The process of TOOTH formation. It is divided into several stages including: the dental lamina stage, the bud stage, the cap stage, and the bell stage. Odontogenesis includes the production of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS), dentin (DENTINOGENESIS), and dental cementum (CEMENTOGENESIS).
One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.
Odontoblasts are columnar, highly differentiated, dentin-forming cells that originate from the ectodermal neural crest and reside within the pulp cavity of teeth, characterized by their production and secretion of the organic matrix component of dentin during amelogenesis.
The collective tissues from which an entire tooth is formed, including the DENTAL SAC; ENAMEL ORGAN; and DENTAL PAPILLA. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
Cylindrical epithelial cells in the innermost layer of the ENAMEL ORGAN. Their functions include contribution to the development of the dentinoenamel junction by the deposition of a layer of the matrix, thus producing the foundation for the prisms (the structural units of the DENTAL ENAMEL), and production of the matrix for the enamel prisms and interprismatic substance. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
Epithelial cells surrounding the dental papilla and differentiated into three layers: the inner enamel epithelium, consisting of ameloblasts which eventually form the enamel, and the enamel pulp and external enamel epithelium, both of which atrophy and disappear before and upon eruption of the tooth, respectively.
Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)
The most posterior teeth on either side of the jaw, totaling eight in the deciduous dentition (2 on each side, upper and lower), and usually 12 in the permanent dentition (three on each side, upper and lower). They are grinding teeth, having large crowns and broad chewing surfaces. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p821)
A paired box transcription factor that is involved in ODONTOGENESIS.
A richly vascularized and innervated connective tissue of mesodermal origin, contained in the central cavity of a tooth and delimited by the dentin, and having formative, nutritive, sensory, and protective functions. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
A homeodomain protein that interacts with TATA-BOX BINDING PROTEIN. It represses GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of target GENES and plays a critical role in ODONTOGENESIS.
The elaboration of dental enamel by ameloblasts, beginning with its participation in the formation of the dentino-enamel junction to the production of the matrix for the enamel prisms and interprismatic substance. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992).
Mesodermal tissue enclosed in the invaginated portion of the epithelial enamel organ and giving rise to the dentin and pulp.
A major dental enamel-forming protein found in mammals. In humans the protein is encoded by GENES found on both the X CHROMOSOME and the Y CHROMOSOME.
The formation of dentin. Dentin first appears in the layer between the ameloblasts and odontoblasts and becomes calcified immediately. Formation progresses from the tip of the papilla over its slope to form a calcified cap becoming thicker by the apposition of new layers pulpward. A layer of uncalcified dentin intervenes between the calcified tissue and the odontoblast and its processes. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.
A bone morphogenetic protein that is a potent inducer of bone formation. It also functions as a regulator of MESODERM formation during EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT.
The hard portion of the tooth surrounding the pulp, covered by enamel on the crown and cementum on the root, which is harder and denser than bone but softer than enamel, and is thus readily abraded when left unprotected. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
A hard thin translucent layer of calcified substance which envelops and protects the dentin of the crown of the tooth. It is the hardest substance in the body and is almost entirely composed of calcium salts. Under the microscope, it is composed of thin rods (enamel prisms) held together by cementing substance, and surrounded by an enamel sheath. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)
The middle germ layer of an embryo derived from three paired mesenchymal aggregates along the neural tube.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.
Bone-growth regulatory factors that are members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily of proteins. They are synthesized as large precursor molecules which are cleaved by proteolytic enzymes. The active form can consist of a dimer of two identical proteins or a heterodimer of two related bone morphogenetic proteins.
A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.
Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.
Proteins encoded by homeobox genes (GENES, HOMEOBOX) that exhibit structural similarity to certain prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA-binding proteins. Homeodomain proteins are involved in the control of gene expression during morphogenesis and development (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION, DEVELOPMENTAL).
Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.

Diverse developing mouse lineages exhibit high-level c-Myb expression in immature cells and loss of expression upon differentiation. (1/364)

The c-myb gene encodes a sequence specific transactivator that is required for fetal hematopoiesis, but its potential role in other tissues is less clear because of the early fetal demise of mice with targeted deletions of the c-myb gene and incomplete of knowledge about c-myb's expression pattern. In the hematopoietic system, c-Myb protein acts on target genes whose expression is restricted to individual lineages, despite Myb's presence and role in multiple immature lineages. This suggests that c-Myb actions within different cell type-specific contexts are strongly affected by combinatorial interactions. To consider the possibility of similar c-Myb actions could extend into non-hematopoietic systems in other cell and tissue compartments, we characterized c-myb expression in developing and adult mice using in situ hybridization and correlated this with stage-specific differentiation and mitotic activity. Diverse tissues exhibited strong c-myb expression during development, notably tooth buds, the thyroid primordium, developing trachea and proximal branching airway epithelium, hair follicles, hematopoietic cells, and gastrointestinal crypt epithelial cells. The latter three of these all maintained high expression into adulthood, but with characteristic restriction to immature cell lineages prior to their terminal differentiation. In all sites, during fetal and adult stages, loss of c-Myb expression correlated strikingly with the initiation of terminal differentiation, but not the loss of mitotic activity. Based on these data, we hypothesize that c-Myb's function during cellular differentiation is both an activator of immature gene expression and a suppressor of terminal differentiation in diverse lineages.  (+info)

Pathological evaluation of the effects of intentional disocclusion and overloading occlusion in odontogenesis disorders in N-methylnitrosourea-treated hamsters. (2/364)

This study compares the effects of disocclusion and overloading occlusion on dental lesions. Ten-day-old Syrian hamsters were divided into 4 groups: group I, untreated animals; group II, animals whose hemilateral incisors were disoccluded; group III, N-methylnitrosourea (MNU)-treated animals; and group IV, MNU-treated animals whose hemilateral incisors were disoccluded. The ipsilateral maxillary and mandibular incisors were repetitively cut with diamond discs. The hamster is easier to anesthetize. Animals received a 0.2% solution of MNU (10 mg/kg body weight) intragastrically twice a week for 16 wk. All the cut mandibular incisors and the MNU-treated uncut mandibular incisors showed lack of iron deposition on the enamel surface. The eruption rate was significantly higher in the cut disoccluded incisors of groups II and IV (p < 0.05) and significantly lower in the uncut overloaded incisors of groups II and IV (p < 0.05). In the cut mandibular incisors of group IV, the degree of the disturbance of odontogenesis and the atypical proliferation of odontogenic epithelium were more prominent (p < 0.02), and the dental lesions occurred earlier. Histologically, the disturbed Hertwig's epithelial sheath and the Hertwig's epithelial sheath-like transformed U-shaped part and enamel organ seemed to lead to disturbances of amelogenesis and detinogenesis as well as to atypical proliferation of odontogenic epithelium nests. Thus, this method of disocclusion of the incisors of rodents may represent a useful model for the investigation of the effects of various agents on tooth formation over a short experimental period.  (+info)

Immunohistological distributions of fibronectin, tenascin, type I, III and IV collagens, and laminin during tooth development and degeneration in fetuses of minke whale, Balaenoptera acutorostrata. (3/364)

The immunohistological distributions of fibronectin, tenascin, type I, III and IV collagens, and laminin were observed in the tooth buds of fetuses of minke whale, Balaenoptera acutorostrata. Distributions of extracellular matrices (ECMs) examined in this study except for tenascin were generally similar to those of terrestrial mammalian species during development of the tooth bud. Tenascin in the fetuses of minke whale showed characteristic distributions in the dental lamina and the enamel organ in the early tooth developmental stage. In the physiological degeneration stage of tooth bud development, immunoreactivity of the ECMs were very weakly and limitedly detected in the dental papilla and the surrounding mesenchyme. Immunoreactivity of tenascin and type I and III collagens were positively detected in the developing baleen plate germ which was associated with the degenerating tooth bud. These findings suggested that expressions of the ECMs were related to the formation of the tooth bud and baleen plate germ, and that the lack of the ECMs was related to the degeneration of the tooth bud in the fetal minke whale.  (+info)

Cbfa1 is required for epithelial-mesenchymal interactions regulating tooth development in mice. (4/364)

Osteoblasts and odontoblasts, cells that are responsible for the formation of bone and dentin matrices respectively, share several molecular characteristics. Recently, Cbfa1 was shown to be a critical transcriptional regulator of osteoblast differentiation. Mutations in this gene cause cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD), an autosomal dominant disorder in humans and mice characterized by defective bone formation. CCD also results in dental defects that include supernumerary teeth and delayed eruption of permanent dentition. The dental abnormalities in CCD suggest an important role for this molecule in the formation of dentition. Here we describe results of studies aimed at understanding the functions of Cbfa1 in tooth formation. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization analyses show that Cbfa1 has a unique expression pattern in dental mesenchyme from the bud to early bell stages during active epithelial morphogenesis. Unlike that observed in osteoblast differentiation, Cbfa1 is downregulated in fully differentiated odontoblasts and is surprisingly expressed in ectodermally derived ameloblasts during the maturation phase of enamel formation. The role of Cbfa1 in tooth morphogenesis is further illustrated by the misshapen and severely hypoplastic tooth organs in Cbfa1-/- mice. These tooth organs lacked overt odontoblast and ameloblast differentiation and normal dentin and enamel matrices. Epithelial-mesenchymal recombinants demonstrate that dental epithelium regulates mesenchymal Cbfa1 expression during the bud and cap stages and that these effects are mimicked by the FGFs but not by the BMPs as shown by our bead implantation assays. We propose that Cbfa1 regulates the expression of molecules in mesenchyme that act reciprocally on dental epithelium to control its growth and differentiation. Taken together, our data indicate a non-redundant role for Cbfa1 in tooth development that may be distinct from that in bone formation. In odontogenesis, Cbfa1 is not involved in the early signaling networks regulating tooth initiation and early morphogenesis but regulates key epithelial-mesenchymal interactions that control advancing morphogenesis and histodifferentiation of the epithelial enamel organ.  (+info)

The heritability of malocclusion: Part 1--Genetics, principles and terminology. (5/364)

The relative contribution of genes and the environment to the aetiology of malocclusion has been a matter of controversy throughout the twentieth century. Genetic mechanisms are clearly predominant during embryonic craniofacial morphogenesis, but environment is also thought to influence dentofacial morphology postnatally, particularly during facial growth. Orthodontic and orthopaedic techniques are used in the treatment of malocclusion and other dentofacial deformities, but with limited effectiveness. The key to the determination of the aetiology of malocclusion, and its treatability lies in the ability to differentiate the effect of genes and environment on the craniofacial skeleton in a particular individual. Our ability to do this is limited by our lack of knowledge on the genetic mechanisms that control facial growth and lack of scientific evidence for the influence of environmental factors on human craniofacial morphogenesis.  (+info)

Nerve growth factor (NGF) supports tooth morphogenesis in mouse first branchial arch explants. (6/364)

Posterior midbrain and anterior hindbrain neuroectoderm trans-differentiate into cranial neural crest cells (CNCC), emigrate from the neural folds, and become crest-derived ectomesenchyme within the mandibular and maxillary processes. To investigate the growth factor requirement specific for the initiation of tooth morphogenesis, we designed studies to test whether nerve growth factor (NGF) can support odontogenesis in a first branchial arch (FBA) explant culture system. FBA explants containing neural-fold tissues before CNCC emigration and the anlagen of the FBA were microdissected from embryonic day 8 (E8) mouse embryos, and cultured for 8 days in medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum only, or serum-containing medium further supplemented with either NGF or epidermal growth factor (EGF) at three different concentrations: 50, 100, or 200 ng/ml. Morphological, morphometric, and total protein analyses indicated that growth and development in all groups were comparable. Meckel's cartilage and tongue formation were also observed in all groups. However, odontogenesis was only detected in explants cultured in the presence of exogenous NGF. NGF-supplemented cultures were permissive for bud stage (50 ng/ml) as well as cap stage of tooth morphogenesis (100 and 200 ng/ml). Morphometric analyses of the volume of tooth organs showed a significant dose-dependent increase in tooth volume as the concentration of NGF increased. Whole-mount in situ hybridization and semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for Pax9, a molecular marker of dental mesenchyme, further supported and confirmed the morphological data of the specificity and dose dependency of NGF on odontogenesis. We conclude that (1) E8 FBA explants contain premigratory CNCC that are capable of emigration, proliferation, and differentiation in vitro; (2) serum-supplemented medium is permissive for CNCC differentiation into tongue myoblasts and chondrocytes in FBA explants; and (3) NGF controls CNCC cell fate specification and differentiation into tooth organs.  (+info)

Alterations in the incisor development in the Tabby mouse. (7/364)

The X-linked tabby (Ta) syndrome in the mouse is homologous to the hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) in humans. As in humans with HED, Ta mice exhibit hypohidrosis, characteristic defects of hairs and tooth abnormalities. To analyze the effects of Ta mutation on lower incisor development, histology, morphometry and computer-aided 3D reconstructions were combined. We observed that Ta mutation had major consequences for incisor development leading to abnormal tooth size and shape, change in the balance between prospective crown- and root-analog tissues and retarded cytodifferentiations. The decrease in size of Ta incisor was observed at ED13.5 and mainly involved the width of the tooth bud. At ED14.5-15.5, the incisor appeared shorter and narrower in the Ta than in the wild type (WT). Growth alterations affected the diameter to a greater extent than the length of the Ta incisor. From ED14.5, changes in the shape interfered with the medio-lateral asymmetry and alterations in the posterior growth of the cervical loop led to a loss of the labio-lingual asymmetry until ED17.0. Although the enamel organ in Ta incisors was smaller than in the WT, a larger proportion of the dental papilla was covered by preameloblasts-ameloblasts. These changes apparently resulted from reduced development of the lingual part of the enamel organ and might be correlated with a possible heterogeneity in the development of the enamel organ, as demonstrated for upper incisors. Our observations suggest independent development of the labial and lingual parts of the cervical loop. Furthermore, it appeared that the consequences of Ta mutation could not be interpreted only as a delay in tooth development.  (+info)

Antagonistic signals between BMP4 and FGF8 define the expression of Pitx1 and Pitx2 in mouse tooth-forming anlage. (8/364)

Members of the Pitx/RIEG family of homeodomain-containing transcription factors have been implicated in vertebrate organogenesis. In this study, we examined the expression and regulation of Pitx1 and Pitx2 during mouse tooth development. Pitx1 expression is detected in early development in a widespread pattern, in both epithelium and mesenchyme, covering the tooth-forming region in the mandible, and is then maintained in the dental epithelium from the bud stage to the late bell stage. Pitx2 expression, on the other hand, is restricted to the dental epithelium throughout odontogenesis. Interestingly, from E9.5 to E10.5, the expression domains of Pitx1 and Pitx2, in the developing mandible, overlap with that of Fgf8 but are exclusive to the zone of Bmp4 expression. Bead implantation experiments demonstrate that ectopic expression of Fgf8 can induce/maintain the expression of both Pitx1 and Pitx2 at E9.5. In contrast, Bmp4-expressing tissues and BMP4-soaked beads were able to repress Pitx1 expression in mandibular mesenchyme and Pitx2 expression in the presumptive dental epithelium, respectively. However, the effects of FGF8 and BMP4 are transient. It thus appears that the early expression patterns of Pitx1 and Pitx2 in the developing mandible are regulated by the antagonistic effects of FGF8 and BMP4 such that the Pitx1 and Pitx2 expression patterns are defined. These results indicate that the epithelial-derived signaling molecules are responsible not only for restricting specific gene expression in the dental mesenchyme, but also for defining gene expression in the dental epithelium.  (+info)

Odontogenesis is the process of tooth development that involves the formation and calcification of teeth. It is a complex process that requires the interaction of several types of cells, including epithelial cells, mesenchymal cells, and odontoblasts. The process begins during embryonic development with the formation of dental lamina, which gives rise to the tooth bud. As the tooth bud grows and differentiates, it forms the various structures of the tooth, including the enamel, dentin, cementum, and pulp. Odontogenesis is completed when the tooth erupts into the oral cavity. Abnormalities in odontogenesis can result in developmental dental anomalies such as tooth agenesis, microdontia, or odontomas.

A tooth is a hard, calcified structure found in the jaws (upper and lower) of many vertebrates and used for biting and chewing food. In humans, a typical tooth has a crown, one or more roots, and three layers: the enamel (the outermost layer, hardest substance in the body), the dentin (the layer beneath the enamel), and the pulp (the innermost layer, containing nerves and blood vessels). Teeth are essential for proper nutrition, speech, and aesthetics. There are different types of teeth, including incisors, canines, premolars, and molars, each designed for specific functions in the mouth.

Odontoblasts are defined as columnar-shaped cells that are located in the pulp tissue of teeth, specifically within the predentin region. They are responsible for the formation of dentin, one of the main components of a tooth, by synthesizing and depositing collagenous and non-collagenous proteins, as well as the mineral hydroxyapatite.

Odontoblasts have a single process that extends into the dentinal tubules, which are microscopic channels within the dentin matrix. These cells play a crucial role in sensing external stimuli, such as heat, cold, or pressure, and transmitting signals to the nerves located in the pulp tissue, thereby contributing to the tooth's sensitivity.

In summary, odontoblasts are specialized dental cells that produce dentin, provide structural support for teeth, and contribute to their sensory functions.

A tooth germ is a small cluster of cells that eventually develop into a tooth. It contains the dental papilla, which will become the dentin and pulp of the tooth, and the dental follicle, which will form the periodontal ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone. The tooth germ starts as an epithelial thickening called the dental lamina, which then forms a bud, cap, and bell stage before calcification occurs and the tooth begins to erupt through the gums. It is during the bell stage that the enamel organ, which will form the enamel of the tooth, is formed.

Ameloblasts are the specialized epithelial cells that are responsible for the formation of enamel, which is the hard, outermost layer of a tooth. These cells are a part of the dental lamina and are present in the developing tooth's crown region. They align themselves along the surface of the developing tooth and secrete enamel proteins and minerals to form the enamel rods and interrod enamel. Once the enamel formation is complete, ameloblasts undergo programmed cell death, leaving behind the hard, mineralized enamel matrix. Any damage or abnormality in the functioning of ameloblasts can lead to developmental defects in the enamel, such as hypoplasia or hypocalcification, which may affect the tooth's structure and function.

The enamel organ is a structure found in the developing teeth of vertebrates. It is responsible for the formation of enamel, which is the hard, outermost layer of the tooth crown. The enamel organ is derived from the dental papilla and is composed of several layers: the outer enamel epithelium, the stellate reticulum, the stratum intermedium, and the inner enamel epithelium. These layers work together to produce the enamel matrix, which is then mineralized to form the hard tissue that covers the tooth's crown. The enamel organ disappears after the formation of enamel is complete, leaving only the hardened enamel layer behind.

An incisor is a type of tooth that is primarily designed for biting off food pieces rather than chewing or grinding. They are typically chisel-shaped, flat, and have a sharp cutting edge. In humans, there are eight incisors - four on the upper jaw and four on the lower jaw, located at the front of the mouth. Other animals such as dogs, cats, and rodents also have incisors that they use for different purposes like tearing or gnawing.

In the context of dentistry, a molar is a type of tooth found in the back of the mouth. They are larger and wider than other types of teeth, such as incisors or canines, and have a flat biting surface with multiple cusps. Molars are primarily used for grinding and chewing food into smaller pieces that are easier to swallow. Humans typically have twelve molars in total, including the four wisdom teeth.

In medical terminology outside of dentistry, "molar" can also refer to a unit of mass in the apothecaries' system of measurement, which is equivalent to 4.08 grams. However, this usage is less common and not related to dental or medical anatomy.

PAX9 is a transcription factor that belongs to the PAX family of genes, which are characterized by a highly conserved DNA-binding domain known as the paired box. The PAX9 gene provides instructions for making a protein that plays important roles in the development of several parts of the body, including the face and the teeth.

As a transcription factor, PAX9 binds to specific regions of DNA and helps control the activity of other genes. In the developing face, PAX9 helps regulate the formation of facial structures by controlling the growth and development of cells that give rise to bones and cartilage. In the developing teeth, PAX9 plays a critical role in tooth development by controlling the formation and growth of dental tissues.

Mutations in the PAX9 gene have been associated with several genetic disorders, including tooth agenesis (the absence of one or more teeth) and oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (a disorder that affects the development of the eyes, ears, and spine).

Dental pulp is the soft tissue located in the center of a tooth, surrounded by the dentin. It contains nerves, blood vessels, and connective tissue, and plays a vital role in the development and health of the tooth. The dental pulp helps to form dentin during tooth development and continues to provide nourishment to the tooth throughout its life. It also serves as a sensory organ, allowing the tooth to detect hot and cold temperatures and transmit pain signals to the brain. Injury or infection of the dental pulp can lead to serious dental problems, such as tooth decay or abscesses, and may require root canal treatment to remove the damaged tissue and save the tooth.

MSX1 (Homeobox protein MSX-1) is a transcription factor that belongs to the muscle segment homebox gene family, also known as the msh homeobox genes. These genes are involved in the development and differentiation of various tissues, including muscle, bone, and neural crest derivatives.

MSX1 plays crucial roles during embryonic development, such as regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. It is widely expressed in the developing embryo, particularly in the oral ectoderm, neural crest, and mesenchyme. In the oral region, MSX1 helps control tooth development by interacting with other transcription factors and signaling molecules.

As a transcription factor, MSX1 binds to specific DNA sequences called homeobox response elements (HREs) in the promoter regions of its target genes. This binding either activates or represses gene expression, depending on the context and interacting partners. Dysregulation of MSX1 has been implicated in various developmental disorders and diseases, such as tooth agenesis, cleft lip/palate, and cancer.

Amelogenesis is the biological process of forming enamel, which is the hard and highly mineralized outer layer of teeth. Enamel is primarily made up of calcium and phosphate minerals and is the toughest substance in the human body. Amelogenesis involves the synthesis, secretion, and maturation of enamel proteins by specialized cells called ameloblasts.

The medical definition of 'Amelogenesis' refers to a genetic disorder that affects the development and formation of tooth enamel. This condition is also known as Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI) and can result in teeth that are discolored, sensitive, and prone to decay. There are several types of Amelogenesis Imperfecta, each with its own set of symptoms and genetic causes.

In summary, 'Amelogenesis' is the biological process of enamel formation, while 'Amelogenesis Imperfecta' is a genetic disorder that affects this process, leading to abnormal tooth enamel development.

The dental papilla is a type of tissue found in the developing tooth within the jawbone. It is composed of cells that will eventually differentiate into odontoblasts, which are the cells responsible for producing dentin, one of the main hard tissues that make up the tooth. The dental papilla is located in the center of the tooth germ and is surrounded by the dental follicle, another type of tissue that helps to form the tooth. As the tooth develops, the dental papilla becomes smaller and eventually forms the pulp chamber, which contains the blood vessels, nerves, and connective tissue that support and nourish the tooth.

Amelogenin is a protein that plays a crucial role in the formation and mineralization of enamel, which is the hard, calcified tissue that covers the outer surface of teeth. It is expressed during tooth development and is secreted by ameloblasts, the cells responsible for producing enamel.

Amelogenin makes up approximately 90% of the organic matrix of developing enamel and guides the growth and organization of hydroxyapatite crystals, which are the primary mineral component of enamel. The protein is subsequently degraded and removed as the enamel matures and becomes fully mineralized.

Mutations in the gene that encodes amelogenin (AMELX on the X chromosome) can lead to various inherited enamel defects, such as amelogenesis imperfecta, which is characterized by thin, soft, or poorly formed enamel. Additionally, because of its high expression in developing teeth and unique size and structure, amelogenin has been widely used as a marker in forensic dentistry for human identification and sex determination.

Dentinogenesis is the process of dentin formation, which is one of the main components of teeth. Dentin is a hard, calcified tissue that lies beneath the tooth's enamel and cementum layers, providing structural support and protection to the pulp tissue containing nerves and blood vessels. The process of dentinogenesis involves the differentiation and activation of odontoblasts, which are specialized cells that synthesize and secrete the organic and inorganic components of dentin matrix. These components include collagenous proteins and hydroxyapatite crystals, which form a highly mineralized tissue that is both strong and flexible. Dentinogenesis continues throughout life as new layers of dentin are formed in response to various stimuli such as tooth wear, dental caries, or injury.

The mandible, also known as the lower jaw, is the largest and strongest bone in the human face. It forms the lower portion of the oral cavity and plays a crucial role in various functions such as mastication (chewing), speaking, and swallowing. The mandible is a U-shaped bone that consists of a horizontal part called the body and two vertical parts called rami.

The mandible articulates with the skull at the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) located in front of each ear, allowing for movements like opening and closing the mouth, protrusion, retraction, and side-to-side movement. The mandible contains the lower teeth sockets called alveolar processes, which hold the lower teeth in place.

In medical terminology, the term "mandible" refers specifically to this bone and its associated structures.

Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 (BMP-4) is a growth factor that belongs to the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily. It plays crucial roles in various biological processes, including embryonic development, cell growth, and differentiation. In the skeletal system, BMP-4 stimulates the formation of bone and cartilage by inducing the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into chondrocytes and osteoblasts. It also regulates the maintenance and repair of bones throughout life. An imbalance in BMP-4 signaling has been associated with several skeletal disorders, such as heterotopic ossification and osteoarthritis.

Dentin is the hard, calcified tissue that lies beneath the enamel and cementum of a tooth. It forms the majority of the tooth's structure and is composed primarily of mineral salts (hydroxyapatite), collagenous proteins, and water. Dentin has a tubular structure, with microscopic channels called dentinal tubules that radiate outward from the pulp chamber (the center of the tooth containing nerves and blood vessels) to the exterior of the tooth. These tubules contain fluid and nerve endings that are responsible for the tooth's sensitivity to various stimuli such as temperature changes, pressure, or decay. Dentin plays a crucial role in protecting the dental pulp while also providing support and structure to the overlying enamel and cementum.

Dental enamel is the hard, white, outermost layer of a tooth. It is a highly mineralized and avascular tissue, meaning it contains no living cells or blood vessels. Enamel is primarily composed of calcium and phosphate minerals and serves as the protective covering for the crown of a tooth, which is the portion visible above the gum line.

Enamel is the hardest substance in the human body, and its primary function is to provide structural support and protection to the underlying dentin and pulp tissues of the tooth. It also plays a crucial role in chewing and biting by helping to distribute forces evenly across the tooth surface during these activities.

Despite its hardness, dental enamel can still be susceptible to damage from factors such as tooth decay, erosion, and abrasion. Once damaged or lost, enamel cannot regenerate or repair itself, making it essential to maintain good oral hygiene practices and seek regular dental checkups to prevent enamel damage and protect overall oral health.

In medical and embryological terms, the mesoderm is one of the three primary germ layers in the very early stages of embryonic development. It forms between the ectoderm and endoderm during gastrulation, and it gives rise to a wide variety of cell types, tissues, and organs in the developing embryo.

The mesoderm contributes to the formation of structures such as:

1. The connective tissues (including tendons, ligaments, and most of the bones)
2. Muscular system (skeletal, smooth, and cardiac muscles)
3. Circulatory system (heart, blood vessels, and blood cells)
4. Excretory system (kidneys and associated structures)
5. Reproductive system (gonads, including ovaries and testes)
6. Dermis of the skin
7. Parts of the eye and inner ear
8. Several organs in the urogenital system

Dysfunctions or abnormalities in mesoderm development can lead to various congenital disorders and birth defects, highlighting its importance during embryogenesis.

Developmental gene expression regulation refers to the processes that control the activation or repression of specific genes during embryonic and fetal development. These regulatory mechanisms ensure that genes are expressed at the right time, in the right cells, and at appropriate levels to guide proper growth, differentiation, and morphogenesis of an organism.

Developmental gene expression regulation is a complex and dynamic process involving various molecular players, such as transcription factors, chromatin modifiers, non-coding RNAs, and signaling molecules. These regulators can interact with cis-regulatory elements, like enhancers and promoters, to fine-tune the spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during development.

Dysregulation of developmental gene expression can lead to various congenital disorders and developmental abnormalities. Therefore, understanding the principles and mechanisms governing developmental gene expression regulation is crucial for uncovering the etiology of developmental diseases and devising potential therapeutic strategies.

Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) are a group of growth factors that play crucial roles in the development, growth, and repair of bones and other tissues. They belong to the Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily and were first discovered when researchers found that certain proteins extracted from demineralized bone matrix had the ability to induce new bone formation.

BMPs stimulate the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into osteoblasts, which are the cells responsible for bone formation. They also promote the recruitment and proliferation of these cells, enhancing the overall process of bone regeneration. In addition to their role in bone biology, BMPs have been implicated in various other biological processes, including embryonic development, wound healing, and the regulation of fat metabolism.

There are several types of BMPs (BMP-2, BMP-4, BMP-7, etc.) that exhibit distinct functions and expression patterns. Due to their ability to stimulate bone formation, recombinant human BMPs have been used in clinical applications, such as spinal fusion surgery and non-healing fracture treatment. However, the use of BMPs in medicine has been associated with certain risks and complications, including uncontrolled bone growth, inflammation, and cancer development, which necessitates further research to optimize their therapeutic potential.

In situ hybridization (ISH) is a molecular biology technique used to detect and localize specific nucleic acid sequences, such as DNA or RNA, within cells or tissues. This technique involves the use of a labeled probe that is complementary to the target nucleic acid sequence. The probe can be labeled with various types of markers, including radioisotopes, fluorescent dyes, or enzymes.

During the ISH procedure, the labeled probe is hybridized to the target nucleic acid sequence in situ, meaning that the hybridization occurs within the intact cells or tissues. After washing away unbound probe, the location of the labeled probe can be visualized using various methods depending on the type of label used.

In situ hybridization has a wide range of applications in both research and diagnostic settings, including the detection of gene expression patterns, identification of viral infections, and diagnosis of genetic disorders.

Cell differentiation is the process by which a less specialized cell, or stem cell, becomes a more specialized cell type with specific functions and structures. This process involves changes in gene expression, which are regulated by various intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factors. Differentiation results in the development of distinct cell types that make up tissues and organs in multicellular organisms. It is a crucial aspect of embryonic development, tissue repair, and maintenance of homeostasis in the body.

Homeodomain proteins are a group of transcription factors that play crucial roles in the development and differentiation of cells in animals and plants. They are characterized by the presence of a highly conserved DNA-binding domain called the homeodomain, which is typically about 60 amino acids long. The homeodomain consists of three helices, with the third helix responsible for recognizing and binding to specific DNA sequences.

Homeodomain proteins are involved in regulating gene expression during embryonic development, tissue maintenance, and organismal growth. They can act as activators or repressors of transcription, depending on the context and the presence of cofactors. Mutations in homeodomain proteins have been associated with various human diseases, including cancer, congenital abnormalities, and neurological disorders.

Some examples of homeodomain proteins include PAX6, which is essential for eye development, HOX genes, which are involved in body patterning, and NANOG, which plays a role in maintaining pluripotency in stem cells.

Transcription factors are proteins that play a crucial role in regulating gene expression by controlling the transcription of DNA to messenger RNA (mRNA). They function by binding to specific DNA sequences, known as response elements, located in the promoter region or enhancer regions of target genes. This binding can either activate or repress the initiation of transcription, depending on the properties and interactions of the particular transcription factor. Transcription factors often act as part of a complex network of regulatory proteins that determine the precise spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during development, differentiation, and homeostasis in an organism.

Tooth development or odontogenesis is the complex process by which teeth form from embryonic cells, grow, and erupt into the ... 1995). "Odontogenesis". The International Journal of Developmental Biology. 39, N° 1. Archived from the original on 2011-07-16 ...
Buchtová, Marcela; Zahradníček, Oldřich; Balková, Simona; Tucker, Abigail S. (1 February 2013). "Odontogenesis in the Veiled ...
Buchtova, M.; Zahradnicek, O.; Balkova, S.; Tucker, A.S. (2013). "Odontogenesis in the Veiled Chameleon (Chamaeleo calyptratus ... "Heterochronic truncation of odontogenesis in theropod dinosaurs provides insight into the macroevolution of avian beaks". ...
"Ctip2/Bcl11b controls ameloblast formation during mammalian odontogenesis". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of ...
Expression of FAM20C in the Osteogenesis and Odontogenesis of Mouse. Journal of Histochemistry & Cytochemistry, 58(11), 957-967 ...
Odontogenesis is a multiplex and long process of postnatal organogenesis. A tooth needs a supplemental 3 years after eruption ...
"Expression of FAM20C in the osteogenesis and odontogenesis of mouse". The Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry. 58 (11 ...
... is found here both during odontogenesis and in the mature tooth. Some authors suggest that odontoblasts play an ...
Mitsiadis TA, Hirsinger E, Lendahl U, Goridis C (1999). "Delta-notch signaling in odontogenesis: correlation with ...
In relation to bone, he studied skeletal development, bone mineral loss, odontogenesis and dysmorphogenesis. His hypothesis was ...
"Heterochronic truncation of odontogenesis in theropod dinosaurs provides insight into the macroevolution of avian beaks". ...
This is possibly the result of exposure to tetracycline during odontogenesis, however cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator ... Several genetic disorders affect tooth development (odontogenesis), and lead to abnormal tooth appearance and structure. Enamel ...
Odontogenesis happens by means of a complex interaction between oral epithelium and surrounding mesenchymal tissue. Abnormal ...
During odontogenesis, when the dentin forms around the dental papilla, the innermost tissue is considered pulp. There are 4 ...
Tooth development or odontogenesis is the process in which teeth develop and grow into the mouth. Tooth development varies ...
It may also have roles in limb-pattern formation, craniofacial development, in particular, odontogenesis, and tumor growth ...
... are a group of jaw cysts that are formed from tissues involved in odontogenesis (tooth development). ...
Over 300 genes have been found that are a part of odontogenesis and quite a few affect the epigenome. For example, JMJD3 is a ...
... odontogenesis). Specifically, they emerge when the process of formation extends into the abnormal sites to form small ...
It is more common in the first and second decades of life, when odontogenesis is ongoing, than in later decades. In 50% of ...
... a developmental anomaly resulting from invagination of a portion of crown forming within the enamel organ during odontogenesis ...
... and morphology of teeth among populations have been able to provide insights for genetic basis of odontogenesis. The origins of ...
It is suggested that dens invaginatus arises because during odontogenesis, there is proliferation and ingrowth of the cells of ...
2002), "Development of the Vestigial Tooth Primordia as Part of Mouse Odontogenesis", Connective Tissue Research, 43 (2-3): 120 ...
However, there are several theories: Infection Trauma Growth pressure of the dental arches during odontogenesis Rapid ...
... odontogenesis) Chemotherapy during tooth development Marshall syndrome Rieger syndrome Focal dermal hypoplasia Silver-Russell ...
Epithelial cell rests of Malassez List of cutaneous conditions Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 Tooth development and Odontogenesis ...
... odontogenesis MeSH G07.574.500.325.377.750.190 - amelogenesis MeSH G07.574.500.325.377.750.325 - cementogenesis MeSH G07.574. ...
... and so remnants of epithelium can be left in the bone during odontogenesis (tooth development). The bones of the jaws develop ...
Laboratory of Odontogenesis Laboratory of the Genetics of Cancer, Laboratory of DNA Repair Laboratory of Eye Histochemistry and ...
Tooth development or odontogenesis is the complex process by which teeth form from embryonic cells, grow, and erupt into the ... 1995). "Odontogenesis". The International Journal of Developmental Biology. 39, N° 1. Archived from the original on 2011-07-16 ...
Odontogenesis. Odontogenic tumors represent the results of interruptions in or reactivation of tissues involved in the normal ... At the sixth week of gestation, odontogenesis begins with proliferation of certain areas of oral ectoderm to form the dental ... The dental follicle is normally lined by the reduced enamel epithelium (see Odontogenesis), while the dentigerous cyst is lined ... The neoplastic component is purely epithelial and resembles the cap stage of odontogenesis (ie, polarized tall columnar cells ...
Odontogeneses use Odontogenesis Odontogenesis Odontogenesis Imperfecta use Odontodysplasia Odontogenic Cyst use Odontogenic ...
Odontogeneses use Odontogenesis Odontogenesis Odontogenesis Imperfecta use Odontodysplasia Odontogenic Cyst use Odontogenic ...
The dentist should be able to the conduct the correct diagnosis and ready attendance of the anomalies of the odontogenesis, ...
Tooth development or odontogenesis is the complex process by which teeth form from embryonic cells, grow, and erupt into the ... Of self-control first of five stages in tooth development is recognised to in! Initiation of odontogenesis, identifiable stages ...
It is found to be associated with odontogenesis. Treatment is usually surgical, with extent varying from curettage to resection ...
Another point to be considered is that: at the time of the occurrence of the disease in the adult form, odontogenesis has ...
Any prolonged febrile illness during odontogenesis can cause a permanent narrow zone of chalky, pitted enamel or simply white ... after even short-term use of tetracyclines by the mother during the 2nd half of pregnancy or by the child during odontogenesis ...
Shell teeth Odontogenesis imperfecta 520.6 Disturbances in tooth eruption Teeth: Tooth eruption: embedded late impacted ...
Odontogenesis. *Response To Drug. *Hyperosmotic Salinity Response. *Negative Regulation Of Apoptotic Process ...
Odontogenesis. *Embryonic Digit Morphogenesis. *Negative Regulation Of Apoptotic Process. *Negative Regulation Of Sequence- ...
Les lesions bucco-cervicales observees au cours des hemopathies malignes peuvent revetir des aspects varies et plusieurs tissus comme la muqueuse buccale; les glandes salivaires; les os de la face peuvent etre concernes. Les objectifs de cette etude etaient devaluer letat bucco-cervical de malades souffrant dhemopathies malignes et de decrire les lesions bucco-cervicales rencontrees. Une etude prospective de type descriptif a ete realisee de janvier 2004 - octobre 2006; dans les services de Stomatologie et de Chirurgie Maxillo-faciale et dHemato-Oncologie de lHopital National Donka du CHU de Conakry. Durant cette periode; 44 malades ont ete examines. Il sagissait de 26 hommes et de 18 femmes qui avaient un Lymphome malin non Hodgkinien (21 cas); un Leucemie aigue (8 cas); un Lymphome malin Hodgkinien (8 cas); une Leucemie hronique lymphoide (4 cas) et une Leucemie chronique myeloide (3 cas). Les lesions bucco-cervicales couramment rencontrees ont ete: les adenopathies cervicales dans ...
Role of Primary Cilia in Odontogenesis M Hampl 1 2 , P Cela 1 3 , H L Szabo-Rogers 4 5 , M Kunova Bosakova, H Dosedelova 1 , P ... Role of Primary Cilia in Odontogenesis M Hampl et al. J Dent Res. 2017 Aug. ... As the primary cilium coordinates several signaling pathways essential for odontogenesis, ciliary defects can interrupt the ... altogether demonstrating that primary cilia play a critical role in regulation of both the early odontogenesis and later ...
70 Odontogenesis -- WU 101 71 Organ Culture Techniques -- QS 525. 72 Osmoregulation -- QU 375 73 Papanicolaou Test 74 Parish ...
Much of our understanding of odontogenesis comes from studies of mice. Odontogenesis requires epithelial-mesenchymal ... odontogenesis). Well over 100 environmental and genetic factors have been associated with developmental defects of tooth enamel ... use of mice to study the effects of endocrine disruptors during odontogenesis is a wise choice for a number of reasons, ... disturb tooth and enamel development in humans stems from the fact that odontogenesis begins during the embryonic period and is ...
Keywords: Ameloblastin; Amelogenin; ChIP-seq; Col1a2; Hapln1; Matrix; Odontogenesis; Promoter; Sp6; Sp7; Tooth; Transcriptional ...
Odontogenesis, organogenetic model in teratomas: crown formation].. David P; Gaillard JA. C R Acad Hebd Seances Acad Sci D; ...
Effects of mineral trioxide aggregate, calcium hydroxide, biodentine and Emdogain on osteogenesis, Odontogenesis, angiogenesis ...
A disorder of the teeth arising during odontogenesis. C89330 Developmental Disorder C118464 Pediatric Adverse Events ... C35596 Dental Developmental Disorder Tooth Development Disorder A disorder of the teeth arising during odontogenesis. ...
Odontogeneses use Odontogenesis Odontogenesis Odontogenesis Imperfecta use Odontodysplasia Odontogenic Cyst use Odontogenic ...
Odontogenesis G7.700.320.500.325.377.750 G7.345.500.325.377.750 Ofloxacin D3.438.810.835.322.500 D3.633.100.810.835.322.500 ...
Odontogenesis Preferred Term Term UI T029124. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1965). ... Odontogenesis Preferred Concept UI. M0015220. Scope Note. The process of TOOTH formation. It is divided into several stages ... Odontogenesis includes the production of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS), dentin (DENTINOGENESIS), and dental cementum ( ... Odontogenesis includes the production of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS), dentin (DENTINOGENESIS), and dental cementum ( ...
Odontogenesis Preferred Term Term UI T029124. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1965). ... Odontogenesis Preferred Concept UI. M0015220. Scope Note. The process of TOOTH formation. It is divided into several stages ... Odontogenesis includes the production of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS), dentin (DENTINOGENESIS), and dental cementum ( ... Odontogenesis includes the production of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS), dentin (DENTINOGENESIS), and dental cementum ( ...
Odontogenesis imperfecta (disorder). Code System Preferred Concept Name. Odontogenesis imperfecta (disorder). Concept Status. ...
... yes odontogenesis,noun,E0043597,odontogenetic,adj,E0043599,yes ovigenesis,noun,E0341150,ovigenetic,adj,E0421490,yes ...
Any prolonged febrile illness during odontogenesis can cause a permanent narrow zone of chalky, pitted enamel or simply white ... after even short-term use of tetracyclines by the mother during the 2nd half of pregnancy or by the child during odontogenesis ...
Found 1 targets. The following filters were applied: DTO Class = KCNJ2 subfamily
Worldwide source of medical classification resources ...
Excess NF-κB induces ectopic odontogenesis in embryonic incisor epithelium. Blackburn, J; Kawasaki, K; Porntaveetus, T; ... Excess NF-κB activity thus induces an ectopic odontogenesis program that is usually suppressed under physiological conditions. ...
It represses GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of target GENES and plays a critical role in ODONTOGENESIS. HN - 2006(1993) MH - Mucositis ... A paired box transcription factor that is involved in ODONTOGENESIS. HN - 2006(1993) MH - Paxillin UI - D051419 MN - D12.644. ...
The Development and Fate of Epithelial Residues after Completion of the Human Odontogenesis with Special Reference to the ...
... odontogenesis,noun odorant,noun,odor,noun odorless,adj,odor,noun odorless,adj,odourlessness,noun odourless,adj,odourlessness, ...
... yes odontogenesis,noun,E0043597,odontogenetic,adj,E0043599,yes oncogenesis,noun,E0416151,oncogenetic,adj,E0043799,yes ...
Odontogenesis G7.700.320.500.325.377.750 G7.345.500.325.377.750 Ofloxacin D3.438.810.835.322.500 D3.633.100.810.835.322.500 ...
X ODONTOGENESIS diluting agents X PHARHACEUTIC AIDS dilution gene X GENES, SUPPRESSOR Dimmers keratitis X KERATITIS N TEARS N ...
  • Tooth development or odontogenesis is the complex process by which teeth form from embryonic cells, grow, and erupt into the mouth. (wikipedia.org)
  • The process of tooth replacement in elephants is called odontogenesis. (supportwild.com)
  • Tooth development or odontogenesis is the complex process by which teeth form from embryonic cells, grow, and erupt into the mouth.For human teeth to have a healthy oral environment, all parts of the tooth must develop during appropriate stages of fetal development. (freedomsoftevent.com)
  • Odontogenic cysts are a group of jaw cysts that are formed from tissues involved in odontogenesis and results because of the enlargement of the follicular space of the whole or part of the crown of an impacted or unerupted tooth and is attached to the neck of the tooth. (ijcridentistry.com)
  • Administration of this antibiotic to infants or children during odontogenesis results in permanent brown-yellow discoloration of teeth. (pharmacy180.com)
  • The process is called odontogenesis, and it keeps going even after the teeth start to erupt, because the roots will still have some growing to do at that point . (broadwaydental.org)
  • MSX1 may also have roles in limb-pattern formation, craniofacial development, particularly odontogenesis, and tumor growth inhibition. (thermofisher.com)
  • 9 , 10 The authors' use of mice to study the effects of endocrine disruptors during odontogenesis is a wise choice for a number of reasons, including continuous enamel formation (amelogenesis) throughout the mouse's life. (nih.gov)