Oculomotor Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the oculomotor nerve or nucleus that result in weakness or paralysis of the superior rectus, inferior rectus, medial rectus, inferior oblique, or levator palpebrae muscles, or impaired parasympathetic innervation to the pupil. With a complete oculomotor palsy, the eyelid will be paralyzed, the eye will be in an abducted and inferior position, and the pupil will be markedly dilated. Commonly associated conditions include neoplasms, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, ischemia (especially in association with DIABETES MELLITUS), and aneurysmal compression. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p270)Oculomotor Nerve: The 3d cranial nerve. The oculomotor nerve sends motor fibers to the levator muscles of the eyelid and to the superior rectus, inferior rectus, and inferior oblique muscles of the eye. It also sends parasympathetic efferents (via the ciliary ganglion) to the muscles controlling pupillary constriction and accommodation. The motor fibers originate in the oculomotor nuclei of the midbrain.Oculomotor Nerve Injuries: Traumatic injuries to the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. This may result in various eye movement dysfunction.Ophthalmoplegia: Paralysis of one or more of the ocular muscles due to disorders of the eye muscles, neuromuscular junction, supporting soft tissue, tendons, or innervation to the muscles.Mydriasis: Dilation of pupils to greater than 6 mm combined with failure of the pupils to constrict when stimulated with light. This condition may occur due to injury of the pupillary fibers in the oculomotor nerve, in acute angle-closure glaucoma, and in ADIE SYNDROME.Cranial Nerve Diseases: Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.Abducens Nerve: The 6th cranial nerve which originates in the ABDUCENS NUCLEUS of the PONS and sends motor fibers to the lateral rectus muscles of the EYE. Damage to the nerve or its nucleus disrupts horizontal eye movement control.Cerebral Aqueduct: Narrow channel in the MESENCEPHALON that connects the third and fourth CEREBRAL VENTRICLES.Cranial Nerves: Twelve pairs of nerves that carry general afferent, visceral afferent, special afferent, somatic efferent, and autonomic efferent fibers.Red Nucleus: A pinkish-yellow portion of the midbrain situated in the rostral mesencephalic tegmentum. It receives a large projection from the contralateral half of the CEREBELLUM via the superior cerebellar peduncle and a projection from the ipsilateral MOTOR CORTEX.Cell Adhesion Molecules: Surface ligands, usually glycoproteins, that mediate cell-to-cell adhesion. Their functions include the assembly and interconnection of various vertebrate systems, as well as maintenance of tissue integration, wound healing, morphogenic movements, cellular migrations, and metastasis.Drosophila Proteins: Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.Growth Differentiation Factor 6: A growth differentiation factor that plays a role in the neural differentiation, specifically in the retinal development of the EYE.Saccades: An abrupt voluntary shift in ocular fixation from one point to another, as occurs in reading.Eye Movements: Voluntary or reflex-controlled movements of the eye.Fixation, Ocular: The positioning and accommodation of eyes that allows the image to be brought into place on the FOVEA CENTRALIS of each eye.Apraxias: A group of cognitive disorders characterized by the inability to perform previously learned skills that cannot be attributed to deficits of motor or sensory function. The two major subtypes of this condition are ideomotor (see APRAXIA, IDEOMOTOR) and ideational apraxia, which refers to loss of the ability to mentally formulate the processes involved with performing an action. For example, dressing apraxia may result from an inability to mentally formulate the act of placing clothes on the body. Apraxias are generally associated with lesions of the dominant PARIETAL LOBE and supramarginal gyrus. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp56-7)Friedreich Ataxia: An autosomal recessive disease, usually of childhood onset, characterized pathologically by degeneration of the spinocerebellar tracts, posterior columns, and to a lesser extent the corticospinal tracts. Clinical manifestations include GAIT ATAXIA, pes cavus, speech impairment, lateral curvature of spine, rhythmic head tremor, kyphoscoliosis, congestive heart failure (secondary to a cardiomyopathy), and lower extremity weakness. Most forms of this condition are associated with a mutation in a gene on chromosome 9, at band q13, which codes for the mitochondrial protein frataxin. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1081; N Engl J Med 1996 Oct 17;335(16):1169-75) The severity of Friedreich ataxia associated with expansion of GAA repeats in the first intron of the frataxin gene correlates with the number of trinucleotide repeats. (From Durr et al, N Engl J Med 1996 Oct 17;335(16):1169-75)Apraxia, Ideomotor: A form of apraxia characterized by an acquired inability to carry out a complex motor activity despite the ability to mentally formulate the action. This condition has been attributed to a disruption of connections between the dominant parietal cortex and supplementary and premotor cortical regions in both hemispheres. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p57)Cerebellar Ataxia: Incoordination of voluntary movements that occur as a manifestation of CEREBELLAR DISEASES. Characteristic features include a tendency for limb movements to overshoot or undershoot a target (dysmetria), a tremor that occurs during attempted movements (intention TREMOR), impaired force and rhythm of diadochokinesis (rapidly alternating movements), and GAIT ATAXIA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p90)Ataxia: Impairment of the ability to perform smoothly coordinated voluntary movements. This condition may affect the limbs, trunk, eyes, pharynx, larynx, and other structures. Ataxia may result from impaired sensory or motor function. Sensory ataxia may result from posterior column injury or PERIPHERAL NERVE DISEASES. Motor ataxia may be associated with CEREBELLAR DISEASES; CEREBRAL CORTEX diseases; THALAMIC DISEASES; BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES; injury to the RED NUCLEUS; and other conditions.Gait Ataxia: Impairment of the ability to coordinate the movements required for normal ambulation (WALKING) which may result from impairments of motor function or sensory feedback. This condition may be associated with BRAIN DISEASES (including CEREBELLAR DISEASES and BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES); SPINAL CORD DISEASES; or PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES.Iron-Binding Proteins: Proteins that specifically bind to IRON.Spinocerebellar Degenerations: A heterogenous group of degenerative syndromes marked by progressive cerebellar dysfunction either in isolation or combined with other neurologic manifestations. Sporadic and inherited subtypes occur. Inheritance patterns include autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked.Spinocerebellar Ataxias: A group of dominantly inherited, predominately late-onset, cerebellar ataxias which have been divided into multiple subtypes based on clinical features and genetic mapping. Progressive ataxia is a central feature of these conditions, and in certain subtypes POLYNEUROPATHY; DYSARTHRIA; visual loss; and other disorders may develop. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1997, Ch65, pp 12-17; J Neuropathol Exp Neurol 1998 Jun;57(6):531-43)Genes, Dominant: Genes that influence the PHENOTYPE both in the homozygous and the heterozygous state.Ocular Motility Disorders: Disorders that feature impairment of eye movements as a primary manifestation of disease. These conditions may be divided into infranuclear, nuclear, and supranuclear disorders. Diseases of the eye muscles or oculomotor cranial nerves (III, IV, and VI) are considered infranuclear. Nuclear disorders are caused by disease of the oculomotor, trochlear, or abducens nuclei in the BRAIN STEM. Supranuclear disorders are produced by dysfunction of higher order sensory and motor systems that control eye movements, including neural networks in the CEREBRAL CORTEX; BASAL GANGLIA; CEREBELLUM; and BRAIN STEM. Ocular torticollis refers to a head tilt that is caused by an ocular misalignment. Opsoclonus refers to rapid, conjugate oscillations of the eyes in multiple directions, which may occur as a parainfectious or paraneoplastic condition (e.g., OPSOCLONUS-MYOCLONUS SYNDROME). (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p240)Machado-Joseph Disease: A dominantly-inherited ATAXIA first described in people of Azorean and Portuguese descent, and subsequently identified in Brazil, Japan, China, and Australia. This disorder is classified as one of the SPINOCEREBELLAR ATAXIAS (Type 3) and has been associated with a mutation of the MJD1 gene on chromosome 14. Clinical features include progressive ataxia, DYSARTHRIA, postural instability, nystagmus, eyelid retraction, and facial FASCICULATIONS. DYSTONIA is prominent in younger patients (referred to as Type I Machado-Joseph Disease). Type II features ataxia and ocular signs; Type III features MUSCULAR ATROPHY and a sensorimotor neuropathy; and Type IV features extrapyramidal signs combined with a sensorimotor neuropathy. (From Clin Neurosci 1995;3(1):17-22; Ann Neurol 1998 Mar;43(3):288-96)Trinucleotide Repeats: Microsatellite repeats consisting of three nucleotides dispersed in the euchromatic arms of chromosomes.Muscular Dystrophy, Oculopharyngeal: An autosomal dominant hereditary disease that presents in late in life and is characterized by DYSPHAGIA and progressive ptosis of the eyelids. Mutations in the gene for POLY(A)-BINDING PROTEIN II have been associated with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy.Poly(A)-Binding Protein II: A poly(A) binding protein that is involved in promoting the extension of the poly A tails of MRNA. The protein requires a minimum of ten ADENOSINE nucleotides in order for binding to mRNA. Once bound it works in conjunction with CLEAVAGE AND POLYADENYLATION SPECIFICITY FACTOR to stimulate the rate of poly A synthesis by POLY A POLYMERASE. Once poly-A tails reach around 250 nucleotides in length poly(A) binding protein II no longer stimulates POLYADENYLATION. Mutations within a GCG repeat region in the gene for poly(A) binding protein II have been shown to cause the disease MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY, OCULOPHARYNGEAL.Poly(A)-Binding Protein I: A poly(A) binding protein that has a variety of functions such as mRNA stabilization and protection of RNA from nuclease activity. Although poly(A) binding protein I is considered a major cytoplasmic RNA-binding protein it is also found in the CELL NUCLEUS and may be involved in transport of mRNP particles.Blepharoptosis: Drooping of the upper lid due to deficient development or paralysis of the levator palpebrae muscle.Muscular Dystrophies: A heterogeneous group of inherited MYOPATHIES, characterized by wasting and weakness of the SKELETAL MUSCLE. They are categorized by the sites of MUSCLE WEAKNESS; AGE OF ONSET; and INHERITANCE PATTERNS.Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Scleritis: Refers to any inflammation of the sclera including episcleritis, a benign condition affecting only the episclera, which is generally short-lived and easily treated. Classic scleritis, on the other hand, affects deeper tissue and is characterized by higher rates of visual acuity loss and even mortality, particularly in necrotizing form. Its characteristic symptom is severe and general head pain. Scleritis has also been associated with systemic collagen disease. Etiology is unknown but is thought to involve a local immune response. Treatment is difficult and includes administration of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents such as corticosteroids. Inflammation of the sclera may also be secondary to inflammation of adjacent tissues, such as the conjunctiva.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Ophthalmology: A surgical specialty concerned with the structure and function of the eye and the medical and surgical treatment of its defects and diseases.Pupil Disorders: Conditions which affect the structure or function of the pupil of the eye, including disorders of innervation to the pupillary constrictor or dilator muscles, and disorders of pupillary reflexes.Spindle Apparatus: A microtubule structure that forms during CELL DIVISION. It consists of two SPINDLE POLES, and sets of MICROTUBULES that may include the astral microtubules, the polar microtubules, and the kinetochore microtubules.Diplopia: A visual symptom in which a single object is perceived by the visual cortex as two objects rather than one. Disorders associated with this condition include REFRACTIVE ERRORS; STRABISMUS; OCULOMOTOR NERVE DISEASES; TROCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; ABDUCENS NERVE DISEASES; and diseases of the BRAIN STEM and OCCIPITAL LOBE.Hypoglossal Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the twelfth cranial (hypoglossal) nerve or nuclei. The nuclei and fascicles of the nerve are located in the medulla, and the nerve exits the skull via the hypoglossal foramen and innervates the muscles of the tongue. Lower brain stem diseases, including ischemia and MOTOR NEURON DISEASES may affect the nuclei or nerve fascicles. The nerve may also be injured by diseases of the posterior fossa or skull base. Clinical manifestations include unilateral weakness of tongue musculature and lingual dysarthria, with deviation of the tongue towards the side of weakness upon attempted protrusion.Abducens Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the sixth cranial (abducens) nerve or its nucleus in the pons. The nerve may be injured along its course in the pons, intracranially as it travels along the base of the brain, in the cavernous sinus, or at the level of superior orbital fissure or orbit. Dysfunction of the nerve causes lateral rectus muscle weakness, resulting in horizontal diplopia that is maximal when the affected eye is abducted and ESOTROPIA. Common conditions associated with nerve injury include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ISCHEMIA; and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.Paralysis: A general term most often used to describe severe or complete loss of muscle strength due to motor system disease from the level of the cerebral cortex to the muscle fiber. This term may also occasionally refer to a loss of sensory function. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p45)Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures: Methods, procedures, and tests performed to diagnose disease, disordered function, or disability.Supranuclear Palsy, Progressive: A degenerative disease of the central nervous system characterized by balance difficulties; OCULAR MOTILITY DISORDERS (supranuclear ophthalmoplegia); DYSARTHRIA; swallowing difficulties; and axial DYSTONIA. Onset is usually in the fifth decade and disease progression occurs over several years. Pathologic findings include neurofibrillary degeneration and neuronal loss in the dorsal MESENCEPHALON; SUBTHALAMIC NUCLEUS; RED NUCLEUS; pallidum; dentate nucleus; and vestibular nuclei. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1076-7)Multiple System Atrophy: A syndrome complex composed of three conditions which represent clinical variants of the same disease process: STRIATONIGRAL DEGENERATION; SHY-DRAGER SYNDROME; and the sporadic form of OLIVOPONTOCEREBELLAR ATROPHIES. Clinical features include autonomic, cerebellar, and basal ganglia dysfunction. Pathologic examination reveals atrophy of the basal ganglia, cerebellum, pons, and medulla, with prominent loss of autonomic neurons in the brain stem and spinal cord. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1076; Baillieres Clin Neurol 1997 Apr;6(1):187-204; Med Clin North Am 1999 Mar;83(2):381-92)Parkinsonian Disorders: A group of disorders which feature impaired motor control characterized by bradykinesia, MUSCLE RIGIDITY; TREMOR; and postural instability. Parkinsonian diseases are generally divided into primary parkinsonism (see PARKINSON DISEASE), secondary parkinsonism (see PARKINSON DISEASE, SECONDARY) and inherited forms. These conditions are associated with dysfunction of dopaminergic or closely related motor integration neuronal pathways in the BASAL GANGLIA.Parkinson Disease: A progressive, degenerative neurologic disease characterized by a TREMOR that is maximal at rest, retropulsion (i.e. a tendency to fall backwards), rigidity, stooped posture, slowness of voluntary movements, and a masklike facial expression. Pathologic features include loss of melanin containing neurons in the substantia nigra and other pigmented nuclei of the brainstem. LEWY BODIES are present in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus but may also be found in a related condition (LEWY BODY DISEASE, DIFFUSE) characterized by dementia in combination with varying degrees of parkinsonism. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1059, pp1067-75)Carbidopa: An inhibitor of DOPA DECARBOXYLASE, preventing conversion of LEVODOPA to dopamine. It is used in PARKINSON DISEASE to reduce peripheral adverse effects of LEVODOPA. It has no antiparkinson actions by itself.Dihydroxyphenylalanine: A beta-hydroxylated derivative of phenylalanine. The D-form of dihydroxyphenylalanine has less physiologic activity than the L-form and is commonly used experimentally to determine whether the pharmacological effects of LEVODOPA are stereospecific.Inorganic Chemicals: A broad class of substances encompassing all those that do not include carbon and its derivatives as their principal elements. However, carbides, carbonates, cyanides, cyanates, and carbon disulfide are included in this class.
oculomotor. *Nuclei *Oculomotor nucleus. *Edinger-Westphal nucleus. *Branches *superior. *parasympathetic root of ciliary ...
Oculomotor. *Nuclei *oculomotor nucleus. *Edinger-Westphal nucleus. *Branches *superior. *parasympathetic root of ciliary ...
Damage to the oculomotor nerve (III) can cause double vision (diplopia) and inability to coordinate the movements of both eyes ... They are: the olfactory nerve (I), the optic nerve (II), oculomotor nerve (III), trochlear nerve (IV), trigeminal nerve (V), ... The oculomotor nerve (III), trochlear nerve (IV), abducens nerve (VI) and the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve (V1) ... In terms of specific cranial nerve nuclei, the midbrain of the brainstem has the nuclei of the oculomotor nerve (III) and ...
Oculomotor. *Nuclei *oculomotor nucleus. *Edinger-Westphal nucleus. *Branches *superior. *parasympathetic root of ciliary ...
Oculomotor. *Nuclei *oculomotor nucleus. *Edinger-Westphal nucleus. *Branches *superior. *parasympathetic root of ciliary ...
2007). "Oculomotor disorders". Semin Neurol. 27 (3): 244-56. doi:10.1055/s-2007-979682. PMID 17577866. Kernich, C.A. (2006). " ... and occasionally disorders involving the supranuclear oculomotor pathways or ingestion of toxins. Diplopia can be one of the ...
This is an interaction between the abducens nerve and a branch of the oculomotor nerve. Voluntary activation of the abducens ... Moreover, while the abducens and the trochlear nerve each innervate one specific muscle, the oculomotor nerve has many ... Buckley EG, Ellis FD, Postel E, Saunders T (2005). "Postraumatic Abducens to Oculomotor Nerve Misdirection". Journal of AAPOS. ... Sibony PA, Lessell S, Gittinger JW Jr (1984). "Acquired oculomotor synkinesis". Surv Ophthalmol. 28 (5): 382-90. doi:10.1016/ ...
ISBN 0-07-112826-3. Sheldon M. Ebenholtz (2001). Oculomotor Systems and Perception. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521- ...
Plan of oculomotor nerve. This article incorporates text in the public domain from the 20th edition of Gray's Anatomy (1918). ... The branch of communication with the oculomotor nerve joins that nerve at its point of division; the branch to the trochlear ... It communicates with the oculomotor, the trochlear, the ophthalmic and the abducent nerves, and with the ciliary ganglion, and ...
The oculomotor nerve coming into the ganglion contains preganglionic axons from the Edinger-Westphal nucleus (a part of the ... Plan of oculomotor nerve. The right sympathetic chain and its connections with the thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic plexuses. ...
Plan of oculomotor nerve. Nerves of the orbit. Seen from above. Distribution of the maxillary and mandibular nerves, and the ... the orbit between the two heads of the lateral rectus muscles and between the superior and inferior rami of the oculomotor ...
Oculomotor nucleus (III). *Edinger-Westphal nucleus. *Trochlear nucleus (IV). *Mesencephalic duct (cerebral aqueduct, aqueduct ...
Oculomotor nerve damage on one side: (Example in parens: Left oculomotor nerve, CN III, is transected, therefore the left ... The oculomotor nerve is responsible for the efferent limb of the pupillary reflex; it drives the iris muscles that constrict ... "Cranial Nerve III-Oculomotor Nerve". yale.edu. Retrieved 2008-07-27. Colman, Andrew M. (August 2001). A Dictionary of ... Lack of the pupillary reflex or an abnormal pupillary reflex can be caused by optic nerve damage, oculomotor nerve damage, ...
GeneReviews/NCBI/NIH/UW entry on Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia Type 1 OMIM entries on Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia Type 1 ... 2005). "The ataxia-oculomotor apraxia 1 gene product has a role distinct from ATM and interacts with the DNA strand break ... Ataxia oculomotor apraxia-1 is a neurological disorder caused by mutations in the APTX gene that encodes aprataxin. The ... 1995). "Ataxia-oculomotor apraxia syndrome". J. Child Neurol. 10 (2): 118-22. doi:10.1177/088307389501000210. PMID 7782601. ...
Moreira, Maria-Ceu; Koenig, Michel (December 8, 2011). Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia Type 2. PMID 20301333. NBK1154. In ... ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA), spastic ataxia. Disorder subdivisions: Friedreich's ataxia, Spinocerebellar ataxia, ...
Sparks, DL; Gandhi NJ (2003). "Single-cell signals: an oculomotor perspective". Prog Brain Res. 142: 35-53. doi:10.1016/S0079- ... code used by oculomotor neurons. Eye movements are generated by six muscles, arranged in three orthogonally-aligned pairs. Thus ...
Fischer, M. H., Warlop, N., Hill, R. L., & Fias, W. (2004). Oculomotor bias induced by number perception. Experimental ... attentional and oculomotor. The first of these involves people being faster to detect left probes after smaller numbers are ... shown and right probes after large numbers, whereas the oculomotor effects are seen when participants look at greater speeds ...
Horner, D.G. "Oculomotor Functions & Neurology". Indiana University School of Optometry. Retrieved 31 August 2013. Leigh, R.J ... They presented a virtual gimbaled model of the oculomotor system, which provides accurate visualization of the kinematics of ... Historically, mechanical representations of oculomotor mechanics have been used for visualization of eye movements and their ... Schreiber, K. M.; Schor, C. M. (2007). "A virtual ophthalmotrope illustrating oculomotor coordinate systems and retinal ...
doi:10.1111/j.1755-5949.2010.00183.x. Seeley; Venna (2004). "Neurosyphilis presenting with gummatous oculomotor nerve palsy". ...
The oculomotor nerve also innervates this muscle. The pupillary dilator acts to increase the size of the pupil to allow more ...
Oculomotor nerve Mesencephalon List of regions in the human brain Gamlin, PD; Lund, R.D. (2006). "The pretectum: connections ... Collewijn, H (January 1975). "Oculomotor areas in the rabbits midbrain and pretectum". Journal of Neurobiology. 6 (1): 3-22. ... and oculomotor-related roles". Progress in brain research. 151: 379-405. doi:10.1016/S0079-6123(05)51012-4. PMID 16221595. ...
A different set of goggles, simulating the oculomotor cues for distances greater than veridical, yielded the opposite result. ... Wallach, H. & Frey, K. J. (1972) Adaptation in distance perception based on oculomotor cues. Perception & Osychophysics, 11, 77 ... These two cues together are called oculomotor cues. Other cues also play a part in distance perception; among these are ... Wallach and Frey constructed special goggles that artificially distorted oculomotor distance cues, such that the wearer would ...
Kawar, Mary (2002). "Oculomotor Control: An Integral Part of Sensory Integration". In Anita C. Bundy, Shelly J. Lane, Elizabeth ...
Her research bridges perceptual, cognitive, and oculomotor neuroscience. She is best known for her studies on illusions, eye ...
PHACE syndrome associated with congenital oculomotor nerve palsy. Strabismus. 2009;17:75-7. 106. Murthy R, Vemuganti GK, ...
Oculomotor deficits that are attributed to dysfunction of cerebellar structures occurred in all three mutations without major ... The present data show that each mutation is associated with a distinct syndrome of oculomotor deficits. Reduced saccade ... Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type I: oculomotor abnormalities in families with SCA1, SCA2, and SCA3. ...
Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia is a condition characterized by problems with movement that worsen over time. Explore symptoms, ... Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 4 begins around age 4. In addition to ataxia and oculomotor apraxia, individuals with this ... Mutations in the APTX, SETX, or PNKP gene cause ataxia with oculomotor apraxia types 1, 2, or 4, respectively. Mutations in ... Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia is a rare condition. Types 1 and 4 are most frequent in Portugal, and type 1 is also found in ...
The oculomotor nerve is the third of twelve paired cranial nerves. It controls the ciliary muscle (affecting accomodation), and ... The oculomotor nerve is the third of twelve paired cranial nerves. It controls the ciliary muscle (affecting accomodation), and ...
Camilo J. Morado-Díaz, Esperanza R. Matarredona, Sara Morcuende, Rocío Talaverón, María A. Davis-López de Carrizosa, Rosa R. de la Cruz and Angel M. Pastor ...
Paralysis of the oculomotor nerve, i.e., oculomotor nerve palsy, can arise due to: direct trauma, demyelinating diseases (e.g ... Map of the oculomotor nerve. Median sagittal section of brain. Plan of oculomotor nerve. Pathways in the Ciliary Ganglion. ... "Oculomotor nerve palsy" Oculomotor Nerve at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) hier-479 at ... There are two nuclei for the oculomotor nerve: The oculomotor nucleus originates at the level of the superior colliculus. The ...
"Oculomotor nucleus" at the BrainMaps project Steiger, H.-J.; Büttner-Ennever, J.A. (1979). "Oculomotor nucleus afferents in the ... and emerge from the oculomotor sulcus on the medial side of the cerebral peduncle. The nucleus of the oculomotor nerve does not ... Plan of oculomotor nerve. Figure showing the mode of innervation of the Recti medialis and lateralis of the eye. Vestibulo- ... The fibers of the oculomotor nerve arise from a nucleus in the midbrain, which lies in the gray substance of the floor of the ...
Painful oculomotor palsy caused by posterior-draining dural carotid cavernous fistulas. Arch Ophthalmol. 1995;113(8):1045-9. ... Pupil involvement in patients with diabetes-associated oculomotor nerve palsy. Arch Ophthalmol. 1998;116(6):723-7.CrossRef ... Lv X, Jiang C, Li Y, Yang X, Wu Z. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy in interventional neuroradiology. Eur J Radiol. 2010;74(3): ... Motoyama Y, Nonaka J, Hironaka Y, Park YS, Nakase H. Pupil-sparing oculomotor nerve palsy caused by upward compression of a ...
Medical definition of oculomotor nucleus: a nucleus that is situated under the aqueduct of Sylvius rostral to the trochlear ... nucleus and is the source of the motor fibers of the oculomotor nerve. ... Dictionary Entries near oculomotor nucleus. oculogyric crisis oculomotor oculomotor nerve oculomotor nucleus oculoplastic ... Share oculomotor nucleus Post the Definition of oculomotor nucleus to Facebook Share the Definition of oculomotor nucleus on ...
Oculomotor nucleus definition at Dictionary.com, a free online dictionary with pronunciation, synonyms and translation. Look it ... oculomotor nucleus in Medicine Expand. oculomotor nucleus n. The group of motor neurons that innervate the external eye muscles ...
The oculomotor nerve is the third of 12 pairs of cranial nerves in the brain. This nerve is responsible for eyeball and eyelid ... The oculomotor nerve can become paralyzed in a condition known as oculomotor nerve palsy. This condition can result from ... The oculomotor nerve is the third of 12 pairs of cranial nerves in the brain. This nerve is responsible for eyeball and eyelid ... The oculomotor nerve is responsible for the majority of eye and eyelid movements, although the trochlear nerve and abducens ...
Visual attention is not limited to the oculomotor range. Nina M. Hanning, Martin Szinte, and Heiner Deubel ... In this posture, an attentional cue was presented inside or outside their oculomotor range. Participants either made a saccade ... Here, we measured the ability to shift attention toward a cue presented within or beyond participants oculomotor range. ... This demonstrates that spatial attention is not coupled to the executed oculomotor program but instead can be deployed ...
Evidence for brainstem structures participating in oculomotor integration.. Nakamagoe K1, Iwamoto Y, Yoshida K. ... The cerebellar flocculus has been implicated in vestibulo-oculomotor control. One major central input to this structure ...
15 patients with oculomotor apraxia experience fatigue, depressed mood, anxious mood, insomnia, and pain and use Buspirone to ... Find the most comprehensive real-world symptom and treatment data on oculomotor apraxia at PatientsLikeMe. ... 0 oculomotor apraxia patients report severe anxious mood (0%). * 3 oculomotor apraxia patients report moderate anxious mood (50 ... 0 oculomotor apraxia patients report severe depressed mood (0%). * 3 oculomotor apraxia patients report moderate depressed mood ...
oculomotor nerve definition: nounEither of the third pair of cranial nerves, which originate in the midbrain and control most ... oculomotor nerve. oculomotor nerve. noun. Either of the third pair of cranial nerves, which originate in the midbrain and ... plural oculomotor nerves). *The third of twelve paired cranial nerves, which controls most of the eyes movements and ... "oculomotor nerve." YourDictionary, n.d. Web. 19 September 2018. ,http://www.yourdictionary.com/oculomotor-nerve,. ...
Effects of lorazepam on vision and oculomotor balance.. Speeg-Schatz C1, Giersch A, Boucart M, Gottenkiene S, Tondre M, ... A single dose of lorazepam induces an esophoric oculomotor imbalance and impaired fusional convergence and divergence ...
VDT work, oculomotor strain and subjective complaints: An experimental and clinical study. ... neck and upper back may result from near-point induced oculomotor strain. The effect of optical correction was examined in 14 ...
Oculomotor Assessment of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). Official Title ICMJE Oculomotor Assessment of Traumatic Brain Injury ( ... Oculomotor Assessment of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility ... The purpose of the proposed study is to compare the sensitivity and specificity of three oculomotor test devices in normal ... that influence oculo-vestibular perception in normal and TBI patients and might influence the results from the three oculomotor ...
Major themes of oculomotor and vestibular interest are covered in this volume, which integrates basic anatomy, neurophysiology ... The Oculomotor and Vestibular Systems. Edited by Edited by Thomas Brandt (University of Munich, Germany; Bernard Cohen, Mount ... Major themes of oculomotor and vestibular interest are covered in this volume, which integrates basic anatomy, neurophysiology ...
Oculomotor Nerve. The oculomotor nerve is the 3rd of 12 paired cranial nerves. It enters the orbit via the superior orbital ... Oculomotor Nerve Palsy. ... Oculomotor nerve palsy is an eye condition resulting from damage to the third cranial nerve or a ... Oculomotor Nerve - Additional Images. ... Oculomotor nerve Dura mater and its processes exposed by removing part of the right ... Other articles related to oculomotor nerve, nerve, oculomotor:. Pupillary Light Reflex - Clinical Significance. ... pupil ( ...
Oculomotor and Spatial Cognition Deficits in Schizophrenia. This study has been terminated. ...
Zebrafish dscaml1 Deficiency Impairs Retinal Patterning and Oculomotor Function. Manxiu Ma 马漫修, Alexandro D. Ramirez, Tong Wang ... Zebrafish dscaml1 Deficiency Impairs Retinal Patterning and Oculomotor Function. Manxiu Ma 马漫修, Alexandro D. Ramirez, Tong Wang ... Zebrafish dscaml1 Deficiency Impairs Retinal Patterning and Oculomotor Function. Manxiu Ma 马漫修, Alexandro D. Ramirez, Tong Wang ... Notably, the oculomotor phenotypes in dscaml1 mutants are reminiscent of human ocular motor apraxia, a neurodevelopmental ...
Ataxia Oculomotor Apraxia. Some articles on ataxia, oculomotor apraxia:. Ataxia Telangiectasia - Differential Diagnosis. ... ... common disorders that are sometimes confused with A-T are Cerebral palsy Friedreich ataxia Cogan oculomotor apraxia ... Most ...
oculomotor (Science: anatomy) Of or pertaining to the movement of the eye; applied especially to the common motor nerves (or ... Retrieved from "https://www.biology-online.org/dictionary/index.php?title=Oculomotor&oldid=44699" ...
BrainMaps at UCDavis Oculomotor%20nucleus. The University of California, Davis, commonly known as UC Davis, is one of the ten ... The oculomotor nerve () is the third of twelve paired cranial nerves. ... Image File history File links Gray696. ... Latin is ... The fibers of the oculomotor nerve arise from a nucleus in the midbrain, which lies in the gray substance of the floor of the ... The somatic motor component of CN III originates from the oculomotor nucleus located in the rostral midbrain at the level of ...
J. D. Enderle, "Neural control of saccades," in The Brains Eyes: Neurobiological and Clinical Aspects to Oculomotor Research, ... D. A. Robinson, "Models of mechanics of eye movements," in Models of Oculomotor Behavior and Control, B. L. Zuber, Ed., pp. 21- ... The parameterized saccadic oculomotor plant for monkey has been used (see page 47 in [3]). The trend of changes in muscle ... Oculomotor Plant. A linear homeomorphic MFM that captures the nonlinear properties of the muscle, namely, force-velocity and ...
  • There are two nuclei for the oculomotor nerve: The oculomotor nucleus originates at the level of the superior colliculus. (wikipedia.org)
  • The main forms of impact that produced concussion in such head impacts are oblique impacts that caused shear stresses and neural damage in the upper brainstem, precisely the region of the main oculomotor control nuclei for binocular coordination (as inferred from monkey studies and human brain injury cases). (ski.org)
  • Two important neuropathological findings are noted: The first is a systemic degeneration of cerebellifugal oculomotor control (cerebello-fastigio-vestibulo-MLF (medial longitudinal fasiculus) and perihypoglossal nuclei) in both types. (eurekamag.com)
  • Furthermore, neuronal loss of the oculomotor nuclei (oculomotor, trochlear and abducens nuclei) was found only in the hereditary cases. (eurekamag.com)
  • Both patients with eye movement disorders and healthy participants whose oculomotor range had been experimentally reduced have been reported to show attentional deficits at locations unreachable by their eyes. (pnas.org)
  • Oculomotor analyses revealed specific deficits related to the dscaml1 mutation, including severe fatigue during gaze stabilization, reduced saccade amplitude and velocity in the light, greater disconjugacy, and impaired fixation. (jneurosci.org)
  • Oculomotor deficits that are attributed to dysfunction of cerebellar structures occurred in all three mutations without major differences between the groups. (springer.com)
  • The present data show that each mutation is associated with a distinct syndrome of oculomotor deficits. (springer.com)
  • Key examples of such disorders include attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and dyslexia, both of which appear to include deficits in oculomotor control. (grantome.com)
  • It is responsible for the autonomic functions of the oculomotor nerve, including pupillary constriction and lens accommodation. (wikipedia.org)
  • We treated two patients with partial oculomotor paresis who had pupillary mydriasis, marked inferior rectus muscle weakness, and medial rectus muscle paresis, which were attributed to an ipsilateral fascicular lesion, demonstrated on neuroimaging studies. (semanticscholar.org)
  • The cerebellar flocculus has been implicated in vestibulo-oculomotor control. (nih.gov)
  • Twelve healthy men underwent measurement of their carotid-cardiac baroreflex response during varying conditions of vestibulo-oculomotor stimulation to test the hypothesis that vestibular and/or oculomotor stimulation associated with head movements in the yaw plane inhibit baroreflex control of heart rate. (physiology.org)
  • We investigated the functional consequences of dscaml1 deficiency in the larval zebrafish (sexually undifferentiated) oculomotor system, where behavior, circuit function, and neuronal activity can be precisely quantified. (jneurosci.org)
  • While we know a great deal about the dynamics and characteristics of eye movements in relatively simple tasks performed under reduced laboratory conditions, we know less about oculomotor behavior in complex, multi-step tasks. (nih.gov)
  • Additional experimental evidence suggests that information carried through this pathway bears direct functional relevance for visuomotor behavior: transient inactivation of this pathway on the thalamic level impaired oculomotor behavior in a task that required internal monitoring of saccade metrics ( Sommer and Wurtz, 2002 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • We excluded compressive causes of oculomotor neuropathy, such as aneurysm of the posterior communicating artery. (j-nn.org)
  • Differences were found for certain oculomotor tests, including vertical saccades, horizontal saccades, and optokinetics. (neuro-kinetics.com)
  • The oculomotor integrator (OI) in the hindbrain transforms incoming horizontal eye movement commands into position signals to maintain stable eye fixations after saccades. (manchester.ac.uk)
  • Therapist-assisted vision therapy improves outcome for stroke patients with homonymous hemianopia alone or combined with oculomotor dysfunction. (medworm.com)
  • Many of the studies use unreliable methodology, and few attempts have been made to interpret the observed oculomotor dysfunction in terms of current understanding of eye movement physiology. (sussex.ac.uk)
  • Also known as an eye-tracking problem, Oculomotor Dysfunction occurs when there is a developmental delay or neurological event that interferes with the brain's ability to effectively coordinate the eyes to fixate, follow, and move from spot to spot with accuracy and efficient control. (wowvision.net)
  • Oculomotor Dysfunction is a relatively common visual condition that can affect individuals of all ages, usually due to a developmental delay or a result of a concussion (mTBI) or more serious traumatic brain injury (TBI). (wowvision.net)
  • We address vision problems like Oculomotor Dysfunction with a personalized approach. (wowvision.net)
  • Whereas previous studies were mainly based on the evaluation of reaction times, we measured visual sensitivity before saccadic eye movements and during fixation at locations either within or beyond participants' oculomotor range. (pnas.org)
  • To study the oculomotor system in its native mode, we developed a wearable eyetracker that allows natural eye, head and whole-body movements. (nih.gov)
  • These results suggest that vestibular stimulation associated with head movements in yaw inhibits vagally mediated baroreflex control of heart rate, whereas oculomotor stimulation is less of a factor and only in the absence of vestibular stimulation. (physiology.org)
  • The oculomotor nerve helps control muscle movements of the eyes. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Internal monitoring of oculomotor commands may help to anticipate and keep track of changes in perceptual input imposed by our eye movements. (frontiersin.org)
  • From this nucleus the fibers pass forward through the tegmentum, the red nucleus, and the medial part of the substantia nigra, forming a series of curves with a lateral convexity, and emerge from the oculomotor sulcus on the medial side of the cerebral peduncle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sympathetic - No direct function, but sympathetic fibres run with the oculomotor nerve to innervate the superior tarsal muscle (helps to raise the eyelid). (teachmeanatomy.info)
  • Potential implications for the neural mechanisms underlying the typical and atypical development of oculomotor control are discussed. (ox.ac.uk)
  • The oculomotor network is a well-characterized neural system in which to study this balance of behavioral control. (nyu.edu)
  • These results support the view that effective oculomotor control depends on an intact network of frontal and posterior brain regions. (sinapse.ac.uk)
  • Note the posterior cerebral arteries (PCA), superior cerebellar arteries (SCA), oculomotor (CN III) and trochlear nerves (CN IV) and posterior communicating artery (PComm). (cureus.com)
  • Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) after evacuation revealed no intracranial aneurysms, but constructive interference in steady-state (CISS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed that the left posterior cerebral artery (PCA) ran much more anteriorly and inferiorly compared with the right PCA and the left oculomotor nerve passed very closely between the left PCA and the left superior cerebellar artery (SCA). (operativeneurosurgery.com)
  • Furthermore, perceptual judgments in seven patients systematically depended on oculomotor targeting errors, with self-generated targeting errors erroneously attributed to external stimulus jumps. (frontiersin.org)
  • Our findings suggest that trans-thalamic CD transmission decisively contributes to a correct prediction of the perceptual consequences of oculomotor actions. (frontiersin.org)
  • Despite its frequency, the pathophysiology of VM remains uncertain and no specific oculomotor, postural, or perceptual defect has been described in this disorder. (grantome.com)
  • In recent years, evidence from psychophysical, neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies has accumulated suggesting that basic visual perceptual and cognitive functions such as attention and working memory emerge from the reciprocal interaction of oculomotor signals and visual representations in cortex. (grantome.com)
  • Data from patients with oculomotor apraxia, who reported starting treatments within the last 5 years. (patientslikeme.com)
  • Participants will also be screened for vestibular migraine and visual vertigo, which are two conditions that influence oculo-vestibular perception in normal and TBI patients and might influence the results from the three oculomotor devices. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • This analysis led us to the novel hypothesis that functional imaging in the oculomotor brainstem and cerebellum pathways of the mTBI patients should provide the needed insight into the nature of the deficit that is persistently clouding their lives. (ski.org)
  • This breakthrough will allow us to test this hypothesis with innovative studies of the functional losses in each oculomotor nucleus in the brains of the mTBI patients. (ski.org)
  • This proposal will provide the first accurate knowledge of the oculomotor pathways in the human brainstem and their functional and structural changes in mTBI patients. (ski.org)
  • Oculomotor function could also differ between subgroups of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). (diva-portal.org)
  • Detailed studies revealed a variety of oculomotor anomalies in sALS patients. (termedia.pl)
  • The data are interpreted in the context of a novel hypothesis regarding oculomotor IOR. (psu.edu)
  • This proposal investigates the pathophysiology of VM using quantitative psychophysical and oculomotor tests with the underlying hypothesis that the rotational information provided by the semicircular canals and the gravito-inertial information provided by the otolith organs are synthesized abnormally by the brain in VM. (grantome.com)
  • not only visual symptoms but also muscle pain in the head, neck and upper back may result from near-point induced oculomotor strain. (ilo.org)
  • Evidence for brainstem structures participating in oculomotor integration. (nih.gov)
  • Recently, single-unit recordings in non-human primates identified a CD pathway that conveys oculomotor monitoring information from brainstem structures to the frontal eye field (FEF) via central portions of the thalamus ( Sommer and Wurtz, 2002 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • Our results are compatible with the view that covert and overt attentional orienting are guided by feedback projections of visual and visuomotor neurons of the gaze control system, irrespective of oculomotor limitations. (pnas.org)
  • Responsiveness of the vestibular system did not modify cognitive and oculomotor test performance upon exposure to MRI-related magnetic fields. (uu.nl)
  • This contradicts the results of earlier studies based on experimental or pathologic eye movement restrictions and supports the view that attention-modulating feedback from gaze control areas, relying on visual and visuomotor cell activity, is not bound by oculomotor limitations. (pnas.org)
  • However, oculomotor control involves a incompletely understood complex of brainstem, subcortical and cortical pathways, any of which may be disrupted by TBI. (ski.org)
  • Typical and atypical development of oculomotor control. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Here we tested oculomotor control in typically developing toddlers and toddlers with fragile X syndrome (FXS), a disorder of known genetic origin that allows the investigation of the neuro-computational properties contributing to the development of saccadic control. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Ryan McDonald and Andy Poulos (hidden) provide "oculomotor" control for two cameras. (thebrainissocool.com)
  • Implicit and explicit timing in oculomotor control. (uclouvain.be)