCT in uveitic disease. (arvojournals.org)
  • PURPOSE: Primary open angle glaucoma is a chronic optic neuropathy affecting millions of people worldwide and represents a major public health issue. (isharonline.org)
  • METHODS: We discuss the recent success of gene transfer experiments in animal models of glaucoma, optic neuritis, Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), and optic nerve transection, and we assess the possibility of using similar techniques to treat human disease in the future. (edu.au)
  • In macular degeneration, glaucoma, and the major corneal diseases, the cells responsible for normal visual function die and are not replaced through natural healing mechanisms. (stanford.edu)
  • Glaucoma is a common degenerative disease affecting (RGC) and optic nerve axons, with modern and chronic program. (angiogenesis-blog.com)
  • The glaucoma can be a intensifying disease related, in most instances, to intraocular pressure (IOP) height, influencing the optic nerve and its retinal materials and leading to a intensifying reduction of eyesight if neglected. (angiogenesis-blog.com)
  • To investigate the role of the common OPTN Met98Lys variant as a risk allele in open-angle glaucoma (OAG), autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). (cdc.gov)
  • Our long-term goal is to improve outcomes by identifying biomarkers and environmental factors that profile a patient at risk for glaucoma by age-of-onset, rate of disease progression, 'poor response' to treatment, and large IOP fluctuation. (mayo.edu)
  • however, recent research into sex-related differences has begun to reveal possible links between estrogens and eye diseases, i.e., glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and cataracts. (frontiersin.org)
  • Regarding ocular diseases only few studies have been published, related to diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment, age-related macular degeneration, uveitis and glaucoma. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • According to the present findings, the vascular capillary network inside and outside of the optic disc has a significant, in fact, the leading role in nerve nutrition that is essential in glaucoma. (seeos.eu)
  • As the glaucoma disease is progressing, the scans will show more changes and thinning of RNFL according to the dark and blue colours in the PCD maps and drop-outs in the OCT angiograms. (seeos.eu)
  • All of those findings should correspond to each other and should help us to understand the exact semiology of glaucoma disease. (seeos.eu)
  • Glaucoma, the leading cause of blindness in the U.S., is one of four major ARED's, age-related eye diseases. (adorahills.com)
  • They have an incidence rate of glaucoma that is much higher than the rest of the population and are stricken with the disease at younger ages. (adorahills.com)
  • Comparison of retinal nerve fiber layer and optic disc imaging for diagnosing glaucoma in patients suspected of having the disease. (duke.edu)
  • To compare retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and optic disc topographic imaging for detection of optic nerve damage in patients suspected of having glaucoma.Observational cohort study.A cohort of 82 patients suspected of having glaucoma based on the appearance of the optic nerve.All patients were imaged using the GDx VCC scanning laser polarimeter and HRT (software version 3.0) confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope. (duke.edu)
  • For a similar specificity (70%), the parameter NFI had a significantly larger sensitivity (83%) (P = 0.003).Retinal nerve fiber layer imaging with GDx VCC had a superior performance versus topographic optic disc assessment with the HRT for detecting early damage in patients suspected of having glaucoma. (duke.edu)
  • For glaucoma diagnosis, these results suggest that GDx VCC may offer advantage over the HRT when these tests are combined with clinical examination of the optic nerve. (duke.edu)
  • The Auckland baby, conceived on a fifth cycle of IVF fertility treatment, was born with glaucoma, a condition that damages the nerves running from the back of the eyes to the brain. (nzherald.co.nz)
  • Glaucoma is a disease that damages the optic nerve and peripheral vision. (prnewswire.com)
  • If you suffer from glaucoma, you can increase the risk of the disease. (wikihow.com)
  • Glaucoma is an eye disease. (wikihow.com)
  • Glaucoma is an optic nerve disease that often occurs without symptoms. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Glaucoma is an eye disorder affecting the optic nerve cells. (newsmax.com)
  • Optic nerve damage from glaucoma is often related to higher-than-normal eye pressure. (aao.org)
  • As the studies reveal more information about the eye during sleep, ophthalmologists are hopeful that we will see new treatments for glaucoma and other OSA-related eye disease. (aao.org)
  • The five leading causes of impaired vision and blindness in the United States are age-related macular degeneration , cataract , glaucoma , diabetic retinopathy , and atrophy of the optic nerve . (thefreedictionary.com)
  • it is either congenital and stationary with myopia and degeneration of the disc-eg, retinitis pigmentosa, hereditary optic atrophy or progressive and acquired with retinal, choroidal or vitrioretinal degeneration-eg, cataract, glaucoma, optic atrophy, retinal degeneration and, the 'classic' cause of nyctalopia, vitamin A deficiency. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Reduction of oscillatory potentials and photopic negative response in patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy with OPA1 mutations," Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science , vol. 48, no. 2, pp. 820-824, 2007. (hindawi.com)
  • Disc excavation in dominant optic atrophy. (springer.com)
  • of these, two with optic nerve atrophy. (deepdyve.com)
  • Two patients had partial optic nerve atrophy with no retinal abnormalities on funduscopy. (deepdyve.com)
  • Conclusion: Ocular pathologies are not exclusively confined to opacities of the cornea and lens or strabismus and ocular motility disorders but tapeto-retinal degeneration and optic nerve atrophy may be a common feature in α-mannosidosis. (deepdyve.com)
  • However, only recently, retinal abnormal- ities and optic nerve atrophy have been described in a few 1st presentation 0.56 ± 0.28 (0.04-1.00) case reports and confirmed by electrophysiology or optical Last presentation 0.60 ± 0.25 (0.10-1.00) coherence tomography (OCT) as fundus biomicroscopy ERT with velmanase alfa 7 (21.9%) only reveals subtle retinal changes [9, 10]. (deepdyve.com)
  • However, only recently, retinal abnormalities and optic nerve atrophy have been described in a few case reports and confirmed by electrophysiology or optical coherence tomography (OCT) as fundus biomicroscopy only reveals subtle retinal changes [ 9 , 10 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This occurs as a wave of death and optic atrophy, often triggered by environmental exposure to ROS (such as in smoke). (ifond.org)
  • Persistent optic nerve edema is eventually followed by some degree of optic atrophy. (arizona.edu)
  • Globoid leukodystrophy (Krabbe's disease) was diagnosed in an infant in whom a progressive neurological disorder and optic atrophy developed. (jamanetwork.com)
  • Hereditary optic atrophy are diseases in which the optic disc loses nerve fibres and neuroretinal rim becomes pale. (drdigvijaysingh.com)
  • These present in first decade of life with progressive vision loss and optic atrophy. (drdigvijaysingh.com)
  • They often have a family history of optic atrophy (pale optic disc) in the parents and grandparents. (drdigvijaysingh.com)
  • Hereditary optic atrophy. (drdigvijaysingh.com)
  • Optic neuropathy/atrophy may sometimes occur in the absence of genetic defects due to various conditions. (drdigvijaysingh.com)
  • Leber Optic Atrophy The National Center for Biotechnology Information provides details of the genetic components, and a description of clinical features. (inter.rs)
  • Six displayed features of optic atrophy. (elsevier.com)
  • All the patients had either an abnormal electroretinogram or optic atrophy. (elsevier.com)
  • Signs of inflammation resolved gradually with some improvement of visual acuity despite developing optic atrophy.Conclusionand importance: To our knowledge, this is the first case of unilateral CRAO and bilateral optic nerve occlusive vasculitis in Crohn disease, which should be considered as an etiology of retinal vascular occlusive disorders especially in young patients. (core.ac.uk)
  • Note bilateral optic atrophy and macular exudate in OD. (scielo.br)
  • Colour fundus photograph of the left optic disc showing optic nerve pallor in a patient with dominant optic atrophy and OPA1 gene mutation. (cardiff.ac.uk)
  • Autosomal dominant optic atrophy is the commonest inherited optic neuropathy. (cardiff.ac.uk)
  • Optic atrophy may also be referred to as optic nerve head pallor because of the pale appearance of the optic nerve head as seen at the back of the eye . (factbites.com)
  • Hereditary conditions that feature progressive visual loss in association with optic atrophy. (curehunter.com)
  • Relatively common forms include autosomal dominant optic atrophy (OPTIC ATROPHY, AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT) and Leber hereditary optic atrophy (OPTIC ATROPHY, HEREDITARY, LEBER). (curehunter.com)
  • Where, in addition to a decided congestion, the outlines of the papilla become at all indistinct, it is preferable to speak of slight or incipient optic neuritis. (operatingmicroscopes.com)
  • Optic Neuritis. (operatingmicroscopes.com)
  • Where from the severity of the disturbance of Vision in comparison with the negative or slightly pronounced character of the ophthalmoscopic symptoms an inflammation of the nerves between the eye and the chiasm is diagnosed, the condition is termed retro bulbar neuritis. (operatingmicroscopes.com)
  • Papillitis, or Intraocular Optic Neuritis. (operatingmicroscopes.com)
  • and descending neuritis, sometimes known as simple, optic neuritis, in which he believed that the inflammation spread down the nerve trunk from the intracranial lesion. (operatingmicroscopes.com)
  • Optic neuritis refers to inflammation of the optic nerve often in association with a demyelinating illness such as multiple sclerosis. (drdigvijaysingh.com)
  • It may be either retrobulbar neuritis (where the optic disc appearance is unaltered) or papillitis (where there is swelling of optic disc). (drdigvijaysingh.com)
  • Nearly three-fourths of optic neuritis in children is preceded by an episode of fever, often viral. (drdigvijaysingh.com)
  • Optic neuritis presents with sudden vision loss, pain behind the eyeballs and alteration in color vision. (drdigvijaysingh.com)
  • The overall outcome for optic neuritis in children is good though worse than that for adults. (drdigvijaysingh.com)
  • The disorder is sometimes mistaken for atypical optic neuritis. (scielo.br)
  • Optic neuritis is most commonly observed in women aged 20-50 years. (scielo.br)
  • Neuromyelitis optica, chronic relapsing inflammatory optic neuropathy, and autoimmune optic neuropathy are examples of atypical optic neuritis. (scielo.br)
  • In this paper, we describe a case of RINR and discuss how to distinguish RINR from atypical optic neuritis. (scielo.br)
  • Optic neuritis is an inflammation of the optic nerve. (factbites.com)
  • Optic neuritis is found clinically at some time in 75% of patients with MS and is one of the presenting signs of MS in about 35% of cases. (factbites.com)
  • Optic neuritis is characterized by an acute loss of vision, often associated with retrobulbar pain with eye movement. (factbites.com)
  • Phosphenes that are induced by movement or sound may be associated with optic neuritis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Optic papillitis is a specific type of optic neuritis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Retrobulbar neuritis, an inflamed optic nerve, but with a normal-appearing nerve head, is associated with pain and the other findings of papillitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • This, our ninth trip, was to the same remote area in Brazil allowed us to continue the examination of the world's largest pedigree with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON). (ifond.org)
  • One special form called Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) occurs during adolescent age and has a maternal inheritance. (drdigvijaysingh.com)
  • In this report, we present the results of a single patient with optic neuropathy treated within the Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study (SCOTS). (nih.gov)
  • To compare superior ophthalmic vein diameter and extraocular muscle index in patients with thyroid eye disease with or without optic neuropathy. (arvojournals.org)
  • High-resolution CT scan images of 40 orbits of twenty patients with history of thyroid eye disease (with or without optic neuropathy), who underwent orbital decompression surgery from January 2007 to November 2009, were retrospectively reviewed. (arvojournals.org)
  • The clinical diagnosis of optic neuropathy was based on characteristic signs that included afferent pupillary defect, decreased visual acuity, visual field defects and dyschromatopsia. (arvojournals.org)
  • Optic neuropathy was present in ten orbits prior to decompression surgery. (arvojournals.org)
  • Thirty orbits with no clinical evidence of optic neuropathy made up the control group. (arvojournals.org)
  • Muscle index greater than 50% was present in all patients with dysthyroid optic neuropathy (100% sensitivity) and was 63.3% specific. (arvojournals.org)
  • This study suggests that patients with thyroid eye disease with enlarged superior ophthalmic vein and increased extraocular muscle index are more likely to have concomitant optic neuropathy. (arvojournals.org)
  • As the most important disease entities, we must distinguish between ischemic optic neuropathy and arterial and venous perfusion disturbances. (isharonline.org)
  • All these forms of optic neuropathy present with vision loss in either one or both eyes. (drdigvijaysingh.com)
  • Leber's Optic Neuropathy The Scottish Sensory Centre provides an outline of the condition, as well as explaining how affected individuals can be helped by family and friends. (inter.rs)
  • Leber's Optic Neuropathy Explains the hereditary nature of the disease, and provides FAQ and details of current research. (inter.rs)
  • AbstractPurposeTo describe a case of Crohn disease presenting as occlusive vasculitis resulting in a central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) in one eye and transient ischemic optic neuropathy in the fellow eye.ObservationsAn 18-year-old patient recently diagnosed with biopsy-proven Crohn disease presented with CRAO OD after a previous episode of transient visual loss OS. (core.ac.uk)
  • Great curiosity in the last years provides been devoted to the treatment of glaucomatous optic neuropathy, with great regards to the biological and clinical analysis for cell therapy. (angiogenesis-blog.com)
  • RPh201 is a proprietary, isolated botanical extract of gum mastic for treatment of nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Recurrent idiopathic neuroretinitis is an inflammatory optic neuropathy characterized by optic nerve edema and macular star, associated with painless and recurrent episodes of visual loss, poor visual prognosis, and visual field defects related to nerve fiber layer injury. (scielo.br)
  • Neuroretinitis is a self-limiting inflammatory optic neuropathy characterized by edema of the optic nerve associated with macular exudate in a star-shaped pattern, absence of recurrence and good visual prognosis. (scielo.br)
  • Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) typically presents in young adults as bilateral, painless, subacute visual failure. (nih.gov)
  • This springs from work on the pathophysiology of inherited optic neuropathy. (cardiff.ac.uk)
  • Opa3, like Opa1, is thought to have a role in mitochondrial membrane dynamics, and when mutated in the human, a complex neurodegenerative disease, comprising optic neuropathy secondary to RGC loss, cataract and neuromuscular degeneration, arises. (cardiff.ac.uk)
  • As part of my role as a Clinician Scientist, I also recruit patients with inherited optic neuropathy for genetic screening and I run a Retinal Clinic and a Genetic Eye Clinic, at the University Hospital of Wales. (cardiff.ac.uk)
  • We have performed functional and expression studies of the OPA1 gene and assessed its wider role in inherited optic neuropathy and we are developing model systems to explore the mechanisms and pathways of RGC loss. (cardiff.ac.uk)
  • They are initially asymptomatic but may causes progressive optic neuropathy. (intechopen.com)
  • Frequent complications: progressive visual field scotoma, ischemic optic neuropathy, central retinal artery or vein occlusion, and neovascularization adjacent to the optic nerve head. (intechopen.com)
  • Thus, they are also considered to be one of the causes of the progressive type of optic neuropathy with genetic etiology [ 1 , 2 ]. (intechopen.com)
  • Your doctor may prescribe a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitor (a type of growth factor inhibitor therapy ) to treat radiation retinopathy or optic neuropathy. (cancer.ca)
  • Ethambutol-associated optic neuropathy. (medscape.com)
  • Amiodarone and optic neuropathy: the heart of the matter. (medscape.com)
  • Macaluso DC, Shults WT, Fraunfelder FT. Features of amiodarone-induced optic neuropathy. (medscape.com)
  • Amiodarone induced optic neuropathy. (medscape.com)
  • Bilateral optic neuropathy associated with amiodarone therapy. (medscape.com)
  • Tobacco optic neuropathy (TON) - the historical and present concept of the disease. (medscape.com)
  • Wilczynski M, Wilczynska O. Severe acute bilateral alcohol-induced toxic optic neuropathy--case report. (medscape.com)
  • Optical coherence tomography can measure axonal loss in patients with ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy. (medscape.com)
  • Chai SJ, Foroozan R. Decreased retinal nerve fibre layer thickness detected by optical coherence tomography in patients with ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy. (medscape.com)
  • The clinical spectrum of amiodarone-associated optic neuropathy. (medscape.com)
  • In cases of optic neuropathy due to inflammation, infiltration, ischemia or demyelinization, visual acuity is often significantly diminished. (factbites.com)
  • Optical coherence tomography of superior segmental optic hypoplasia. (springer.com)
  • Mouse embryos with mutations in the Shh co-receptor, Cdon , were treated in utero with ethanol or saline at embryonic day 8 (E8.0) and evaluated for optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH), a prominent feature of SOD. (biologists.org)
  • Septo-optic dysplasia (SOD) is a clinically heterogeneous disorder that is diagnosed on the presence of at least two of the following conditions: optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH), hypopituitarism and absence of the septum pellucidum ( Webb and Dattani, 2010 ). (biologists.org)
  • Microphthalmia and optic nerve hypoplasia with "blindness" seem to be common. (arizona.edu)
  • Optic nerve hypoplasia is evident on brain MRIs. (arizona.edu)
  • Optic nerve hypoplasia is present in some individuals. (arizona.edu)
  • - Optic Nerve Hypoplasia results from an insult during early pregnancy and presents with a disc which is small and pale. (drdigvijaysingh.com)
  • 36 Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. (malacards.org)
  • Optic Nerve Hypoplasia, Bilateral, also known as optic nerve hypoplasia , is related to septooptic dysplasia and microphthalmia, syndromic 3 . (malacards.org)
  • An important gene associated with Optic Nerve Hypoplasia, Bilateral is PAX6 (Paired Box 6), and among its related pathways/superpathways is Transcriptional Regulatory Network in Embryonic Stem Cell . (malacards.org)
  • 12 An optic nerve disease characterized by isolated optic nerve hypoplasia or aplasia that has material basis in heterozygous mutation in PAX6 on chromosome 11p13. (malacards.org)
  • 72 Bilateral optic nerve hypoplasia: A congenital anomaly in which the optic disk appears abnormally small. (malacards.org)
  • 73 Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is a medical condition arising from the underdevelopment of the optic. (malacards.org)
  • He was taken to an ophthalmology department and was diagnosed with optic nerve hypoplasia. (chinastemcell.com.cn)
  • After the admission he received related examinations and was diagnosed with Optic nerve hypoplasia. (chinastemcell.com.cn)
  • A case of topless disc syndrome (superior segmental optic hypoplasia). (harvard.edu)
  • Hypoplasia of the optic disc is a " smaller " disc that carries fewer axons than normal and may be associated with poor visual acuity, field defect, strabismus. (factbites.com)
  • Optic disc hypoplasia and is seen with particular frequency in children of diabetic mothers (may be familial) with maternal drug use (alcohol, phenytoin, quinine, LSD, PCP), and with maternal infections (e.g. (factbites.com)
  • Optic nerve hypoplasia is frequently associated with systemic conditions--some of them serious-- CNS abnormalities like hypopituitarism, agenesis of the septum pellucidum, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, head/face anomalies, deafness, chondrodysplasia, heart disease and trisomy 18. (factbites.com)
  • What are the hereditary optic nerve disorders in children? (drdigvijaysingh.com)
  • This may have ramifications for the use of hormone therapy in the treatment of eye disease and of retinal disorders in particular. (frontiersin.org)
  • This new approach recognizes early retinal, macular and optic disc disorders, and is becoming a part of the standard care in everyday practice in ophthalmology. (seeos.eu)
  • Sensitivity data were obtained by evaluating patients within the Ocular Disease and Special Testing Service at the UEC with known central retinal and/or optic nerve disorders (CD subjects). (hindawi.com)
  • Part two then dives into the clinical application of electrophysiology of vision, and subsequently summarizes the characteristics of the electrophysiological signals in a number of disorders of retina and optic nerve. (springer.com)
  • Department faculty are now paving the way in battling vision loss through stem cell research focused on diseases that range from the cornea on the front of the eye to the retina and optic nerve in the back. (stanford.edu)
  • Methods: The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot analysis were used to identify autoantibody reactions with retina and optic nerve components. (elsevier.com)
  • Results: Eight patients, one man and seven women, were found to produce an autoantibody reaction with retina and optic nerve, including a novel 22-kDa neuronal antigen present within the retina and optic nerve. (elsevier.com)
  • Conclusions: In the eight cases described, unexplained visual loss was associated with autoantibody reactions with retina and optic nerve, including a common antibody reaction with a 22-kDa neuronal antigen found in the retina and optic nerve. (elsevier.com)
  • The 22-kDa immunologic marker may not be directly involved in the patient's vision loss, but rather may be related to a nonspecific destruction of retina and optic nerve. (elsevier.com)
  • This SD-OCT scan obtains a substantial amount of data for the assessment of both central retina and optic nerve integrity simultaneously [ 2 - 7 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a relatively new technology that provides information about the retina, optic nerve, and nerve fiber layer (NFL) differently from other instruments. (springer.com)
  • Imaging congenital optic disc pits and associated maculopathy using optical coherence tomography. (springer.com)
  • Optical coherence tomography in optic disc pit maculopathy treated by the macular buckling procedure. (springer.com)
  • Rutledge BK, Puliafito CA, Duker JS, Hee MR, Cox MS. Optical coherence tomography of macular lesions associated with optic nerve head pits. (springer.com)
  • Optical coherence tomography shows increased nerve fiber layer thickness in pseudo- and mild papilledema. (springer.com)
  • Examination of optic nerve peripapillary vasculature in uveitic disease through optical coherence tomography angiography. (arvojournals.org)
  • Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) noninvasively provides information about optic nerve health. (arvojournals.org)
  • Previous studies have shown that optical coherence tomography (OCT) alone is unreliable when assessing optic nerve health in uveitis, due to edematous changes during inflammation [Moore et al, Ophthalmology. (arvojournals.org)
  • Optic nerve images of 21 patients (35 eyes) were imaged using optical coherence tomography angiography (Optovue, Inc., Fremont, CA). Descriptive data including gender, visual acuity, and intraocular pressure was obtained. (arvojournals.org)
  • We brought and added a new technology in the form of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) that offered the clinical quantification of retinal nerve fiber thickening and losses. (ifond.org)
  • Additionally, optical coherence tomography (OCT RS-3000 Lite, NIDEK Corporation, Tokyo, JP) measurement of the peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer thickness, and Humprey visual field testing (Carl-Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA) were also performed. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Since optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides in vivo cellular imaging on a near histologic scale with precision at the level of microns, the retina can act as a biomarker for central nervous system disease. (healio.com)
  • Damage to optic nerve fibers may occur at or near their origin in the retina, at the optic disk, or in the nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract, or lateral geniculate nuclei. (rightdiagnosis.com)
  • - Myelinated Nerve Fibers are the persistence of whitish appearing nerve sheath (at the optic disc) which is normally absent. (drdigvijaysingh.com)
  • As a consequence, the fibers of the optic nerve are covered with myelin produced by oligodendrocytes , rather than Schwann cells of the peripheral nervous system , and are encased within the meninges . (wikipedia.org)
  • The fibers from the retina run along the optic nerve to nine primary visual nuclei in the brain, from which a major relay inputs into the primary visual cortex . (wikipedia.org)
  • Each human optic nerve contains between 770,000 and 1.7 million nerve fibers, [3] which are axons of the retinal ganglion cells of one retina. (wikipedia.org)
  • The optic nerve leaves the orbit (eye socket) via the optic canal , running postero-medially towards the optic chiasm , where there is a partial decussation (crossing) of fibers from the temporal visual fields (the nasal hemi-retina) of both eyes. (wikipedia.org)
  • There, partial decussation occurs, and about 53% of the fibers cross to form the optic tracts. (wikipedia.org)
  • From the lateral geniculate body, fibers of the optic radiation pass to the visual cortex in the occipital lobe of the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • The capillaries run along relatively long straight paths and are limited to the posterior pole where they seem to be associated highly with the superficial nerve fibers. (seeos.eu)
  • It is a disorder that damages the optic nerve, the transmission line of 1 million+ nerve fibers that sends pictures from the eye to the brain. (adorahills.com)
  • Septo-optic dysplasia (SOD) is a congenital disorder characterized by optic nerve, pituitary and midline brain malformations. (biologists.org)
  • IN this section it is not proposed to discuss the affections commonly classed as amblyopias or amauroses, although in many of them the optic nerve is primarily or secondarily affected : they will be considered in another article (page 457), as will also many of the congenital peculiarities of the optic disk (pages 191 195). (operatingmicroscopes.com)
  • Coloboma of the optic nerve is a congenital eye abnormality in which the optic nerve (which carries images of what the eye sees to the brain) is incompletely formed. (cdc.gov)
  • Optic nerve head drusen (ONHD) represent congenital anomaly, which is a form of calcium degeneration of optic nerve head axons. (intechopen.com)
  • Optic nerve head drusen (ONHD) represent the congenital, developmental anomaly of the second cranial nerve. (intechopen.com)
  • C. H. Moon, S. C. Hwang, Y. H. Ohn, and T. K. Park, "The time course of visual field recovery and changes of retinal ganglion cells after optic chiasmal decompression," Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science , vol. 52, pp. 7966-7973, 2011. (hindawi.com)
  • Our goal is to stabilize, better diagnose, and find cures for common eye diseases, so that we can help not just our patients, but patients globally as well," said Jeffrey Goldberg, MD, PhD, professor and chair of ophthalmology at Stanford, noting that some 1.3 billion people worldwide suffer from vision impairment. (stanford.edu)
  • Keltner, JL & Thirkill, CE 1999, ' The 22-kDa antigen in optic nerve and retinal diseases ', Journal of Neuro-Ophthalmology , vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 71-83. (elsevier.com)
  • With the findings signaling that many Americans may not be defending themselves against diabetes-related vision loss, the American Academy of Ophthalmology is sharing information about diabetic eye disease and dilated eye exams to encourage those with diabetes to take proactive steps to protect their vision. (prnewswire.com)
  • Veterinary Ophthalmology, Fifth Edition is a fully updated version of the gold-standard reference for diseases and treatment of the animal eye in veterinary medicine. (ecampus.com)
  • The book retains its classic structure, with sections on basic vision sciences, the foundations of clinical ophthalmology, canine ophthalmology, and special ophthalmology, which encompasses specific coverage of most commonly treated species and chapters on neuro-ophthalmology and systemic diseases. (ecampus.com)
  • This is a Single arm, Single centre trial to check the safety and efficacy of bone marrow derived autologous mono nuclear cell(100 millions per dose )clinical trial to be conducted for 36 months in patients with optic nerve diseases. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Two α-mannosidosis phenotypes have been described based on clinical severity: a severe infantile form (type I) characterized by early death due to rapid progressive central nervous system involvement and a milder phenotype with a slower disease progression and survival into adulthood (type II) [ 1 , 2 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In short, we have found at least one and probably two excellent biomarkers of this disease that can be used for any future clinical study of a therapeutic agent. (ifond.org)
  • We discuss the pathogenesis of the clinical and pathological ocular findings, with regard to the inherited absence of the enzyme galactocerebroside β-galactosidase and the accumulation in the optic nerve and brain of its substrates, galactocerebroside and psychosine. (jamanetwork.com)
  • Clinical analysis of the abnormal optic nerve is crucial to formulating the correct clinical plan. (westernu.edu)
  • NTG was diagnosed based on a clinical examination showing a normal IOP (corrected for corneal thickness), thinning of the peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer, optic nerve damage, and characteristic glaucomatous visual field defects. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Objective To explore the clinical features,primary lesions and prognosis of optic nerve metastases . (bvsalud.org)
  • My goals are aimed at developing a deeper understanding of inherited eye disease and ultimately utilising my position as a clinical ophthalmologist to drive the application of translational research in this area. (cardiff.ac.uk)
  • Clinical understanding of the disease is poor, although we have clinical and some pathological evidence that retinal ganglion cells are deficient in the eyes of patients. (cardiff.ac.uk)
  • Diagnostic investigations are limited, and physicians rely on clinical examination and exclusion of differential diagnoses that may cause cognitive impairment, such as depression, Parkinson's disease (PD), hypothyroidism, drug interactions, and vitamin deficiencies ( 6 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • Alzheimer's clinical trials thus far have failed to reach primary endpoints, and the clinical and research community recognizes that a better understanding of the pathophysiology and treating at earlier stages of these diseases are the roads forward for effective therapeutic intervention. (healio.com)
  • A robust, relatively low-cost, and patient-friendly biomarker for early diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases, perhaps even before clinical symptomatology, is therefore currently a large unmet need. (healio.com)
  • Illustrates the techniques of clinical electrophysiology of vision and the applications of different recording tests for varying diseases. (springer.com)
  • Handbook of Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision is designed to aid the readers in understanding the types of electrophysiologic tests that should be used in specific diseases, how to explain the results of these exams, and how to perform the tests of clinical electrophysiology of vision. (springer.com)
  • Concise in format, the Handbook of Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision is divided into two sections that discuss a wide range of relevant topics, such as technology of electroretinography, electrooculography, visual evoked potential, characteristics of electroretinography in retinal diseases, and the characteristics of optic nerve diseases. (springer.com)
  • These courses form the foundation for the more advanced study of clinical medicine, systemic and ocular pathological processes, and the diagnosis, treatment, and management of ocular disease. (neco.edu)
  • By reducing intraocular pressure, the compression to the optic nerve axons decreases, thus improving perfusion of the optic nerve head. (intechopen.com)
  • Epilepsy is more common than Parkinson's disease , multiple sclerosis , cerebral palsy , and muscular dystrophy all combined. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The concept of "the retina as a window to the brain" has emerged with possible implications in various pathologies, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis [ 1 ]. (springer.com)
  • citation needed] Less commonly, phosphenes can also be caused by some diseases of the retina and nerves, such as multiple sclerosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ophthalmoscopy revealed the absence of vitreous cellularity (score 0 in the grading of vitreous haze proposed by the Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature), pallor of both optic nerves, and macular exudate in OD ( Figure 1 ). (scielo.br)
  • A variety of visual symptoms have been associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). (aston.ac.uk)
  • Smith, Christopher U.M. / Large diameter optic nerve axon fibres in Alzheimer's disease . (aston.ac.uk)
  • Metabolomic analysis of serum, plasma and urine has revealed panels of metabolites that distinguish patients with cardiovascular disease, breast cancer, Parkinson disease, Alzheimer's disease and diabetes from control patients. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia affecting the growing aging population today, with prevalence expected to rise over the next 35 years. (frontiersin.org)
  • The growth in life expectancy and the developing aging population has led to the increased prevalence of chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). (frontiersin.org)
  • In this installment of Practical Retina, Dilraj S. Grewal, MD , and Sharon Fekrat, MD , both of Duke Eye Center, provide a timely update on the use of OCT imaging in the detection of neurodegenerative disease, including Alzheimer's, dementia, and Parkinson's disease. (healio.com)
  • There is expected to be a considerable increase in the incidence of neurodegenerativediseases such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and Parkinson's disease (PD). (healio.com)
  • However, concerning Alzheimer's disease (AD), it still remains controversial whether changes occurring in the brain and retina are associated. (springer.com)
  • The paper presents young female patient with bilateral optic nerve drusen and progressive visual field defects (scotomas), which implies topical hypotensive therapy. (intechopen.com)
  • We show that both Cdon −/− mutation and prenatal ethanol exposure independently cause ONH through a similar pathogenic mechanism that involves selective inhibition of Shh signaling in retinal progenitor cells, resulting in their premature cell-cycle arrest, precocious differentiation and failure to properly extend axons to the optic nerve. (biologists.org)
  • The purpose of this study was to determine whether there were differences in the number and/or size of optic nerve axons between AD patients and non-demented age-matched controls. (aston.ac.uk)
  • The optic nerve is composed of retinal ganglion cell axons and glial cells . (wikipedia.org)
  • [4] Most of the axons of the optic nerve terminate in the lateral geniculate nucleus from where information is relayed to the visual cortex, while other axons terminate in the pretectal nucleus and are involved in reflexive eye movements. (wikipedia.org)
  • RGC) and the optic nerve axons, with progressive and chronic course. (angiogenesis-blog.com)
  • This is a form of calcium degeneration of the axons of the optic nerve head (ONH). (intechopen.com)
  • and the color of the normal papilla is subject to such wide variation in different individuals that a positive diagnosis of hyperemia, even where it is strongly suspected, is frequently difficult, unless the papilla has been previously examined under normal conditions or unless the nerve in question can be compared with that of the other side. (operatingmicroscopes.com)
  • Its diagnosis chiefly of value as a premonition of approaching inflammation or of inflammation already exists farther back in the nerve. (operatingmicroscopes.com)
  • Diagnosis may be difficult due the lack of symptoms in early stages of disease. (angiogenesis-blog.com)
  • It also potentially improves disease management and quality of life for AD patients, as an earlier diagnosis allows initiation of medication and treatment. (frontiersin.org)
  • The optic nerve component lengths are 1 mm in the globe, 24 mm in the orbit, 9 mm in the optic canal, and 16 mm in the cranial space before joining the optic chiasm. (wikipedia.org)
  • cranial part (the part within the cranial cavity, which ends at the optic chiasm). (wikipedia.org)
  • This table lists symptoms that people with this disease may have. (cdc.gov)
  • For most diseases, symptoms will vary from person to person. (cdc.gov)
  • People with the same disease may not have all the symptoms listed. (cdc.gov)
  • Do you have more information about symptoms of this disease? (cdc.gov)
  • Eye diseases are common and can go unnoticed for a long time-some have no symptoms at first. (cdc.gov)
  • Although there are few symptoms, eye professionals are able to detect the disease. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Thinning of the nerve fiber and ganglion cell layers of the retina appeared to be due to retrograde degeneration of the optic nerve related to the abnormal metabolism of myelin. (jamanetwork.com)
  • Optic disc drusen are abnormal deposits of protein-like material in the optic disc - the front part of the optic nerve. (factbites.com)
  • You can't feel it, but this disease damages your optic nerve. (webmd.com)
  • Roh S, Noecker RJ, Schumman J, Hedges TR III, Weiter JJ, Mattox C. Effect of optic nerve head drusen on nerve fiber layer thickness. (springer.com)
  • Ocakoglu O, Ustundag C, Koyluoglu N, Oguz V, Kendiroglu G, Ozkan S. Long term follow-up of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in eyes with optic nerve head drusen. (springer.com)
  • We also noted retinal nerve fiber layer swelling that could be documented photographically or by GDx and that was reflected in subtle visual field changes. (ifond.org)
  • We also continue the OCT studies that are quite interesting in that they provide objective and quantifiable corroborations of the fundus examinations that some carriers were developing swelling of their retinal nerve fiber layers. (ifond.org)
  • The nerve fiber layer of the retina was prominent with some proliferation of glial tissue. (arizona.edu)
  • Fiber tracts of the mammalian central nervous system (as opposed to the peripheral nervous system) are incapable of regeneration, and, hence, optic nerve damage produces irreversible blindness. (wikipedia.org)
  • OCT detected the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer and found out the organisation of them. (seeos.eu)
  • We can compare the angiography, vessel density and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in a healthy eye and in a glaucomatous eye. (seeos.eu)
  • SCOTS utilizes autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells in the treatment of optic nerve and retinal diseases. (nih.gov)
  • The damage to the optic nerve is usually caused by elevated pressure in the eye. (prnewswire.com)
  • The fundi have been described as normal in one patient but postmortem histopathology at 8 weeks revealed optic nerve edema with segmental axonal dropout and loss of myelin. (arizona.edu)
  • The nerve edema may be seen early in the first decade of life and is not associated with increased lumbar puncture pressure. (arizona.edu)
  • Jastrzembski B, Torun N. A 45-year-old man with unilateral optic disc edema and vision loss. (harvard.edu)
  • Optic disc edema results primarily because of axoplasmic stasis, or slowed cellular conduction along the nerve. (factbites.com)
  • Malinserted discs , congenitally full discs (seen often in hypermetropes), or especially buried drusen may sometimes be mistaken for optic disc edema, even though all are non-pathological conditions. (factbites.com)
  • NMOSD is a rare autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that mainly affects the optic nerves and spinal cord. (msworld.org)
  • Neurofibromatosis (NF) is a genetic disorder that causes tumors to develop in the brain, spinal cord, and nerves. (healthline.com)
  • NF2 causes noncancerous tumors to grow on nerves in the brain and spinal cord. (healthline.com)
  • Nervous system is made up of brain, spinal cord, nerves and neurons. (steadyhealth.com)
  • Morning Glory Disc Anomaly occurs from maldevelopment of optic stalk in the fetus. (drdigvijaysingh.com)
  • For example, when an optic nerve coloboma occurs as part of renal coloboma syndrome , it is caused by mutations in the PAX2 gene. (cdc.gov)
  • Pitz, Susanne 2018-06-01 00:00:00 Background: α-mannosidosis is a rare, autosomal-recessive, lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficient activity of α-mannosidase. (deepdyve.com)
  • Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases (2018) 13:88 Page 2 of 9 tissues and organs. (deepdyve.com)
  • Genetically, optic nerve head drusen are inherited in autosomal dominant (AD) type of inheritance with variable penetration. (intechopen.com)
  • In a glaucomatous eye we can notice in the angiogram the decreasing blood flow with the drop-outs in the superior, temporal and inferior peripapillary parts of the optic disc. (seeos.eu)
  • Juxtapapillary subretinal pigment epithelial polypoid pseudocysts associated with unilateral tilted optic disc. (springer.com)
  • The eye and pituitary develop in close proximity to the source of SHH in the anterior hypothalamus and depend on this signal for formation of the optic disc, from where the optic nerve exits the eye, and for coordinating pituitary morphogenesis. (biologists.org)
  • It is visible at the back of the eye as the optic disc which is a well-defined circular/slightly vertically oval structure in the fundus with a well-defined cup and a healthy pink neuroretinal rim surrounding it. (drdigvijaysingh.com)
  • Most diseases of the optic nerve present as a change in the appearance of this disc. (drdigvijaysingh.com)
  • The optic disc resembles a morning glory flower with an excavation covered with white glial tissue and multiple blood vessels. (drdigvijaysingh.com)
  • Tilted disc syndrome, optic disc pit and optic disccoloboma are other abnormalities. (drdigvijaysingh.com)
  • Myelinated Nerve Fibres: Note the feathery fluffy white fibres at the optic disc. (drdigvijaysingh.com)
  • Papilledema is swelling of the optic disc secondary to raised pressure in the brain (intracranial pressure). (drdigvijaysingh.com)
  • Note the swollen optic disc with haemorrhages and white deposits. (drdigvijaysingh.com)
  • it extends from the optic disc to the optic chiasma and continues as the optic tract to the lateral geniculate nucleus , pretectal nuclei , and superior colliculus . (wikipedia.org)
  • ISNT rule assessment was performed by measuring the rim width with stereoscopic optic disc photographs using ImageJ software. (nih.gov)
  • It is useful for detection the optic nerve vascular diseases and offers us the opportunity to expand our knowledge of the physiology of the optic disc. (seeos.eu)
  • Optic disc drusen are usually not visible at birth and are rarely found in infants and children. (factbites.com)
  • The elevation of the optic disc with drusen may be mistaken for papilledema , which is swelling of the optic nerve from high pressure in the brain. (factbites.com)
  • Optic disc colobomas are often quite dramatic in appearance and once were considered to be mutilations of the disc . (factbites.com)
  • When examining the back of the eye , a portion of the optic nerve called the optic disc can be seen. (factbites.com)
  • A compelling case report that demonstrates the value of the careful use of these current technologies is one of optic disc drusen in a 55-year-old white female, who recently presented for her annual comprehensive eye and vision examination. (factbites.com)
  • an isolated ODD was visually noted deep in the optic disc tissue at the five o'clock position. (factbites.com)
  • In the optic nerve head analysis for the left eye , I noted a substantial optic disc drusen-related elevation in each meridian of the optic nerve scan. (factbites.com)
  • Where an inflammation of the optic nerve is plainly revealed by the ophthalmoscope, it is commonly called papillitis, although in many cases the retro ocular portion of the nerve is also involved, sometimes very extensively. (operatingmicroscopes.com)
  • In some cases, however, where the inflammation has not been very severe nor prolonged, the nerve may gradually assume an almost normal aspect. (operatingmicroscopes.com)
  • A disturbance of the nerves, not caused by an inflammation. (factbites.com)
  • Diseases in another part of the body can sometimes cause blindness e.g. diabetes . (pdsa.org.uk)
  • While 'diabetic eye disease' is often used, people may be unaware that this term encompasses a number of diseases and conditions that can cause blindness if left untreated. (prnewswire.com)
  • In the U.S., blindness due to infection is rare, but worldwide diseases like trachoma and onchocerciasis are relatively common causes of severe visual impairment. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Massive perfusion with vasodilators for ischaemic retinopathy and optic nerve diseases--a new approach. (bvsalud.org)
  • Retinal ganglion cells are the cells that make up the nerve of vision, taking impulses from the retina to the brain. (cardiff.ac.uk)
  • founded that the incidence of drusen is 10 times higher among members of the family with manifest optic nerve drusen [ 9 ]. (intechopen.com)
  • Another name for Optic nerve disorder (or close medical condition association). (rightdiagnosis.com)
  • Optic nerve sheath fenestration vs cerebrospinal diversion procedures: what is the preferred surgical procedure for the treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension failing maximum medical therapy? (nih.gov)
  • Optic nerve sheath decompression is the second form of surgery used in the management of patients with severe vision loss from papilledema(ibid). (factbites.com)
  • We also made arrangements for specialized necropsy of eye, brain and peripheral nerve tissues for some members of the family who may die during the next few years. (ifond.org)
  • The optic nerve has been classified as the second of twelve paired cranial nerves but is technically part of the central nervous system , rather than the peripheral nervous system because it is derived from an out-pouching of the diencephalon ( optic stalks ) during embryonic development. (wikipedia.org)
  • Peripheral neuropathies like Guillain-Barré syndrome do not affect the optic nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, most typically the optic nerve is grouped with the other eleven cranial nerves and considered to be part of the peripheral nervous system. (wikipedia.org)
  • The optic nerve is ensheathed in all three meningeal layers ( dura , arachnoid , and pia mater ) rather than the epineurium, perineurium, and endoneurium found in peripheral nerves. (wikipedia.org)
  • Spinner M. Injuries to the Major Branches of Peripheral Nerves of the Forearm . (medscape.com)
  • Is OCT Angiography Useful in Neurodegenerative Diseases? (healio.com)
  • Drs. Grewal and Fekrat summarize their cutting-edge research evaluating the use of OCT angiography for detecting retinal microvascular changes in neurodegenerative disease. (healio.com)
  • Herein, we discuss the utility of OCT angiography, which has very recently shown promise to detect microvasculature changes in the retina in neurodegenerative diseases, as well as the current limitations of OCTA technology as a diagnostic tool in these diseases. (healio.com)
  • Advances in the knowledge of neuroprotection, immunomodulation and regenerative properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been obtained by several preclinical studies of various neurodegenerative diseases. (uva.es)
  • A reliable, precise, and easily accessible biomarker for neurodegenerative diseases is crucial to identify in order to diagnose and monitor patients, and also to help possibly develop new therapies to treat these devastating diseases. (healio.com)
  • The retina is embryologically derived from the neural tube and is a uniquely accessible, noninvasive diagnostic target for neurodegenerative diseases. (healio.com)
  • Nothing is known regarding the etiology or the mechanism of disease. (arizona.edu)
  • Organized in 11 chapters that address the technology of electroretinography, visual evoked potentials and electro-oculography, characteristics of electroretinography in retinal diseases, and the characteristics of optic nerve diseases. (springer.com)
  • I am currently investigating inherited optic neuropathies, which are a pure model of isolated retinal ganglion cell loss. (cardiff.ac.uk)
  • Nutritional optic neuropathies. (medscape.com)
  • Drug-related mitochondrial optic neuropathies. (medscape.com)
  • Optic neuropathies caused by toxins and adverse drug reactions. (medscape.com)
  • Lessell S. Nutritional deficiency and toxic optic neuropathies. (medscape.com)
  • Miller NR. Anterior toxic optic neuropathies. (medscape.com)
  • Miller NR. Retrobulbar toxic and deficiency optic neuropathies. (medscape.com)
  • Metabolic optic neuropathies. (medscape.com)