Conjunctiva: The mucous membrane that covers the posterior surface of the eyelids and the anterior pericorneal surface of the eyeball.Conjunctival DiseasesConjunctival Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the CONJUNCTIVA.ConjunctivitisPterygium: An abnormal triangular fold of membrane in the interpalpebral fissure, extending from the conjunctiva to the cornea, being immovably united to the cornea at its apex, firmly attached to the sclera throughout its middle portion, and merged with the conjunctiva at its base. (Dorland, 27th ed)Conjunctivitis, Allergic: Conjunctivitis due to hypersensitivity to various allergens.Pemphigoid, Benign Mucous Membrane: A chronic blistering disease with predilection for mucous membranes and less frequently the skin, and with a tendency to scarring. It is sometimes called ocular pemphigoid because of conjunctival mucous membrane involvement.Eyelids: Each of the upper and lower folds of SKIN which cover the EYE when closed.Cornea: The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Tears: The fluid secreted by the lacrimal glands. This fluid moistens the CONJUNCTIVA and CORNEA.Eye: The organ of sight constituting a pair of globular organs made up of a three-layered roughly spherical structure specialized for receiving and responding to light.Blepharitis: Inflammation of the eyelids.Eye Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the EYE.Dry Eye Syndromes: Corneal and conjunctival dryness due to deficient tear production, predominantly in menopausal and post-menopausal women. Filamentary keratitis or erosion of the conjunctival and corneal epithelium may be caused by these disorders. Sensation of the presence of a foreign body in the eye and burning of the eyes may occur.Ophthalmic Solutions: Sterile solutions that are intended for instillation into the eye. It does not include solutions for cleaning eyeglasses or CONTACT LENS SOLUTIONS.Lacrimal Apparatus: The tear-forming and tear-conducting system which includes the lacrimal glands, eyelid margins, conjunctival sac, and the tear drainage system.Ocular Hypertension: A condition in which the intraocular pressure is elevated above normal and which may lead to glaucoma.Eye Infections, Parasitic: Mild to severe infections of the eye and its adjacent structures (adnexa) by adult or larval protozoan or metazoan parasites.Keratoconjunctivitis: Simultaneous inflammation of the cornea and conjunctiva.Sclera: The white, opaque, fibrous, outer tunic of the eyeball, covering it entirely excepting the segment covered anteriorly by the cornea. It is essentially avascular but contains apertures for vessels, lymphatics, and nerves. It receives the tendons of insertion of the extraocular muscles and at the corneoscleral junction contains the canal of Schlemm. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Goblet Cells: A glandular epithelial cell or a unicellular gland. Goblet cells secrete MUCUS. They are scattered in the epithelial linings of many organs, especially the SMALL INTESTINE and the RESPIRATORY TRACT.Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the eye or any of its parts.Limbus Corneae: An annular transitional zone, approximately 1 mm wide, between the cornea and the bulbar conjunctiva and sclera. It is highly vascular and is involved in the metabolism of the cornea. It is ophthalmologically significant in that it appears on the outer surface of the eyeball as a slight furrow, marking the line between the clear cornea and the sclera. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 3d ed)Trachoma: A chronic infection of the CONJUNCTIVA and CORNEA caused by CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS.Epithelium, Corneal: Stratified squamous epithelium that covers the outer surface of the CORNEA. It is smooth and contains many free nerve endings.Corneal Diseases: Diseases of the cornea.Toxoplasmosis, Ocular: Infection caused by the protozoan parasite TOXOPLASMA in which there is extensive connective tissue proliferation, the retina surrounding the lesions remains normal, and the ocular media remain clear. Chorioretinitis may be associated with all forms of toxoplasmosis, but is usually a late sequel of congenital toxoplasmosis. The severe ocular lesions in infants may lead to blindness.Uvea: The pigmented vascular coat of the eyeball, consisting of the CHOROID; CILIARY BODY; and IRIS, which are continuous with each other. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Melanosis: Disorders of increased melanin pigmentation that develop without preceding inflammatory disease.Eyelid Neoplasms: Tumors of cancer of the EYELIDS.Eye Diseases: Diseases affecting the eye.Conjunctivitis, Bacterial: Purulent infections of the conjunctiva by several species of gram-negative, gram-positive, or acid-fast organisms. Some of the more commonly found genera causing conjunctival infections are Haemophilus, Streptococcus, Neisseria, and Chlamydia.Eye Injuries: Damage or trauma inflicted to the eye by external means. The concept includes both surface injuries and intraocular injuries.Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca: Drying and inflammation of the conjunctiva as a result of insufficient lacrimal secretion. When found in association with XEROSTOMIA and polyarthritis, it is called SJOGREN'S SYNDROME.Ophthalmic Nerve: A sensory branch of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The ophthalmic nerve carries general afferents from the superficial division of the face including the eyeball, conjunctiva, upper eyelid, upper nose, nasal mucosa, and scalp.Administration, Topical: The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.Anterior Eye Segment: The front third of the eyeball that includes the structures between the front surface of the cornea and the front of the VITREOUS BODY.Scleral Diseases: General disorders of the sclera or white of the eye. They may include anatomic, embryologic, degenerative, or pigmentation defects.Eyelid DiseasesRabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Albinism, Ocular: Albinism affecting the eye in which pigment of the hair and skin is normal or only slightly diluted. The classic type is X-linked (Nettleship-Falls), but an autosomal recessive form also exists. Ocular abnormalities may include reduced pigmentation of the iris, nystagmus, photophobia, strabismus, and decreased visual acuity.Dominance, Ocular: The functional superiority and preferential use of one eye over the other. The term is usually applied to superiority in sighting (VISUAL PERCEPTION) or motor task but not difference in VISUAL ACUITY or dysfunction of one of the eyes. Ocular dominance can be modified by visual input and NEUROTROPHIC FACTORS.Keratitis: Inflammation of the cornea.Intraocular Pressure: The pressure of the fluids in the eye.Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect: A form of fluorescent antibody technique commonly used to detect serum antibodies and immune complexes in tissues and microorganisms in specimens from patients with infectious diseases. The technique involves formation of an antigen-antibody complex which is labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody. (From Bennington, Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984)Eyelashes: The hairs which project from the edges of the EYELIDS.Tonometry, Ocular: Measurement of ocular tension (INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE) with a tonometer. (Cline, et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Aqueous Humor: The clear, watery fluid which fills the anterior and posterior chambers of the eye. It has a refractive index lower than the crystalline lens, which it surrounds, and is involved in the metabolism of the cornea and the crystalline lens. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed, p319)Glaucoma: An ocular disease, occurring in many forms, having as its primary characteristics an unstable or a sustained increase in the intraocular pressure which the eye cannot withstand without damage to its structure or impairment of its function. The consequences of the increased pressure may be manifested in a variety of symptoms, depending upon type and severity, such as excavation of the optic disk, hardness of the eyeball, corneal anesthesia, reduced visual acuity, seeing of colored halos around lights, disturbed dark adaptation, visual field defects, and headaches. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Ambrosia: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. The POLLEN is one cause of HAYFEVER.Refraction, Ocular: Refraction of LIGHT effected by the media of the EYE.Eye Burns: Injury to any part of the eye by extreme heat, chemical agents, or ultraviolet radiation.Iris: The most anterior portion of the uveal layer, separating the anterior chamber from the posterior. It consists of two layers - the stroma and the pigmented epithelium. Color of the iris depends on the amount of melanin in the stroma on reflection from the pigmented epithelium.Epithelium: One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.Rose Bengal: A bright bluish pink compound that has been used as a dye, biological stain, and diagnostic aid.Ciliary Body: A ring of tissue extending from the scleral spur to the ora serrata of the RETINA. It consists of the uveal portion and the epithelial portion. The ciliary muscle is in the uveal portion and the ciliary processes are in the epithelial portion.Vitreous Body: The transparent, semigelatinous substance that fills the cavity behind the CRYSTALLINE LENS of the EYE and in front of the RETINA. It is contained in a thin hyaloid membrane and forms about four fifths of the optic globe.Conjunctivitis, Inclusion: An infection of the eyes characterized by the presence in conjunctival epithelial cells of inclusion bodies indistinguishable from those of trachoma. It is acquired by infants during birth and by adults from swimming pools. The etiological agent is CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS whose natural habitat appears to be the genito-urinary tract. Inclusion conjunctivitis is a less severe disease than trachoma and usually clears up spontaneously.Immunoenzyme Techniques: Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.Ocular Motility Disorders: Disorders that feature impairment of eye movements as a primary manifestation of disease. These conditions may be divided into infranuclear, nuclear, and supranuclear disorders. Diseases of the eye muscles or oculomotor cranial nerves (III, IV, and VI) are considered infranuclear. Nuclear disorders are caused by disease of the oculomotor, trochlear, or abducens nuclei in the BRAIN STEM. Supranuclear disorders are produced by dysfunction of higher order sensory and motor systems that control eye movements, including neural networks in the CEREBRAL CORTEX; BASAL GANGLIA; CEREBELLUM; and BRAIN STEM. Ocular torticollis refers to a head tilt that is caused by an ocular misalignment. Opsoclonus refers to rapid, conjugate oscillations of the eyes in multiple directions, which may occur as a parainfectious or paraneoplastic condition (e.g., OPSOCLONUS-MYOCLONUS SYNDROME). (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p240)Stevens-Johnson Syndrome: Rare cutaneous eruption characterized by extensive KERATINOCYTE apoptosis resulting in skin detachment with mucosal involvement. It is often provoked by the use of drugs (e.g., antibiotics and anticonvulsants) or associated with PNEUMONIA, MYCOPLASMA. It is considered a continuum of Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis.Eye Infections, Bacterial: Infections in the inner or external eye caused by microorganisms belonging to several families of bacteria. Some of the more common genera found are Haemophilus, Neisseria, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Chlamydia.Conjunctivitis, Viral: Inflammation, often mild, of the conjunctiva caused by a variety of viral agents. Conjunctival involvement may be part of a systemic infection.Prostaglandins F, Synthetic: Analogs or derivatives of prostaglandins F that do not occur naturally in the body. They do not include the product of the chemical synthesis of hormonal PGF.Pallor: A clinical manifestation consisting of an unnatural paleness of the skin.Ocular Physiological Phenomena: Processes and properties of the EYE as a whole or of any of its parts.Keratin-12: A type I keratin that is found associated with the KERATIN-3 in the CORNEA and is regarded as a marker for corneal-type epithelial differentiation. Mutations in the gene for keratin-12 have been associated with MEESMANN CORNEAL EPITHELIAL DYSTROPHY.Eye Infections, Viral: Infections of the eye caused by minute intracellular agents. These infections may lead to severe inflammation in various parts of the eye - conjunctiva, iris, eyelids, etc. Several viruses have been identified as the causative agents. Among these are Herpesvirus, Adenovirus, Poxvirus, and Myxovirus.Rhinosporidiosis: Chronic, localized granulomatous infection of mucocutaneous tissues, especially the NOSE, and characterized by HYPERPLASIA and the development of POLYPS. It is found in humans and other animals and is caused by the mesomycetozoean organism RHINOSPORIDIUM SEEBERI.Eye Foreign Bodies: Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the eye.Epithelial Cells: Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.Burns, ChemicalBenzalkonium Compounds: A mixture of alkylbenzyldimethylammonium compounds. It is a bactericidal quaternary ammonium detergent used topically in medicaments, deodorants, mouthwashes, as a surgical antiseptic, and as a as preservative and emulsifier in drugs and cosmetics.Preservatives, Pharmaceutical: Substances added to pharmaceutical preparations to protect them from chemical change or microbial action. They include ANTI-BACTERIAL AGENTS and antioxidants.Pharmaceutic Aids: Substances which are of little or no therapeutic value, but are necessary in the manufacture, compounding, storage, etc., of pharmaceutical preparations or drug dosage forms. They include SOLVENTS, diluting agents, and suspending agents, and emulsifying agents. Also, ANTIOXIDANTS; PRESERVATIVES, PHARMACEUTICAL; COLORING AGENTS; FLAVORING AGENTS; VEHICLES; EXCIPIENTS; OINTMENT BASES.Tuberculosis, Ocular: Tuberculous infection of the eye, primarily the iris, ciliary body, and choroid.Meibomian Glands: The sebaceous glands situated on the inner surface of the eyelids between the tarsal plates and CONJUNCTIVA.Timolol: A beta-adrenergic antagonist similar in action to PROPRANOLOL. The levo-isomer is the more active. Timolol has been proposed as an antihypertensive, antiarrhythmic, antiangina, and antiglaucoma agent. It is also used in the treatment of MIGRAINE DISORDERS and tremor.Trabeculectomy: Any surgical procedure for treatment of glaucoma by means of puncture or reshaping of the trabecular meshwork. It includes goniotomy, trabeculectomy, and laser perforation.Keratitis, Herpetic: A superficial, epithelial Herpesvirus hominis infection of the cornea, characterized by the presence of small vesicles which may break down and coalesce to form dendritic ulcers (KERATITIS, DENDRITIC). (Dictionary of Visual Science, 3d ed)Mucins: High molecular weight mucoproteins that protect the surface of EPITHELIAL CELLS by providing a barrier to particulate matter and microorganisms. Membrane-anchored mucins may have additional roles concerned with protein interactions at the cell surface.Amnion: The innermost membranous sac that surrounds and protects the developing embryo which is bathed in the AMNIOTIC FLUID. Amnion cells are secretory EPITHELIAL CELLS and contribute to the amniotic fluid.Rhinosporidium: A genus in the order Dermocystidium, class MESOMYCETOZOEA. It causes RHINOSPORIDIOSIS in MAMMALS and BIRDS.Eye Enucleation: The surgical removal of the eyeball leaving the eye muscles and remaining orbital contents intact.Mucin 5AC: A gel-forming mucin that is primarily found on the surface of gastric epithelium and in the RESPIRATORY TRACT. Mucin 5AC was originally identified as two distinct proteins, however a single gene encodes the protein which gives rise to the mucin 5A and mucin 5C variants.Orbital Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the bony orbit and contents except the eyeball.Orbit: Bony cavity that holds the eyeball and its associated tissues and appendages.Oculomotor Muscles: The muscles that move the eye. Included in this group are the medial rectus, lateral rectus, superior rectus, inferior rectus, inferior oblique, superior oblique, musculus orbitalis, and levator palpebrae superioris.Mucous Membrane: An EPITHELIUM with MUCUS-secreting cells, such as GOBLET CELLS. It forms the lining of many body cavities, such as the DIGESTIVE TRACT, the RESPIRATORY TRACT, and the reproductive tract. Mucosa, rich in blood and lymph vessels, comprises an inner epithelium, a middle layer (lamina propria) of loose CONNECTIVE TISSUE, and an outer layer (muscularis mucosae) of SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS that separates the mucosa from submucosa.Lacrimal Apparatus Diseases: Diseases of the lacrimal apparatus.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Myiasis: The invasion of living tissues of man and other mammals by dipterous larvae.Corneal Ulcer: Loss of epithelial tissue from the surface of the cornea due to progressive erosion and necrosis of the tissue; usually caused by bacterial, fungal, or viral infection.Keratin-4: A type II keratin that is found associated with the KERATIN-13 in the internal stratified EPITHELIUM. Defects in gene for keratin-4 are a cause of HEREDITARY MUCOSAL LEUKOKERATOSIS.Eye Infections: Infection, moderate to severe, caused by bacteria, fungi, or viruses, which occurs either on the external surface of the eye or intraocularly with probable inflammation, visual impairment, or blindness.Uveitis: Inflammation of part or all of the uvea, the middle (vascular) tunic of the eye, and commonly involving the other tunics (sclera and cornea, and the retina). (Dorland, 27th ed)Blister: Visible accumulations of fluid within or beneath the epidermis.Fluorophotometry: Measurement of light given off by fluorescein in order to assess the integrity of various ocular barriers. The method is used to investigate the blood-aqueous barrier, blood-retinal barrier, aqueous flow measurements, corneal endothelial permeability, and tear flow dynamics.Instillation, Drug: The administration of therapeutic agents drop by drop, as eye drops, ear drops, or nose drops. It is also administered into a body space or cavity through a catheter. It differs from THERAPEUTIC IRRIGATION in that the irrigate is removed within minutes, but the instillate is left in place.Visual Acuity: Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.Ocular Hypotension: Abnormally low intraocular pressure often related to chronic inflammation (uveitis).Eye ProteinsCryotherapy: A form of therapy consisting in the local or general use of cold. The selective destruction of tissue by extreme cold or freezing is CRYOSURGERY. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Filtering Surgery: A surgical procedure used in treatment of glaucoma in which an opening is created through which aqueous fluid may pass from the anterior chamber into a sac created beneath the conjunctiva, thus lowering the pressure within the eye. (Hoffman, Pocket Glossary of Ophthalmologic Terminology, 1989)Retina: The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.
"Anaphylactic shock caused by application of fluorescein on the ocular conjunctiva". Presse Médicale. 25 (32): 1546-7. PMID ...
One source defines "ocular adnexa" as the orbit, conjunctiva, and eyelids. Knowles, Daniel M. (2001). Neoplastic ...
Heath, Greg (10 February 2010). "The episclera, sclera and conjunctiva An overview of relevant ocular anatomy" (PDF). OT: 36-42 ... The episclera is a thin layer of tissue that lies between the conjunctiva and the connective tissue layer that forms the white ... After anesthetizing the eye with medication, the conjunctiva may be moved with a cotton swab to observe the location of the ... clinical evaluation in the treatment of external ocular inflammation". Annals of Ophthalmology. 16 (12): 1110-5. PMID 6398026. ...
The Morgan Lens provides ocular irrigation or medication to the cornea and conjunctiva. Once inserted, the Morgan Lens floats ... The Morgan Lens can be used in many situations requiring ocular irrigation or the application of medicine to the eye, including ...
Heath, G. "The episclera, sclera and conjunctiva: An overview of relevant ocular anatomy." Archived 2013-05-13 at the Wayback ... A vascular plexus is found between the bulbar conjunctiva and the sclera consisting of two layers of vessels, the superficial ...
MUC16 is a component of the ocular surface (including the cornea and conjunctiva), the respiratory tract and the female ... Gipson IK (Oct 2007). "The ocular surface: the challenge to enable and protect vision: the Friedenwald lecture". Investigative ... "Alterations of the ocular surface epithelial MUC16 and goblet cell MUC5AC in patients with atopic keratoconjunctivitis". ... "Association of cell surface mucins with galectin-3 contributes to the ocular surface epithelial barrier". The Journal of ...
... is a bacterium that can be recovered from the conjunctiva of Guinea pigs suffering from ocular ...
Pigmented conjunctival tumors Pingueculum Pterygium Squamous carcinoma and intraepithelial neoplasia of the conjunctiva Ocular ... PA USA The Ocular Oncology Service The Eye Cancer Network Cancer.Net: Eye Cancer Eye Cancer - Medline Plus Ocular Oncology - ... Ocular oncology takes into consideration that the primary requirement for patients is preservation of life by removal of the ... "Lymphoma of the Conjunctiva - The Eye Cancer Network". Retrieved 2010-03-10. "Melanoma and PAM with Atypia - The Eye Cancer ...
1996). "Anaphylactic shock caused by application of fluorescein on the ocular conjunctiva". Presse Med (francoščina) 25 (32): ...
Later, once the conjunctiva have healed and post-operative swelling has subsided, an ocular prosthesis can be placed to provide ... This type of ocular surgery is indicated for a number of ocular tumors, in eyes that have suffered severe trauma, and in eyes ... Orbital implants and ocular prostheses are used by the surgeon to restore a more natural appearance. An orbital implant is ... Its form is that of a cupped disc so that it can fit comfortably in the pocket behind the eyelids overlying the conjunctiva ...
The conjunctiva is then sutured. A temporary ocular conformer is inserted at the completion of the pro- cedure and is worn ... A few ocular prostheses today are made of cryolite glass. A variant of the ocular prosthesis is a very thin hard shell known as ... Makers of ocular prosthetics are known as ocularists. An ocular prosthesis does not provide vision; this would be a visual ... having an artificial eye Fabricating Ocular Prostheses History of Artificial Eyes Ocular Prosthetics Eyeform Opticians Ocular ...
Klintworth, G; Cummings, T. "24; The eye and ocular adnexa". In Stacey, Mills. Sternberg's Diagnostic Surgical Pathology (5th ... Pterygium in the conjunctiva is characterized by elastotic degeneration of collagen (actinic elastosis) and fibrovascular ... Auto-grafting covers the bare sclera with conjunctival tissue that is surgically removed from an area of healthy conjunctiva. ... conjunctiva) can be diagnosed without need for a specific exam, however corneal topography is a practical test (technique) as ...
Examples include a PDMS microfluidic device implanted under the conjunctiva for drug delivery to the eye to treat ocular ... "A refillable microfabricated drug delivery device for treatment of ocular diseases". Lab on a Chip. 8 (7): 1027-30. doi:10.1039 ...
Topical ocular administration of emedastine inhibits histamine-stimulated vascular permeability in the conjunctiva as a ...
When an allergen irritates the conjunctiva, common symptoms that occur in the eye include: ocular itching, eyelid swelling, ... SAC is the most common ocular allergy. Symptoms of the aforementioned ocular diseases include itching and pink to reddish eye(s ... The ocular allergic response is a cascade of events that is coordinated by mast cells. Beta chemokines such as eotaxin and MIP- ... When histamine is released from mast cells, it binds to H1 receptors on nerve endings and causes the ocular symptom of itching ...
Symptoms of scleritis include: Redness of the sclera and conjunctiva, sometimes changing to a purple hue Severe ocular pain, ... Unlike in conjunctivitis, this redness will not move with gentle pressure to the conjunctiva. Secondary keratitis or uveitis ...
Conjunctiva, globe and orbicularis can be paralysed using a combination of surface anaesthesia, facial anaesthesia and ... Ocular Anaesthesia on EOphtha[permanent dead link] Anaesthesia for adults having ocular surgery NeyYork School of Regional ... Ocular surgery may be performed under topical, local or general anesthesia. Local anaesthesia is more preferred because it is ... If this occurs, the choroid swells up and ocular contents may prolapse as soon as the eye is opened. The advantages of general ...
Palpebral or tarsal conjunctiva Lines the eyelids Bulbar or ocular conjunctiva Covers the eyeball, over the anterior sclera: ... Conjunctiva. The upper half of a sagittal section through the front of the eyeball. (Label for 'Conjunctiva' visible at center- ... Fornix conjunctiva Forms the junction between the bulbar and palpebral conjunctivas: It is loose and flexible, allowing the ... Blood to the bulbar conjunctiva is primarily derived from the ophthalmic artery. The blood supply to the palpebral conjunctiva ...
Collections of keratin in the conjunctiva, known as Bitot's spots, are also seen. Imtiaz's sign is the earliest ocular sign of ... Night blindness caused by VAD has been associated with the loss of goblet cells in the conjunctiva, a membrane covering the ... Dead epithelial and microbial cells accumulate on the conjunctiva and form debris that can lead to infection and possibly ... Deficiency impairs immunity and hematopoiesis and causes rashes and typical ocular effects (e.g., xerophthalmia, night ...
Some other ocular changes are referred to as xerophthalmia. First there is dryness of the conjunctiva (xerosis) as the normal ...
Some other ocular changes are referred to as xerophthalmia. First there is dryness of the conjunctiva (xerosis) as the normal ...
Topical lubricants are prescribed according to the ocular surface changes. Preservative free lubricants are initiated in ... Fibrin glue is applied for apposing the flaps and conjunctiva. PDEK can be combined or performed simultaneously with glued IOL ... Scharioth and Pavilidis in 2006 reported the scleral tuck and intrascleral haptic fixation of a posterior chamber Intra ocular ...
It is the most common ocular disease of cattle (mostly beef). IBK is similar to human pink eye and causes severe infection of ... and conjunctiva of healthy animals. Transmission of IBK is through direct contact with mucous membranes and their secretions ... the conjunctiva, edema, corneal opacity, and ulceration. This disease is highly contagious and occurs worldwide. Younger ...
1] Presumed Ocular Histoplasmosis Syndrome *^ Stefan Dithmar; Frank Gerhard Holz (28 April 2008). Fluorescence Angiography in ... Presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome (POHS) is a syndrome affecting the eye, which is characterized by peripheral atrophic ... Thuruthumaly C; Yee D. C.; Rao P. K. (2014). "Presumed ocular histoplasmosis". Current Opinion in Ophthalmology. 25 (6): 508-12 ... Presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) have been successfully treated with laser, ...
In the conjunctiva goblet cells are a source of mucin in tears and they also secrete different types of mucins onto the ocular ... "Structure and biological roles of mucin-type O-glycans at the ocular surface". The Ocular Surface. 8 (1): 8-17. doi:10.1016/ ...
List of systemic diseases with ocular manifestations. References[edit]. *^ a b c Matejcek, A; Goldman, RD (November 2013). " ... Conjunctiva shows hyperaemia and chemosis. Eyelids are usually swollen.. *Corneal involvement (rare) may occur in herpes ...
Ocular lesions are characterised by conjunctival inflammation, ulceration and symblepharon due to fusion of the palpebral and ... bulbar conjunctivae. There may be severe scarring, entropion and blindness. Skin lesions are uncommon and usually involve the ...
Areas commonly involved are the oral mucosa (lining of the mouth) and conjunctiva (mucous membrane that coats the inner surface ... Autoimmune blistering disorder, Brunsting-Perry pemphigoid, Oral pemphigoid, Ocular pemphigoid, Genital pemphigoid, Direct ...
On the other hand, involvement of the conjunctiva as erosions with scarring and cicatrization may lead to blindness and the ... However, Iaccheri et al reported IVIg with systemic steroids and immunosuppressive agents failed to control ocular MMP[22]. A ... In 2002,Chan[1] suggested the term of mucous membrane pemphigoid; because some serious complications, for instance ocular ... But most critical complication of MMP is scarring which is spesifically poses important problem when the conjunctiva, esophagus ...
Ocular conjunctiva synonyms, Ocular conjunctiva pronunciation, Ocular conjunctiva translation, English dictionary definition of ... Ocular conjunctiva. n. pl. con·junc·ti·vas or con·junc·ti·vae The mucous membrane that lines the inner surface of the eyelid ... Related to Ocular conjunctiva: bulbar conjunctiva, conjunctival, palpebral conjunctiva. con·junc·ti·va. (kŏn′jŭngk-tī′və). n. ... Ocular conjunctiva - definition of Ocular conjunctiva by The Free Dictionary https://www.thefreedictionary.com/Ocular+ ...
The Conjunctiva has a Sparse Endogenous Flora that is Distinct from that of the Peri-Ocular Skin ... The Conjunctiva has a Sparse Endogenous Flora that is Distinct from that of the Peri-Ocular Skin ... The Conjunctiva has a Sparse Endogenous Flora that is Distinct from that of the Peri-Ocular Skin. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. ... The most common ocular species was Staphylococcus epidermidis, at 4%. Peri-ocular skin flora of the same individual was ...
Get the complete, evidence-based guidance you need to provide optimal care for your patients with ocular surface disease. ... 45 Non Ocular Sources for Cell-Based Ocular Surface Reconstruction 46 Immunosuppression in Ocular Surface Stem Cell ... Ocular Surface Disease: Cornea, Conjunctiva and Tear Film pp_authorblistbyline By Edward J Holland, MD MD, Mark J Mannis, MD, ... Ocular Surface Disease: Cornea, Conjunctiva and Tear Film incorporates current research and the latest management strategies as ...
Palpebral or tarsal conjunctiva Lines the eyelids Bulbar or ocular conjunctiva Covers the eyeball, over the anterior sclera: ... Conjunctiva. The upper half of a sagittal section through the front of the eyeball. (Label for Conjunctiva visible at center- ... Fornix conjunctiva Forms the junction between the bulbar and palpebral conjunctivas: It is loose and flexible, allowing the ... Blood to the bulbar conjunctiva is primarily derived from the ophthalmic artery. The blood supply to the palpebral conjunctiva ...
Ocular Pathology Use it to review eye pathology for Ophthalmology Board Review or OKAP. Anatomy and pathology of the human eye ... What is carcinoma-in-situ of the conjunctiva? Squamous Carcinoma in Situ Definition: Full thickness intraepithelial involvement ...
Xeroderma Pigmentosum- Diagnosis and Treatment of Two Different Ocular Tumors in Eyelid and Conjunctiva. Höehr GC*, Vesanterä ... 2018) Xeroderma Pigmentosum-Diagnosis and Treatment of Two Different Ocular Tumors in Eyelid and Conjunctiva. Int J Ophthalmic ... Keywords: Xeroderma pigmentosum; Ocular disease; Basal cell carcinoma; Epidermoid carcinoma. Subscription required. Please ... This disease may be associated with ocular findings such as dry eye syndrome, photophobia, blepharospasm and a number of ...
Nociceptive sensation and sensitivity evoked from human cornea and conjunctiva stimulated by CO2. ... Development and characterization of biomaterials for a wide variety of anterior ocular applications. ...
Purpose: To evaluate cellular changes on the conjunctiva and cornea in patients with ocular allergy and non-allergic ocular ... In vivo confocal microscopy as a tool to evaluate cellular changes in the cornea and conjunctiva in ocular allergy and non- ... In Vivo Confocal Microscopy as a Tool to Evaluate Cellular Changes in the Cornea and Conjunctiva in Ocular Allergy and Non- ... In vivo confocal microscopy as a tool to evaluate cellular changes in the cornea and conjunctiva in ocular allergy and non- ...
Conjunctiva Ocular pathology Optic nerve Uveal Tract Authors and affiliations. *Thomas J Cummings*1 ... Each chapter (Overview; Cornea; Conjunctiva; Eyelids; Uveal Tract; Retina; Orbit; and, Optic Nerve) includes approximately 30 ... color figures of common eye pathology diagnoses and also reviews the normal histology of each ocular component. An assortment ...
Surgical resection has historically been used to treat ocular surface squamous neoplasia, but non-surgical interventions are ... Conjunctiva, Cornea , Ocular Pathology/Oncology Add to My To-Do List *View ... Surgical resection has historically been used to treat ocular surface squamous neoplasia, but non-surgical interventions are ...
... pseudopemphigoid of the ocular conjunctiva.. Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders: Asthma and exacerbation of asthma ... Table 1: Ocular Adverse Reactions and Ocular Signs/Symptoms Reported by 5-15% of Patients Receiving Latanoprost. Symptom/ ... Advise patients that if they develop an intercurrent ocular condition (e.g., trauma or infection) or have ocular surgery, or ... Xalatan is indicated for the reduction of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular ...
Nasal and ocular discharge and red, swollen conjunctiva. *Drop in milk yield ... Crater like erosions of the nose, mouth, conjunctiva, oesophagus and gastrointestinal tract ...
Images of microcirculation were taken from at least three different points in each ocular conjunctiva and recorded for at least ... Images of microcirculation were taken from at least three different points in each ocular conjunctiva and recorded for at least ... Images of microcirculation were taken from at least three different points in each ocular conjunctiva and recorded for at least ... Perfused vessel density (PVD) of ocular conjunctiva. [ Time Frame: After confirmed diagnosis of brain death of any course using ...
"Anaphylactic shock caused by application of fluorescein on the ocular conjunctiva". Presse Médicale. 25 (32): 1546-7. PMID ...
Populo H, Soares P, Rocha AS, Silva P, Lopes JM . Evaluation of the mTOR pathway in ocular (uvea and conjunctiva) melanoma. ... The centre of the conjunctiva is the centre of the cornea. The limbus, bulbar conjunctiva, fornix, tarsal conjunctiva, eyelid ... Conjunctival melanoma (CoM) constitutes about 2% of all ocular malignancies and 5% of all ocular melanoma.1, 2 CoM is the ... Conjunctival diagram for tumour mapping displaying the conjunctiva as a flat surface. The conjunctiva is divided into quadrants ...
... pseudopemphigoid of the ocular conjunctiva. Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders: Asthma and exacerbation of asthma ... Table 1: Ocular Adverse Reactions and Ocular Signs/Symptoms Reported by 5-15% of Patients Receiving Latanoprost ... Advise patients that if they develop an intercurrent ocular condition (e.g., trauma or infection) or have ocular surgery, or ... The ocular event/signs and symptoms of blepharitis have been identified as commonly observed through analysis of clinical ...
Bulbar or ocular conjunctiva: The conjunctiva covering the eyeball, over the sclera. This region of the conjunctiva is bound ... Palpebral or tarsal conjunctiva: The conjunctiva lining the eyelids.. *Fornix conjunctiva: The conjunctiva where the inner part ... the palpebral conjunctiva is reflected at the superior fornix and the inferior fornix to become the bulbar conjunctiva. ... The conjunctiva is a membrane that covers the sclera (white part of the eye) and lines the inside of the eyelids. ...
Concentrations of besifloxacin, gatifloxacin, and moxifloxacin in human conjunctiva after topical ocular administration Gail ... Ocular surface disease in patients with glaucoma or ocular hypertension treated with either BAK-preserved latanoprost or BAK- ... Evaluation of ocular surface glycocalyx using lectin-conjugated fluorescein Hiroshi Mochizuki, Masaki Fukui, Shin Hatou, et al ... Cerebral and ocular congenital toxoplasmosis complicated by West syndrome André Omgbwa Eballe, Augustin Ellong, Marie Evodie ...
Innovative Imaging of the Conjunctiva, Cornea, and Ocular Adnexa. *Corneal Disease. *Blepharitis ... Ocular discomfort. 150. All. 18 Years and older (Adult, Senior). NCT03334539. HL036-DED-US-P201. November 5, 2017. May 2018. ... Change in Ocular Surface Disease Index. 316. All. 18 Years and older (Adult, Senior). NCT03292809. CYS-003 (ESSENCE). October ... Patients With Ocular Neuropathic Pain: Description of Pain and Impact on Their Quality of Life. *Dry Eye Syndromes ...
Figure D: Sparganum removed from the ocular conjunctiva of a patient from Taiwan. The worm measured 40 mm long. Image courtesy ...
  • On the other hand, involvement of the conjunctiva as erosions with scarring and cicatrization may lead to blindness and the involvement of respiratory tract lesions in larynx, esophagus and lower airway may result in airway loss . (ommegaonline.org)
  • 1 , 2 CoM is the second most frequent malignant neoplasm of the conjunctiva after squamous cell carcinoma. (nature.com)
  • 4- 6 OSSN is a spectrum from simple dysplasia to carcinoma in situ (CIS) to invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) involving the conjunctiva as well as the cornea. (bmj.com)
  • The infection is typically chronic and may induce a chronic antigenic stimulation of the lymphoid ocular adnexal tissue - the so called OA MALT (Ocular Adnexal Mucosa -Associated Lymphoid Tissue). (medsci.org)
  • The biomicroscopy revealed an oval, bluish mass measuring 10x10x5 mm with congestion of the overlying conjunctiva. (bireme.br)
  • 4 A screening including approximately 1000 16S rRNA reads revealed that the diversity of healthy conjunctiva was higher than previously thought. (bmj.com)
  • Afterward, the most important malignant neoplastic processes affecting the conjunctiva will be reviewed along with the latest updates in the medical literature. (intechopen.com)
  • Scientists have only recently started to investigate the composition and function of the bacteria coating our ocular conjunctiva. (refinery29.com)
  • In viral hemorrhagic fever disease, ocular manifestations are not limited to LF and are well described for infection with Ebola virus (EBOV) ( 11 , 12 ), Marburg virus ( 13 ), and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) ( 14 - 16 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare genetic disease associated with hypersensitivity to ultraviolet radiation resulting in cutaneous, ocular and neurological abnormalities. (omicsonline.org)
  • Ocular discharge is a common sign of eye disease in dogs. (petplace.com)
  • Abnormal ocular discharge is not diagnostic of any one disease or disorder. (petplace.com)
  • Ocular medications, sera, plasma, and platelet-rich plasma have been used to restore and/or supplement the healing properties provided by the tear film. (vmcli.com)