Paralysis of one or more of the ocular muscles due to disorders of the eye muscles, neuromuscular junction, supporting soft tissue, tendons, or innervation to the muscles.
A mitochondrial myopathy characterized by slowly progressive paralysis of the levator palpebrae, orbicularis oculi, and extraocular muscles. Ragged-red fibers and atrophy are found on muscle biopsy. Familial and sporadic forms may occur. Disease onset is usually in the first or second decade of life, and the illness slowly progresses until usually all ocular motility is lost. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1422)
A mitochondrial disorder featuring the triad of chronic progressive EXTERNAL OPHTHALMOPLEGIA, cardiomyopathy (CARDIOMYOPATHIES) with conduction block (HEART BLOCK), and RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA. Disease onset is in the first or second decade. Elevated CSF protein, sensorineural deafness, seizures, and pyramidal signs may also be present. Ragged-red fibers are found on muscle biopsy. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p984)
A variant of the GUILLAIN-BARRE SYNDROME characterized by the acute onset of oculomotor dysfunction, ataxia, and loss of deep tendon reflexes with relative sparing of strength in the extremities and trunk. The ataxia is produced by peripheral sensory nerve dysfunction and not by cerebellar injury. Facial weakness and sensory loss may also occur. The process is mediated by autoantibodies directed against a component of myelin found in peripheral nerves. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1313; Neurology 1987 Sep;37(9):1493-8)
Drooping of the upper lid due to deficient development or paralysis of the levator palpebrae muscle.
Disorders that feature impairment of eye movements as a primary manifestation of disease. These conditions may be divided into infranuclear, nuclear, and supranuclear disorders. Diseases of the eye muscles or oculomotor cranial nerves (III, IV, and VI) are considered infranuclear. Nuclear disorders are caused by disease of the oculomotor, trochlear, or abducens nuclei in the BRAIN STEM. Supranuclear disorders are produced by dysfunction of higher order sensory and motor systems that control eye movements, including neural networks in the CEREBRAL CORTEX; BASAL GANGLIA; CEREBELLUM; and BRAIN STEM. Ocular torticollis refers to a head tilt that is caused by an ocular misalignment. Opsoclonus refers to rapid, conjugate oscillations of the eyes in multiple directions, which may occur as a parainfectious or paraneoplastic condition (e.g., OPSOCLONUS-MYOCLONUS SYNDROME). (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p240)
Unequal pupil size, which may represent a benign physiologic variant or a manifestation of disease. Pathologic anisocoria reflects an abnormality in the musculature of the iris (IRIS DISEASES) or in the parasympathetic or sympathetic pathways that innervate the pupil. Physiologic anisocoria refers to an asymmetry of pupil diameter, usually less than 2mm, that is not associated with disease.
Double-stranded DNA of MITOCHONDRIA. In eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GENOME is circular and codes for ribosomal RNAs, transfer RNAs, and about 10 proteins.
An irregularly shaped venous space in the dura mater at either side of the sphenoid bone.
Virus infection of the Gasserian ganglion and its nerve branches characterized by pain and vesicular eruptions with much swelling. Ocular involvement is usually heralded by a vesicle on the tip of the nose. This area is innervated by the nasociliary nerve.
Abnormal protrusion of both eyes; may be caused by endocrine gland malfunction, malignancy, injury, or paralysis of the extrinsic muscles of the eye.
The muscles that move the eye. Included in this group are the medial rectus, lateral rectus, superior rectus, inferior rectus, inferior oblique, superior oblique, musculus orbitalis, and levator palpebrae superioris.
An idiopathic syndrome characterized by the formation of granulation tissue in the anterior cavernous sinus or superior orbital fissure, producing a painful ophthalmoplegia. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p271)
A visual symptom in which a single object is perceived by the visual cortex as two objects rather than one. Disorders associated with this condition include REFRACTIVE ERRORS; STRABISMUS; OCULOMOTOR NERVE DISEASES; TROCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; ABDUCENS NERVE DISEASES; and diseases of the BRAIN STEM and OCCIPITAL LOBE.
Diseases of the oculomotor nerve or nucleus that result in weakness or paralysis of the superior rectus, inferior rectus, medial rectus, inferior oblique, or levator palpebrae muscles, or impaired parasympathetic innervation to the pupil. With a complete oculomotor palsy, the eyelid will be paralyzed, the eye will be in an abducted and inferior position, and the pupil will be markedly dilated. Commonly associated conditions include neoplasms, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, ischemia (especially in association with DIABETES MELLITUS), and aneurysmal compression. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p270)
A group of muscle diseases associated with abnormal mitochondria function.
Diseases caused by abnormal function of the MITOCHONDRIA. They may be caused by mutations, acquired or inherited, in mitochondrial DNA or in nuclear genes that code for mitochondrial components. They may also be the result of acquired mitochondria dysfunction due to adverse effects of drugs, infections, or other environmental causes.
An acute neurological disorder characterized by the triad of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and disturbances of mental activity or consciousness. Eye movement abnormalities include nystagmus, external rectus palsies, and reduced conjugate gaze. THIAMINE DEFICIENCY and chronic ALCOHOLISM are associated conditions. Pathologic features include periventricular petechial hemorrhages and neuropil breakdown in the diencephalon and brainstem. Chronic thiamine deficiency may lead to KORSAKOFF SYNDROME. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1139-42; Davis & Robertson, Textbook of Neuropathology, 2nd ed, pp452-3)
A heterogenous group of disorders characterized by alterations of mitochondrial metabolism that result in muscle and nervous system dysfunction. These are often multisystemic and vary considerably in age at onset (usually in the first or second decade of life), distribution of affected muscles, severity, and course. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp984-5)
The 6th cranial nerve which originates in the ABDUCENS NUCLEUS of the PONS and sends motor fibers to the lateral rectus muscles of the EYE. Damage to the nerve or its nucleus disrupts horizontal eye movement control.
Diseases of the sixth cranial (abducens) nerve or its nucleus in the pons. The nerve may be injured along its course in the pons, intracranially as it travels along the base of the brain, in the cavernous sinus, or at the level of superior orbital fissure or orbit. Dysfunction of the nerve causes lateral rectus muscle weakness, resulting in horizontal diplopia that is maximal when the affected eye is abducted and ESOTROPIA. Common conditions associated with nerve injury include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ISCHEMIA; and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.
A subtype of mitochondrial ADP, ATP translocase found primarily in heart muscle (MYOCARDIUM) and skeletal muscle (MUSCLE, SKELETAL).
Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.
Impairment of the ability to perform smoothly coordinated voluntary movements. This condition may affect the limbs, trunk, eyes, pharynx, larynx, and other structures. Ataxia may result from impaired sensory or motor function. Sensory ataxia may result from posterior column injury or PERIPHERAL NERVE DISEASES. Motor ataxia may be associated with CEREBELLAR DISEASES; CEREBRAL CORTEX diseases; THALAMIC DISEASES; BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES; injury to the RED NUCLEUS; and other conditions.
The 3d cranial nerve. The oculomotor nerve sends motor fibers to the levator muscles of the eyelid and to the superior rectus, inferior rectus, and inferior oblique muscles of the eye. It also sends parasympathetic efferents (via the ciliary ganglion) to the muscles controlling pupillary constriction and accommodation. The motor fibers originate in the oculomotor nuclei of the midbrain.
Involuntary movements of the eye that are divided into two types, jerk and pendular. Jerk nystagmus has a slow phase in one direction followed by a corrective fast phase in the opposite direction, and is usually caused by central or peripheral vestibular dysfunction. Pendular nystagmus features oscillations that are of equal velocity in both directions and this condition is often associated with visual loss early in life. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p272)
Acquired, familial, and congenital disorders of SKELETAL MUSCLE and SMOOTH MUSCLE.
Neoplasms of the bony orbit and contents except the eyeball.
A rare central nervous system demyelinating condition affecting children and young adults. Pathologic findings include a large, sharply defined, asymmetric focus of myelin destruction that may involve an entire lobe or cerebral hemisphere. The clinical course tends to be progressive and includes dementia, cortical blindness, cortical deafness, spastic hemiplegia, and pseudobulbar palsy. Concentric sclerosis of Balo is differentiated from diffuse cerebral sclerosis of Schilder by the pathologic finding of alternating bands of destruction and preservation of myelin in concentric rings. Alpers' Syndrome refers to a heterogeneous group of diseases that feature progressive cerebral deterioration and liver disease. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p914; Dev Neurosci 1991;13(4-5):267-73)
A nonspecific tumor-like inflammatory lesion in the ORBIT of the eye. It is usually composed of mature LYMPHOCYTES; PLASMA CELLS; MACROPHAGES; LEUKOCYTES with varying degrees of FIBROSIS. Orbital pseudotumors are often associated with inflammation of the extraocular muscles (ORBITAL MYOSITIS) or inflammation of the lacrimal glands (DACRYOADENITIS).
Mitochondria of skeletal and smooth muscle. It does not include myocardial mitochondria for which MITOCHONDRIA, HEART is available.
A type of ILEUS, a functional not mechanical obstruction of the INTESTINES. This syndrome is caused by a large number of disorders involving the smooth muscles (MUSCLE, SMOOTH) or the NERVOUS SYSTEM.
Recording of the average amplitude of the resting potential arising between the cornea and the retina in light and dark adaptation as the eyes turn a standard distance to the right and the left. The increase in potential with light adaptation is used to evaluate the condition of the retinal pigment epithelium.
A general term encompassing lower MOTOR NEURON DISEASE; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; and certain MUSCULAR DISEASES. Manifestations include MUSCLE WEAKNESS; FASCICULATION; muscle ATROPHY; SPASM; MYOKYMIA; MUSCLE HYPERTONIA, myalgias, and MUSCLE HYPOTONIA.
Voluntary or reflex-controlled movements of the eye.
A subclass of ACIDIC GLYCOSPHINGOLIPIDS. They contain one or more sialic acid (N-ACETYLNEURAMINIC ACID) residues. Using the Svennerholm system of abbrevations, gangliosides are designated G for ganglioside, plus subscript M, D, or T for mono-, di-, or trisialo, respectively, the subscript letter being followed by a subscript arabic numeral to indicated sequence of migration in thin-layer chromatograms. (From Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1997)
Bony cavity that holds the eyeball and its associated tissues and appendages.
A characteristic symptom complex.
Severe or complete loss of facial muscle motor function. This condition may result from central or peripheral lesions. Damage to CNS motor pathways from the cerebral cortex to the facial nuclei in the pons leads to facial weakness that generally spares the forehead muscles. FACIAL NERVE DISEASES generally results in generalized hemifacial weakness. NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION DISEASES and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause facial paralysis or paresis.
The front part of the hindbrain (RHOMBENCEPHALON) that lies between the MEDULLA and the midbrain (MESENCEPHALON) ventral to the cerebellum. It is composed of two parts, the dorsal and the ventral. The pons serves as a relay station for neural pathways between the CEREBELLUM to the CEREBRUM.
Diseases of the fourth cranial (trochlear) nerve or its nucleus in the midbrain. The nerve crosses as it exits the midbrain dorsally and may be injured along its course through the intracranial space, cavernous sinus, superior orbital fissure, or orbit. Clinical manifestations include weakness of the superior oblique muscle which causes vertical DIPLOPIA that is maximal when the affected eye is adducted and directed inferiorly. Head tilt may be seen as a compensatory mechanism for diplopia and rotation of the visual axis. Common etiologies include CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.
Inflammation of a transverse portion of the spinal cord characterized by acute or subacute segmental demyelination or necrosis. The condition may occur sporadically, follow an infection or vaccination, or present as a paraneoplastic syndrome (see also ENCEPHALOMYELITIS, ACUTE DISSEMINATED). Clinical manifestations include motor weakness, sensory loss, and incontinence. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1242-6)
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
DNA-dependent DNA polymerases found in bacteria, animal and plant cells. During the replication process, these enzymes catalyze the addition of deoxyribonucleotide residues to the end of a DNA strand in the presence of DNA as template-primer. They also possess exonuclease activity and therefore function in DNA repair.
Diseases of the bony orbit and contents except the eyeball.
An acute inflammatory autoimmune neuritis caused by T cell- mediated cellular immune response directed towards peripheral myelin. Demyelination occurs in peripheral nerves and nerve roots. The process is often preceded by a viral or bacterial infection, surgery, immunization, lymphoma, or exposure to toxins. Common clinical manifestations include progressive weakness, loss of sensation, and loss of deep tendon reflexes. Weakness of respiratory muscles and autonomic dysfunction may occur. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1312-1314)
Diseases affecting or involving the PARANASAL SINUSES and generally manifesting as inflammation, abscesses, cysts, or tumors.
Incoordination of voluntary movements that occur as a manifestation of CEREBELLAR DISEASES. Characteristic features include a tendency for limb movements to overshoot or undershoot a target (dysmetria), a tremor that occurs during attempted movements (intention TREMOR), impaired force and rhythm of diadochokinesis (rapidly alternating movements), and GAIT ATAXIA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p90)
A glucocorticoid with the general properties of the corticosteroids. It is the drug of choice for all conditions in which routine systemic corticosteroid therapy is indicated, except adrenal deficiency states.
Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.
A disorder of neuromuscular transmission characterized by weakness of cranial and skeletal muscles. Autoantibodies directed against acetylcholine receptors damage the motor endplate portion of the NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION, impairing the transmission of impulses to skeletal muscles. Clinical manifestations may include diplopia, ptosis, and weakness of facial, bulbar, respiratory, and proximal limb muscles. The disease may remain limited to the ocular muscles. THYMOMA is commonly associated with this condition. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1459)

Absent pituitary gland and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis associated with partial ophthalmoplegia and postaxial polydactyly: a variant of orofaciodigital syndrome VI or a new syndrome? (1/328)

We report two sibs with features overlapping those of orofaciodigital syndrome type VI (Varadi syndrome). Both presented at birth with oculomotor abnormalities, dysmorphic facial features, and dysgenesis of the cerebellar vermis. There were minimal oral manifestations (high arched palate) in both of them and one had postaxial polydactyly of both hands and one foot. In addition, there was evidence of aplasia of the pituitary gland on MRI scan in both of them with evidence of hypopituitarism. Both responded well to hormone replacement therapy with improvement in their linear growth and mental ability. These cases may represent a new autosomal recessive midline defect syndrome with features overlapping OFDS VI. Alternatively the features in these children could represent variability within OFDS VI.  (+info)

Congenital myasthenia gravis: clinical and HLA studies in two brothers. (2/328)

Two brothers with congenital myasthenia gravis are described. In both, ptosis and ophthalmoplegia responded poorly to oral anticholinesterase therapy and to thymectomy. The brothers had two different HLA haplotypes and neither had the HLA-A1-B8-DW3 haplotypes which are commonly associated with myathenia gravis in adult-onset cases.  (+info)

Dominant hereditary inclusion-body myopathy gene (IBM3) maps to chromosome region 17p13.1. (3/328)

We recently described an autosomal dominant inclusion-body myopathy characterized by congenital joint contractures, external ophthalmoplegia, and predominantly proximal muscle weakness. A whole-genome scan, performed with 161 polymorphic markers and with DNA from 40 members of one family, indicated strong linkage for markers on chromosome 17p. After analyses with additional markers in the region and with DNA from eight additional family members, a maximum LOD score (Zmax) was detected for marker D17S1303 (Zmax=7.38; recombination fraction (theta)=0). Haplotype analyses showed that the locus (Genome Database locus name: IBM3) is flanked distally by marker D17S945 and proximally by marker D17S969. The positions of cytogenetically localized flanking markers suggest that the location of the IBM3 gene is in chromosome region 17p13.1. Radiation hybrid mapping showed that IBM3 is located in a 2-Mb chromosomal region and that the myosin heavy-chain (MHC) gene cluster, consisting of at least six genes, co-localizes to the same region. This localization raises the possibility that one of the MHC genes clustered in this region may be involved in this disorder.  (+info)

Tolosa Hunt syndrome: a case report. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging findings. (4/328)

A 36-year-old woman was admitted with a left abducens nerve palsy. MR showed enlargement of the left cavernous sinus. The patient was treated with 80 mg oral methyl prednisolone. Clinical findings improved within a month. Two months later, she was readmitted with left oculomotor and right abducens nerve palsy. MR showed significant increase in the volume of the abnormal area in the left cavernous sinus and a new lesion within the right cavernous sinus. After intravenous gadolinium DTPA, there was enhancement in both cavernous sinuses. Methyl prednisolone therapy was again started. After one month of treatment neurological examination was normal. Follow-up MR findings were similar to previous ones.  (+info)

Clinical genetics of familial progressive supranuclear palsy. (5/328)

Recent studies have shown that progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) could be inherited, but the pattern of inheritance and the spectrum of the clinical findings in relatives are unknown. We here report 12 pedigrees, confirmed by pathology in four probands, with familial PSP. Pathological diagnosis was confirmed according to recently reported internationally agreed criteria. The spectrum of the clinical phenotypes in these families was variable including 34 typical cases of PSP (12 probands plus 22 secondary cases), three patients with postural tremor, three with dementia, one with parkinsonism, two with tremor, dystonia, gaze palsy and tics, and one with gait disturbance. The presence of affected members in at least two generations in eight of the families and the absence of consanguinity suggests autosomal dominant transmission with incomplete penetrance. We conclude that hereditary PSP is more frequent than previously thought and that the scarcity of familial cases may be related to a lack of recognition of the variable phenotypic expression of the disease.  (+info)

CFEOM3: a new extraocular congenital fibrosis syndrome that maps to 16q24.2-q24.3. (6/328)

PURPOSE: To define the clinical characteristics and determine the gene localization for a previously undescribed form of congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM), referred to as CFEOM type 3 (CFEOM3). METHODS: A large family with CFEOM was identified, and participating individuals underwent ophthalmologic examination and donated blood for genetic analysis. The family's disorder was tested for linkage to the known CFEOM loci, followed by a genome-wide search and linkage refinement using polymorphic DNA markers. RESULTS: Thirty-eight members of this Canadian family participated in the study. Affected individuals are born with a nonprogressive eye movement disorder characterized by variable expression of ptosis and restrictive external ophthalmoplegia. Severely affected individuals have ptosis, primary gaze fixed in a hypo- and exotropic position, and marked restriction of eye movement bilaterally. Mildly affected individuals have normally positioned globes with a limitation of vertical gaze. Moderately affected individuals have asymmetrical involvement with one eye severely and one eye mildly affected. The disorder is autosomal dominant with variable expression and probable incomplete penetrance. Genetic analysis reveals linkage to markers on 16q24.2q24.3. A maximum lod score of 5.8 occurs at markers D16S3063 and D16S689, and the CFEOM3 disease gene is located within a 5.6-cM region flanked by D16S486 and D16S671. CONCLUSIONS: These data establish that CFEOM3 is a phenotypically variant and genotypically distinct form of CFEOM with linkage to chromosome 16qter. The authors have previously demonstrated that CFEOM1 results from a developmental absence of the superior division of the oculomotor nerve. The authors hypothesize that CFEOM3 results from a defect analogous to, but distinct from CFEOM1.  (+info)

Neuro-Behcet's disease presenting with isolated unilateral lateral rectus muscle palsy. (7/328)

The authors present the clinical findings of a 30-year-old female and a 29-year-old male who both had isolated unilateral lateral rectus muscle palsy in neuro-Behcet's disease. The clinical feature related to isolated abduscens nerve palsy was identified by CT, systemic assessment and extraocular examination. These patients' constellation of findings appear to be unique: it does not follow any previously reported pattern of ocular manifestations of neuro-Behcet's disease.  (+info)

Proprioceptive and retinal afference modify postsaccadic ocular drift. (8/328)

Drift of the eyes after saccades produces motion of images on the retina (retinal slip) that degrades visual acuity. In this study, we examined the contributions of proprioceptive and retinal afference to the suppression of postsaccadic drift induced by a unilateral ocular muscle paresis. Eye movements were recorded in three rhesus monkeys with a unilateral weakness of one vertical extraocular muscle before and after proprioceptive deafferentation of the paretic eye. Postsaccadic drift was examined in four visual states: monocular viewing with the normal eye (4-wk period); binocular viewing (2-wk period); binocular viewing with a disparity-reducing prism (2-wk period); and monocular viewing with the paretic eye (2-wk period). The muscle paresis produced vertical postsaccadic drift in the paretic eye, and this drift was suppressed in the binocular viewing condition even when the animals could not fuse. When the animals viewed binocularly with a disparity-reducing prism, the drift in the paretic eye was suppressed in two monkeys (with superior oblique pareses) but generally was enhanced in one animal (with a tenotomy of the inferior rectus). When drift movements were enhanced, they reduced the retinal disparity that was present at the end of the saccade. In the paretic-eye-viewing condition, postsaccadic drift was suppressed in the paretic eye and was induced in the normal eye. After deafferentation in the normal-eye-viewing state, there was a change in the vertical postsaccadic drift of the paretic eye. This change in drift was idiosyncratic and variably affected the amplitude and velocity of the postsaccadic drift movements of the paretic eye. Deafferentation of the paretic eye did not affect the postsaccadic drift of the normal eye nor did it impair visually mediated adaptation of postsaccadic drift. The results demonstrate several new findings concerning the roles of visual and proprioceptive afference in the control of postsaccadic drift: disconjugate adaptation of postsaccadic drift does not require binocular fusion; slow, postsaccadic drift movements that reduce retinal disparity but concurrently increase retinal slip can be induced in the binocular viewing state; postsaccadic drift is modified by proprioception from the extraocular muscles, but these modifications do not serve to minimize retinal slip or to correct errors in saccade amplitude; and visually mediated adaptation of postsaccadic drift does not require proprioceptive afference from the paretic eye.  (+info)

Looking for ophthalmoplegia totalis? Find out information about ophthalmoplegia totalis. a paralysis of one or more cranial nerves by which the eye muscles are innervated. Ophthalmoplegia may be congenital-a result of underdevelopment of the... Explanation of ophthalmoplegia totalis
Subacute complete ophthalmoplegia: an anti-Hu paraneoplastic manifestation of myxoid liposarcoma.: Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes are well-known sequelae
TY - JOUR. T1 - Transorbital intracavernous needle biopsy in painful ophthalmoplegia.. AU - Slamovits, T. L.. PY - 1985/12/1. Y1 - 1985/12/1. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0022230253&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0022230253&partnerID=8YFLogxK. M3 - Letter. C2 - 4056919. AN - SCOPUS:0022230253. VL - 63. SP - 996. EP - 997. JO - Journal of Neurosurgery. JF - Journal of Neurosurgery. SN - 0022-3085. IS - 6. ER - ...
Painful Ophthalmoplegia & Transient Ischemic Attack Symptom Checker: Possible causes include Migraine & Cavernous Sinus Aneurysm & Temporal Arteritis. Check the full list of possible causes and conditions now! Talk to our Chatbot to narrow down your search.
Two patients with mild, adult-onset diabetes mellitus developed a painful ophthalmoplegia and ipsilateral optic neuropathy that was relatively unresponsive to steroids. Histopathological study of the optic nerve of one patient revealed an extensive i
Neuro-ophthalmologic examination showing ophthalmoplegia affecting the left eye in a patient with Tolosa-Hunt syndrome. The central image represents forward gaze, and each image around it represents gaze in that direction (for example, in the upper left image, the patient looks up and right; the left eye is unable to accomplish this movement). The examination shows ptosis of the left eyelid, exotropia (outward deviation) of the primary look of the left eye, and paresis (weakness) of the third (oculomotor), fourth (trochlear) and sixth (abducens) left cranial nerves ...
Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus | The authors report a case of internal ophthalmoplegia in a 5-year-old boy presenting after primary varicella infection. This is an uncommon and mostly irreversible ocular manifestation after chickenpox. The internal ophthalmoplegia showed a potential mild improvement with oral acyclovir. Consideration should be given to starting treatment on presentation in such cases.From NHS Eye Clinic,
Hypopituitarism is a rare presentation of Burkitts lymphoma (BL). The purpose of this report is to present a case of BL presenting with panhypopituitarism and to review other case reports of lymphoma presenting with pituitary dysfunction to highlight the distinguishing features of these cases from other benign aetiologies of pituitary dysfunction such as non-functioning pituitary adenomas. We reviewed a total of 11 cases of lymphoma presenting with pituitary dysfunction published from 1998 to 2013 including the present case. The demographics, clinical presentations, laboratory features, radiological findings, histological diagnosis, treatment administered and outcomes were described. Of the total number of patients, 45.5% of the cases had diffuse large B-cell lymphoma while 27.3% had BL. Anterior pituitary dysfunction was more common than posterior pituitary dysfunction at presentation. The other common associated presenting symptoms were painful ophthalmoplegia, cranial nerve palsies and ...
Hypopituitarism is a rare presentation of Burkitts lymphoma (BL). The purpose of this report is to present a case of BL presenting with panhypopituitarism and to review other case reports of lymphoma presenting with pituitary dysfunction to highlight the distinguishing features of these cases from other benign aetiologies of pituitary dysfunction such as non-functioning pituitary adenomas. We reviewed a total of 11 cases of lymphoma presenting with pituitary dysfunction published from 1998 to 2013 including the present case. The demographics, clinical presentations, laboratory features, radiological findings, histological diagnosis, treatment administered and outcomes were described. Of the total number of patients, 45.5% of the cases had diffuse large B-cell lymphoma while 27.3% had BL. Anterior pituitary dysfunction was more common than posterior pituitary dysfunction at presentation. The other common associated presenting symptoms were painful ophthalmoplegia, cranial nerve palsies and ...
Results Ocular manifestations were observed in 79 patients (96.4%) and were the presenting symptoms in 48 (58.5%). Intermittent diplopia with subtle ophthalmoparesis was the most common complaint, ptosis was generally symmetrical and conjugated gaze paresis occurred in 35% of the patients. Ocular manifestations responded well to prednisone and partially to symptomatic treatment. A few patients developed chronic symmetrical ophthalmoparesis, associated with persistent weakness in other muscle groups. All patients with ocular presentation progressed to generalised disease, though weakness spread to other muscle groups was considerably delayed in a few cases. ...
CheckOrphan is a non-profit organization located in Basel, Switzerland and Santa Cruz, California that is dedicated to rare, orphan and neglected diseases. CheckOrphan offers users an interactive and dynamic platform for all these diseases. This strategy allows visitors to be updated daily on all the latest news and interact with people internationally. This is essential, because due to the nature of these diseases, there is not a large concentration of individuals within any given proximity ...
MYOPATHY and OPHTHALMOPLEGIA related symptoms, diseases, and genetic alterations. Get the complete information with our medical search engine for phen
The Ophthalmoplegia Market report summarizes the industry on the basis of treatment. The market is segmented into surgery, drug treatment, and others. The surgery sector is further segmented into strabismus surgery and others.
Fovilles syndrome is caused by the blockage of the perforating branches of the basilar artery in the region of the brainstem known as the pons.[1] Structures affected by the infarct are the PPRF, nuclei of cranial nerves VI and VII, corticospinal tract, medial lemniscus, and the MLF. This produces ipsilateral horizontal gaze palsy and Bells Palsy and contralateral hemiparesis, hemisensory loss, and internuclear ophthalmoplegia. ...
Internuclear ophthalmoplegia INO is characterized by inability to adduct one eye, combined with nystagmus of the other, abducted eye dissociated nystagmus , on
- Nucleus praepositus hypoglossi lateral gaze Neuroanatomy of internuclear ophthalmoplegia INO shown left INO on rightward gaze leftward, rightward, and
restitution idiomorphically unscholar scombriform phosphation moonsickness gombeenism unsuspectible exploitative predevote kawika scrike merlette photesthesis pastry revelation latheron atomizer toyingly ophthalmoplegia [email protected] ...
As we prepare for another busy and rewarding year of rescue, it is inspiring to look back at the rescues of 2013. Here are some of the most memorable stories:Clive and Callum These one-and-a-half year old brothers came to us from a horrific situation: a mentally ill person had kept them confined in small…
Neo-B12® Injection is usually stored in the doctors surgery or clinic, or at the pharmacy. The injection is kept in a cool dry place where the temperature stays below 25°C.. If you need to store Neo-B12® Injection, keep it in the original pack until it is time for it to be given. If you take the ampoules out of the pack, they will not keep well.. Keep Neo-B12® Injection in a cool dry place, where the temperature stays below 25°C.. Do not store this medicine or any other medicine in the bathroom or near a sink. Do not leave it in the car on hot days, or on window sills. Heat and dampness can destroy some medicines.. Keep it where children cannot reach it. A locked cupboard at least one-and-a-half metres above the ground is a good place to store medicines.. ...
Thats the question I spend some of my time trying to figure out. A new pain in my elbow. Nausea if I eat one more bite. A nose so runny I use up one-and-a-half boxes of Kleenex in a day....
Thats the question I spend some of my time trying to figure out. A new pain in my elbow. Nausea if I eat one more bite. A nose so runny I use up one-and-a-half boxes of Kleenex in a day....
After one-and-a-half years of fruitless (and awkward) babymaking sex and the threat of separation, we decided it was time to move forward with Plan B and seek out fertility testing.
Exosomal MiR-744 Inhibits Proliferation and Sorafenib Chemoresistance in Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Targeting PAX2 - Get your full text copy in PDF #919219
TY - JOUR. T1 - Clinical features, ARIX and PHOX2B nucleotide changes in three families with congenital superior oblique muscle palsy. AU - Imai, Sayuri. AU - Matsuo, Toshihiko. AU - Itoshima, Emi. AU - Ohtsuki, Hiroshi. PY - 2008/2. Y1 - 2008/2. N2 - We analyzed nucleotide changes in 3 genes, ARIX, PHOX2B, and KIF21A, in 6 patients of 3 families with congenital superior oblique muscle palsy. Three exons of ARIX, 3 exons of PHOX2B, and exons 8, 20, and 21 of KIF21A were amplified by polymerase chain reaction from genomic DNA isolated from the peripheral blood. The DNA fragments were directly sequenced in both directions. In 2 different families, a heterozygous nucleotide change, ARIX 153G , A, in the 5′-untranslated region was found in common between a father and daughter with muscle palsy and between a mother and daughter with muscle palsy (Family No. 1 and No. 3). In the other family (Family No. 2), a heterozygous 15-nucleotide deletion, PHOX2B 1124del15, resulting in loss of 5 alanine ...
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia is a condition characterized by weakness of the eye muscles. The condition typically appears in adults between ages 18 and 40 and slowly worsens over time. The first sign of progressive external ophthalmoplegia is typically drooping eyelids (ptosis), which can affect one or both eyelids. As ptosis worsens, affected individuals may use the forehead muscles to try to lift the eyelids, or they may lift up their chin in order to see. Another characteristic feature of progressive external ophthalmoplegia is weakness or paralysis of the muscles that move the eye (ophthalmoplegia). Affected individuals have to turn their head to see in different directions, especially as the ophthalmoplegia worsens. People with progressive external ophthalmoplegia may also have general weakness of the muscles used for movement (myopathy), particularly those in the neck, arms, or legs. The weakness may be especially noticeable during exercise (exercise intolerance). Muscle weakness ...
MalaCards based summary : Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia with Mitochondrial Dna Deletions, Autosomal Dominant 6, also known as progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial dna deletions, autosomal dominant, 6, is related to rapadilino syndrome and baller-gerold syndrome, and has symptoms including myalgia, muscle cramp and facial paresis. An important gene associated with Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia with Mitochondrial Dna Deletions, Autosomal Dominant 6 is DNA2 (DNA Replication Helicase/Nuclease 2), and among its related pathways/superpathways is Cytosolic iron-sulfur cluster assembly. Related phenotypes are progressive external ophthalmoplegia and limb-girdle muscle weakness ...
Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) is a mitochondrial disorder stemming from several genetic mutations. The most characteristic feature of the disease is extraocular muscle weakness leading to ptosis and limited eye movements. Generalized weakness, cataracts, ataxia, depression, heart conduction abnormalities, and hearing loss are other notable manifestations of the disease. The diagnosis rests on a thorough clinical assessment followed by imaging and muscle biopsy studies. Molecular genetic testing for detection of mitochondrial DNA mutations is necessary for a confirmation of the diagnosis.… Chronic Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia (CPEO): Read more about Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Complications, Causes and Prognosis.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Left vertebral artery dissection causing bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia. AU - Jickling, Glen. AU - Leung, Kelvin. AU - Gan, Kenman. AU - Shuaib, Ashfaq. AU - Lewis, James. AU - Mouradian, Mikael S.. PY - 2008/9. Y1 - 2008/9. N2 - A 21-year-old woman presented to the emergency department 1 day after a fall. On the day of presentation, she awoke with horizontal diplopia and posterior neck pain. Based on clinical findings, she was diagnosed with bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia. A conventional angiogram identified a left vertebral artery dissection. She was started on anticoagulant therapy, with gradual improvement of her diplopia over several months. Diplopia is frequently seen in the emergency department. Internuclear ophthalmoplegia is a cause of binocular diplopia and is important to recognize because it indicates a brainstem lesion requiring neurologic evaluation.. AB - A 21-year-old woman presented to the emergency department 1 day after a fall. On the day of ...
A large Swedish family with members affected by progressive external ophthalmoplegia with hypogonadism were followed-up and reviewed. Hypogonadism included delayed sexual maturation, primary amenorrhea, early menopause, and testicular atrophy. Cataracts, cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy, hypoacusia, pes cavus, tremor, parkinsonism, depression, and mental retardation were other features observed in this family. Muscle biopsy samples of advanced cases showed ragged-red fibers, focal cytochrome c oxidase deficiency, and multiple mtDNA deletions by Southern blot analysis. An autosomal dominant mode of inheritance was evident with anticipation in successive generations. Linkage analysis excluded the chromosome 10q23.3-q24.3 region reported as being linked to the disease in a Finnish family with autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia. We report for the first time clinical evidence for anticipation in a family with autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia. We hypothesize ...
Chronic Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia(CPEO): A not so rare mitochondrial myopathy-PJMS-Print ISSN No:-2249-8176 Online ISSN No:-2348-7682Article DOI No:-10.18231,Panacea Journal of Medical Sciences-IP Innovative Publication Pvt Limited, Medical Journals Publication, Open Access Journals, Print Journals,Indian
Learn more about Chronic Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia from related diseases, pathways, genes and PTMs with the Novus Bioinformatics Tool.
Definition of chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia. Provided by Stedmans medical dictionary and Drugs.com. Includes medical terms and definitions.
Tolosa-Hunt syndrome (THS) is a painful ophthalmoplegia caused by nonspecific inflammation of the cavernous sinus or superior orbital fissure. See the image below.
Tolosa-Hunt syndrome (THS) is a painful ophthalmoplegia caused by nonspecific inflammation of the cavernous sinus or superior orbital fissure. See the image below.
Tolosa-Hunt syndrome (THS) is a painful ophthalmoplegia caused by nonspecific inflammation of the cavernous sinus or superior orbital fissure. See the image below.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Mechanisms of vertical fusional vergence in patients with congenital superior oblique paresis investigated with an eye-tracking haploscope. AU - Irsch, Kristina. AU - Guyton, David Lee. AU - Park, Hee Jung S. AU - Ying, Howard S.. PY - 2015. Y1 - 2015. N2 - PURPOSE. To determine the mechanisms of vertical fusional vergence in patients with congenital unilateral superior oblique paresis (SOP) and to discuss the implications of these mechanisms. METHODS. Eleven patients were examined with our eye-tracking haploscope. RESULTS. Three different fusion mechanisms were found, producing significantly different cyclovergence to vertical vergence ratios (P ,0.05): primary use of the vertical rectus muscles in seven patients (ratio: 0.36 6 1.6), primary use of the oblique muscles in one patient (0.04), and use of the superior oblique muscle in the higher eye and the superior rectus muscle in the lower eye in three patients (1.15 6 0.32). Lancaster red-green testing showed alignment ...
Definition of kearns-sayre syndrome in the Definitions.net dictionary. Meaning of kearns-sayre syndrome. What does kearns-sayre syndrome mean? Information and translations of kearns-sayre syndrome in the most comprehensive dictionary definitions resource on the web.
Five-year follow-up of a young male patient is presented. Total external ophthalmoplegia developed 1 week after an upper respiratory tract infection. After 3 years of the course, hyperthyreosis and clinical signs of thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy occurred. Hashimotos thyroiditis and ultrastructural signs of mitochondrial damage of striated muscle were found by histological investigations. The paresis of the external ocular muscles recovered after long-term corticosteroid treatment. On the basis of clinical symptoms and histological results, the authors supposed that an immunological reaction had caused mitochondrial damage in the striated muscles, which also resulted in thyroiditis. This case history points that autoimmune mechanism more frequently might participate in the pathogenesis of chronic external ophthalmoplegia, and the symptoms might precede organ-specific or perhaps systemic autoimmune disorders.. ...
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but they are mainly a cosmetic nuisance and never become going. Operating on a keloid usually forests more scar tissue to form, so klitotishypertrophie with fairways may have been told that there is nothing that can be done to get rid of them. Facilities may be often be prevented by using a pressure dressing, software gel pad or paper tape over the injury tourist.. These are left on for 23 of 24 athletics each day. Dacryoadenitis Epiphora Dacryocystitis Xerophthalmia. Exophthalmos Enophthalmos Different cellulitis Orbital lymphoma Periorbital klitorishypertrophie nivala. Conjunctivitis allergic Pterygium Pinguecula Subconjunctival back. Cataract Congenital cataract Childhood cataract Aphakia Klitorishypertrophue lentis.. Ophthalmoparesis Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia Kearns-Sayre opportunity. Conjugate gaze palsy Convergence insufficiency Internuclear ophthalmoplegia One and a acceptable syndrome. Hemianopsia binasal bitemporal homonymous Quadrantanopia. Teaching Hemeralopia ...
Tolosa-Hunt syndrome (THS) is a rare disorder characterized by severe and unilateral headaches with orbital pain, along with weakness and paralysis (ophthalmoplegia) of certain eye muscles (extraocular palsies). In 2004, the International Headache Society provided a definition of the diagnostic criteria which included granuloma. Symptoms are usually limited to one side of the head, and in most cases the individual affected will experience intense, sharp pain and paralysis of muscles around the eye. Symptoms may subside without medical intervention, yet recur without a noticeable pattern. In addition, affected individuals may experience paralysis of various facial nerves and drooping of the upper eyelid (ptosis). Other signs include double vision, fever, chronic fatigue, vertigo or arthralgia. Occasionally the patient may present with a feeling of protrusion of one or both eyeballs (exophthalmos). The exact cause of THS is not known, but the disorder is thought to be, and often assumed to be, ...
UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot : 72 Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal dominant, 5: A disorder characterized by progressive weakness of ocular muscles and levator muscle of the upper eyelid. In a minority of cases, it is associated with skeletal myopathy, which predominantly involves axial or proximal muscles and which causes abnormal fatigability and even permanent muscle weakness. Ragged-red fibers and atrophy are found on muscle biopsy. A large proportion of chronic ophthalmoplegias are associated with other symptoms, leading to a multisystemic pattern of this disease. Additional symptoms are variable, and may include cataracts, hearing loss, sensory axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, hypogonadism, and parkinsonism ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Isolated third nerve palsy. T2 - A rare neurological presentation of Burkitts lymphoma. AU - Kalantri, Siddhesh Arun. AU - Nayak, Akshatha. AU - Datta, Saikat. AU - Bhattacharyya, Maitreyee. PY - 2017/1/1. Y1 - 2017/1/1. N2 - Lymphoma patient presenting with isolated third nerve palsy is relatively rare, and diagnosis of underlying disease may be challenging. Until this date, less than 20 cases have been described in the literature. This is the case of a 3-year-old boy who presented to neurologist with ptosis of left eye for 8 days. On examination, abdominal mass was detected, and the child was referred to paediatric surgery department. Laparotomy and excision of the mass was done. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry of the mass confirmed it to be a case of Burkitts lymphoma. At this point, the patient was referred to haematology department. Contrast-enhanced CT brain showed infiltration around left cavernous sinus. Patient was treated with two cycles of R-CODOX-M/R-IVAC. ...
Background: Tolosa Hunt Syndrome is an inflammatory condition of unknown etiology of the cavernous sinus and superior orbital fissure. Because of the difficulty in establishing histological evidence, his diagnosis is based on a set of arguments established by the International Headache Society. MRI allows indirect visualization of the granuloma and plays a key role in diagnosis and follow-up. Aim: To illustrate High-field MRI contribution in Tolosa-Hunt Syndrome (THS). Cases Presentation: Two patients, a 25-year-old female and a 40-year-old male were recruited in this retrospective case report study at the Radiology service of Fann University Hospital (Dakar Senegal). The first patient has been suffering from a right retro-orbital pain and diplopia for 2 months and the second from a painful oculomotor nerve palsy for 3 months. Blood tests, lumbar puncture, thyroid hormone levels and an infectious screen were done. Screening for converting enzymes, and serum antibodies were also done. They underwent a
Hi, Did you tried colloidal silver? You can prepare a solution with colloidal silver diluted with purified water in a proportion like 1:50. Use one drop in one eye one time per day to check the result. If things go well rise the number of drops per day and use in both eyes. Hope this help.
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List of disease causes of Oculomotor palsy due to diabetes, patient stories, diagnostic guides. Diagnostic checklist, medical tests, doctor questions, and related signs or symptoms for Oculomotor palsy due to diabetes.
A collection of disease information resources and questions answered by our Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Specialists for Minicore myopathy with external ophthalmoplegia
External ophthalmoplegia definition at Dictionary.com, a free online dictionary with pronunciation, synonyms and translation. Look it up now!
Looking for ophthalmoplegic? Find out information about ophthalmoplegic. a paralysis of one or more cranial nerves by which the eye muscles are innervated. Ophthalmoplegia may be congenital-a result of underdevelopment of the... Explanation of ophthalmoplegic
A 46-year-old woman sustained a penetrating left eye (OS) injury after tripping and falling onto a motorcycle antenna. She removed the antenna immediately and presented to the emergency room complaining of diplopia. Examination demonstrated proptosis and subconjunctival hemorrhage OS. Her diplopia was initially attributed to mechanical restriction OS secondary to retrobulbar hemorrhage visualized on CT scan (figure 1). Careful examination, however, revealed left conjugate horizontal gaze palsy and left internuclear ophthalmoplegia. This was consistent with one-and-a-half syndrome from left pons penetrating trauma, confirmed on MRI (figure 2). Two months later, her condition had improved, but she continued to demonstrate abduction paresis OS. ...
The one and a half Fisher syndrome is produced by a unilateral lesion in the dorsal and inferior part of the pons located specifically in the pontine tegmentum. This is an area that contains the medial longitudinal fasciculus (LMF), the paramedian pontine reticular formation (PPRF) and the nucleus of the sixth cranial nerve, responsible for the horizontal movements of the gaze. Clinically it manifests with conjugate gaze palsy with internuclear ophthalmoplegia.. The case is reported on a 60 year-old patient, who presented with binocular diplopia, ophthalmoplegia and paralysis of the gaze conjugated to the left. Imaging studies were performed that showed a hemi-protuberant hematoma secondary to a cavernoma. As expected, he presented with several episodes of re-bleeding with clinical worsening: headache, diplopia, tetraparesis, and hypoaesthesia in the right side of the face, as such that the microsurgical exeresis of the protuberant cavernoma was considered.. ...
Cranial nerve three (CN3) palsies are overall rare in the pediatric population with up to 50% diagnosed as congenital, followed by trauma, inflammation, and vascular etiologies .[1] [2] [3] It may also uncommonly present in the setting of migraine, infection, or neoplasm. [1][4] When combined with both congenital sixth and forth nerve palsies, congenital third nerve palsies have an estimated incidence of 7.6 per 100,000. [5]
Localized T-cell lymphoma in the orbit should be treated carefully with planned local radiation plus systemic chemotherapy. However, prognosis is poor once dissemination occurs, and long-term remissions, even with aggressive chemotherapy, are rare.11 Saga et al2 reported two patients with peripheral T-cell lymphoma involving the orbit secondarily from the testicular lymphoma. The patients received chemotherapy and local radiation, but died of progression of the disease. Leidenix et al7 reported the case of primary T-cell lymphoma confined to the orbit in a pediatric patient. The patient received surgical excision, systemic chemotherapy, and local radiation and died of dissemination of the disease. Hassan and Elner6 reported orbital peripheral T-cell lymphoma in a child who responded to local radiation and systemic chemotherapy. T-cell lymphoma is generally rapidly progressive and likely to have a high mortality despite aggressive treatment ...
List of 44 causes for Ophthalmoplegia in both eyes and Permanent brain damage, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and much more.
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a slowly progressing, bilateral myopathy often affecting only the extraocular muscles, but sometimes also the orbicularis oculi. The levators of the upper lids are usually affected first, with ptosis resulting, followed by progressive, total…
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There are many different types of strabismus. Strabismus is most commonly described by the direction of the eye misalignment; common types of strabismus are esotropia, exotropia, hypotropia, and hypertropia.. Strabismus can also be described by its cause. The 3 cranial nerves (III, IV, VI) responsible for eye movement can be weak or palsied and cause strabismus. Some examples of paralytic strabismus include third nerve palsy and superior oblique palsy.. Special patterns of strabismus can have unique names such as Brown syndrome, and Duane syndrome.. ...
A 26-year-old man was referred with facial weakness, dysarthria, dysphagia, ophthalmoparesis and severely weak and wasted legs. His symptoms had begun when aged 20 with electric shock pains and paraesthesia in both feet progressing over 6 months to the lower calves. He then developed buttock numbness and occasional faecal incontinence. By age 22, he had diffuse lower limb weakness and wasting, with difficulty standing from a seated position and frequent tripping. He became wheelchair-dependent within 3 years.. Over the same time period, he developed progressive facial weakness, bilateral ptosis, slurred speech, difficulty chewing and swallowing and lost 10 kg of weight. He reported hearing difficulty, and an audiogram showed high-frequency hearing loss. Important negatives included absence of upper limb symptoms, autonomic, cardiac, respiratory or cognitive dysfunction ...
This page includes the following topics and synonyms: Herpes Ophthalmicus, Zoster Ophthalmicus, Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus, Ophthalmic Herpes Zoster, Hutchinsons Sign.
Take a moment right now to view the free Beyond Headaches Lifestyle tour for the 3 most useful tips when dealing with ophthalmoplegic migraines.
The finding of globe retraction on attempted adduction and grossly normal looking adducting saccades indicated a restrictive etiology rather than a left medial rectus paresis or left internuclear ophthalmoplegia. The orbital CT scan effectively ruled out thyroid orbitopathy or orbital mass. On a subsequent visit, the patient insisted that this was acquired in the past few years and definitely not congenital. He denied any previous operations or trauma to the left eye. It was not until he was getting ready to leave that his wife asked if his ocular motility problems could be related to injections into the eye that he had received 5 years earlier while being treated for iritis OS. His previous ophthalmologist had since left town; however, we were able to obtain his records. These indicated that he had received a series of subconjunctival methylprednisolone injections OS under retrobulbar anaesthesia with xylocaine for iritis ...
The first signs of Leigh syndrome seen in infancy are usually vomiting, diarrhea, and difficulty swallowing (dysphagia) that leads to eating problems. These problems often result in an inability to grow and gain weight at the expected rate (failure to thrive). Severe muscle and movement problems are common in Leigh syndrome. Affected individuals may develop weak muscle tone (hypotonia), involuntary muscle contractions (dystonia), and problems with movement and balance (ataxia). Loss of sensation and weakness in the limbs (peripheral neuropathy), common in people with Leigh syndrome, may also make movement difficult.. Several other symptoms may occur in people with Leigh syndrome. Many affected individuals develop weakness or paralysis of the muscles that move the eyes (ophthalmoparesis); rapid, involuntary eye movements (nystagmus); or degeneration of the nerves that carry information from the eyes to the brain (optic atrophy). Severe breathing problems are common in people with Leigh syndrome, ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Extensive Involvement of Multiple Cranial and Spinal Nerves in Lymphomatous Meningitis. AU - Cordano, Christian. AU - Nourbakhsh, Bardia. AU - Brown, Ethan. AU - Glastonbury, Christine. PY - 2017/9/1. Y1 - 2017/9/1. KW - B-cell lymphoma. KW - Lymphomatous meningitis. KW - ophthalmoparesis. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85030784037&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85030784037&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.1017/cjn.2017.50. DO - 10.1017/cjn.2017.50. M3 - Comment/debate. C2 - 28482940. AN - SCOPUS:85030784037. VL - 44. SP - 599. EP - 600. JO - Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences. JF - Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences. SN - 0317-1671. IS - 5. ER - ...
Miller-Fisher syndrome (MFS) is a rare variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and is characterized by the clinical triad of ataxia, ophthalmoplegia, and areflexia. The incidence rate in Thailand has not been established but it occurred approximately 1-5% that of GBS. Here, the authors report a Thai patient diagnosed as MFS that had a positive test of antibodies against the ganglioside GQ1b. These antibodies have diagnostic and pathogenic importance to MFS because of high sensitivity and specificity. All other investigations, such as cerebrospinal fluid analysis, electrophysiological studies, and imaging studies had no significant abnormalities. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous immunoglobulin and fully recovered within one month. After eighteen months follow-up, he is still healthy and has had no recurrent symptoms.
Paralysis of one or more of the ocular muscles due to disorders of the eye muscles, neuromuscular junction, supporting soft tissue, tendons, or innervation to the muscles.
In 1969 this 54 year old man presented with a one month history of blurry vision which started suddenly one afternoon. He said he was just not focusing and he saw two images when he relaxed his sight. He could see clearly covering one eye. Initially, the difficulty in focusing occurred late in the afternoon but as it progressed it appeared earlier and earlier each day. Finally he awoke in the morning with double vision. Past History: Three years prior to admission he had two or three similar transient episodes of blurred vision. On one occasion this occurred at the end of a bowling session when the pins appeared out of focus. Negative for strabismus as a child In 1967 had an episode of chest pain A cardiogram ruled out myocardial infarct Family History: Negative for neurologic disease Symptomatic Inquiry: Negative for generalized fatigue, droopy eyelids, difficulty chewing, swallowing or respiratory difficulty. Neuro-ophthalmic Examination: Visual acuity J1 OU with glasses Visual fields, ...
Conjugate gaze palsy symptoms, causes, diagnosis, and treatment information for Conjugate gaze palsy (Supranuclear ocular palsy) with alternative diagnoses, full-text book chapters, misdiagnosis, research treatments, prevention, and prognosis.
My aunt has KSS and has been suffering with this for over 30 years. She became a diabetic as a teen and was later diagnosed with KSS. Over the years she has gotten progressively worse. As a result of KSS, she has complete loss of hearing, sight and has also suffers from irregular heart beats which resulted in the need for a pacemaker. Weve noticed that her muscles have become very weak and every month or so she has these episodes I dont know how else to explain them where she becomes almost paralysed....she cant speak, she begins to smack her lips a lot, she becomes complete dead weight. They occur sporadically and if she happens to be walking she fall straight back or if shes sitting shell begin to slide off the chair. This is extremely frightening...many times weve called 911 because we think shes having a stroke. Her doctors havent done much and were pretty much at a loss. Anyone experience anything similar ...
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Internuclear ophthalmoplegia: Internuclear ophthalmoplegia affects horizontal gaze, such that one eye is capable of full ... Retrieved from [2] Toral, M., Haugsdal, J., & Wall, M. (2017, June 08). Internuclear Ophthalmoplegia. Retrieved from [3][ ...
Changes in MT-TY may also result in progressive external ophthalmoplegia. Progressive external ophthalmoplegia is characterized ... "Progressive external ophthalmoplegia". Genetics Home Reference. Raffelsberger T, Rossmanith W, Thaller-Antlanger H, Bittner RE ... associated with familial chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia". Journal of Medical Genetics. 38 (10): 703-5. doi: ...
Mutations in MT-TN have been associated with isolated ophthalmoplegia. Ophthalmoplegia is a condition characterized by eye ... Multiple mutations of 5692A>G and 5703G>A have been found in patients with ophthalmoplegia. Such mutations in MT-TN resulted in ... "Progressive external ophthalmoplegia". Genetics Home Reference. Hao H, Moraes CT (December 1997). "A disease-associated G5703A ...
These entities overlap with ophthalmoparesis and ophthalmoplegia. Symptoms of conjugate gaze palsies include the impairment of ... Zee, DS (August 1992). "Internuclear ophthalmoplegia: pathophysiology and diagnosis". Bailliere's Clinical Neurology. 1 (2): ...
Internal ophthalmoplegia means involvement limited to the pupillary sphincter and ciliary muscle. External ophthalmoplegia ... Ophthalmoplegia is an important finding in orbital cellulitis. The orbit of the eye, including mechanical restrictions of eye ... Complete ophthalmoplegia indicates involvement of both. Ophthalmoparesis can result from disorders of various parts of the eye ... The muscle, as in progressive external ophthalmoplegia or Kearns-Sayre syndrome. The neuromuscular junction, as in myasthenia ...
POLG Progressive external ophthalmoplegia, autosomal recessive; 258450; POLG Progressive familial heart block, type IB; 604559 ... C10orf2 Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal dominant 4; 610131; POLG2 Progressive ... PGR Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions 3; 609283; SLC25A4 Progressive external ... RRM2B Progressive external ophthalmoplegia, autosomal dominant, with or without hypogonadism; 157640; ...
with W. Russell Brain: "Exophthalmic ophthalmoplegia". Quarterly Journal of Medicine. 7 (2): 293-324. 1938. Munks Roll Details ...
Metz HS (1976). "Saccadic velocity measurements in internuclear ophthalmoplegia". Am J Ophthalmol. 81 (3): 296-9. PMID 1258953 ...
Other Names: IBM3; Myopathy with congenital joint contractures, ophthalmoplegia, and rimmed vacuoles; Inclusion body myopathy ... "OMIM# 605637 - Myopathy, Proximal, and Ophthalmoplegia; MYPOP". Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man. Retrieved 19 September ... Myopathy With Congenital Joint Contractures, Ophthalmoplegia, And Rimmed Vacuoles Inclusion Body Myopathy 3, Autosomal Dominant ... Hereditary inclusion body myopathy-joint contractures-ophthalmoplegia syndrome". OrphaNet. Retrieved 19 September 2016. " ...
Hutchinson, J. (1913). "Ophthalmoplegia externa in connection with inherited syphilis". Syphilis. Funk & Wagnalls Co. pp. 483- ... It is named in honour of the English physician Jonathan Hutchinson (1828-1913). When the ophthalmoplegia is complete, the ... Hutchinson's facies is a facial appearance involving drooping eyelids and immobile eyes in external ophthalmoplegia. This sign ... Hutchinson, J. (1879). "On Ophthalmoplegia Externa, or Symmetrical Immobility (partial) of the Eyes, with Ptosis". Medico- ...
Nagaseki Y, Shimizu T, Kakizawa T, Fukamachi A, Nukui H (1989). "Primary internal ophthalmoplegia due to head injury". Acta ... This can cause injury to the pupillomotor fibres of the oculomotor nerve, consequently leading to internal ophthalmoplegia The ...
Hirano M, DiMauro S (December 2001). "ANT1, Twinkle, POLG, and TP: new genes open our eyes to ophthalmoplegia". Neurology. 57 ( ... "Entrez Gene: PEO1 progressive external ophthalmoplegia 1". "TWNK gene". Genetics Home Reference. Diray-Arce, J; Liu, B; Cupp, ... Baloh RH, Salavaggione E, Milbrandt J, Pestronk A (July 2007). "Familial parkinsonism and ophthalmoplegia from a mutation in ... Infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia (IOSCA) and progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO) are associated with multiple ...
Suspicion for myopathies should be increased in patients whose ophthalmoplegia does not match a particular set of cranial nerve ... KSS is a more severe syndromic variant of chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (abbreviated CPEO), a syndrome that is ... These most often occur years after the development of ptosis and ophthalmoplegia. Atrioventricular (abbreviated "AV") block is ... Jager BV, Fred HL, Butler RB, Carnes WH (November 1960). "Occurrence of retinal pigmentation, ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, deafness ...
Internuclear ophthalmoplegia Wall M, Wray S (1983). "The one-and-a-half syndrome--a unilateral disorder of the pontine ... More formally, it is characterized by "a conjugate horizontal gaze palsy in one direction and an internuclear ophthalmoplegia ...
... multiplex congenita, distal type 1 (AMCD1). Arthrogryposis ophthalmoplegia retinopathy, also known as Oculomelic ... ophthalmoplegia, and retinopathy: Confirmation of a new type of arthrogryposis". Journal of Medical Genetics. 30 (1): 78-80. ... About orphan drugs Arthrogryposis ophthalmoplegia retinopathy at NIH's Office of Rare Diseases Schrander-Stumpel, C T; Höweler ...
Richardson, J. C.; Steele, J; Olszewski, J (1963). "Supranuclear Ophthalmoplegia, Pseudobulbar Palsy, Nuchal Dystonia and ...
BBE is characterized by the rapid onset of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and disturbance of consciousness, and may be associated ... Fisher M (July 1956). "An unusual variant of acute idiopathic polyneuritis (syndrome of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and areflexia ... ataxic hypersomnolence without ophthalmoplegia". J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 84 (11): 1206-7. doi:10.1136/jnnp-2013-304993. ...
Richardson JC, Steele J, Olszewski J (1963). "Supranuclear Ophthalmoplegia, Pseudobulbar Palsy, Nuchal Dystonia and Dementia. A ...
Internuclear ophthalmoplegia occurs when MS affects a part of the brain stem called the medial longitudinal fasciculus, which ... Internuclear ophthalmoplegia is a disorder of conjugate lateral gaze. The affected eye shows impairment of adduction. The ... Menon GJ, Thaller VT (2002). "Therapeutic external ophthalmoplegia with bilateral retrobulbar botulinum toxin- an effective ...
MJD causes ophthalmoplegia and mixed sensory and cerebellar ataxia. Symptoms of MJD are memory deficits, spasticity, difficulty ...
It is characterized by vertical gaze palsy and ophthalmoplegia. This state of akinetic mutism varies in intensity, but it is ...
Ocular symptoms may include retinal degeneration, ophthalmoplegia, and ptosis. Those with MNGIE are often thin and experience ... It has been previously referred to as polyneuropathy, ophthalmoplegia, leukoencephalopathy, and POLIP syndrome. The disease ...
Occasionally, ptosis, chemosis, motility dysfunction (ophthalmoplegia), and optic neuropathy are seen. In the setting of ...
Hirano M, DiMauro S (December 2001). "ANT1, Twinkle, POLG, and TP: new genes open our eyes to ophthalmoplegia". Neurology. 57 ( ... Defects in this gene are a cause of progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions 1 (PEOA1), sensory ... progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions 1 (PEOA1), sensory ataxic neuropathy dysarthria and ... "Active site mutation in DNA polymerase gamma associated with progressive external ophthalmoplegia causes error-prone DNA ...
This presents with the classical triad of ataxia, areflexia and ophthalmoplegia. Studies of these antibodies reveal large ... Anti-GQ1b IgG levels were elevated in patients with ophthalmoplegia in Guillain-Barré syndrome Microbial agents include: ...
"A novel Twinkle gene mutation in autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia". Neuromuscul. Disord. 13 (7-8): 568- ...
Clinical manifestations can include lactic acidosis, cerebral degeneration, ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, spasticity, and dystonia ... "Early-onset ophthalmoplegia in Leigh-like syndrome due to NDUFV1 mutations". Pediatric Neurology. 36 (1): 54-7. doi:10.1016/j. ...
The most common finding is oculomotor nerve dysfunction leading to ophthalmoplegia. This is often accompanied by ophthalmic ...
Mutations in this gene result in autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions. ... "Mutant POLG2 disrupts DNA polymerase gamma subunits and causes progressive external ophthalmoplegia". American Journal of Human ... "Mutant POLG2 disrupts DNA polymerase gamma subunits and causes progressive external ophthalmoplegia". American Journal of Human ... Mutations in POLG2 have been associated with progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions. This ...
Mutations in this gene have been shown to cause progressive external ophthalmoplegia. Increased expression of RRM2B has been ... identifies a novel missense variant in RRM2B associated with autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia". Genome ...
Internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO) is a disorder of conjugate lateral gaze in which the affected eye shows impairment of ... Lana MA, Moreira PR, Neves LB (December 1990). "Wall-eyed bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia (Webino syndrome) and ... "Internuclear ophthalmoplegia: unusual causes in 114 of 410 patients". Arch. Neurol. 62 (5): 714-7. doi:10.1001/archneur.62.5. ...
Supranuclear ophthalmoplegia is a condition that affects the movement of the eyes. ... supranuclear ophthalmoplegia; Whipple disease - supranuclear ophthalmoplegia; Dementia - supranuclear ophthalmoplegia ... Progressive supranuclear palsy - supranuclear ophthalmoplegia; Encephalitis - supranuclear ophthalmoplegia; ... People with supranuclear ophthalmoplegia are unable to move their eyes at will in all directions, especially looking upward. ...
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia is a condition characterized by weakness of the eye muscles. Explore symptoms, inheritance ... especially as the ophthalmoplegia worsens. People with progressive external ophthalmoplegia may also have general weakness of ... When the nuclear genes POLG, TWNK, RRM2B, or SLC25A4 are involved, progressive external ophthalmoplegia is usually inherited in ... Progressive external ophthalmoplegia can result from mutations in one of several different genes. In some cases, mutations in ...
Ophthalmoplegia can be produced by any condition affecting the muscles themselves or the nerves that supply them. Head injuries ...
Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO), is a type of eye disorder characterized by slowly progressive inability to ... The progressive ophthalmoplegia is often unnoticed till decreased ocular motility limits peripheral vision. Often someone else ... Those that have diplopia as a result of asymmetric ophthalmoplegia may be corrected with prisms or with surgery to create a ... It is important to differentiate CPEO from other pathologies that may cause an ophthalmoplegia. There are specific therapies ...
External ophthalmoplegia definition at Dictionary.com, a free online dictionary with pronunciation, synonyms and translation. ...
ophthalmoplegia synonyms, ophthalmoplegia pronunciation, ophthalmoplegia translation, English dictionary definition of ... n the paralysis of the motor nerves in the eye Noun 1. ophthalmoplegia - paralysis of the motor nerves of the eye palsy, ... Related to ophthalmoplegia: ophthalmoplegic migraine. ophthalmoplegia. (ɒfˌθælməˈpliːdʒjə) n. (Medicine) the paralysis of the ... Ophthalmoplegia - definition of ophthalmoplegia by The Free Dictionary https://www.thefreedictionary.com/ophthalmoplegia ...
... Richard L. Rabin,1 Azeem Wasay,2 Nicolas Biro,3 and Marcelle Morcos1 ... K. Johkura, Y. Kudo, Y. Amano et al., "Gaze palsy and exotropia in internuclear ophthalmoplegia," Journal of the Neurological ... E. Diaz-Calderon, O. H. Del Brutto, R. Aguirre, and T. A. Alarcon, "Bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia after smoking ...
Also see the Eyerounds Atlas entry on Internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO).. References. *Kim JS. Internuclear Ophthalmoplegia as ... Internuclear Ophthalmoplegia. Marcus Toral BA, Jaclyn Haugsdal, MD, Michael Wall, MD. June 8, 2017 Initial Presentation. Chief ... Internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO) is a deficit in the control of conjugate eye movements, which results from damage to the ... Figure 3. Internuclear Ophthalmoplegia (INO) produces adduction defects. Note adduction deficit of the right eye. INO is named ...
Definition of chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia. Provided by Stedmans medical dictionary and Drugs.com. Includes ... chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia. Definition: a specific type of slowly worsening weakness of the ocular muscles, ...
Ophthalmoplegia is a condition characterized by paralysis or weakness in eye muscles which can affect eye movement and vision ... bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia).. Supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. Most people with supranuclear ophthalmoplegia have ... internal ophthalmoplegia. Ophthalmoplegia cases may be broken into two main groups, based on whether the condition affects the ... Internuclear ophthalmoplegia. Internuclear ophthalmoplegia is commonly caused by changes in the brain from MS or from a stroke ...
... external resources Schematic demonstrating right internuclear ophthalmoplegia, caused ... Internuclear ophthalmoplegia or INO is a physical finding, or sign, that is a particular form of eye muscle weakness or ... Paralytic strabismus: Ophthalmoparesis - Progressive external ophthalmoplegia - Palsy (III, IV, VI) - Kearns-Sayre syndrome ... It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Internuclear_ophthalmoplegia". A list of authors is available in Wikipedia. ...
Typical causes of internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO) include arterial infarcts, demyelinating conditions, inflammation and ... Typical causes of internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO) include arterial infarcts, demyelinating conditions, inflammation and ...
... internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO) is a horizontal gaze palsy; it results from a brainstem lesion affecting the MLF between the ... Clinically, internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO) is a horizontal gaze palsy; it results from a brainstem lesion affecting the MLF ... What are the signs and symptoms of internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO in vertebrobasilar stroke?. Updated: Mar 03, 2020 ... Lesion of the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) resulting in internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO). (Courtesy of BC Decker Inc ...
We report the case of a 67 year old man with acute ophthalmoplegia due to extensive damage to the fibers innervating the ... We report the case of a 67 year old man with acute ophthalmoplegia due to extensive damage to the fibers innervating the ... Acute third cranial nerve ophthalmoplegia: Possible pathogenesis from alpha-II-interferon treatment. ...
Ophthalmoplegia, Chronic Progressive External. Ophthalmoplegia. Ocular Motility Disorders. Cranial Nerve Diseases. Nervous ... MRI Study - Chronic Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia (CPEO). The safety and scientific validity of this study is the ... MedlinePlus Genetics related topics: Kearns-Sayre syndrome Progressive external ophthalmoplegia MedlinePlus related topics: MRI ... Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center resources: Chronic Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia Ocular Muscular Dystrophy ...
Re: Chronic Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) Hi There. Good to hear from you, I was off work yesterday and took ...
If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Centers RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.. ...
The global Ophthalmoplegia Market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 7.12% from 2017 to 2025. Ophthalmoplegia is the paralysis or ... 1.1 external Ophthalmoplegia. 1.2 internuclear Ophthalmoplegia. 2. Global Ophthalmoplegia Market, by Treatment:. 2.1 surgery ... Ophthalmoplegia is the paralysis or weakness of the eye muscles. It can affect one or more of the six muscles that hold the eye ... 4. Global Ophthalmoplegia Market, by Region:. 4.1 North America (U.S., Canada, Mexico). 4.2 Europe (Germany, UK, France, Rest ...
Paralytic strabismus: Ophthalmoparesis - Progressive external ophthalmoplegia - Palsy (III, IV, VI) - Kearns-Sayre syndrome ... Internuclear ophthalmoplegia or INO is a physical finding, or sign, that is a particular form of eye muscle weakness or ... Other binocular: Conjugate gaze palsy - Convergence insufficiency - Internuclear ophthalmoplegia - One and a half syndrome. ... Schematic demonstrating right internuclear ophthalmoplegia, caused by injury of the right medial longitudinal fasciculus. ...
... adult-onset diabetes mellitus developed a painful ophthalmoplegia and ipsilateral optic neuropathy that was relatively ... Ophthalmoplegia / complications*, drug therapy. Optic Nerve / blood supply, pathology. Prednisone / therapeutic use. ... Two patients with mild, adult-onset diabetes mellitus developed a painful ophthalmoplegia and ipsilateral optic neuropathy that ...
... antibody and ophthalmoplegia in Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) and Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) has been reported. We ... ophthalmoplegia without ataxia). In contrast, five showed ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. Some large neurons of the dorsal root ... Anti-GQ1b IgG antibody is associated with ataxia as well as ophthalmoplegia Muscle Nerve. 1999 Aug;22(8):1071-4. doi: 10.1002/( ... Anti-GQ1b IgG antibody may thus be associated with ataxia as well as ophthalmoplegia. Ataxia may be due to its binding to a ...
Learn more about Chronic Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia from related diseases, pathways, genes and PTMs with the Novus ... Research of Chronic Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia has been linked to Ophthalmoplegia, External Ophthalmoplegia, Myopathy ... Chronic Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia has been studied in relation to diseases such as: *Ophthalmoplegia ... Chronic Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia is also known as chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia, progressive ...
The Internuclear Ophthalmoplegia (INO ) is characterized clinically by an ipsilesional adduction deficit (partial or complete) ... Internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO) is an ocular movement disorder that presents as inability to perform conjugate lateral gaze ... Internuclear ophthalmoplegia: unusual causes in 114 of 410 patients. Arch Neurol. 2005 May;62(5):714-7. ... "Isolated Internuclear Ophthalmoplegia After Massive Supratentorial Epidural Hematoma: A Case Report and Review of the ...
MFS is an immune-mediated neuropathy presenting with ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia. Even if only a few cases of MFS ... Miller Fisher Syndrome is an immune-mediated neuropathy presenting with ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and areflexia. Even if only a ... the patient developed progressive ocular movement abnormalities up to complete external ophthalmoplegia, severe limb and gait ... the patient developed progressive ocular movement abnormalities up to complete external ophthalmoplegia, severe limb and gait ...
1. Raeder JG: "Paratrigeminal" paralysis of oculo-pupillary sympathetic. Brain 47:149-1581924Raeder JG: "Paratrigeminal" paralysis of oculo-pupillary sympathetic. Brain 47:149-158 1924. ...
The pathognomonic clinical sign of internuclear ophthalmoplegia is an impaired adduction while testing horizontal saccades on ... Internuclear Ophthalmoplegia. Known as: lhermittes syndrome, Ophthalmoplegia, Internuclear, Ophthalmoplegias, Internuclear ( ... Vestibulo-ocular reflex pathways in internuclear ophthalmoplegia.. *Phillip Cremer, Amerio A Migliaccio, G. Michael Halmagyi, ... Internuclear ophthalmoplegia and optic neuritis: paraneoplastic effects of bronchial carcinoma.. *Nelishia. Pillay, ...
List of 44 causes for Ophthalmoplegia in both eyes and Permanent brain damage, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses ... Ophthalmoplegia in both eyes:*Causes: Ophthalmoplegia in both eyes *Introduction: Ophthalmoplegia in both eyes *Ophthalmoplegia ... More Searches: Ophthalmoplegia in both eyes. *Ophthalmoplegia in both eyes: Add a 3rd symptom *Ophthalmoplegia in both eyes: ... Ophthalmoplegia (43 causes) *Eyes *more symptoms...» Broaden Your Search: Remove a Symptom. *REMOVE Ophthalmoplegia in both ...
Our patients ophthalmoplegia, unlike typical diabetic ophthalmoplegia, improved immediately and completely resolved within two ... Cerebral Edema and Ophthalmoplegia Reversed by Mannitol in a New Case of Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus. Bonita Franklin, ... Cerebral Edema and Ophthalmoplegia Reversed by Mannitol in a New Case of Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus ... Cerebral Edema and Ophthalmoplegia Reversed by Mannitol in a New Case of Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus ...
... Gati, Istvan ... Total external ophthalmoplegia developed 1 week after an upper respiratory tract infection. After 3 years of the course, ... External ophthalmoplegia, Hashimotos thyroiditis, Corticosteroid treatment National Category Medical and Health Sciences ... points that autoimmune mechanism more frequently might participate in the pathogenesis of chronic external ophthalmoplegia, and ...
  • Clinical examination revealed features suggestive of left sided internuclear ophthalmoplegia i. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO) - Horizontal gaze involves two cranial nerves, the abducens for the ipsilateral lateral rectus, and the oculomotor for the contralateral medial rectus. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Gaze palsy and exotropia in internuclear ophthalmoplegia," Journal of the Neurological Sciences , vol. 353, no. 1-2, pp. 158-160, 2015. (hindawi.com)
  • This patient was diagnosed with a left internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO) resulting from brainstem infarction of the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF). (uiowa.edu)
  • Internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO) is a deficit in the control of conjugate eye movements, which results from damage to the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF). (uiowa.edu)
  • Schematic demonstrating right internuclear ophthalmoplegia, caused by injury of the right medial longitudinal fasciculus. (bionity.com)
  • Internuclear ophthalmoplegia or INO is a physical finding, or sign, that is a particular form of eye muscle weakness or ophthalmoparesis . (bionity.com)
  • An unusual aetiology for internuclear ophthalmoplegia. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Typical causes of internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO) include arterial infarcts, demyelinating conditions, inflammation and trauma. (biomedsearch.com)
  • What are the signs and symptoms of internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO in vertebrobasilar stroke? (medscape.com)
  • Lesion of the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) resulting in internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO). (medscape.com)
  • Iatrogenic internuclear ophthalmoplegia. (bmj.com)
  • Internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO) is an ocular movement disorder that presents as inability to perform conjugate lateral gaze and ophthalmoplegia due to damage to the interneuron between two nuclei of cranial nerves (CN) VI and CN III (internuclear). (aao.org)
  • Wall-Eyed Bilateral Internuclear Ophthalmoplegia exists when there is bilateral damage to the MLF. (aao.org)
  • Vestibulo-ocular reflex pathways in internuclear ophthalmoplegia. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Lidocaine-induced unilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia: effects on convergence and conjugate eye movements. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Abduction nystagmus in internuclear ophthalmoplegia. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Internuclear ophthalmoplegia: MR-anatomic correlation. (semanticscholar.org)
  • The clinical spectrum of internuclear ophthalmoplegia in multiple sclerosis. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Internuclear ophthalmoplegia and 'optic neuritis': paraneoplastic effects of bronchial carcinoma. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Internuclear ophthalmoplegia following head injury. (semanticscholar.org)
  • The most common causes of internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO) are multiple sclerosis and vascular disease of the brain stem. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Excitatory termination of abducens internuclear neurons on medial rectus motoneurons: relationship to syndrome of internuclear ophthalmoplegia. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Clinical examination revealed left sided internuclear ophthalmoplegia and dysdiadochokinesia and ataxia on left side. (ajol.info)
  • This case highlights the need for a high degree of suspicion for CNS tuberculosis in patients presenting with internuclear ophthalmoplegia. (ajol.info)
  • Internuclear ophthalmoplegia(IO) (right sided) + one & Half syndrome. (thisisms.com)
  • Internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO) is a disorder of conjugate lateral gaze in which the affected eye shows impairment of adduction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Saccades (horizontal and vertical) and dissociated nystagmus were quantitatively assessed in four patients with internuclear ophthalmoplegia. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Results of extraocular muscle surgery in WEBINO bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia patients. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Based on clinical findings, she was diagnosed with bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia. (elsevier.com)
  • Internuclear ophthalmoplegia is a cause of binocular diplopia and is important to recognize because it indicates a brainstem lesion requiring neurologic evaluation. (elsevier.com)
  • However, vertebrobasilar artery dolichoectasia with internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO) clinical presentation has not been reported in literature yet. (jneuro.com)
  • Ophthalmoplegia Market Information: By Types (External Opthalmoplegia, Internuclear Opthalmoplegia), By Treatment (Surgery, Drug Treatment), By End Users (Hospital & Clinics, Ambulatory Clinics) - Global Forecast Till 2023. (whatech.com)
  • Some of the eye complications associated with MS include optic neuritis, diplopia, nystagmus, and internuclear ophthalmoplegia. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Diagnosis: Pseudo-Internuclear Ophthalmoplegia Ocular Myasthenia Gravis An Oculoelectromyogram was recorded with an indwelling needle electrode in the right medial rectus, inserted by Dr. Cogan. (utah.edu)
  • This patient with pseudo-internuclear ophthalmoplegia illustrates how closely bilateral weakness of adduction due to ocular myasthenia gravis can mimic a brainstem bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia due to a lesion of the medial longitudinal fasciculus in the brainstem. (utah.edu)
  • White matter tracts connecting these nuclei, as in internuclear ophthalmoplegia , an occasional finding in multiple sclerosis . (wikipedia.org)
  • Inter-nuclear ophthalmoplegia may cause horizontal diplopia. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • However, diplopia and ophthalmoplegia persisted for 4 weeks. (bmj.com)
  • This could be in the form of diplopia, ptosis, ophthalmoplegia , or pain or paresthesia along the fifth nerve distribution. (symptoma.com)
  • The purpose of this study is to investigate the fraction of fat on a MRI scan of lower bag muscles, thighs and calves in patients with the mitochondrial disease chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Chronic Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia is also known as chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia, progressive external ophthalmoplegia, cpeo, peo, progressive external ophthalmoplegia (disorder). (novusbio.com)
  • Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) is a classical manifestation of mitochondrial disease characterised by slowly progressive limitation of eye movements and ptosis. (arvojournals.org)
  • Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO), is a type of eye disorder characterized by slowly progressive inability to move the eyes and eyebrows. (wikipedia.org)
  • These findings are typical of an infranuclear gaze palsy, in this case chronic, progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO). (neurocular.com)
  • Chronic Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia - (CPEO) is one manifestation in a constellation of associated mitochondrial DNA mutation known as mitochondrial myopathy or cytopathy that cause ocular motility disturbances. (enacademic.com)
  • Background: Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) is a classical mitochondrial ocular disorder characterised by bilateral progressive ptosis and ophthalmoplegia. (ncl.ac.uk)
  • The aim of this magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study was to investigate whether the ophthalmoplegia in CPEO is primarily myopathic in origin or whether there is evidence of contributory supranuclear pathway dysfunction.Methods: Ten age-matched normal controls and twenty patients with CPEO were recruited nine patients with single, large-scale mtDNA deletions and eleven patients with multiple mtDNA deletions secondary to mutations in POLG, PEO1, OPA1, and RRM2B. (ncl.ac.uk)
  • In an even more exceptional presentation, limited WG may appear as Tolosa-Hunt syndrome (painful ophthalmoplegia due to inflammation of the cavernous sinus or superior orbital fissure), meningeal and cerebral parenchymal granulomatous inflammation, chronic meningitis, and cranial neuropathies. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Patients with verified singe large-scale mtDNA deletions and chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Submit your Twitter account related to Chronic Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia to be featured! (novusbio.com)
  • Research of Chronic Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia has been linked to Ophthalmoplegia, External Ophthalmoplegia, Myopathy, Mitochondrial Myopathies, Mitochondrial Diseases. (novusbio.com)
  • The study of Chronic Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia has been mentioned in research publications which can be found using our bioinformatics tool below. (novusbio.com)
  • These pathways complement our catalog of research reagents for the study of Chronic Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia including antibodies and ELISA kits against POLG, C10ORF2, CYCS, CHMP1B, CPOX. (novusbio.com)
  • Explore more on Chronic Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia below! (novusbio.com)
  • We have 745 products for the study of Chronic Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia that can be applied to Western Blot, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation, Flow Cytometry, Immunocytochemistry/Immunofluorescence, Immunohistochemistry from our catalog of antibodies and ELISA kits. (novusbio.com)
  • This case history points that autoimmune mechanism more frequently might participate in the pathogenesis of chronic external ophthalmoplegia, and the symptoms might precede organ-specific or perhaps systemic autoimmune disorders. (diva-portal.org)
  • 12 A chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia characterized by muscle weakness, mainly affecting the lower limbs, external ophthalmoplegia, exercise intolerance and mtDNA deletions that has material basis in heterozygous mutation in DNA2 on chromosome 10q21.3. (malacards.org)
  • This is a video presentation of the eyelid and eye movement findings in chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia. (utah.edu)
  • What is the abbreviation for Chronic Intestinal Pseudoobstruction with myopathy and Ophthalmoplegia? (acronymsandslang.com)
  • Progressive external ophthalmoplegia is a condition characterized by weakness of the eye muscles. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Another characteristic feature of progressive external ophthalmoplegia is weakness or paralysis of the muscles that move the eye (ophthalmoplegia). (medlineplus.gov)
  • People with progressive external ophthalmoplegia may also have general weakness of the muscles used for movement (myopathy), particularly those in the neck, arms, or legs. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Although muscle weakness is the primary symptom of progressive external ophthalmoplegia, this condition can be accompanied by other signs and symptoms. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In these instances, the condition is referred to as progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus (PEO+). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Progressive external ophthalmoplegia is part of a spectrum of disorders with overlapping signs and symptoms. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Like progressive external ophthalmoplegia, the other conditions in this spectrum can involve weakness of the eye muscles. (medlineplus.gov)
  • However, these conditions have many additional features not shared by most people with progressive external ophthalmoplegia. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The prevalence of progressive external ophthalmoplegia is unknown. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Progressive external ophthalmoplegia is a condition caused by defects in mitochondria, which are structures within cells that use oxygen to convert the energy from food into a form cells can use. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Progressive external ophthalmoplegia can result from mutations in one of several different genes. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Less commonly, mutations that change single nucleotides in genes found in mtDNA, such as the MT-TL1 gene, cause progressive external ophthalmoplegia. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The transfer RNAs associated with progressive external ophthalmoplegia are present in mitochondria and help assemble the proteins that carry out the steps of oxidative phosphorylation. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Researchers have not determined how deletions of mtDNA or mutations in mtDNA genes lead to the specific signs and symptoms of progressive external ophthalmoplegia, although the features of the condition are probably related to impaired oxidative phosphorylation. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Progressive external ophthalmoplegia can have different inheritance patterns depending on the gene involved. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The G451E mutation was found in a patient with autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO) (PEOA4). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • During the first days, the patient developed progressive ocular movement abnormalities up to complete external ophthalmoplegia, severe limb and gait ataxia, and mild dysarthria. (frontiersin.org)
  • A large Swedish family with members affected by progressive external ophthalmoplegia with hypogonadism were followed-up and reviewed. (diva-portal.org)
  • Linkage analysis excluded the chromosome 10q23.3-q24.3 region reported as being linked to the disease in a Finnish family with autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia. (diva-portal.org)
  • We report for the first time clinical evidence for anticipation in a family with autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia. (diva-portal.org)
  • Progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO) is an inherited mitochondrial disease that follows either autosomal dominant or recessive forms of inheritance (adPEO or arPEO). (biomedcentral.com)
  • The progressive ophthalmoplegia is often unnoticed till decreased ocular motility limits peripheral vision. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another highly similar condition in this database is External Ophthalmoplegia, Progressive, With mtDNA Deletions, AR 3 . (arizona.edu)
  • A very rare, dominantly inherited genetic disorder involving progressive muscle weakness and wasting, joint contractures at birth and ophthalmoplegia. (rightdiagnosis.com)
  • OBSERVATIONS: A man in his late 60s had ptosis and tremor on standing for 30 years, followed by development of progressive external ophthalmoplegia. (elsevier.com)
  • An 83-year-old woman presented with a several-month history of progressive ophthalmoplegia without any other neurological symptoms or signs. (mysciencework.com)
  • Genetics Home Reference provides information about progressive external ophthalmoplegia. (nih.gov)
  • 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia, see PEOA1 (157640). (malacards.org)
  • Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia with Mitochondrial Dna Deletions, Autosomal Dominant 6, also known as progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial dna deletions, autosomal dominant, 6 , is related to rapadilino syndrome and baller-gerold syndrome , and has symptoms including myalgia , muscle cramp and facial paresis . (malacards.org)
  • An important gene associated with Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia with Mitochondrial Dna Deletions, Autosomal Dominant 6 is DNA2 (DNA Replication Helicase/Nuclease 2), and among its related pathways/superpathways is Cytosolic iron-sulfur cluster assembly . (malacards.org)
  • Progressive external ophthalmoplegia is characterized by multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in skeletal muscle. (mendelian.co)
  • For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia, see PEOA1 ( OMIM ). (mendelian.co)
  • At least 17 mutations in the RRM2B gene have been identified in people with an eye condition called progressive external ophthalmoplegia. (nih.gov)
  • Typically, mutations that cause progressive external ophthalmoplegia occur in one copy of the RRM2B gene, although rarely both copies of the gene are altered. (nih.gov)
  • RRM2B gene mutations associated with progressive external ophthalmoplegia lead to impaired RNR activity. (nih.gov)
  • It is unclear why some RRM2B gene mutations result in deletions of genetic material from mtDNA (as in progressive external ophthalmoplegia, described above) and others reduce the overall amount of mtDNA (as in RRM2B -MDS). (nih.gov)
  • Novel Twinkle (PEO1) gene mutations in mendelian progressive external ophthalmoplegia. (cdc.gov)
  • The patients were predominantly affected with a mitochondrial myopathy with or without progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO). (cdc.gov)
  • Diagnosis: Progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO) In 7th grade, she developed hearing loss and ultimately became totally deaf. (utah.edu)
  • Progressive external ophthalmoplegia is a common clinical feature in mitochondrial disease caused by nuclear DNA defects and single, large-scale mitochondrial DNA deletions and is less frequently associated with point mutations of mitochondrial DNA. (cdc.gov)
  • Based on clinical observations, we systematically investigated whether the presence of peripheral neuropathy could predict the underlying genetic defect in patients with progressive external ophthalmoplegia. (cdc.gov)
  • We analysed detailed demographic, clinical and neurophysiological data from 116 patients with genetically-defined mitochondrial disease and progressive external ophthalmoplegia. (cdc.gov)
  • Univariate analyses revealed significant differences in the distribution of other clinical features between genotypes, including age at disease onset, gender, family history, progressive external ophthalmoplegia at clinical presentation, hearing loss, pigmentary retinopathy and extrapyramidal features. (cdc.gov)
  • The muscle , as in progressive external ophthalmoplegia or Kearns-Sayre syndrome . (wikipedia.org)
  • An elderly man developed acute progressive supranuclear ophthalmoplegia and other central nervous system manifestations that suggested Whipple disease. (houstonmethodist.org)
  • Close association between the increase in anti-GQ1b immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody and ophthalmoplegia in Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) and Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) has been reported. (nih.gov)
  • This syndrome is a rare ophthalmoplegia, either bilateral or unilateral that exhibits contralateral adducting eye (rather than abducting eye) nystagmus with abduction restriction on physical exam. (aao.org)
  • 34 patients who had ophthalmoplegia of definite cause, 16 healthy people, and 23 patients with typical Fisher syndrome served as the controls. (bmj.com)
  • RESULTS Two of the 16 patients with ophthalmoplegia of unknown cause had serum IgG antibody against GQ1b but not against other glycolipids, and 22 of the 23 patients with typical Fisher syndrome had this antibody. (bmj.com)
  • CONCLUSION A common underlying cause appears to bring about the pathogenesis of palsy in Fisher syndrome and in the ophthalmoplegia with positive anti-GQ1b IgG antibody, called atypical Fisher syndrome. (bmj.com)
  • This antibody may prove a useful clinical marker for differentiating Fisher syndrome, typical and atypical, in patients with ophthalmoplegia. (bmj.com)
  • After a 15 - 20 minute exam she was diagnosed with http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_and_a_half_syndrome . (thisisms.com)
  • Though painful ophthalmoplegia technically describes any patient presentation in which there is pain and limitation in eye movements, it is often used more specifically to describe the syndrome of periorbital pain and multiple ipsilateral oculomotor nerve palsies sometimes accompanied by Horner syndrome and sensory impairment in the ophthalmic and, occasionally, the maxillary divisions of the trigeminal nerve suggesting a cavernous sinus lesion. (medlink.com)
  • Tolosa-Hunt syndrome, an idiopathic inflammatory condition causing nonspecific inflammation in the region of the cavernous sinus and superior orbital fissure, is an important cause of painful ophthalmoplegia, often termed orbital pseudotumor when the inflammation is primarily the orbit. (medlink.com)
  • Experts now believe that it is high time to revisit the use of the terms "Tolosa-Hunt syndrome" and "orbital pseudotumor", with the cause of painful ophthalmoplegia more appropriately described by its location, impacted tissue, and underlying histology (when available). (medlink.com)
  • In this article, the author describes idiopathic inflammatory causes of painful ophthalmoplegia (also known as Tolosa-Hunt syndrome or orbital pseudotumor), its imaging features, and the response to corticosteroid, along with differential diagnosis of painful ophthalmoplegia. (medlink.com)
  • Tolosa-Hunt syndrome is used to describe the clinical presentation of painful ophthalmoplegia presumed due to idiopathic cavernous sinus inflammation whereas orbital pseudotumor is used to describe the idiopathic orbital inflammation. (medlink.com)
  • A 61-year-old woman presented with painful ophthalmoplegia , Tolosa - Hunt syndrome . (symptoma.com)
  • Tolosa - Hunt syndrome ( painful ophthalmoplegia caused by nonspecific inflammation of the cavernous sinus or superior orbital fissure). (symptoma.com)
  • Find the definition of Ataxia and Areflexia Syndrome Ophthalmoplegia in Wikipedia. (medconditions.net)
  • The author reports 12 cases of Tolosa-Hunt syndrome, a benign steroid-resistant cryptogenic granuloma that presents as painful ophthalmoplegia. (thejns.org)
  • This syndrome is differentiated from other causes of painful ophthalmoplegia including tumors, aneurysms, collagen disease, specific infections, mucoceles, and benign granulomas of unknown etiology. (thejns.org)
  • Absent pituitary gland and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis associated with partial ophthalmoplegia and postaxial polydactyly: A variant of orofaciodigital syndrome VI or a new syndrome? (elsevier.com)
  • Neuro-ophthalmologic examination showing ophthalmoplegia affecting the left eye in a patient with Tolosa-Hunt syndrome . (wikipedia.org)
  • Bilateral occurrence of internal ophthalmoplegia as an isolated entity has been shown to be an initial manifestation of Miller Fisher variant of Guillain Barré syndrome. (nigerianjournalofophthalmology.com)
  • More detailed information about the symptoms , causes , and treatments of Hereditary inclusion body myopathy -- joint contractures -- ophthalmoplegia is available below. (rightdiagnosis.com)
  • Wrongly Diagnosed with Hereditary inclusion body myopathy -- joint contractures -- ophthalmoplegia? (rightdiagnosis.com)
  • In the following list you will find some of the most common rare diseases related to Myopathy and Ophthalmoplegia that can help you solving undiagnosed cases. (mendelian.co)
  • Congenital myopathy associated with proximal extremity weaknesses, external ophthalmoplegia, and eventual respiratory failure. (mhmedical.com)
  • 24, ophthalmoplegia without ataxia). (nih.gov)
  • In contrast, five showed ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. (nih.gov)
  • Anti-GQ1b IgG antibody may thus be associated with ataxia as well as ophthalmoplegia. (nih.gov)
  • MFS is an immune-mediated neuropathy presenting with ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia. (frontiersin.org)
  • Classically characterised by a triad of clinical findings: post-traumatic cerebellar ataxia, ophthalmoplegia and generalised areflexia. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Treatment depends on the cause and symptoms of the supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Symptoms may vary based on the type and cause of ophthalmoplegia, as well as the specific eye muscles affected. (allaboutvision.com)
  • It's important to note that these symptoms may also be caused by eye conditions other than ophthalmoplegia. (allaboutvision.com)
  • The other common associated presenting symptoms were painful ophthalmoplegia, cranial nerve palsies and constitutional symptoms. (bioscientifica.com)
  • In conclusion, a high index of suspicion of underlying malignancy, such as lymphoma, should be present in patients presenting with acute pituitary dysfunction associated with painful ophthalmoplegia, rapidly evolving neurological features, radiological features atypical of a pituitary adenoma and constitutional symptoms. (bioscientifica.com)
  • The common associated symptoms of hypopituitarism due to lymphoma infiltration of the hypothalamic-pituitary system include painful ophthalmoplegia, cranial nerve palsies and constitutional symptoms. (bioscientifica.com)
  • A high index of suspicion of underlying malignancy such as lymphoma should be present in patients presenting with acute pituitary dysfunction associated with painful ophthalmoplegia, radiological features atypical of pituitary adenomas and constitutional symptoms to enable early diagnosis and prompt initiation of definitive therapy. (bioscientifica.com)
  • Ischaemic optic neuropathy with painful ophthalmoplegia in diabetes mellitus. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Two patients with mild, adult-onset diabetes mellitus developed a painful ophthalmoplegia and ipsilateral optic neuropathy that was relatively unresponsive to steroids. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Painful ophthalmoplegia due to inflammatory pseudotumor is generally responsive to oral corticosteroids, which form the mainstay of treatment, but occasionally the disease is refractory, and additional immunosuppressive agents or orbit radiation may be indicated. (medlink.com)
  • The differential diagnosis of painful ophthalmoplegia includes a variety of vascular, neoplastic, inflammatory, and infectious conditions affecting cavernous sinus region and orbit along with diabetes and ophthalmoplegic migraine. (medlink.com)
  • To present a case of peripheral T-cell lymphoma presenting as painful ophthalmoplegia. (ekjo.org)
  • T-cell lymphoma in the orbit can present as painful ophthalmoplegia and take a rapid clinical course. (ekjo.org)
  • The disease should be regarded as one of the differential diagnosis for painful ophthalmoplegia refractory to corticosteroid therapy. (ekjo.org)
  • Painful ophthalmoplegia can be resulted from inflammatory lesions in the orbital apex or cavernous sinus. (ekjo.org)
  • We present a patient who had painful ophthalmoplegia unresponsive to corticosteroid treatment and was disclosed to have a peripheral T-cell lymphoma. (ekjo.org)
  • The patient was transferred to BIDMC with painful right eye ophthalmoplegia. (present5.com)
  • No fever, chills, rash, or stiff neck No documented history of head trauma Seen at Mount Auburn Hospital on 6/6 and was noted to have right periorbital edema, chemosis, and painful ophthalmoplegia. (present5.com)
  • Recurrent painful ophthalmoplegic neuropathy (RPON) is a rare condition that manifests as headache and ophthalmoplegia . (symptoma.com)
  • Transorbital intracavernous needle biopsy in painful ophthalmoplegia. (elsevier.com)
  • ophthalmoplegia - Paralysis of one or more of the ocular muscles. (enacademic.com)
  • Merrill, KS , Lee, MS & McClelland, C 2018, ' Red Flags in the Assessment of Adult Ophthalmoplegia ', Journal of Binocular Vision and Ocular Motility , vol. 68, no. 1, pp. 20-23. (elsevier.com)
  • External ophthalmoplegia is a paralysis of the external ocular muscles with retention of function in the internal muscles. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Ophthalmoplegia, also referred as extra ocular muscle palsy, is a paralysis of the extra ocular muscles that control movements of eyes. (whatech.com)
  • An ophthalmoplegia diagnosis can sometimes be confusing to patients. (allaboutvision.com)
  • If you get a diagnosis of ophthalmoplegia, the name of your condition may include one or more of these terms. (allaboutvision.com)
  • Based on the current literature, this is the first report of a complete ophthalmoplegia preceding the diagnosis of a myxoid liposarcoma associated with the anti-Hu antibody. (mysciencework.com)
  • Diagnosis of (OD) internal ophthalmoplegia was made. (nigerianjournalofophthalmology.com)
  • The clinical diagnosis of MNGIE disease is based on the presence of severe gastrointestinal dysmotility, cachexia, ptosis, external ophthalmoplegia, sensorimotor neuropathy, asymptomatic leukoencephalopathy as observed on brain MRI, and family history consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. (nih.gov)
  • Ophthalmoplegia cases may be broken into two main groups, based on whether the condition affects the external eye muscles (external ophthalmoplegia) or the internal eye muscles (internal ophthalmoplegia). (allaboutvision.com)
  • Internal ophthalmoplegia affects the muscles inside the eye: the iris (which controls the size of the pupil) and also the ciliary muscle (which is responsible for accommodation). (enacademic.com)
  • First is the internal ophthalmoplegia which is limited to the pupillary sphincter and ciliary muscle. (medicalparkromania.com)
  • Unilateral internal ophthalmoplegia is rare to occur as an isolated entity. (nigerianjournalofophthalmology.com)
  • Herein, we report a case of a young boy with isolated unilateral internal ophthalmoplegia, that is, mydriasis with absent near response without external ophthalmoplegia. (nigerianjournalofophthalmology.com)
  • The internal ophthalmoplegia was presumed to be idiopathic in nature. (nigerianjournalofophthalmology.com)
  • Murthy SR, Sudhakar P. Unilateral Isolated Internal Ophthalmoplegia − Idiopathic Etiology. (nigerianjournalofophthalmology.com)
  • The latter is termed as internal ophthalmoplegia. (nigerianjournalofophthalmology.com)
  • 3],[4] Unilateral internal ophthalmoplegia may be the initial manifestation of III nerve palsy and needs to evaluated and monitored. (nigerianjournalofophthalmology.com)
  • 5],[6] We hereby describe a case of internal ophthalmoplegia with normal MRI and MRA, hence presumed to be idiopathic. (nigerianjournalofophthalmology.com)
  • Ophthalmoplegia is characterized by paralysis or weakness in one or more eye muscles . (allaboutvision.com)
  • External ophthalmoplegia is a paralysis or weakness in one of six external muscles that work together to move the eye. (allaboutvision.com)
  • Ophthalmoplegia is the paralysis or weakness of the eye muscles. (bccresearch.com)
  • 56 PEOA6 is characterized by muscle weakness, mainly affecting the lower limbs, external ophthalmoplegia, exercise intolerance, and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions on muscle biopsy. (malacards.org)
  • Ophthalmoparesis or ophthalmoplegia refers to weakness (-paresis) or paralysis (-plegia) of one or more extraocular muscles which are responsible for eye movements . (wikipedia.org)
  • We report the case of a 67 year old man with acute ophthalmoplegia due to extensive damage to the fibers innervating the extrinsic muscles of the left third cranial nerve. (springer.com)
  • The authors propose that biotin-responsive basal ganglia disease be considered in a case of unexplained acute dystonia, external ophthalmoplegia, confusion and encephalopathy. (pediatricneurologybriefs.com)
  • The global Ophthalmoplegia Market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 7.12% from 2017 to 2025. (bccresearch.com)
  • The Global Ophthalmoplegia Market report is segmented on the basis of end users, the market is segmented into hospital & clinics, ambulatory clinics, and others. (whatech.com)
  • The Global ophthalmoplegia market is driven by increasing number of people with ophthalmoplegia and increasing geriatric population. (whatech.com)
  • The global ophthalmoplegia market is expected to grow at a CAGR of ~ 7.2 % during the forecast period 2017-2023. (whatech.com)
  • Ophthalmoplegia Market Regional Analysis: The Americas dominates the global ophthalmoplegia market owing to well-developed technology and increased patient population with eye sight problem primarily due to increasing prevalence of diabetes. (whatech.com)
  • 3. A complete external ophthalmoplegia with gaze fixed in primary position and total absence of horizontal and vertical eye movements on command. (utah.edu)
  • Total external ophthalmoplegia developed 1 week after an upper respiratory tract infection. (diva-portal.org)
  • Other diseases like Graves' disease, myasthenia gravis and glioma that may cause an external ophthalmoplegia must be ruled out. (wikipedia.org)
  • A number of genetic disorders cause difficulties in eye movement, known as external ophthalmoplegia, but there are usually associated neurologic manifestations. (arizona.edu)
  • Two elderly sisters reported with this disorder died of other conditions and the impact of external ophthalmoplegia on longevity is unknown. (arizona.edu)
  • A 10-year-old girl with a 4-month history of abnormal gait and dysarthria had bilateral external ophthalmoplegia, dystonia, and altered mental status. (pediatricneurologybriefs.com)
  • Bilateral external ophthalmoplegia in biotin-responsive basal ganglia disease. (pediatricneurologybriefs.com)
  • Total ophthalmoplegia is a paralysis of both internal and external muscle groups. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Second is the external ophthalmoplegia which involves only the extraocular muscle. (medicalparkromania.com)
  • She presented at age 9 with bilateral ptosis and 5 months later external ophthalmoplegia which progressed to almost complete fixation of all eye movements. (utah.edu)
  • External ophthalmoplegia refers to involvement of only the extraocular muscles. (wikipedia.org)
  • No features of external ophthalmoplegia were noted. (nigerianjournalofophthalmology.com)
  • Additionally an investigation of the volume of the eye muscles will be done and compared to the patient's clinical presentation of ptosis and ophthalmoplegia. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Investigation of the volume of the eye muscles on a MRI scan and compare these with the patients clinical presentation of ptosis and ophthalmoplegia. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Its presence against glycolipids, in particular ganglioside GQ1b, was investigated in patients with ophthalmoplegia of unknown origin. (bmj.com)
  • METHODS 16 patients with ophthalmoplegia, the cause of which could not be confirmed from clinical findings or diagnostic testing, were tested. (bmj.com)
  • No anti-GQ1b antibodies were found in the patients with ophthalmoplegia of definite cause or in the normal controls. (bmj.com)
  • Afshinmajd S, Ghasemi H, Rajabi M T, Jalili M, Yarmohammadi M E. Clinical Evaluation, Prevalence and Etiologic Factors in Patients with Ophthalmoplegia. (irjo.org)
  • Ophthalmoplegia can be produced by any condition affecting the muscles themselves or the nerves that supply them. (everything2.com)
  • Generally, ophthalmoplegia occurs due to an issue in the brain that interferes with signals being sent to the eye muscles. (allaboutvision.com)
  • ophthalmoplegia - n. paralysis of the muscles of the eye. (enacademic.com)
  • Secondary causes of bilateral ophthalmoplegia were ruled out by a proper history, clinical examinations and appropriate investigations. (bmj.com)
  • Supranuclear ophthalmoplegia is a condition that affects the movement of the eyes. (medlineplus.gov)
  • People with supranuclear ophthalmoplegia are unable to move their eyes at will in all directions, especially looking upward. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Tests will be done to check for diseases linked with supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Lee, AG 2002, ' Whipple disease with supranuclear ophthalmoplegia diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction of cerebrospinal fluid ', Journal of Neuro-Ophthalmology , vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 18-21. (houstonmethodist.org)
  • This article reviews relevant clinical pearls for the detection of dire causes of acquired ophthalmoplegia in adults including myasthenia gravis, carotid cavernous fistula, giant cell arteritis, and thiamine deficiency. (elsevier.com)
  • abstract = "Acquired ophthalmoplegia can represent a harbinger of vision and life-threatening disease. (elsevier.com)
  • BACKGROUND/AIM Serum antibody against ganglioside GQ1b is reported to be closely associated with immune mediated ophthalmoplegia in the Fisher and Guillain-Barré syndromes. (bmj.com)
  • Peripheral neuropathy predicts nuclear gene defect in patients with mitochondrial ophthalmoplegia. (cdc.gov)