Motor Skills: Performance of complex motor acts.Physical Fitness: The ability to carry out daily tasks and perform physical activities in a highly functional state, often as a result of physical conditioning.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Physical Therapy Modalities: Therapeutic modalities frequently used in PHYSICAL THERAPY SPECIALTY by PHYSICAL THERAPISTS or physiotherapists to promote, maintain, or restore the physical and physiological well-being of an individual.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Physical Examination: Systematic and thorough inspection of the patient for physical signs of disease or abnormality.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Physical Therapy Specialty: The auxiliary health profession which makes use of PHYSICAL THERAPY MODALITIES to prevent, correct, and alleviate movement dysfunction of anatomic or physiological origin.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Physical Education and Training: Instructional programs in the care and development of the body, often in schools. The concept does not include prescribed exercises, which is EXERCISE THERAPY.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Physical Exertion: Expenditure of energy during PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. Intensity of exertion may be measured by rate of OXYGEN CONSUMPTION; HEAT produced, or HEART RATE. Perceived exertion, a psychological measure of exertion, is included.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Role Playing: The adopting or performing the role of another significant individual in order to gain insight into the behavior of that person.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Physical Chromosome Mapping: Mapping of the linear order of genes on a chromosome with units indicating their distances by using methods other than genetic recombination. These methods include nucleotide sequencing, overlapping deletions in polytene chromosomes, and electron micrography of heteroduplex DNA. (From King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 5th ed)Education, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.Physical Therapists: Persons trained in PHYSICAL THERAPY SPECIALTY to make use of PHYSICAL THERAPY MODALITIES to prevent, correct, and alleviate movement dysfunction.Patient Simulation: The use of persons coached to feign symptoms or conditions of real diseases in a life-like manner in order to teach or evaluate medical personnel.Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Sedentary Lifestyle: Usual level of physical activity that is less than 30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity on most days of the week.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Motor Skills Disorders: Marked impairments in the development of motor coordination such that the impairment interferes with activities of daily living. (From DSM-V)Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Self Efficacy: Cognitive mechanism based on expectations or beliefs about one's ability to perform actions necessary to produce a given effect. It is also a theoretical component of behavior change in various therapeutic treatments. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)United StatesLife Style: Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Walking: An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.Recreation: Activity engaged in for pleasure.Sports: Activities or games, usually involving physical effort or skill. Reasons for engagement in sports include pleasure, competition, and/or financial reward.Aptitude: The ability to acquire general or special types of knowledge or skill.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Exercise Therapy: A regimen or plan of physical activities designed and prescribed for specific therapeutic goals. Its purpose is to restore normal musculoskeletal function or to reduce pain caused by diseases or injuries.ReadingTask Performance and Analysis: The detailed examination of observable activity or behavior associated with the execution or completion of a required function or unit of work.ManikinsPhysical Endurance: The time span between the beginning of physical activity by an individual and the termination because of exhaustion.Generalization (Psychology): The phenomenon of an organism's responding to all situations similar to one in which it has been conditioned.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Problem Solving: A learning situation involving more than one alternative from which a selection is made in order to attain a specific goal.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Play and Playthings: Spontaneous or voluntary recreational activities pursued for enjoyment and accessories or equipment used in the activities; includes games, toys, etc.Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the use of physical agents, mechanical apparatus, and manipulation in rehabilitating physically diseased or injured patients.Models, Educational: Theoretical models which propose methods of learning or teaching as a basis or adjunct to changes in attitude or behavior. These educational interventions are usually applied in the fields of health and patient education but are not restricted to patient care.Videotape Recording: Recording of visual and sometimes sound signals on magnetic tape.Schools: Educational institutions.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Practice (Psychology): Performance of an act one or more times, with a view to its fixation or improvement; any performance of an act or behavior that leads to learning.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Education, Medical, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Accelerometry: Qualitative and quantitative measurement of MOVEMENT patterns.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Problem-Based Learning: Instructional use of examples or cases to teach using problem-solving skills and critical thinking.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Environment Design: The structuring of the environment to permit or promote specific patterns of behavior.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Computer-Assisted Instruction: A self-learning technique, usually online, involving interaction of the student with programmed instructional materials.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)General Surgery: A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Teaching Materials: Instructional materials used in teaching.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Language Development: The gradual expansion in complexity and meaning of symbols and sounds as perceived and interpreted by the individual through a maturational and learning process. Stages in development include babbling, cooing, word imitation with cognition, and use of short sentences.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Education: Acquisition of knowledge as a result of instruction in a formal course of study.Child Behavior: Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Faculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Education of Intellectually Disabled: The teaching or training of those individuals with subnormal intellectual functioning.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Behavior Therapy: The application of modern theories of learning and conditioning in the treatment of behavior disorders.Students, Pharmacy: Individuals enrolled in a school of pharmacy or a formal educational program leading to a degree in pharmacy.Computer Literacy: Familiarity and comfort in using computers efficiently.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Child Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological maturing of an individual from birth up to but not including ADOLESCENCE.Inservice Training: On the job training programs for personnel carried out within an institution or agency. It includes orientation programs.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Feedback: A mechanism of communication within a system in that the input signal generates an output response which returns to influence the continued activity or productivity of that system.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Self-Assessment: Appraisal of one's own personal qualities or traits.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Disabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Professional-Patient Relations: Interactions between health personnel and patients.Education, Pharmacy: Formal instruction, learning, or training in the preparation, dispensing, and proper utilization of drugs in the field of medicine.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Language Tests: Tests designed to assess language behavior and abilities. They include tests of vocabulary, comprehension, grammar and functional use of language, e.g., Development Sentence Scoring, Receptive-Expressive Emergent Language Scale, Parsons Language Sample, Utah Test of Language Development, Michigan Language Inventory and Verbal Language Development Scale, Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities, Northwestern Syntax Screening Test, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Ammons Full-Range Picture Vocabulary Test, and Assessment of Children's Language Comprehension.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Clinical Clerkship: Undergraduate education programs for second- , third- , and fourth-year students in health sciences in which the students receive clinical training and experience in teaching hospitals or affiliated health centers.Actigraphy: The measurement and recording of MOTOR ACTIVITY to assess rest/activity cycles.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Physical Conditioning, Animal: Diet modification and physical exercise to improve the ability of animals to perform physical activities.Physical Therapy Department, Hospital: Hospital department which is responsible for the administration and provision of diagnostic and medical rehabilitation services to restore or improve the functional capacity of the patient.Mentors: Senior professionals who provide guidance, direction and support to those persons desirous of improvement in academic positions, administrative positions or other career development situations.Staff Development: The process by which the employer promotes staff performance and efficiency consistent with management goals and objectives.Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Medical History Taking: Acquiring information from a patient on past medical conditions and treatments.Faculty: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.Peer Group: Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.Social Adjustment: Adaptation of the person to the social environment. Adjustment may take place by adapting the self to the environment or by changing the environment. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996)Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Video Games: A form of interactive entertainment in which the player controls electronically generated images that appear on a video display screen. This includes video games played in the home on special machines or home computers, and those played in arcades.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Education, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform individuals of recent advances in their particular field of interest. They do not lead to any formal advanced standing.Great BritainDyslexia: A cognitive disorder characterized by an impaired ability to comprehend written and printed words or phrases despite intact vision. This condition may be developmental or acquired. Developmental dyslexia is marked by reading achievement that falls substantially below that expected given the individual's chronological age, measured intelligence, and age-appropriate education. The disturbance in reading significantly interferes with academic achievement or with activities of daily living that require reading skills. (From DSM-IV)Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.Writing: The act or practice of literary composition, the occupation of writer, or producing or engaging in literary work as a profession.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Leadership: The function of directing or controlling the actions or attitudes of an individual or group with more or less willing acquiescence of the followers.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Socialization: The training or molding of an individual through various relationships, educational agencies, and social controls, which enables him to become a member of a particular society.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Thinking: Mental activity, not predominantly perceptual, by which one apprehends some aspect of an object or situation based on past learning and experience.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Students, Health Occupations: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program in the health occupations.Language Development Disorders: Conditions characterized by language abilities (comprehension and expression of speech and writing) that are below the expected level for a given age, generally in the absence of an intellectual impairment. These conditions may be associated with DEAFNESS; BRAIN DISEASES; MENTAL DISORDERS; or environmental factors.Counseling: The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.Self Care: Performance of activities or tasks traditionally performed by professional health care providers. The concept includes care of oneself or one's family and friends.Risk Reduction Behavior: Reduction of high-risk choices and adoption of low-risk quantity and frequency alternatives.Programmed Instruction as Topic: Instruction in which learners progress at their own rate using workbooks, textbooks, or electromechanical devices that provide information in discrete steps, test learning at each step, and provide immediate feedback about achievement. (ERIC, Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, 1996).Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Musculoskeletal Diseases: Diseases of the muscles and their associated ligaments and other connective tissue and of the bones and cartilage viewed collectively.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Vocabulary: The sum or the stock of words used by a language, a group, or an individual. (From Webster, 3d ed)Energy Metabolism: The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Learning Curve: The course of learning of an individual or a group. It is a measure of performance plotted over time.Comprehension: The act or fact of grasping the meaning, nature, or importance of; understanding. (American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed) Includes understanding by a patient or research subject of information disclosed orally or in writing.Child Abuse: Abuse of children in a family, institutional, or other setting. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Monitoring, Ambulatory: The use of electronic equipment to observe or record physiologic processes while the patient undergoes normal daily activities.Muscle Strength: The amount of force generated by MUSCLE CONTRACTION. Muscle strength can be measured during isometric, isotonic, or isokinetic contraction, either manually or using a device such as a MUSCLE STRENGTH DYNAMOMETER.Language: A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.Fatigue: The state of weariness following a period of exertion, mental or physical, characterized by a decreased capacity for work and reduced efficiency to respond to stimuli.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Overweight: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is above certain standard of acceptable or desirable weight. In the scale of BODY MASS INDEX, overweight is defined as having a BMI of 25.0-29.9 kg/m2. Overweight may or may not be due to increases in body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE), hence overweight does not equal "over fat".Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Chemistry, Physical: The study of CHEMICAL PHENOMENA and processes in terms of the underlying PHYSICAL PHENOMENA and processes.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.Retention (Psychology): The persistence to perform a learned behavior (facts or experiences) after an interval has elapsed in which there has been no performance or practice of the behavior.Imitative Behavior: The mimicking of the behavior of one individual by another.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Intervention Studies: Epidemiologic investigations designed to test a hypothesized cause-effect relation by modifying the supposed causal factor(s) in the study population.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Goals: The end-result or objective, which may be specified or required in advance.Verbal Behavior: Includes both producing and responding to words, either written or spoken.Preceptorship: Practical experience in medical and health-related services that occurs as part of an educational program wherein the professionally-trained student works outside the academic environment under the supervision of an established professional in the particular field.Parent-Child Relations: The interactions between parent and child.Early Intervention (Education): Procedures and programs that facilitate the development or skill acquisition in infants and young children who have disabilities, who are at risk for developing disabilities, or who are gifted. It includes programs that are designed to prevent handicapping conditions in infants and young children and family-centered programs designed to affect the functioning of infants and children with special needs. (From Journal of Early Intervention, Editorial, 1989, vol. 13, no. 1, p. 3; A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, prepared for the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, 1976)Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Adolescent Behavior: Any observable response or action of an adolescent.Anesthesiology: A specialty concerned with the study of anesthetics and anesthesia.Group Processes: The procedures through which a group approaches, attacks, and solves a common problem.Cognitive Therapy: A direct form of psychotherapy based on the interpretation of situations (cognitive structure of experiences) that determine how an individual feels and behaves. It is based on the premise that cognition, the process of acquiring knowledge and forming beliefs, is a primary determinant of mood and behavior. The therapy uses behavioral and verbal techniques to identify and correct negative thinking that is at the root of the aberrant behavior.
MRCPs tend to resemble a "set of plans" used by the cortex for the generation and control of movement. The BP is activated by ... This delay period occurs in between the instructed cue and the subsequently triggered movement. During these delay periods ... This may provide a way to allow professionals to maintain a skill without actually performing the movement. Or it may provide ... Simple observation of the movement allows the same type of brain stimulation as the actual physical movement. Execution of ...
For survivors living with MDDS, there are drugs to control epilepsy, and physical therapy can help with muscle control. Liver ... Optic atrophy may also occur, often leading to blindness. Hearing loss may also occur. Additionally, although physical signs of ... Motor skills that had been learned may be lost, but generally the functioning of the brain and ability to think are not ... Some toddlers start to lose control of the muscles in their face, mouth, and throat, and may have difficulty swallowing. ...
... can be disrupted in a more controlled manner in laboratory studies using transcranial magnetic ... as well as the process of stabilizing newly formed motor skills. Damage to the cerebellum can occur through a number of causes ... Cyclists, in contrast, tend to avoid other physical activity after completing daily training loads. Indeed, this study ... Motor Skill Consolidation represents the process by which motor skills are transformed from an initial fragile state, in which ...
Development of executive functions tends to occur in spurts, when new skills, strategies, and forms of awareness emerge. These ... Further information: Neurobiological effects of physical exercise § Cognitive control and memory. The executive functions are ... Top-down inhibitory controlEdit. Aside from facilitatory or amplificatory mechanisms of control, many authors have argued for ... 2011) ... Inhibitory control (one of the core EFs) involves being able to control one's attention, behavior, thoughts, and/or ...
... though they can be used for practicing balance skills. Proper use of a balance board is a test of both physical skill and the ... the need to avoid losing control of the board forces the rider to exercise considerably more skill in order to avoid falling. ... This sliding occurs much less often and usually across a shorter distance than in the case of a rocker-roller board and sphere- ... The balance board is a device that has come to be used for training in sports and martial arts, for physical fitness and for ...
... "when control of necessary skill falls short, [and] the balance [shifts] to the negative." This occurs "because the [ ... In particular, excited physical reactions were expected to co-exist with task-emotions such as tension, excitement, and ... This occurs as the actor delves into previous emotional experiences, be they joyful or traumatic. The psychological effects, ... The danger comes when control precedence "manifests itself by sudden interruptions of behavior, changes in behavior or by ...
People who have greater self-control, greater self-efficacy, intact reality-testing, and more adaptive coping skills are at ... Desire for death occurs through ideations of thwarted belongingness. It is described as feeling alienated from others ... The capability to carry out the suicide attempt is usually formed from emotional and physical pain and disrupted cognitive ... Person-centered life skills training. e.g., Problem solving.. *Registering with support groups like Alcoholics Anonymous, ...
Time dilation occurs due to the individual becoming hyper aware of the hind brain (the seat of fight or flight)[citation needed ... Role playing is utilized by angering an individual to the point of rage and then showing them how to control it. Multi-modal ... This increase in adrenal output raises the physical strength and endurance levels of the person and sharpens their senses, ... This therapy teaches individuals relaxation techniques, problem solving skills, and techniques on response disruption. This ...
This mechanism is controlled neuromuscularly, which allows the muscle(s) to contract. This occurs through a motor neuron ... In the upper limbs, the stability of muscle coactivation allows for precise low-level physical tasks. An example of this would ... Muscle coactivation is absolutely necessary for learning a fine motor skill or for any activity involving stability. In order ... which occurs when a muscle contracts and the synergist muscle relaxes. For muscle coactivation to occur, both the muscle and ...
... control the signs and symptoms of the stroke and rehabilitation therapy will begin to begin to manage and recover lost skills. ... Embolic strokes occur when a blood clot forms away from the brain, typically in the heart. A small portion of this clot breaks ... The rehabilitation team may consist of a certified Speech-Language Pathologist, Physical Therapist, Occupational Therapist, and ... All of these factors influence the brain's ability to adapt to change, restore previous skills, and learn new skills. It is ...
Cerebral development normally occurs in the first two years of life when the infant is acquiring new motor and adaptive skills ... Physical diagnostic tests, such as cerebral imaging using Computerized Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and ... Although no cure exists, there are many different treatments which are currently being used to help control symptoms. These ... Brain injury can occur during prenatal, perinatal, or postnatal periods. Most cases of cerebral palsy, approximately 80%, are ...
... by damage to the angular gyrus Peripheral agraphias occurs when there is damage to the various motor and visualization skills ... He believed the ability to write not only involved motor control, but also the memory of the signs and their meaning. In 1867, ... Their writing requires great physical effort but lacks proper syntax and often has poor spelling. Expressive aphasia is an ... Agraphia can occur separately or co-occur and can be caused ... If copying skills are preserved in an individual with apraxic ...
A victim mentality may also occur in combination with passive-aggressive control issues.[18] From the perspective of moving ... The caregiver may only require assertiveness skills and the ability to place responsibility for the addiction on the other.[18] ... Not all mental health professionals agree about standard methods of treatment.[31] Caring for an individual with a physical ... Beattie, Melody Codependent No More: How to Stop Controlling Others and Start Caring for Yourself, 1986, Hazelden, Minnesota, ...
The large muscles are used for walking, running and other physical activities. These are known as gross motor skills. Small ... The most information learned occurs between birth and the age of three, during this time humans develop more quickly and ... by strengthening their fingers and developing their finger control. Infants and toddlers experience life more holistically than ... The physical development in children follows a pattern. The large muscles develop before the small muscles. ...
In Ethiopian most of the deliveries occur at home and unattended by skilled provider HIV Sero - prevalence in adults aged ... But they have very little control on the income. According to the federal civil service commission report in 2005, only 33% of ... A study done in Kofele, (Oromia region, Arsi, Ethiopia) in 2004 showed the lifetime and the 12 months prevalence of physical ... Majority of maternal deaths occur in the peripartum period. Deliveries attended by a skilled health care provider were shown to ...
... riot control techniques and other skills as deemed necessary. To maintain their certification teams participate in an annual ... SORTs will primarily operate at their host facility, but are on call to respond to any incident that may occur at any BOP, or ... Monthly training includes firearms instruction, tactical planning, emergency medical care, rappelling, physical training, ... The BOP dispatched several of its SORTs to the area who helped maintain control of federal facilities in the area. Uniforms ...
Control Movement Abilities; and Reaction Time and Speed Abilities), and Physical (Physical Strength Abilities; Endurance; ... In a worker-oriented job analysis, the skills are inferred from tasks and the skills are rated directly in terms of importance ... The KSAOs required for a job are inferred from the most frequently-occurring, important tasks. ... Skills are the proficiencies needed to perform each task. Abilities are the attributes that are relatively stable over time. ...
However, over time, the skills and resources built by broadened behavior enhance survival. When a life-threatening event occurs ... aimless physical play becomes exercise and physical excellence. This is in contrast to negative emotions, which prompt narrow, ... Following the study, the experimental group demonstrated an increase in happiness levels while the control group did not. The ... Defocused attention occurs when a person is able to see a wide range of possibilities and take in as much information as ...
Physical fitness is necessary because play sees few breaks, takes place across a field 150-180 metres long, and has few ... At the start of the match an attack occurred on Dermott Brereton with the intention of taking him out of the game. This set the ... The term Tempo football was coined by commentators to describe the tactic of controlling the tempo of the game. Australian ... The most generic skill for a player is ball handling - being familiar with the shape and weight of the football, how to ...
This gait training typically occurs during physical therapy sessions. The more recent development of body-weight support gait ... This effective therapy increases potential for motor skill gains. The more opportunity for practice and repetitions of step- ... and these devices enable the patient to learn how to generate and control these motor forces in a way that is not available on ... Gait trainers are intended for children or adults with physical disabilities, to provide the opportunity to improve walking ...
Most of the symptoms can also occur randomly when panicked.. Diagnosis[edit]. During a physical exam a doctor can determine ... muscle control, muscle strength, and functional skills. Teaching the patient to brace the affected limb during the tremor or to ... Physical therapy and occupational therapy may help to reduce tremor and improve coordination and muscle control for some ... Tremor may occur at any age but is most common in middle-age and older persons. It may be occasional, temporary, or occur ...
Further damage occurs in the white matter of the uncinate fasciculus. This structure is responsible for providing a major ... These children had no language skills, limited social understanding, and could not be rehabilitated. Genie, a contemporary ... Social behaviours and certain physical developments also have critical periods, often resisting rehabilitation or later ... or control bodily functions and impulsive behaviours. Although Genie was able to learn individual words, she was never able to ...
... disorder that can possibly cause spasms minor physical signs or several symptoms combined that cannot be controlled by the ... Biological factors and lack of relationship skills are a couple to name. As children grow up, in many cases they tend to ... However, there can be times where parents are not aware of when such behaviour is occurring and unknowingly reward it; they are ... It covers behaviours ranging from physical to emotional that we communicate in and also the way we are influenced by ethics, ...
Fine motor skills are involved in smaller movements that occur in the wrists, hands, fingers, feet and toes. They involve ... Fine Motor Control - MedlinePlus (2011) Watch How You Hold That Crayon - The New York Times (2010) Fine Motor Skills (October ... Without learning and advancing FMS especially fine motor skills a child will not advance in any physical activity in the later ... Typically, they are categorized into two groups: gross motor skills and fine motor skills. Gross motor skills are involved in ...
In the early stages, there are subtle changes in personality, cognition, and physical skills. The physical symptoms are usually ... Death typically occurs fifteen to twenty years from when the disease was first detected. The first likely description of the ... The basal ganglia-the part of the brain most prominently affected in early HD-play a key role in movement and behavior control ... With very large repeat counts, HD has full penetrance and can occur under the age of 20, when it is then referred to as ...
The benefit of exercise occurs regardless of the person's initial weight or subsequent weight loss.[72] High levels of physical ... Blood sugar control. See also: Anti-diabetic medication. There are several classes of anti-diabetic medications available. ... "In Lee M (ed.). Basic Skills in Interpreting Laboratory Data (5th ed.). Bethesda, MD: American Society of Health-System ... Type 2 diabetes primarily occurs as a result of obesity and lack of exercise.[1] Some people are more genetically at risk than ...
Gross motor skills development is governed by two principles that also control physical growth. Head to toe development refers ... Gross motor skills develop over a relatively short period of time. Most development occurs during childhood. However, soldiers ... Developmental coordination disorder -A disorder of motor skills. Fine motor skill -The abilities required to control the ... Teach How to Learn a Motor Skill, and Many Skills Can Be Learned-Even After a Student Leaves School. The Journal of Physical ...
In other words, respondents may have longer (or shorter) time periods for certain events to occur (e.g., getting a job, losing ... Specifically, the goals were to: (1) assess the impact of violence on employment over time while controlling for other factors ... There is also information related to literacy and skills, parenting, and children, including the health, education and child ... as well as their physical and mental health. This study used the first three years of data from the Illinois Families Study ( ...
As a result, they may be hyperactive and have poor social skills and impulse control. Other physical symptoms include a small ... Fetal Alcohol Syndrome occurs when a mothers consumption of alcohol damages her unborn baby. Common symptoms include facial ... From poor social skills to problems with impulse control, noticing these behavioral markers may help you identify FAS and get ... Recognize physical symptoms of FAS. There are many different physical symptoms of FAS that may be mild or severe. From ...
Descriptors: Psychomotor Skills, Control Groups, Verbal Communication, Physical Activities. Improving Functional Movement ... A secondary purpose was to determine whether such improvement, if it occurred, would positively influence the technical… ... Purpose: Although motor skill interventions often improve fundamental motor skills (FMS) during preschool, the extent of ... Purpose: The purposes of this study were to (a) investigate the effect of physical effort (cycling for 60 min at 60 ± 5% of ...
Factors that Prevent Flow from Occurring (continued) • Problems with physical readiness or physical state - Lack of physical ... Use physical abuse. • Employ guilt. * 15. Punishment • Punishment can control and change behavior, but 80% to 90% of ... They enjoy competition, like the action and excitement, focus on having fun, and want to learn skills to the best of their ... Factors that Prevent Flow from Occurring • Nonoptimal physical preparation and readiness - Injury - Fatigue - Not feeling good ...
Medication can be helpful for controlling problematic behaviors that may occur due to AS. However, there are other treatments ... Children with AS may also have difficulty with essential motor skills, such as running or walking. These children may lack ... physical therapy. *cognitive behavioral therapy. Parents are often provided with therapy as well. Parental training can help ... motor coordination and motor skills. Because there are no specific tests for diagnosing AS, many patients have been ...
Development of executive functions tends to occur in spurts, when new skills, strategies, and forms of awareness emerge. These ... Further information: Neurobiological effects of physical exercise § Cognitive control and memory. The executive functions are ... Top-down inhibitory controlEdit. Aside from facilitatory or amplificatory mechanisms of control, many authors have argued for ... 2011) ... Inhibitory control (one of the core EFs) involves being able to control ones attention, behavior, thoughts, and/or ...
Dementia is a loss of brain function that occurs with certain diseases. It affects memory, thinking, language, judgment, and ... A skilled health care provider can often diagnose dementia using the following:. *Complete physical exam, including nervous ... Other symptoms that may occur with dementia:. *Problems controlling bowel movements or urine ... Control problems with behavior, such as loss of judgment or confusion Someone with dementia will need support in the home as ...
The type and extent of communication problems will depend on the form of stroke and what kind of injury has occurred. The ... Dysarthria and dyspraxia relate to the physical production of speech sounds. A person with dysarthria can find the words, but ... Every year in the United States, more than 795,000 people have a stroke, according to the Centers for Disease Control and ... Both men have worked hard to regain their communication skills. We asked what advice they would give people in order to help ...
Human infants have an uphill road to climb in gaining motor skill. They are born with extremely limited abilities to control ... By contrast, this result did not occur in control conditions in which infants interacted with the tool or saw the experimenter ... Therefore, much of early motor development involves gaining control of physical movements. Even so, it is clear that these ... 1970 The growth of skill. In Mechanisms of motor skill development (ed. Connolly KJ), pp. 63-94. London, UK: Academic Press. ...
The most physical abuse and the most hurtful words occur within the first 10 seconds of a dispute, Packer says. Thats why a ... This is a complicated problem, and probably has more to do with inherited attitudes, parenting skills and self-control than it ... Once parents identify what causes them to fly out of control, they need two things -- a substitute way of disciplining and ... Everyone inherited some good child-rearing skills from their parents, and everybody ended up with some they dont like. ...
Motor skill consolidation can be disrupted in a more controlled manner in laboratory studies using transcranial magnetic ... as well as the process of stabilizing newly formed motor skills. Damage to the cerebellum can occur through a number of causes ... Cyclists, in contrast, tend to avoid other physical activity after completing daily training loads. Indeed, this study ... Motor Skill Consolidation represents the process by which motor skills are transformed from an initial fragile state, in which ...
... transmitting to collaborators travel directions to a clients physical location, and so on as will occur to those of skill in ... also includes creating (462) a presentation control instruction (460). A presentation control instruction is an instruction to ... Such messages may be communicated according to any useful data communications protocol as will occur to those of skill in the ... Examples of event types include fire, rain, thunder and so on as will occur to those of skill in the art. ...
Motor learning is a relatively permanent change in the ability to execute a motor skill as a result of practice or experience. ... Motor learning is a subdiscipline of motor behavior that examines how people acquire motor skills. ... Physical growth refers to an increase in body size or in individual parts that occurs through maturation. However, the term ... For instance, soccer juggling is a common method (process) to improve ball control in soccer players. A player who tears her ...
The infant develops a sense of personal control over physical skills and a sense of independence. ... The fifth stage occurs during adolescence, from about 12-18 years.. Teenagers explore who they are as individuals, and seek to ... Occurring in young adulthood (ages 18 to 40 yrs), we begin to share ourselves more intimately with others. We explore ... Such skills illustrate the childs growing sense of independence and autonomy. Erikson states it is critical that parents allow ...
... because physical activity can improve seizure control and mood. After the participants developed problem-solving skills (around ... No further intervention occurred after the 12th month.. Supervised by a team psychiatrist, PEARLS therapists (masters-level ... The intervention focuses on problem-solving treatment (PST), a skills-enhancing behavioral approach that addresses problems, ... The home sessions included PST and emphasized social and physical activation, ...
... because physical activity can improve seizure control and mood. After the participants developed problem-solving skills (around ... No further intervention occurred after the 12th month.. Supervised by a team psychiatrist, PEARLS therapists (masters-level ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC twenty four seven. Saving Lives, Protecting People Centers for Disease Control ... The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website. ...
Questions of loads that are applied and transmitted through the body during the procedures, motions that occur, skill of ... a stratified controlled trial. Spine 1987;12:703 6. *. Triano JJ, McGregor M, Hondras MA, Brennan PC. Manipulative Therapy ... Spinal manipulation, by its very nature, is a physical process. In this article, the theoretical basis for using manipulation, ... Maximum displacement occurs at the target segment and decreases with increasing distance from the application point (Table 5). ...
These therapies can help you to better control your emotional and physical responses to stressful events. These skills can be ... Chasteberry should be taken on those days each month when youre not menstruating and stopped altogether if conception occurs ( ... A review of controlled trials of acupuncture for womens reproductive health care. J Fam PLann Reprod Health Care. 2003; 29(4): ... Seek the help of a mind-body skills instructor to help teach you techniques such as meditation or guided imagery. ...
The medical control arrangement may be a diabetes control arrangement, the drug delivery algorithm may be an insulin delivery ... and a processor executing a drug delivery algorithm forming part of the medical control arrangement. The processor may be ... A system providing for user intervention in a medical control arrangement may comprise a first user intervention mechanism ... executing one or more physical exercises, or the like. Other examples will occur to those skilled in the art, and any such ...
Refreshes basic skills of wildland fire fighting. Examines wildland fire behavior, fire control tactics, operation of fire ... Studies characteristics and behavior of fire, fundamental physical laws and chemical reactions occurring in fire and fire ... Trains persons in the basic skills of wildland fire fighting. Examines wildland fire behavior, fire control tactics, operation ... FISC 111BASIC FIRE FIGHTING SKILLS10.0 CRRE F. Studies basic tools,, procedures, techniques and safety precautions utilized by ...
38 Such physical changes often result in a lowered IQ, reduced impulse control, difficulty paying attention, memory impairment ... The incident occurred as final preparations were being made just before the start of the meeting. Neither my interpreter nor I ... As the barrage came his way, Habib could do little to match Naseris verbal skills. Eventually, a switch flipped and Habib ... impulse-control, and conduct disorders that involve "problems in the self-control of emotions and behaviors."77 The negative ...
Dementia is a loss of brain function that occurs with certain diseases. Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of ... A skilled health care provider can often diagnose Alzheimer disease with the following steps:. *Performing a complete physical ... Other symptoms that may occur with Alzheimer disease:. *Problems controlling bowel movements or urine ... It occurs in people age 60 and older. It may run in some families, but the role of genes is less clear. ...
Of course, it is contemplated that other methods could also occur to those skilled in the art. ... Although it has been useful in controlled studies in very small (one-tenth of a cc. to 1 cc.) injections, it is currently not ... A material such as hyaluronic acid may be attached to the micro particle surface either through physical or chemical bonding. ... Other and further objects of the present invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon a study of the ...
... get help from Long Beach Coping Skills Rehab for Coping Skills Treatment in Long Beach. ... Find Coping Skills Treatment Centers in Long Beach, Los Angeles County, California, ... binge-eating disorder and co-occurring mental illnesses. We emphasize emotional and physical healing from eating disorders and ... physical activities and holistic approaches to their daily routines to repair abnormal eating patterns and regain control of ...
  • This cluster randomized controlled trial recruited 542 parents and their infants (mean age 3.8 months at baseline) from 62 first-time parent groups. (aappublications.org)
  • This study is a single site, three-arm, cluster-randomized controlled trial design with a daycare centre as the unit of measurement (clusters). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Studies were included if they were randomized controlled trials that were published in the English language, tested the effect of self-management education on adults with type 2 diabetes, and reported extractable data on the effect of treatment on GHb. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • The objective of this study was to systematically review reports of published, randomized, controlled trials to ascertain the efficacy of DSME in adults with type 2 diabetes, provide summary measures of its effect on GHb, and identify predictors of effect. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Studies were original articles reporting the results of randomized controlled trials of the effectiveness of self-management training in people with type 2 diabetes. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • The objective of this study was to systematically review reports of published randomized controlled trials to ascertain the effectiveness of self-management training in type 2 diabetes, to provide summary information to guide diabetes self-management programs and future quantitative analyses, and to identify further research needs. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • What is needed for 'normal' movements to occur? (studystack.com)
  • Growing older, they start to develop more controlled movements and actions called the gross motor skills such raising head and chest of the ground, rolling over, crawling, grabbing objects and sitting. (bartleby.com)
  • The bowel movements of an infant habitually occur at the same time each day very early in life, but because the child does not have adequate neuromuscular control of bowel and bladder function until the end of the second year, it is not advisable to begin this training until then. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Ideomotor apraxia, a disorder that affects patients with stroke and a variety of other brain lesions, features disturbed timing, sequence, and spatial organization of skilled movements. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • This study will look at how different areas of the human brain control fine hand movements. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • They will lie in the MRI scanner and will be asked to do a number of skilled hand movements using the right hand (such as pretending to use a hammer or waving goodbye) in response to directions that will appear on a screen mounted over their head. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • OBJECTIVE: The present study focuses on evaluating neural activation patterns underlying praxis movements in normal controls and in patients with ideomotor apraxia using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The disorder involves disturbed timing, sequence, and spatial organization of skilled movements, during the execution and probably also preparatory phases. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • One might imagine therefore, that elite athletes-who train rigorously to perfect specialized movements-undergo robust neural adaptations that support, or reflect, their exceptional neuromuscular skills. (plos.org)
  • Different sports, invoking different movements, will target unique neural substrates, but most physical activities similarly rely on regions that are key for eliciting, coordinating and controlling movement, such as the motor cortex, cerebellum and basal ganglia. (plos.org)
  • The researchers focused on the basal ganglia, a set of nuclei comprising the caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, substantia nigra and subthalamic nuclei, since these structures serve critical roles in preparing for and executing movements and learning motor skills. (plos.org)
  • Thus, acquiring and refining skilled movements more generally, rather than any particular movement pattern unique to running or martial arts, may restructure the globus pallidus. (plos.org)
  • This would make sense, considering the area is an important output pathway of the basal ganglia, broadly critical for learning and controlling movements. (plos.org)
  • After the participants developed problem-solving skills (around session 3 or 4), they were encouraged to engage in mild to moderate physical activity and to increase interactions outside the home. (cdc.gov)
  • Resiliency helps to moderate the effects including having problem-solving skills, self control, positive interpersonal relationships, safe home and school environments, religious faith, success with school and peers, socioeconomic advantage, and being older when trauma occurred. (pediatriceducation.org)
  • Temperature is generally moderate and controlled by hotel environmental systems. (hcareers.com)
  • This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of the Activity Begins in Childhood (ABC) intervention delivered in licensed daycare settings alone or in combination with a parent-driven home physical activity-promotion component to increase preschoolers' overall physical activity levels and, specifically, the time spent in moderate to vigorous physical activity. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Cognitive control functions ("executive functions" [EFs] such as attentional control, self-regulation, working memory, and inhibition) that depend on prefrontal cortex (PFC) are critical for success in school and in life. (nih.gov)
  • It also describes in detail the various concepts and therapeutic approaches currently used in the diagnosis and treatment of the cervical spine, myofascial pain syndrome, neuromuscular control deficits, neurodynamics along with the various techniques of mobilization and joint manipulation. (waterstones.com)
  • This is a newer skill set introduced in the latest update to the DBT Skills Manual for Adolescents . (goodtherapy.org)
  • Exposure to traumatic stress events including physical abuse, sexual abuse, violence, witnessing violence in the home or community, severe family dysfunction/psychopathology, natural disasters, severe accidents and/or their own or their caregivers' life-threatening illness are not uncommon in children and adolescents. (pediatriceducation.org)
  • Research shows that most teens do not use drugs, but drug use does occur frequently among adolescents and is often identified among teens who are experiencing interpersonal and family conflicts, school difficulty or failure, criminal activity, or some psychiatric disorders. (drugabuse.gov)
  • This educational module about the clinical assessment of substance abuse disorders in adolescents presents written text and instructional videos that provide the knowledge and skills needed in the screening, evaluation, and referral to treatment of adolescents with substance use disorders. (drugabuse.gov)
  • The first gross motor skill infants learn usually is to lift their heads and shoulders before they can sit up, which, in turn, precedes standing and walking. (healthofchildren.com)
  • Although they are born with virtually no head or neck control, most infants can lift their heads to a 45-degree angle by the age of four to six weeks, and they can lift both their head and chest at an average age of eight weeks. (healthofchildren.com)
  • These effects occur at a relatively abstract level of analysis both in terms of the structure infants perceive in others' actions and relevant structure in infants' own actions. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • The first signs of the disorder appear from 6 to 18 months, when infants lose speech and motor skills and intellectual development appears delayed. (britannica.com)
  • Procedures and programs that facilitate the development or skill acquisition in infants and young children who have disabilities, who are at risk for developing disabilities, or who are gifted. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between fundamental movement skills (FMS) and markers of health among a cohort of Irish primary school children. (ed.gov)
  • The effects can be sudden or gradual, and the damage may impact various aspects of mental and physical health. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Biomarker - a specific physical trait or a measurable biologically produced change in the body connected with a disease or health condition. (fasdoutreach.ca)
  • Part A: Covers hospital care, skilled nursing facility care, skilled nursing care, hospice and home health services. (consumeraffairs.com)
  • Masters in kinesiology programs explore advanced topics in human physical activity, particularly as movement, exercise, and sport apply to health promotion and disease prevention. (gradschools.com)
  • The stated mission of the nursing program at Samuel Merritt University is to train entry-level nurses who have the comprehensive clinical and didactic training necessary to provide highly skilled, competent health care in a wide variety of medical and surgical settings. (samuelmerritt.edu)
  • Physical Health Love and belonging http://www.youtube.com/watch? (coursehero.com)
  • By promoting good health in children, vaccines help to increase cognitive skills, physical strength and performance at school. (abpi.org.uk)
  • On this course, you will have the opportunity to learn how the healthy human body works during exercise, how to prevent or rehabilitate following injury, as well as how sport and physical activity promote health. (coventry.ac.uk)
  • Health care providers try to control the second type of damage to help limit long-term problems. (vidanthealth.com)
  • The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention states that "suicide most often occurs when stressors and health issues converge to create an experience of hopelessness and despair. (lindnercenterofhope.org)
  • While you're receiving mental health and substance abuse treatment, you'll learn how to control your anger. (promises.com)
  • A mental health professional can help you learn to control your anger. (promises.com)
  • Both evidence collected in the laboratory about biological processes that occur at the microscopic level and sophisticated statistical analysis of large volumes of data (big data) 1 have played a part. (nap.edu)
  • A laboratory animal used in research that simulates processes comparable to those that occur in humans. (nih.gov)
  • This injury often occurs during childbirth when your infant does not receive enough oxygen during delivery, resulting in a brain injury. (thefloridafirm.com)
  • events that occur over an indiv lifespan & impact the indiv. (brainscape.com)
  • 2 ) have indicated that neuroplasticity, or the ability of the brain to restructure synaptic connections, specifically in reaction to learning or experience or following injury is a process that occurs throughout the lifespan, even among the aged ( 3 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • The interdisciplinary program is organized around three core content areas: motor control, motor learning and biomechanics and prepares students to be productive in research and to pursue a career in academia. (usu.edu)
  • Thanks to 40 years of uninterrupted war, Afghans suffer from extremely high rates of post‐​traumatic stress disorder and other mental illnesses, substance abuse, and diminished impulse control. (cato.org)
  • In humans, of course, an added complication is that it is rarely tractable to study the activity of single neurons, and so these hypotheses can only be approached by considering the broader idea of mirroring-that is the idea that the neural and cognitive systems that are involved in action control also support the perception or understanding of others' actions. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • They provide mechanical and physical support to neurons and electrical insulation between neurons. (nih.gov)