Crafts, trades, professions, or other means of earning a living.
Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.
The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.
Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.
The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.
A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.
Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.
The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.
Women who are engaged in gainful activities usually outside the home.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Diseases in persons engaged in cultivating and tilling soil, growing plants, harvesting crops, raising livestock, or otherwise engaged in husbandry and farming. The diseases are not restricted to farmers in the sense of those who perform conventional farm chores: the heading applies also to those engaged in the individual activities named above, as in those only gathering harvest or in those only dusting crops.
Unforeseen occurrences, especially injuries in the course of work-related activities.
Exposure of the male parent, human or animal, to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals that may affect offspring.
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
Occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians, and are qualified by special training and, frequently, by licensure to work in supporting roles in the health care field. These occupations include, but are not limited to, medical technology, physical therapy, physician assistant, etc.
The aggregate business enterprise of building.
Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.
Global conflict involving countries of Europe, Africa, Asia, and North America that occurred between 1939 and 1945.
The scientific study of past societies through artifacts, fossils, etc.
A group of four British islands and several islets in the English Channel off the coast of France. They are known to have been occupied prehistorically. They were a part of Normandy in 933 but were united to the British crown at the time of the Norman Conquest in 1066. Guernsey and Jersey originated noted breeds of cattle. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p242)
Male parents, human or animal.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Sweden" is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. It is a country located in Northern Europe. If you have any questions related to medical topics or definitions, I would be happy to try to help answer them!
The science, art, or technology dealing with processes involved in the separation of metals from their ores, the technique of making or compounding the alloys, the techniques of working or heat-treating metals, and the mining of metals. It includes industrial metallurgy as well as metallurgical techniques employed in the preparation and working of metals used in dentistry, with special reference to orthodontic and prosthodontic appliances. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p494)
The aggregate business enterprise of manufacturing textiles. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
A recurrent contact dermatitis caused by substances found in the work place.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.
Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.
Official records of individual deaths including the cause of death certified by a physician, and any other required identifying information.
The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Finland" is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. It is a country located in Northern Europe, known officially as the Republic of Finland. If you have any questions related to medical topics or definitions, I would be happy to help with those!
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
Place or physical location of work or employment.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
Assessment of physiological capacities in relation to job requirements. It is usually done by measuring certain physiological (e.g., circulatory and respiratory) variables during a gradually increasing workload until specific limitations occur with respect to those variables.
The practice of medicine concerned with conditions affecting the health of individuals associated with the marine environment.
'Paint' is not a medical term, it's a common noun used to describe a substance composed of pigment and liquid binder, used for decorative or protective coating of various surfaces, with no direct medical relevance or application in the context you've asked.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.
The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.
Medical specialty concerned with the promotion and maintenance of the physical and mental health of employees in occupational settings.
Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
The period of history before 500 of the common era.
Insurance coverage providing compensation and medical benefits to individuals because of work-connected injuries or disease.
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
The practice of nursing by licensed, non-registered persons qualified to provide routine care to the sick.
The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.
The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.
The movement or shifting of membership between or within social classes by individuals or by groups.
A process of preserving animal hides by chemical treatment (using vegetable tannins, metallic sulfates, and sulfurized phenol compounds, or syntans) to make them immune to bacterial attack, and subsequent treatments with fats and greases to make them pliable. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)
The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.
Malformations of organs or body parts during development in utero.
Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.
The state of being retired from one's position or occupation.
Large vessels propelled by power or sail used for transportation on rivers, seas, oceans, or other navigable waters. Boats are smaller vessels propelled by oars, paddles, sail, or power; they may or may not have a deck.
The great peninsula of southwest Asia comprising most of the present countries of the Middle East. It has been known since the first millennium B.C. In early times it was divided into Arabia Petraea, the northwest part, the only part ever conquered, becoming a Roman province; Arabia Deserta, the northern part between Syria and Mesopotamia; and Arabia Felix, the main part of the peninsula but by some geographers restricted to modern Yemen. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p63)
Techniques used to determine the age of materials, based on the content and half-lives of the RADIOACTIVE ISOTOPES they contain.
A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but 'England' is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom, known for its rich history, cultural heritage, and contributions to medical science. However, in a medical context, it may refer to the location of a patient, healthcare provider, or research study, but it is not a term with a specific medical meaning.
Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.
The term "United States" in a medical context often refers to the country where a patient or study participant resides, and is not a medical term per se, but relevant for epidemiological studies, healthcare policies, and understanding differences in disease prevalence, treatment patterns, and health outcomes across various geographic locations.
'Beauty culture' is not a recognized term in medical terminology; however, if you are referring to the practice and cultural significance of beauty treatments and enhancements, it can be defined as: The societal and individual pursuit, maintenance, and modification of physical attractiveness through various cultural practices, products, and procedures, which may intersect with concepts of health, well-being, self-expression, and identity.
Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the mouth.
Great Britain is not a medical term, but a geographical name for the largest island in the British Isles, which comprises England, Scotland, and Wales, forming the major part of the United Kingdom.
The aggregate enterprise of manufacturing and technically producing chemicals. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
A substance, extract, or preparation for diffusing or imparting an agreeable or attractive smell, especially a fluid containing fragrant natural oils extracted from flowers, woods, etc., or similar synthetic oils. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.
Asbestos. Fibrous incombustible mineral composed of magnesium and calcium silicates with or without other elements. It is relatively inert chemically and used in thermal insulation and fireproofing. Inhalation of dust causes asbestosis and later lung and gastrointestinal neoplasms.
The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.
Productive or purposeful activities.
Welding is not typically considered a medical term, but rather refers to a process in manufacturing and construction involving the joining of metal components through heat or pressure, which isn't directly related to medicine or healthcare.
The distinctly human attributes and attainments of a particular society.
The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Wales" is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. It is a country that is part of the United Kingdom, located in Europe. If you have any questions about a specific medical topic, I would be happy to help answer those!
Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.
Diseases of the muscles and their associated ligaments and other connective tissue and of the bones and cartilage viewed collectively.
Smallest political subdivisions within a country at which general governmental functions are carried-out.
Chemicals used to destroy pests of any sort. The concept includes fungicides (FUNGICIDES, INDUSTRIAL); INSECTICIDES; RODENTICIDES; etc.
Statement of the position requirements, qualifications for the position, wage range, and any special conditions expected of the employee.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Air pollutants found in the work area. They are usually produced by the specific nature of the occupation.
A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.
The art and science of designing buildings and structures. More generally, it is the design of the total built environment, including town planning, urban design, and landscape architecture.
Chronic absence from work or other duty.
Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Denmark" is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. It is a country located in northern Europe. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I would be happy to try to help answer them.
Exposure of the female parent, human or animal, to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals that may affect offspring. It includes pre-conception maternal exposure.
The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.
The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.
Fields representing the joint interplay of electric and magnetic forces.
Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.
The branch of applied psychology concerned with the application of psychologic principles and methods to industrial problems including selection and training of workers, working conditions, etc.
Carcinogenic substances that are found in the environment.
Persons including soldiers involved with the armed forces.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "India" is not a medical term that can be defined in a medical context. It is a geographical location, referring to the Republic of India, a country in South Asia. If you have any questions related to medical topics or definitions, I would be happy to help with those!
Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)
Physiological or psychological effects of periods of work which may be fixed or flexible such as flexitime, work shifts, and rotating shifts.
A product of hard secondary xylem composed of CELLULOSE, hemicellulose, and LIGNANS, that is under the bark of trees and shrubs. It is used in construction and as a source of CHARCOAL and many other products.
A demographic parameter indicating a person's status with respect to marriage, divorce, widowhood, singleness, etc.
An absence from work permitted because of illness or the number of days per year for which an employer agrees to pay employees who are sick. (Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1981)
Allied health personnel who assist the professional nurse in routine duties.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Enumerations of populations usually recording identities of all persons in every place of residence with age or date of birth, sex, occupation, national origin, language, marital status, income, relation to head of household, information on the dwelling place, education, literacy, health-related data (e.g., permanent disability), etc. The census or "numbering of the people" is mentioned several times in the Old Testament. Among the Romans, censuses were intimately connected with the enumeration of troops before and after battle and probably a military necessity. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed; Garrison, An Introduction to the History of Medicine, 4th ed, p66, p119)
Hydrocarbons are organic compounds consisting entirely of hydrogen and carbon atoms, forming the basis of classes such as alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, and aromatic hydrocarbons, which play a vital role in energy production and chemical synthesis.
The science devoted to the comparative study of man.
Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.
Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.
The MUSCLES, bones (BONE AND BONES), and CARTILAGE of the body.
The study of early forms of life through fossil remains.
The social institution involving legal and/or religious sanction whereby individuals are joined together.
FIBROSIS of the hepatic parenchyma due to chronic excess ALCOHOL DRINKING.
A diffuse parenchymal lung disease caused by inhalation of dust and by tissue reaction to their presence. These inorganic, organic, particulate, or vaporized matters usually are inhaled by workers in their occupational environment, leading to the various forms (ASBESTOSIS; BYSSINOSIS; and others). Similar air pollution can also have deleterious effects on the general population.
## I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Japan" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country located in Asia, known as Nihon-koku or Nippon-koku in Japanese, and is renowned for its unique culture, advanced technology, and rich history. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to help answer them!
Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.
The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.
An infant during the first month after birth.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Delaware" is not a medical concept or condition that has a defined meaning within the medical field. It is a state in the United States. If you have any questions about a specific medical topic or condition, I would be happy to help answer those!
All deaths reported in a given population.
Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Brazil" is not a medical term or concept, it is a country located in South America, known officially as the Federative Republic of Brazil. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or science, I'd be happy to help answer those!
Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.
Respiratory tract diseases are a broad range of medical conditions that affect the nose, throat, windpipe, and lungs, impairing breathing and oxygen uptake, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pneumonia, bronchitis, influenza, tuberculosis, and sleep apnea.
'Coal mining' is not a medical term, but it refers to the process of extracting coal from the ground by mechanical or manual means.
The practical application of physical, mechanical, and mathematical principles. (Stedman, 25th ed)
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
The individuals employed by the hospital.
Hair grooming, cleansing and modifying products meant for topical application to hair, usually human. They include sprays, bleaches, dyes, conditioners, rinses, shampoos, nutrient lotions, etc.
Acute or chronic pain located in the posterior regions of the THORAX; LUMBOSACRAL REGION; or the adjacent regions.
The state of not being engaged in a gainful occupation.
The upward or downward mobility in an occupation or the change from one occupation to another.
The science of developing, caring for, or cultivating forests.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Michigan" is not a medical concept or condition that has a defined meaning within the medical field. It refers to a state in the United States, and does not have a direct medical connotation.
Significant decline in economic activity spread across the economy, lasting more than a few months, normally visible in real gross domestic product, real income, employment, industrial production, and wholesale-retail sales. (National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, www.nber.org/cycles.html, accessed 4/23/2009)
A subcategory of CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE. The disease is characterized by hypersecretion of mucus accompanied by a chronic (more than 3 months in 2 consecutive years) productive cough. Infectious agents are a major cause of chronic bronchitis.
Professionals qualified by graduation from an accredited school of nursing and by passage of a national licensing examination to practice nursing. They provide services to patients requiring assistance in recovering or maintaining their physical or mental health.
The science of designing, building or equipping mechanical devices or artificial environments to the anthropometric, physiological, or psychological requirements of the people who will use them.
Harmful and painful condition caused by overuse or overexertion of some part of the musculoskeletal system, often resulting from work-related physical activities. It is characterized by inflammation, pain, or dysfunction of the involved joints, bones, ligaments, and nerves.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Norway" is a country name and doesn't have a medical definition. If you have any medical or health-related questions, I'd be happy to help!
Voluntary use of free time for activities outside the daily routine.
New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.
The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.
A by-product of the destructive distillation of coal used as a topical antieczematic. It is an antipruritic and keratoplastic agent used also in the treatment of psoriasis and other skin conditions. Occupational exposure to soots, tars, and certain mineral oils is known to be carcinogenic according to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985) (Merck Index, 11th ed).
Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.
The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.
A distribution function used to describe the occurrence of rare events or to describe the sampling distribution of isolated counts in a continuum of time or space.
Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.
Living facilities for humans.
Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.
Created as a republic in 1918 by Czechs and Slovaks from territories formerly part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. The country split into the Czech Republic and Slovakia 1 January 1993.
The status of health in rural populations.
Phenomenon of workers' usually exhibiting overall death rates lower than those of the general population due to the fact that the severely ill and disabled are ordinarily excluded from employment.
Expenditure of energy during PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. Intensity of exertion may be measured by rate of OXYGEN CONSUMPTION; HEAT produced, or HEART RATE. Perceived exertion, a psychological measure of exertion, is included.
Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.
Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Acquisition of knowledge as a result of instruction in a formal course of study.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
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Activities associated with the disposition of the dead. It excludes cultural practices such as funeral rites.
West Germany refers to the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), which was the democratic and economically prosperous part of Germany that existed from 1949 to 1990, consisting of the states in the American, British, and French zones of occupation after World War II, and reunified with East Germany in 1990 to form a unified Federal Republic of Germany.

Permanent work incapacity, mortality and survival without work incapacity among occupations and social classes: a cohort study of ageing men in Geneva. (1/1702)

BACKGROUND: The objective of this retrospective cohort study was to investigate the burden of disability and death in men, from middle age to age of retirement, among occupational groups and classes in Geneva. METHODS: Men were included if they resided in the Canton of Geneva, were 45 years of age in 1970-1972, and were not receiving a disability pension at the start of the follow-up. The cohort of 5137 men was followed up for 20 years and linked to national registers of disability pension allowance and of causes of death. RESULTS: There was a steep upward trend in incidence of permanent work incapacity with lower social class for all causes as well as for the seven causes of disability studied. Compared with professional occupations (social class I), the relative risk (RR) of permanent work incapacity was 11.4 for partly skilled and unskilled occupations (class IV+V) (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.2-28.0). The social class gradient in mortality was in the same direction as that in work incapacity although much less steep (RR class IV+V to class I = 1.6, 95% CI : 1.1-2.2). Survival without work incapacity at the time of the 65th birthday ranged from only 57% in construction workers and labourers to 89% in science and related professionals. Unemployment in Geneva was below 1.5% during almost all the study period. CONCLUSIONS: Medically-ascertained permanent work incapacity and survival without work incapacity have shown considerably greater socioeconomic differentials than the mortality differentials.  (+info)

Failing firefighters: a survey of causes of death and ill-health retirement in serving firefighters in Strathclyde, Scotland from 1985-94. (2/1702)

During the decade beginning 1 January 1985, 887 full-time firefighters, all male, left the service of Strathclyde Fire Brigade (SFB). There were 17 deaths--compared to 64.4 expected in the Scottish male population aged 15-54 years--giving a standardized mortality ratio (SMR) of 26, and 488 ill-health retirements (IHR). None of the deaths was attributable to service, the major causes being: myocardial infarction--five, (expected = 17.3; SMR = 29); cancers--three (colon, kidney and lung) (expected = 13.6; SMR = 22); road traffic accidents--two (expected = 4.17; SMR = 48) and suicide--two (expected = 4.9; SMR = 41). Amalgamating the deaths and IHRs showed that the six most common reasons for IHR were musculoskeletal (n = 202, 40%), ocular (n = 61, 12.1%), 'others' (n = 58, 11.5%), injuries (n = 50, 9.9%), heart disease (n = 48, 9.5%) and mental disorders (n = 45, 8.9%). Over 300 IHRs (over 60%) occurred after 20 or more years service. When the IHRs were subdivided into two quinquennia, there were 203 and 302 in each period. Mean length of service during each quinquennium was 19.4 vs. 21.3 years (p = 0.003) and median length was 21 years in both periods; interquartile range was 12-26 years in the first and 17-27 years in the second period (p = 0.002), but when further broken down into diagnostic categories, the differences were not statistically significant, with the exception of means of IHRs attributed to mental disorders (14.5 vs. 19 years, p = 0.03).  (+info)

Sexual harassment and generalized workplace abuse among university employees: prevalence and mental health correlates. (3/1702)

OBJECTIVES: This study hypothesized that interpersonal workplace stressors involving sexual harassment and generalized workplace abuse are highly prevalent and significantly linked with mental health outcomes including symptomatic distress, the use and abuse of alcohol, and other drug use. METHODS: Employees in 4 university occupational groups (faculty, student, clerical, and service workers; n = 2492) were surveyed by means of a mailed self-report instrument. Cross-tabular and ordinary least squares and logistic regression analyses examined the prevalence of harassment and abuse and their association with mental health status. RESULTS: The data show high rates of harassment and abuse. Among faculty, females were subjected to higher rates; among clerical and service workers, males were subjected to higher rates. Male and female clerical and service workers experienced higher levels of particularly severe mistreatment. Generalized abuse was more prevalent than harassment for all groups. Both harassment and abuse were significantly linked to most mental health outcomes for men and women. CONCLUSIONS: Interpersonally abusive workplace dynamics constitute a significant public health problem that merits increased intervention and prevention strategies.  (+info)

Low mortality rates in industrial cohort studies due to selection for work and survival in the industry. (4/1702)

Occupational groups are often described as being relatively healthy because their mortality rates are lower than those of the national average. Although correct this confuses the issue for those who are interested in assessing the effects of exposure to a particular chemical. In a further analysis of data collected in a study of all men ever exposed to vinyl chloride monomer in the manufacture of polyvinyl chloride in Great Britain, three factors have been shown to contribute to the low mortality rates that were observed. The three factors: the selection of a healthy population for employment, the survival in the industry of the healthier men, and the length of time that this population has been pursued, have been quantified. The mortality experience within five years of entering this industry was shown to be as low as 37% of that expected; for circulatory disease and respiratory disease it was as low as 21%. There was a progressive increase in standardized mortality ratio with the length of time since entry so that the effect had almost disappeared 15 years after entry. To avoid confounding the selection effect with the survival effect the latter was measured by separating men who survived 15 years after entering the industry according to whether or not they were still in the industry after this period. Those who had left experienced an overall standardized mortality ratio some 50% higher than those still in the industry. This effect, although consistent in the age groups between 25 and 74 years and for all cause groups studied, was greatest in those aged between 25 and 44 years and for lung cancer and respiratory disease.  (+info)

Adrenosympathetic overactivity under conditions of work stress. (5/1702)

Serial measurements of urinary adrenaline, noradrenaline, and 11-hydroxycorticosteroid excretion were performed on 32 healthy men under two conditions of work stress; piecework and work on assembly line. A statistically significant increase in adrenaline, noradrenaline, and 11-hydroxycorticosteroids was observed for piecework and assembly line workers compared with salaried and 'ordinary' workers. The results support the assumption that psychosocial factors of an everyday type have significant effects on the sympathoadrenomedullary and adrenocortical function.  (+info)

Dynamic strength of the quadriceps muscle and sports activity. (6/1702)

The study objectives were to examine the dynamic strength of the quadriceps muscle in athletes, and investigate its association with participation in sport. The study comprised 168 active competitive non-pregnant athletes, aged 14-24 years. The dynamic strength of their quadriceps muscle was measured, and they answered a questionnaire about sports activity and occupation. The dynamic strength of the quadriceps muscle was significantly higher in men than in women, and was positively associated with body weight, years of jogging, years of soccer, and weekly hours of basketball. In conclusion, the dynamic strength of the quadriceps muscle seems to be associated with sports activity. The results suggest sport specific adaptation, which may reflect high levels of running and jumping activity.  (+info)

An investigation of factors contributing to styrene and styrene-7,8-oxide exposures in the reinforced-plastics industry. (7/1702)

During the manufacturing of reinforced plastics, large amounts of styrene and trace quantities of styrene-7,8-oxide (SO) are released. Since previous work suggests that inhalation of even small amounts of SO might be an important health risk, we investigated several possible factors contributing to styrene and SO exposure during the manufacture of reinforced plastics. Factors related to job type, worker and the type and quantity of styrene-containing resins were investigated using mixed-effects multiple linear regression models. Overall, SO exposure levels were positively correlated with styrene exposure levels. However, this correlation was statistically significant only among hand laminators who had the highest exposures to both styrene and SO. An important factor for predicting both styrene and SO concentrations was the type of resin used, while the quantity of resin consumed was predictive of styrene but not of SO exposure. Since So exposure appears to be associated with factors other than coexposure to styrene, more effort should be placed on investigating emissions of SO per se. The type of mixed-models regression analysis employed in this study can be used for clarifying the underlying patterns for exposures to styrene and SO as well as for evaluating preventive measures.  (+info)

Comparative personal exposures to organic dusts and endotoxin. (8/1702)

The aims of the study were to provide valid comparative data for personal exposures to dust and endotoxins for different occupations and to calculate comparative data for the contamination of organic dusts with endotoxin. Nine different occupational settings were studied, drawn from the textile, agricultural and animal handling industries. Samples were collected by personal sampling techniques, using the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) sampling head, glass fibre filters and rechargeable sampling pumps. The dust exposures were calculated by gravimetric analysis and using the calculated volume of air sampled were expressed as mg/m3. Endotoxin exposures were measured using a simple water extraction from the collected dusts, followed by a quantitative turbidimetric assay. Results were expressed as ng/m3, using the calculated volume of air sampled. In addition, the levels of the contamination of dusts with endotoxin for individual industries were expressed as ng/mg of collected dust. Two hundred and fifty-nine samples, collected from 9 different industries and across 36 different sites were analysed. This represented a sampling rate of 25% for the total work force. The average sampling time was 4.62 h. For all the dusts collected, a significant correlation between the collected dust and endotoxin was seen (r = 0.7 and p < 0.001). The highest dust exposures occurred during cleaning activities (grain handling: 72.5 mg/m3). The individuals exposed to the highest median level of dust and endotoxin were the animal handlers (poultry handlers, dust: 11.53 mg/m3, endotoxin: 71,995 ng/m3). Weaving and mushroom cultivation had the lowest exposures for dust and endotoxins. The mostly highly contaminated dusts (median values expressed as ng of endotoxin per mg of collected dust) were found in the animal handling (poultry: 1,030 ng/mg, swine: 152 ng/mg) and cotton spinning (522 ng/mg) industries. Processing of cotton and wool fibres was found to reduce the levels of contamination of dusts with endotoxin. In the study, valid comparative data for personal exposures to organic dusts and endotoxins have been presented. The highest exposures were found amongst animal handlers and during cleaning activities. The results highlight that dust exposures are greater in a number of industries than the set exposure standards. In addition, endotoxin exposures are found to be greater than levels at which harmful effects have been demonstrated.  (+info)

In the context of medical terminology, "occupations" generally refers to the activities or tasks that a person performs as part of their daily life and routines. This can include both paid work or employment, as well as unpaid activities such as household chores, hobbies, and self-care. The term is often used in the field of occupational therapy, which focuses on helping individuals develop, recover, and maintain the skills needed for participation in their daily occupations and improving their overall quality of life. Additionally, Occupational Medicine is a medical specialty that focuses on the prevention and management of job-related injuries and illnesses, as well as promoting health and productivity in the workplace.

Occupational diseases are health conditions or illnesses that occur as a result of exposure to hazards in the workplace. These hazards can include physical, chemical, and biological agents, as well as ergonomic factors and work-related psychosocial stressors. Examples of occupational diseases include respiratory illnesses caused by inhaling dust or fumes, hearing loss due to excessive noise exposure, and musculoskeletal disorders caused by repetitive movements or poor ergonomics. The development of an occupational disease is typically related to the nature of the work being performed and the conditions in which it is carried out. It's important to note that these diseases can be prevented or minimized through proper risk assessment, implementation of control measures, and adherence to safety regulations.

Occupational exposure refers to the contact of an individual with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents as a result of their job or occupation. This can include exposure to hazardous substances such as chemicals, heavy metals, or dusts; physical agents such as noise, radiation, or ergonomic stressors; and biological agents such as viruses, bacteria, or fungi.

Occupational exposure can occur through various routes, including inhalation, skin contact, ingestion, or injection. Prolonged or repeated exposure to these hazards can increase the risk of developing acute or chronic health conditions, such as respiratory diseases, skin disorders, neurological damage, or cancer.

Employers have a legal and ethical responsibility to minimize occupational exposures through the implementation of appropriate control measures, including engineering controls, administrative controls, personal protective equipment, and training programs. Regular monitoring and surveillance of workers' health can also help identify and prevent potential health hazards in the workplace.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Industry" is a general term that refers to a specific branch of economic activity, or a particular way of producing goods or services. It is not a medical term with a defined meaning within the field of medicine.

However, if you are referring to the term "industrious," which can be used to describe someone who is diligent and hard-working, it could be applied in a medical context to describe a patient's level of engagement and effort in their own care. For example, a patient who is conscientious about taking their medications as prescribed, following through with recommended treatments, and making necessary lifestyle changes to manage their condition might be described as "industrious" by their healthcare provider.

"Employment" is a term that is commonly used in the context of social sciences and law rather than medicine. It generally refers to the state or condition of being employed, which means an individual is engaged in a job or occupation, providing services to an employer in exchange for compensation, such as wages or salary. Employment may involve various types of work arrangements, including full-time, part-time, temporary, contract, or freelance positions.

In the context of medicine and public health, employment is often discussed in relation to its impact on health outcomes, healthcare access, and socioeconomic status. For instance, research has shown that unemployment or underemployment can negatively affect mental and physical health, while stable employment can contribute to better health outcomes and overall well-being. Additionally, employment may influence an individual's ability to afford healthcare, medications, and other essential needs, which can impact their health status.

In summary, the medical definition of 'employment' pertains to the state or condition of being engaged in a job or occupation, providing services to an employer for compensation. Employment has significant implications for health outcomes, healthcare access, and socioeconomic status.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "social class" is not a term that has a medical definition. It is a sociological concept that refers to the grouping of individuals in a society based on their shared economic and social positions. This can include factors such as income, education, occupation, and wealth.

However, social class can have an impact on health outcomes and access to healthcare. For example, people in lower socioeconomic groups are more likely to experience chronic diseases, mental health disorders, and have limited access to quality healthcare services compared to those in higher socioeconomic groups. This relationship is often referred to as the "social determinants of health."

"Health occupations" is a broad term that refers to careers or professions involved in the delivery, management, and improvement of health services. These occupations encompass a wide range of roles, including but not limited to:

1. Healthcare providers: This group includes medical doctors (MDs), doctors of osteopathic medicine (DOs), nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, dentists, dental hygienists, optometrists, pharmacists, and other professionals who provide direct patient care.
2. Allied health professionals: These are healthcare workers who provide diagnostic, technical, therapeutic, and support services. Examples include respiratory therapists, radiologic technologists, dietitians, occupational therapists, physical therapists, speech-language pathologists, and medical laboratory scientists.
3. Public health professionals: This group focuses on preventing diseases and promoting community health. They work in various settings, such as government agencies, non-profit organizations, and academic institutions, addressing public health issues like infectious disease control, environmental health, health education, and policy development.
4. Health administrators and managers: These professionals oversee the operations of healthcare facilities, including hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, and managed care organizations. They ensure that resources are used efficiently, that services meet quality standards, and that regulatory requirements are met.
5. Health educators: These individuals work in various settings to promote health awareness and teach individuals and communities about healthy behaviors and practices.
6. Health information specialists: Professionals in this field manage and analyze health data, maintain medical records, and ensure the security and privacy of patient information.

Overall, health occupations play a crucial role in maintaining, promoting, and restoring the health and well-being of individuals and communities.

Occupational health is a branch of medicine that focuses on the physical, mental, and social well-being of workers in all types of jobs. The goal of occupational health is to prevent work-related injuries, illnesses, and disabilities, while also promoting the overall health and safety of employees. This may involve identifying and assessing potential hazards in the workplace, implementing controls to reduce or eliminate those hazards, providing education and training to workers on safe practices, and conducting medical surveillance and screenings to detect early signs of work-related health problems.

Occupational health also involves working closely with employers, employees, and other stakeholders to develop policies and programs that support the health and well-being of workers. This may include promoting healthy lifestyles, providing access to mental health resources, and supporting return-to-work programs for injured or ill workers. Ultimately, the goal of occupational health is to create a safe and healthy work environment that enables employees to perform their jobs effectively and efficiently, while also protecting their long-term health and well-being.

I'm not sure what you mean by "Women, Working" as it is not a medical term. However, I can provide some information about the relationship between women's health and work.

Women's occupational health is an important area of study that focuses on the physical, mental, and social well-being of women in the workplace. Women face unique health challenges in the workplace, including exposure to hazardous substances, musculoskeletal disorders, sexual harassment, and job stress.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines occupational health as "the promotion and maintenance of the highest degree of physical, mental and social well-being of workers in all occupations." This definition applies to women as much as it does to men. However, due to various factors such as gender roles, societal expectations, and discrimination, women may face additional barriers to achieving optimal health in the workplace.

Therefore, "Women, Working" can be defined in a broader context as the study of the physical, mental, and social well-being of women in relation to their work and employment. This definition encompasses various aspects of women's occupational health, including but not limited to exposure to hazards, job stress, work-life balance, and gender discrimination.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

"Agricultural Workers' Diseases" is a term used to describe a variety of health conditions and illnesses that are associated with agricultural work. These can include both acute and chronic conditions, and can be caused by a range of factors including exposure to chemicals, dusts, allergens, physical injuries, and biological agents such as bacteria and viruses.

Some common examples of Agricultural Workers' Diseases include:

1. Pesticide poisoning: This can occur when agricultural workers are exposed to high levels of pesticides or other chemicals used in farming. Symptoms can range from mild skin irritation to severe neurological damage, depending on the type and amount of chemical exposure.
2. Respiratory diseases: Agricultural workers can be exposed to a variety of dusts and allergens that can cause respiratory problems such as asthma, bronchitis, and farmer's lung. These conditions are often caused by prolonged exposure to moldy hay, grain dust, or other organic materials.
3. Musculoskeletal injuries: Agricultural workers are at risk of developing musculoskeletal injuries due to the physical demands of their job. This can include back pain, repetitive strain injuries, and sprains and strains from lifting heavy objects.
4. Zoonotic diseases: Agricultural workers who come into contact with animals are at risk of contracting zoonotic diseases, which are illnesses that can be transmitted between animals and humans. Examples include Q fever, brucellosis, and leptospirosis.
5. Heat-related illnesses: Agricultural workers who work outside in hot weather are at risk of heat-related illnesses such as heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

Prevention of Agricultural Workers' Diseases involves a combination of engineering controls, personal protective equipment, and training to help workers understand the risks associated with their job and how to minimize exposure to hazards.

Occupational accidents are defined as unexpected and unplanned events that occur in the context of work and lead to physical or mental harm. These accidents can be caused by a variety of factors, including unsafe working conditions, lack of proper training, or failure to use appropriate personal protective equipment. Occupational accidents can result in injuries, illnesses, or even death, and can have significant impacts on individuals, families, and communities. In many cases, occupational accidents are preventable through the implementation of effective safety measures and risk management strategies.

"Paternal exposure" is not a standard term in medicine, but it generally refers to the potential impact on offspring due to exposures experienced by the father prior to conception. These exposures could include environmental factors such as radiation, chemicals, or infections, as well as lifestyle factors such as smoking, alcohol use, or drug use. Some studies suggest that these exposures may have an effect on the developing embryo or fetus, but more research is needed to fully understand the extent and nature of these effects.

Socioeconomic factors are a range of interconnected conditions and influences that affect the opportunities and resources a person or group has to maintain and improve their health and well-being. These factors include:

1. Economic stability: This includes employment status, job security, income level, and poverty status. Lower income and lack of employment are associated with poorer health outcomes.
2. Education: Higher levels of education are generally associated with better health outcomes. Education can affect a person's ability to access and understand health information, as well as their ability to navigate the healthcare system.
3. Social and community context: This includes factors such as social support networks, discrimination, and community safety. Strong social supports and positive community connections are associated with better health outcomes, while discrimination and lack of safety can negatively impact health.
4. Healthcare access and quality: Access to affordable, high-quality healthcare is an important socioeconomic factor that can significantly impact a person's health. Factors such as insurance status, availability of providers, and cultural competency of healthcare systems can all affect healthcare access and quality.
5. Neighborhood and built environment: The physical conditions in which people live, work, and play can also impact their health. Factors such as housing quality, transportation options, availability of healthy foods, and exposure to environmental hazards can all influence health outcomes.

Socioeconomic factors are often interrelated and can have a cumulative effect on health outcomes. For example, someone who lives in a low-income neighborhood with limited access to healthy foods and safe parks may also face challenges related to employment, education, and healthcare access that further impact their health. Addressing socioeconomic factors is an important part of promoting health equity and reducing health disparities.

Allied health occupations refer to a group of healthcare professionals who provide a range of diagnostic, technical, therapeutic, and support services essential for the proper diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of patients. These professions include, but are not limited to:

1. Audiologists: Professionals who diagnose, evaluate, and treat hearing and balance disorders.
2. Dietitians/Nutritionists: Healthcare professionals who specialize in food and nutrition, and help individuals make healthy eating choices to prevent or manage chronic diseases.
3. Occupational Therapists: Professionals who help patients improve their ability to perform everyday activities through the use of therapeutic exercises and adaptive equipment.
4. Physical Therapists: Healthcare professionals who diagnose and treat movement disorders, injuries, and other physical impairments using exercise, massage, and other techniques.
5. Respiratory Therapists: Professionals who evaluate, diagnose, and treat breathing disorders and cardiopulmonary systems.
6. Speech-Language Pathologists: Healthcare professionals who diagnose and treat communication and swallowing disorders in individuals of all ages.
7. Diagnostic Medical Sonographers: Professionals who use ultrasound technology to create images of internal organs, tissues, and blood vessels for diagnostic purposes.
8. Radiologic Technologists: Healthcare professionals who perform medical imaging examinations such as X-rays, CT scans, and MRIs.
9. Rehabilitation Counselors: Professionals who help individuals with disabilities overcome barriers to employment, education, and independent living.
10. Social Workers: Healthcare professionals who provide emotional support, counseling, and advocacy services to patients and their families.

Allied health occupations are an essential part of the healthcare system and work collaboratively with physicians, nurses, and other healthcare providers to ensure high-quality patient care.

The construction industry is a sector that involves the building, alteration, or repair of infrastructure and buildings. This industry includes various activities such as site preparation, demolition, new construction, additions, alterations, maintenance, and repairs. It can be further divided into subsectors such as residential, commercial, industrial, and heavy civil construction.

Construction projects may involve the use of a wide range of materials, equipment, and techniques, and often require collaboration between architects, engineers, contractors, and other professionals to ensure that projects are completed safely, on time, and within budget. The construction industry is an important contributor to the economy, providing jobs and contributing to the development of infrastructure and housing.

Educational status refers to the level or stage of education that a person has reached. It can be used to describe an individual's educational background, achievements, and qualifications. Educational status can be categorized in various ways, including by level (e.g., elementary school, high school, college, graduate school), years of schooling completed, or type of degree earned (e.g., bachelor's, master's, doctoral).

In medical settings, educational status may be used as a demographic variable to describe the characteristics of a patient population or to identify potential disparities in health outcomes based on education level. Research has shown that higher levels of education are often associated with better health outcomes, including lower rates of chronic diseases and improved mental health. Therefore, understanding a patient's educational status can help healthcare providers tailor their care and education strategies to meet the unique needs and challenges of each individual.

I must clarify that there is no medical definition for "World War II." World War II (1939-1945) was a major global conflict involving many of the world's nations, including all of the great powers, organized into two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was marked by significant events, such as the Holocaust, and had profound social, economic, and political consequences. The medical field did play a crucial role during this time, with advancements in battlefield medicine, military medicine, and the treatment of injuries and diseases on a large scale. However, there is no specific medical definition or concept associated with World War II itself.

I believe you may have made a typo in your question. "Archaeology" is the scientific study of past human cultures and societies through the recovery, examination, and analysis of material remains such as artifacts, buildings, biofacts (e.g., bones, shells), and cultural landscapes. It is not typically associated with medical definitions. If you intended to ask for a different term related to medicine or healthcare, please let me know so I can provide the correct information.

For more information about archaeology, you may be interested in visiting the World Archaeological Congress () or the Society for American Archaeology () websites to learn more about this fascinating field of study.

The Channel Islands are not a medical term, but a geographical term referring to a group of islands in the English Channel, off the coast of France. The largest of these islands is Jersey, followed by Guernsey, Alderney, Sark, and Herm. These islands are British Crown Dependencies, meaning they are self-governing possessions of the British Crown, but not part of the United Kingdom or its constituent countries.

Therefore, there is no medical definition associated with the Channel Islands. However, it's worth noting that each island has its own healthcare system and medical facilities, which may have different practices and guidelines compared to those in the UK or other countries.

The term "Fathers" is a general term used to describe male parents or parental figures. It does not have a specific medical definition. In the context of genetics and reproduction, the father is the biological male who contributes his sperm to fertilize an egg, resulting in conception and pregnancy. However, it's important to note that there are many different types of families and parental relationships, and not all fathers are biological parents or male.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Sweden" is not a medical term. It is a country located in northern Europe. If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help answer those!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "metallurgy" is not a term that has a medical definition. Metallurgy is a branch of materials science that deals with the properties, physical and chemical behavior, and production of metals. It involves studying the techniques and processes used to isolate, alloy, and fabricate various types of metal products. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I'd be happy to try to help answer those for you!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Textile Industry" and "medical definition" are not related. The textile industry is the overall system of designing, producing, and distributing clothing and their raw materials, which include fiber, yarn, and cloth. It involves several processes such as spinning, weaving, knitting, dyeing, and finishing.

If you're looking for a medical term or definition, please provide me with the term so I can assist you better.

Occupational dermatitis is a specific type of contact dermatitis that results from exposure to certain substances or conditions in the workplace. It can be caused by direct contact with chemicals, irritants, or allergens present in the work environment. This condition typically affects the skin on the hands and forearms but can also involve other areas of the body, depending on the nature of the exposure.

There are two main types of occupational dermatitis:

1. Irritant contact dermatitis (ICD): This type occurs when the skin comes into direct contact with an irritating substance, leading to redness, swelling, itching, and sometimes blistering. Common irritants include solvents, detergents, oils, and other industrial chemicals.
2. Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD): This type is a result of an allergic reaction to a specific substance. The immune system identifies the allergen as harmful and mounts a response, causing skin inflammation. Common allergens include latex, metals (such as nickel), and certain plants (like poison ivy).

Prevention measures for occupational dermatitis include using appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) like gloves, masks, and aprons, as well as practicing good hygiene, such as washing hands regularly and avoiding touching the face with contaminated hands. If you suspect you have developed occupational dermatitis, consult a healthcare professional for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Prevalence, in medical terms, refers to the total number of people in a given population who have a particular disease or condition at a specific point in time, or over a specified period. It is typically expressed as a percentage or a ratio of the number of cases to the size of the population. Prevalence differs from incidence, which measures the number of new cases that develop during a certain period.

A case-control study is an observational research design used to identify risk factors or causes of a disease or health outcome. In this type of study, individuals with the disease or condition (cases) are compared with similar individuals who do not have the disease or condition (controls). The exposure history or other characteristics of interest are then compared between the two groups to determine if there is an association between the exposure and the disease.

Case-control studies are often used when it is not feasible or ethical to conduct a randomized controlled trial, as they can provide valuable insights into potential causes of diseases or health outcomes in a relatively short period of time and at a lower cost than other study designs. However, because case-control studies rely on retrospective data collection, they are subject to biases such as recall bias and selection bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, it is important to carefully design and conduct case-control studies to minimize these potential sources of bias.

"Sex factors" is a term used in medicine and epidemiology to refer to the differences in disease incidence, prevalence, or response to treatment that are observed between males and females. These differences can be attributed to biological differences such as genetics, hormones, and anatomy, as well as social and cultural factors related to gender.

For example, some conditions such as autoimmune diseases, depression, and osteoporosis are more common in women, while others such as cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancer are more prevalent in men. Additionally, sex differences have been observed in the effectiveness and side effects of various medications and treatments.

It is important to consider sex factors in medical research and clinical practice to ensure that patients receive appropriate and effective care.

A cross-sectional study is a type of observational research design that examines the relationship between variables at one point in time. It provides a snapshot or a "cross-section" of the population at a particular moment, allowing researchers to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition and identify potential risk factors or associations.

In a cross-sectional study, data is collected from a sample of participants at a single time point, and the variables of interest are measured simultaneously. This design can be used to investigate the association between exposure and outcome, but it cannot establish causality because it does not follow changes over time.

Cross-sectional studies can be conducted using various data collection methods, such as surveys, interviews, or medical examinations. They are often used in epidemiology to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition in a population and to identify potential risk factors that may contribute to its development. However, because cross-sectional studies only provide a snapshot of the population at one point in time, they cannot account for changes over time or determine whether exposure preceded the outcome.

Therefore, while cross-sectional studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying potential associations between variables, further research using other study designs, such as cohort or case-control studies, is necessary to establish causality and confirm any findings.

The odds ratio (OR) is a statistical measure used in epidemiology and research to estimate the association between an exposure and an outcome. It represents the odds that an event will occur in one group versus the odds that it will occur in another group, assuming that all other factors are held constant.

In medical research, the odds ratio is often used to quantify the strength of the relationship between a risk factor (exposure) and a disease outcome. An OR of 1 indicates no association between the exposure and the outcome, while an OR greater than 1 suggests that there is a positive association between the two. Conversely, an OR less than 1 implies a negative association.

It's important to note that the odds ratio is not the same as the relative risk (RR), which compares the incidence rates of an outcome in two groups. While the OR can approximate the RR when the outcome is rare, they are not interchangeable and can lead to different conclusions about the association between an exposure and an outcome.

Smoking is not a medical condition, but it's a significant health risk behavior. Here is the definition from a public health perspective:

Smoking is the act of inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning tobacco that is commonly consumed through cigarettes, pipes, and cigars. The smoke contains over 7,000 chemicals, including nicotine, tar, carbon monoxide, and numerous toxic and carcinogenic substances. These toxins contribute to a wide range of diseases and health conditions, such as lung cancer, heart disease, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and various other cancers, as well as adverse reproductive outcomes and negative impacts on the developing fetus during pregnancy. Smoking is highly addictive due to the nicotine content, which makes quitting smoking a significant challenge for many individuals.

A death certificate is a formal legal document that records the date, location, and cause of a person's death. It is typically issued by a medical professional, such as a physician or medical examiner, and is used to establish the fact of death for legal purposes. The information on a death certificate may be used for a variety of purposes, including settling the deceased person's estate, assisting with insurance claims, and supporting public health surveillance and research.

In order to complete a death certificate, the medical professional must determine the cause of death and any significant contributing conditions. This may involve reviewing the deceased person's medical history, conducting a physical examination, and ordering laboratory tests or autopsy. The cause of death is typically described using standardized codes from the International Classification of Diseases (ICD).

It is important to note that the information on a death certificate is considered confidential and is protected by law. Only authorized individuals, such as the deceased person's next of kin or legal representative, are permitted to access the document.

I apologize for any confusion, but "agriculture" is not a term that has a medical definition. Agriculture refers to the cultivation and breeding of animals, plants, and fungi for food, fiber, biofuel, medicinal plants, and other products used to sustain and enhance human life. It is an important industry and practice that has been developed over thousands of years and continues to play a critical role in global food production and security.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Finland" is not a medical term. It is a country located in Northern Europe, known officially as the Republic of Finland. If you have any questions about medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "workplace" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. The term "workplace" generally refers to a place where people work or carry out their jobs. It could be an office, a factory, a construction site, a retail store, or any other location where work-related activities take place.

If you're looking for a term related to health or medicine that describes a physical location, some examples might include "healthcare facility," "clinic," "hospital," "operating room," or "examination room." If you could provide more context or clarify what you're looking for, I'd be happy to help further!

In epidemiology, the incidence of a disease is defined as the number of new cases of that disease within a specific population over a certain period of time. It is typically expressed as a rate, with the number of new cases in the numerator and the size of the population at risk in the denominator. Incidence provides information about the risk of developing a disease during a given time period and can be used to compare disease rates between different populations or to monitor trends in disease occurrence over time.

A Work Capacity Evaluation (WCE) is a set of systematic and objective procedures used to assess an individual's physical and cognitive abilities in relation to their ability to perform specific job tasks. It is typically conducted by a team of healthcare professionals, including occupational therapists, physiatrists, and kinesiologists, who evaluate the person's strength, endurance, flexibility, range of motion, sensation, balance, coordination, and cognitive abilities.

The goal of a WCE is to determine an individual's functional limitations and capabilities, and to provide recommendations regarding their ability to return to work or perform specific job tasks. The evaluation may include a variety of tests and measurements, such as lifting and carrying capacities, fine motor skills, visual tracking, and problem-solving abilities.

The results of the WCE can be used to develop a treatment plan, modify job duties, or determine eligibility for disability benefits. It is an important tool in helping individuals with injuries or disabilities return to work safely and effectively, while also ensuring that employers have the information they need to accommodate their employees' needs.

Naval medicine, also known as marine medicine or maritime medicine, is a branch of medicine that deals with the prevention and treatment of diseases and injuries that occur in naval or maritime environments. This can include conditions related to sea travel, such as motion sickness, decompression sickness, and infectious diseases spread through contaminated water or food. It also covers occupational health concerns for naval personnel, including hearing loss from exposure to loud noises, respiratory problems from inhaling fumes, and musculoskeletal injuries from heavy lifting. Additionally, naval medicine may address the unique mental health challenges faced by naval personnel, such as those related to isolation, stress, and combat.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "paint" is not a medical term. In a general sense, paint is a substance that is applied as a protective or decorative coating to various surfaces. If you have any medical questions or terms you would like me to clarify, please let me know!

"Age factors" refer to the effects, changes, or differences that age can have on various aspects of health, disease, and medical care. These factors can encompass a wide range of issues, including:

1. Physiological changes: As people age, their bodies undergo numerous physical changes that can affect how they respond to medications, illnesses, and medical procedures. For example, older adults may be more sensitive to certain drugs or have weaker immune systems, making them more susceptible to infections.
2. Chronic conditions: Age is a significant risk factor for many chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and arthritis. As a result, age-related medical issues are common and can impact treatment decisions and outcomes.
3. Cognitive decline: Aging can also lead to cognitive changes, including memory loss and decreased decision-making abilities. These changes can affect a person's ability to understand and comply with medical instructions, leading to potential complications in their care.
4. Functional limitations: Older adults may experience physical limitations that impact their mobility, strength, and balance, increasing the risk of falls and other injuries. These limitations can also make it more challenging for them to perform daily activities, such as bathing, dressing, or cooking.
5. Social determinants: Age-related factors, such as social isolation, poverty, and lack of access to transportation, can impact a person's ability to obtain necessary medical care and affect their overall health outcomes.

Understanding age factors is critical for healthcare providers to deliver high-quality, patient-centered care that addresses the unique needs and challenges of older adults. By taking these factors into account, healthcare providers can develop personalized treatment plans that consider a person's age, physical condition, cognitive abilities, and social circumstances.

Health surveys are research studies that collect data from a sample population to describe the current health status, health behaviors, and healthcare utilization of a particular group or community. These surveys may include questions about various aspects of health such as physical health, mental health, chronic conditions, lifestyle habits, access to healthcare services, and demographic information. The data collected from health surveys can be used to monitor trends in health over time, identify disparities in health outcomes, develop and evaluate public health programs and policies, and inform resource allocation decisions. Examples of national health surveys include the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS).

"Sex distribution" is a term used to describe the number of males and females in a study population or sample. It can be presented as a simple count, a percentage, or a ratio. This information is often used in research to identify any differences in health outcomes, disease prevalence, or response to treatment between males and females. Additionally, understanding sex distribution can help researchers ensure that their studies are representative of the general population and can inform the design of future studies.

Occupational medicine is a branch of clinical medicine that deals with the prevention and management of diseases and injuries that may arise in the workplace or as a result of work-related activities. It involves evaluating the health risks associated with various jobs, recommending measures to reduce these risks, providing medical care for workers who become ill or injured on the job, and promoting overall health and wellness in the workplace. Occupational medicine physicians may also be involved in developing policies and procedures related to workplace safety, disability management, and return-to-work programs. The ultimate goal of occupational medicine is to help ensure that workers are able to perform their jobs safely and effectively while maintaining their overall health and well-being.

In medical terms, "dust" is not defined as a specific medical condition or disease. However, generally speaking, dust refers to small particles of solid matter that can be found in the air and can come from various sources, such as soil, pollen, hair, textiles, paper, or plastic.

Exposure to certain types of dust, such as those containing allergens, chemicals, or harmful pathogens, can cause a range of health problems, including respiratory issues like asthma, allergies, and lung diseases. Prolonged exposure to certain types of dust, such as silica or asbestos, can even lead to serious conditions like silicosis or mesothelioma.

Therefore, it is important for individuals who work in environments with high levels of dust to take appropriate precautions, such as wearing masks and respirators, to minimize their exposure and reduce the risk of health problems.

I'm not a medical professional, but the term "History, Ancient" is not a medical term per se. However, in a broader context, it could refer to the study of ancient medical practices, theories, and beliefs that existed in civilizations prior to the Middle Ages or Classical Antiquity. This might include the examination of ancient texts, artifacts, and archaeological evidence to understand how illnesses were treated and viewed in these historical periods. It forms an essential part of the evolution of medical knowledge and practices over time.

Workers' compensation is a form of insurance that provides medical benefits, wage replacement, and rehabilitation expenses to employees who are injured or become ill as a direct result of their job. It is designed to compensate the employee for lost wages and cover medical expenses due to work-related injuries or illnesses, while also protecting employers from potential lawsuits. Workers' compensation laws vary by state but generally require employers to carry this insurance and provide coverage for eligible employees. The program is typically funded through employer premiums and is administered by individual states.

Logistic models, specifically logistic regression models, are a type of statistical analysis used in medical and epidemiological research to identify the relationship between the risk of a certain health outcome or disease (dependent variable) and one or more independent variables, such as demographic factors, exposure variables, or other clinical measurements.

In contrast to linear regression models, logistic regression models are used when the dependent variable is binary or dichotomous in nature, meaning it can only take on two values, such as "disease present" or "disease absent." The model uses a logistic function to estimate the probability of the outcome based on the independent variables.

Logistic regression models are useful for identifying risk factors and estimating the strength of associations between exposures and health outcomes, adjusting for potential confounders, and predicting the probability of an outcome given certain values of the independent variables. They can also be used to develop clinical prediction rules or scores that can aid in decision-making and patient care.

"Practical Nursing" is a term used to describe the hands-on, technical aspects of nursing care provided to patients. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), practical nursing involves the "performance of directly observable and measurable tasks in caring for persons or families." These tasks may include:

* Monitoring vital signs such as blood pressure, temperature, pulse, and respirations
* Administering medications and treatments prescribed by a healthcare provider
* Assisting with activities of daily living (ADLs) such as bathing, dressing, grooming, and toileting
* Collecting and documenting patient health data and reporting changes in condition to the nursing or medical team
* Providing patient education on self-care and disease management

Practical nurses typically work under the supervision of a registered nurse (RN) or other healthcare provider. They may work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, long-term care facilities, clinics, and home health agencies. In some regions, practical nursing is also referred to as licensed practical nursing (LPN) or vocational nursing (VN).

"Age distribution" is a term used to describe the number of individuals within a population or sample that fall into different age categories. It is often presented in the form of a graph, table, or chart, and can provide important information about the demographic structure of a population.

The age distribution of a population can be influenced by a variety of factors, including birth rates, mortality rates, migration patterns, and aging. Public health officials and researchers use age distribution data to inform policies and programs related to healthcare, social services, and other areas that affect the well-being of populations.

For example, an age distribution graph might show a larger number of individuals in the younger age categories, indicating a population with a high birth rate. Alternatively, it might show a larger number of individuals in the older age categories, indicating a population with a high life expectancy or an aging population. Understanding the age distribution of a population can help policymakers plan for future needs and allocate resources more effectively.

In the context of healthcare, workload refers to the amount and complexity of tasks or responsibilities that a healthcare professional is expected to perform within a given period. This can include direct patient care activities such as physical assessments, treatments, and procedures, as well as indirect care activities like documentation, communication with other healthcare team members, and quality improvement initiatives.

Workload can be measured in various ways, including the number of patients assigned to a provider, the amount of time spent on direct patient care, or the complexity of the medical conditions being managed. High workloads can impact the quality of care provided, as well as healthcare professional burnout and job satisfaction. Therefore, it is essential to monitor and manage workload effectively to ensure safe and high-quality patient care.

"Social mobility" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a sociological concept that refers to the ability of individuals, families, or groups to move up or down in social status based on their access to resources, education, occupation, and other factors. However, in some contexts, social mobility may be discussed in relation to health disparities and inequities, as socioeconomic position can have a significant impact on health outcomes and access to care. For example, research has shown that individuals from lower socioeconomic backgrounds often have poorer health outcomes than those from higher socioeconomic backgrounds, due in part to factors such as limited access to quality healthcare, education, and healthy food options. Therefore, improving social mobility may be seen as a way to address these health disparities and promote greater equity in health outcomes.

"Tanning" is not a medical term per se, but rather a common term used to describe the process of skin darkening as a result of exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun or artificial sources like tanning beds. Medically speaking, this process is known as "induction of cutaneous pigmentation."

The UV radiation stimulates the production of melanin, a pigment that absorbs and scatters UV light to protect the skin from further damage. There are two types of melanin: eumelanin (black or brown) and pheomelanin (yellow or red). The type and amount of melanin produced determine the color and tone of an individual's skin, hair, and eyes.

It is important to note that excessive sun exposure and tanning can lead to harmful health effects, including premature aging of the skin, eye damage, and increased risk of skin cancer. Therefore, it is recommended to protect the skin with appropriate clothing, hats, sunglasses, and sunscreen when exposed to UV radiation.

In the context of medicine, risk is the probability or likelihood of an adverse health effect or the occurrence of a negative event related to treatment or exposure to certain hazards. It is usually expressed as a ratio or percentage and can be influenced by various factors such as age, gender, lifestyle, genetics, and environmental conditions. Risk assessment involves identifying, quantifying, and prioritizing risks to make informed decisions about prevention, mitigation, or treatment strategies.

Congenital abnormalities, also known as birth defects, are structural or functional anomalies that are present at birth. These abnormalities can develop at any point during fetal development, and they can affect any part of the body. They can be caused by genetic factors, environmental influences, or a combination of both.

Congenital abnormalities can range from mild to severe and may include structural defects such as heart defects, neural tube defects, and cleft lip and palate, as well as functional defects such as intellectual disabilities and sensory impairments. Some congenital abnormalities may be visible at birth, while others may not become apparent until later in life.

In some cases, congenital abnormalities may be detected through prenatal testing, such as ultrasound or amniocentesis. In other cases, they may not be diagnosed until after the baby is born. Treatment for congenital abnormalities varies depending on the type and severity of the defect, and may include surgery, therapy, medication, or a combination of these approaches.

Psychological stress is the response of an individual's mind and body to challenging or demanding situations. It can be defined as a state of emotional and physical tension resulting from adversity, demand, or change. This response can involve a variety of symptoms, including emotional, cognitive, behavioral, and physiological components.

Emotional responses may include feelings of anxiety, fear, anger, sadness, or frustration. Cognitive responses might involve difficulty concentrating, racing thoughts, or negative thinking patterns. Behaviorally, psychological stress can lead to changes in appetite, sleep patterns, social interactions, and substance use. Physiologically, the body's "fight-or-flight" response is activated, leading to increased heart rate, blood pressure, muscle tension, and other symptoms.

Psychological stress can be caused by a wide range of factors, including work or school demands, financial problems, relationship issues, traumatic events, chronic illness, and major life changes. It's important to note that what causes stress in one person may not cause stress in another, as individual perceptions and coping mechanisms play a significant role.

Chronic psychological stress can have negative effects on both mental and physical health, increasing the risk of conditions such as anxiety disorders, depression, heart disease, diabetes, and autoimmune diseases. Therefore, it's essential to identify sources of stress and develop effective coping strategies to manage and reduce its impact.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "retirement" is not a term that has a medical definition. Retirement generally refers to the point in a person's life when they stop working or withdraw from one's position or occupation. It is often associated with reaching a certain age or becoming eligible for pension benefits. However, it's important to note that retirement can have various physical and mental health implications, as it can impact social connections, cognitive stimulation, financial security, and daily structure, among other factors. These impacts can be either positive or negative, depending on the individual's circumstances and experiences during retirement.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "ships" is not a medical term. It is a common noun referring to large vehicles used for transportation on water. If you have any medical questions or terms you would like defined, I would be happy to help!

'Arabia' is a geographical term and not a medical one. It most commonly refers to the Arabian Peninsula, which is located in the southwestern corner of Asia. The region is made up of several countries including Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Oman, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, and the United Arab Emirates, among others.

Arabia has a diverse climate, ranging from hot and arid deserts to coastal areas with more moderate temperatures. The region is home to a variety of cultures, languages, and religions, although Islam is the dominant religion in most parts of Arabia.

In medical contexts, 'Arabia' may be used to describe medical conditions or practices that are specific to or prevalent in the region. For example, there have been studies on the prevalence of certain genetic disorders in populations from the Arabian Peninsula. However, it is important to note that medical definitions and classifications should not rely solely on geographical location, but rather on a combination of clinical, genetic, and epidemiological factors.

Radiometric dating is a method used to determine the age of objects, including rocks and other fossilized materials, based on the decay rates of radioactive isotopes. This technique relies on the fact that certain elements, such as carbon-14, potassium-40, and uranium-238, are unstable and gradually decay into different elements over time.

By measuring the ratio of the remaining radioactive isotope to the stable end product, scientists can calculate the age of a sample using the following formula:

age = (ln(Nf/N0)) / λ

where Nf is the number of atoms of the decayed isotope, N0 is the initial number of atoms of the radioactive isotope, and λ is the decay constant.

Radiometric dating has been used to date objects ranging from a few thousand years old to billions of years old, making it an essential tool for archaeologists, geologists, and other scientists who study the history of our planet.

A confidence interval (CI) is a range of values that is likely to contain the true value of a population parameter with a certain level of confidence. It is commonly used in statistical analysis to express the uncertainty associated with estimates derived from sample data.

For example, if we calculate a 95% confidence interval for the mean height of a population based on a sample of individuals, we can say that we are 95% confident that the true population mean height falls within the calculated range. The width of the confidence interval gives us an idea of how precise our estimate is - narrower intervals indicate more precise estimates, while wider intervals suggest greater uncertainty.

Confidence intervals are typically calculated using statistical formulas that take into account the sample size, standard deviation, and level of confidence desired. They can be used to compare different groups or to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions in medical research.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "England" is not a medical term or concept. It is one of the four constituent countries that make up the United Kingdom, along with Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland. England is located in the southern part of Great Britain, which is the largest island of the British Isles.

If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, I would be happy to try to help answer them for you!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "income" is not a medical term. Income is an economic term that refers to the inflow of monetary resources or earnings that an individual or household receives from various sources, such as employment, investments, or government benefits. It is typically used in financial and economic contexts rather than medical ones. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help with those!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "United States" is a geopolitical entity, specifically the name of the country consisting of 50 states, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, I can't provide a medical definition for it. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or biology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

"Beauty culture" is not a medical term, but it generally refers to the practices, customs, and products related to enhancing or maintaining physical appearance and attractiveness. This can include various aspects such as skin care, makeup, hair care, body modification (e.g., piercings, tattoos), fashion, fitness, and wellness.

While "beauty culture" is not a medical term per se, some of its components may fall under the purview of medical professionals, particularly dermatologists, plastic surgeons, and other healthcare providers who specialize in aesthetic medicine or cosmetic procedures. These professionals can provide guidance on safe practices and evidence-based treatments to help individuals achieve their desired appearance goals while minimizing risks and potential harm.

Mouth abnormalities, also known as oral or orofacial anomalies, refer to structural or functional differences or defects in the mouth and surrounding structures, including the lips, teeth, gums, palate, tongue, and salivary glands. These abnormalities can be present at birth (congenital) or acquired later in life due to injury, disease, or surgery. They can range from minor variations in size, shape, or position of oral structures to more significant anomalies that may affect speech, swallowing, chewing, breathing, and overall quality of life.

Examples of mouth abnormalities include cleft lip and palate, macroglossia (enlarged tongue), microglossia (small tongue), ankyloglossia (tongue-tie), high or narrow palate, bifid uvula (split uvula), dental malocclusion (misaligned teeth), supernumerary teeth (extra teeth), missing teeth, and various oral tumors or cysts. Some mouth abnormalities may require medical intervention, such as surgery, orthodontic treatment, or speech therapy, while others may not necessitate any treatment.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Great Britain" is not a medical concept or condition. It is a geographical and political term referring to the largest island in the British Isles, on which the majority of England, Scotland, and Wales are located. It's also used to refer to the political union of these three countries, which is called the United Kingdom. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.

The chemical industry is a broad term that refers to the companies and organizations involved in the production or transformation of raw materials or intermediates into various chemical products. These products can be used for a wide range of applications, including manufacturing, agriculture, pharmaceuticals, and consumer goods. The chemical industry includes businesses that produce basic chemicals, such as petrochemicals, agrochemicals, polymers, and industrial gases, as well as those that manufacture specialty chemicals, such as dyestuffs, flavors, fragrances, and advanced materials. Additionally, the chemical industry encompasses companies that provide services related to the research, development, testing, and distribution of chemical products.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "perfume" is not a term that has a medical definition. Perfumes are fragranced products used primarily for personal grooming and aesthetic purposes. They consist of a mixture of essential oils or aroma compounds, fixatives, and solvents.

Perfumes can sometimes cause allergic reactions or irritations in some individuals, leading to symptoms such as skin rashes, itching, or sneezing. In such cases, people might consult with healthcare professionals for advice on avoiding specific fragrances or managing related allergies. However, the term "perfume" itself is not a medical concept and does not have a medical definition.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "France" is not a medical term or concept. France is the largest country in Western Europe and the third-largest in Europe after Russia and Ukraine. It has been a major player in world affairs for centuries, with a significant cultural and artistic influence. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help answer those for you.

A cohort study is a type of observational study in which a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure are followed up over time to determine the incidence of a specific outcome or outcomes. The cohort, or group, is defined based on the exposure status (e.g., exposed vs. unexposed) and then monitored prospectively to assess for the development of new health events or conditions.

Cohort studies can be either prospective or retrospective in design. In a prospective cohort study, participants are enrolled and followed forward in time from the beginning of the study. In contrast, in a retrospective cohort study, researchers identify a cohort that has already been assembled through medical records, insurance claims, or other sources and then look back in time to assess exposure status and health outcomes.

Cohort studies are useful for establishing causality between an exposure and an outcome because they allow researchers to observe the temporal relationship between the two. They can also provide information on the incidence of a disease or condition in different populations, which can be used to inform public health policy and interventions. However, cohort studies can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, and they may be subject to bias if participants are not representative of the population or if there is loss to follow-up.

Epidemiologic methods are systematic approaches used to investigate and understand the distribution, determinants, and outcomes of health-related events or diseases in a population. These methods are applied to study the patterns of disease occurrence and transmission, identify risk factors and causes, and evaluate interventions for prevention and control. The core components of epidemiologic methods include:

1. Descriptive Epidemiology: This involves the systematic collection and analysis of data on the who, what, when, and where of health events to describe their distribution in a population. It includes measures such as incidence, prevalence, mortality, and morbidity rates, as well as geographic and temporal patterns.

2. Analytical Epidemiology: This involves the use of statistical methods to examine associations between potential risk factors and health outcomes. It includes observational studies (cohort, case-control, cross-sectional) and experimental studies (randomized controlled trials). The goal is to identify causal relationships and quantify the strength of associations.

3. Experimental Epidemiology: This involves the design and implementation of interventions or experiments to test hypotheses about disease prevention and control. It includes randomized controlled trials, community trials, and other experimental study designs.

4. Surveillance and Monitoring: This involves ongoing systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of health-related data for early detection, tracking, and response to health events or diseases.

5. Ethical Considerations: Epidemiologic studies must adhere to ethical principles such as respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice. This includes obtaining informed consent, ensuring confidentiality, and minimizing harm to study participants.

Overall, epidemiologic methods provide a framework for investigating and understanding the complex interplay between host, agent, and environmental factors that contribute to the occurrence of health-related events or diseases in populations.

Asbestos is a group of naturally occurring mineral fibers that are resistant to heat, chemical reactions, and electrical currents. There are six types of asbestos, but the most common ones are chrysotile, amosite, and crocidolite. Asbestos has been widely used in various construction materials, such as roofing shingles, ceiling and floor tiles, paper products, and cement products.

Exposure to asbestos can cause serious health problems, including lung cancer, mesothelioma (a rare form of cancer that affects the lining of the lungs, heart, or abdomen), and asbestosis (a chronic lung disease characterized by scarring of the lung tissue). These health risks are related to the inhalation of asbestos fibers, which can become lodged in the lungs and cause inflammation and scarring over time.

As a result, the use of asbestos has been heavily regulated in many countries, and its use is banned in several others. Despite these regulations, asbestos remains a significant public health concern due to the large number of buildings and products that still contain it.

Environmental exposure refers to the contact of an individual with any chemical, physical, or biological agent in the environment that can cause a harmful effect on health. These exposures can occur through various pathways such as inhalation, ingestion, or skin contact. Examples of environmental exposures include air pollution, water contamination, occupational chemicals, and allergens. The duration and level of exposure, as well as the susceptibility of the individual, can all contribute to the risk of developing an adverse health effect.

In a medical or occupational health context, "work" is often used to refer to physical or mental activities that require energy expenditure and are performed as part of a job, daily routine, or exercise. However, there is also a specific medical concept called "work" that is used in the field of ergonomics and musculoskeletal disorders.

In this context, work is defined as the product of force and distance, measured in joules (J) or newton-meters (Nm). It can be used to describe the amount of physical effort required to perform a specific task or activity, such as lifting an object or operating a machine.

For example, if a worker lifts a box that weighs 10 kilograms (kg) and raises it to a height of 0.5 meters (m), the work done can be calculated as follows:

Work = Force x Distance
Force = weight of the object (mass x gravity)
Distance = height raised

Force = 10 kg x 9.8 m/s^2 (acceleration due to gravity) = 98 N (newtons)
Work = 98 N x 0.5 m = 49 J or 49 Nm

This measurement of work can help assess the physical demands of a job and identify potential risk factors for musculoskeletal injuries, such as overexertion or repetitive strain.

I must apologize, but "welding" is not a term that is typically used in medical definitions. Welding is a process that is commonly used in manufacturing and construction to join two pieces of metal together by melting them and adding a filler material to form a pool of molten metal (the weld puddle) that cools to become a strong joint.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to help answer them for you.

I am not a medical professional, but I can tell you that the term 'civilization' is more commonly used in social sciences and humanities rather than medicine. It refers to a complex human society, usually characterized by the development of agriculture, permanent settlements, and advanced institutions and technology. However, it is not a term that would typically be used in a medical definition. If you have any other questions, I'd be happy to try and help!

A rural population refers to people who live in areas that are outside of urban areas, typically defined as having fewer than 2,000 residents and lacking certain infrastructure and services such as running water, sewage systems, and paved roads. Rural populations often have less access to healthcare services, education, and economic opportunities compared to their urban counterparts. This population group can face unique health challenges, including higher rates of poverty, limited access to specialized medical care, and a greater exposure to environmental hazards such as agricultural chemicals and industrial pollutants.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Wales" is not a medical term. It is a country that is part of the United Kingdom, located in Western Europe. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help answer those!

Population surveillance in a public health and medical context refers to the ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of health-related data for a defined population over time. It aims to monitor the health status, identify emerging health threats or trends, and evaluate the impact of interventions within that population. This information is used to inform public health policy, prioritize healthcare resources, and guide disease prevention and control efforts. Population surveillance can involve various data sources, such as vital records, disease registries, surveys, and electronic health records.

Musculoskeletal diseases are a group of medical conditions that affect the bones, joints, muscles, tendons, ligaments, and nerves. These diseases can cause pain, stiffness, limited mobility, and decreased function in the affected areas of the body. They include a wide range of conditions such as:

1. Osteoarthritis: A degenerative joint disease characterized by the breakdown of cartilage in joints, leading to pain, stiffness, and loss of mobility.
2. Rheumatoid arthritis: An autoimmune disorder that causes inflammation in the lining of the joints, resulting in swelling, pain, and bone erosion.
3. Gout: A form of arthritis caused by the buildup of uric acid crystals in the joints, leading to severe pain, redness, and swelling.
4. Osteoporosis: A condition characterized by weakened bones that are more susceptible to fractures due to decreased bone density.
5. Fibromyalgia: A disorder that causes widespread muscle pain, fatigue, and tenderness in specific areas of the body.
6. Spinal disorders: Conditions affecting the spine, such as herniated discs, spinal stenosis, or degenerative disc disease, which can cause back pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness.
7. Soft tissue injuries: Damage to muscles, tendons, and ligaments, often caused by overuse, strain, or trauma.
8. Infections: Bone and joint infections (septic arthritis or osteomyelitis) can cause pain, swelling, and fever.
9. Tumors: Benign or malignant growths in bones, muscles, or soft tissues can lead to pain, swelling, and limited mobility.
10. Genetic disorders: Certain genetic conditions, such as Marfan syndrome or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, can affect the musculoskeletal system and cause various symptoms.

Treatment for musculoskeletal diseases varies depending on the specific condition but may include medications, physical therapy, exercise, surgery, or a combination of these approaches.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Local Government" is not a medical term. It refers to a level of government that is responsible for administering public services within a specific geographic area, typically smaller than a state or province. Local governments may include entities such as counties, municipalities, cities, towns, and villages. They are usually responsible for providing services such as police and fire protection, emergency medical services, waste management, local road maintenance, and public education. It is not directly related to the practice of medicine or healthcare.

Pesticides are substances or mixtures of substances intended for preventing, destroying, or repelling pests. Pests can be insects, rodents, fungi, weeds, or other organisms that can cause damage to crops, animals, or humans and their living conditions. The term "pesticide" includes all of the following: insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, rodenticides, bactericides, and various other substances used to control pests.

It is important to note that while pesticides are designed to be toxic to the target pests, they can also pose risks to non-target organisms, including humans, if not used properly. Therefore, it is essential to follow all label instructions and safety precautions when handling and applying pesticides.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Job Description" is not a medical term. It is a general human resources and employment concept. A job description is a document that provides details about the duties, responsibilities, necessary skills, working conditions, and other relevant information related to a specific job position. It serves as a guide for both employers and employees to understand the expectations and requirements of the role.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Occupational air pollutants refer to harmful substances present in the air in workplaces or occupational settings. These pollutants can include dusts, gases, fumes, vapors, or mists that are produced by industrial processes, chemical reactions, or other sources. Examples of occupational air pollutants include:

1. Respirable crystalline silica: A common mineral found in sand, stone, and concrete that can cause lung disease and cancer when inhaled in high concentrations.
2. Asbestos: A naturally occurring mineral fiber that was widely used in construction materials and industrial applications until the 1970s. Exposure to asbestos fibers can cause lung diseases such as asbestosis, lung cancer, and mesothelioma.
3. Welding fumes: Fumes generated during welding processes can contain harmful metals such as manganese, chromium, and nickel that can cause neurological damage and respiratory problems.
4. Isocyanates: Chemicals used in the production of foam insulation, spray-on coatings, and other industrial applications that can cause asthma and other respiratory symptoms.
5. Coal dust: Fine particles generated during coal mining, transportation, and handling that can cause lung disease and other health problems.
6. Diesel exhaust: Emissions from diesel engines that contain harmful particulates and gases that can cause respiratory and cardiovascular problems.

Occupational air pollutants are regulated by various government agencies, including the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in the United States, to protect workers from exposure and minimize health risks.

I am not aware of a specific medical definition for the term "China." Generally, it is used to refer to:

1. The People's Republic of China (PRC), which is a country in East Asia. It is the most populous country in the world and the fourth largest by geographical area. Its capital city is Beijing.
2. In a historical context, "China" was used to refer to various dynasties and empires that existed in East Asia over thousands of years. The term "Middle Kingdom" or "Zhongguo" (中国) has been used by the Chinese people to refer to their country for centuries.
3. In a more general sense, "China" can also be used to describe products or goods that originate from or are associated with the People's Republic of China.

If you have a specific context in which you encountered the term "China" related to medicine, please provide it so I can give a more accurate response.

The term "architecture" in the context of medicine typically refers to the design and organization of complex systems, such as those found in healthcare. This can include the layout and design of physical spaces, such as hospitals and clinics, as well as the structure and function of information systems used to manage patient data and support clinical decision-making.

In healthcare architecture, there is a focus on creating safe, efficient, and patient-centered environments that promote healing and well-being. This may involve considerations such as natural light, air quality, noise levels, and access to nature, as well as the use of evidence-based design principles to support best practices in care.

Healthcare architecture also encompasses the design of medical equipment and devices, as well as the development of new technologies to support diagnosis, treatment, and research. In all cases, the goal is to create systems and solutions that are safe, effective, and responsive to the needs of patients and healthcare providers.

Absenteeism is a term used in the medical and occupational health fields to describe the habitual pattern of absence from work or school. It refers to an employee or student's repeated failure to show up for scheduled work or classes without a valid reason or excuse. Absenteeism can have various causes, including physical illness or injury, mental health issues, stress, burnout, disengagement, and poor job or school satisfaction. Chronic absenteeism can lead to negative consequences such as decreased productivity, increased healthcare costs, and reduced academic performance.

"Health personnel" is a broad term that refers to individuals who are involved in maintaining, promoting, and restoring the health of populations or individuals. This can include a wide range of professionals such as:

1. Healthcare providers: These are medical doctors, nurses, midwives, dentists, pharmacists, allied health professionals (like physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, dietitians, etc.), and other healthcare workers who provide direct patient care.

2. Public health professionals: These are individuals who work in public health agencies, non-governmental organizations, or academia to promote health, prevent diseases, and protect populations from health hazards. They include epidemiologists, biostatisticians, health educators, environmental health specialists, and health services researchers.

3. Health managers and administrators: These are professionals who oversee the operations, finances, and strategic planning of healthcare organizations, such as hospitals, clinics, or public health departments. They may include hospital CEOs, medical directors, practice managers, and healthcare consultants.

4. Health support staff: This group includes various personnel who provide essential services to healthcare organizations, such as medical records technicians, billing specialists, receptionists, and maintenance workers.

5. Health researchers and academics: These are professionals involved in conducting research, teaching, and disseminating knowledge related to health sciences, medicine, public health, or healthcare management in universities, research institutions, or think tanks.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines "health worker" as "a person who contributes to the promotion, protection, or improvement of health through prevention, treatment, rehabilitation, palliation, health promotion, and health education." This definition encompasses a wide range of professionals working in various capacities to improve health outcomes.

I'm not sure I understand your question. "Denmark" is a country located in Northern Europe, and it is not a medical term or concept. It is the southernmost of the Nordic countries, and it consists of the Jutland peninsula and several islands in the Baltic Sea. The capital city of Denmark is Copenhagen.

If you are looking for information about a medical condition that may be associated with Denmark, could you please provide more context or clarify your question? I would be happy to help you with more specific information if I can.

"Maternal exposure" is a medical term that refers to the contact or interaction of a pregnant woman with various environmental factors, such as chemicals, radiation, infectious agents, or physical environments, which could potentially have an impact on the developing fetus. This exposure can occur through different routes, including inhalation, ingestion, dermal contact, or even transplacentally. The effects of maternal exposure on the fetus can vary widely depending on the type, duration, and intensity of the exposure, as well as the stage of pregnancy at which it occurs. It is important to monitor and minimize maternal exposure to potentially harmful substances or environments during pregnancy to ensure the best possible outcomes for both the mother and developing fetus.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Urban Population" is not a medical term. It is a demographic term used to describe the portion of a country's population that lives in areas classified as urban. The United Nations defines an urban area as a city, town, or other agglomeration with a population of 20,000 or more. However, the specific definition can vary by country and organization.

In contrast, medical terms typically refer to conditions, diseases, symptoms, treatments, or healthcare-related concepts. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to help if I can!

A registry in the context of medicine is a collection or database of standardized information about individuals who share a certain condition or attribute, such as a disease, treatment, exposure, or demographic group. These registries are used for various purposes, including:

* Monitoring and tracking the natural history of diseases and conditions
* Evaluating the safety and effectiveness of medical treatments and interventions
* Conducting research and generating hypotheses for further study
* Providing information to patients, clinicians, and researchers
* Informing public health policy and decision-making

Registries can be established for a wide range of purposes, including disease-specific registries (such as cancer or diabetes registries), procedure-specific registries (such as joint replacement or cardiac surgery registries), and population-based registries (such as birth defects or cancer registries). Data collected in registries may include demographic information, clinical data, laboratory results, treatment details, and outcomes.

Registries can be maintained by a variety of organizations, including hospitals, clinics, academic medical centers, professional societies, government agencies, and industry. Participation in registries is often voluntary, although some registries may require informed consent from participants. Data collected in registries are typically de-identified to protect the privacy of individuals.

Electromagnetic fields (EMFs) are invisible forces that result from the interaction between electrically charged objects. They are created by natural phenomena, such as the Earth's magnetic field, as well as by human-made sources, such as power lines, electrical appliances, and wireless communication devices.

EMFs are characterized by their frequency and strength, which determine their potential biological effects. Low-frequency EMFs, such as those produced by power lines and household appliances, have frequencies in the range of 0 to 300 Hz. High-frequency EMFs, such as those produced by wireless communication devices like cell phones and Wi-Fi routers, have frequencies in the range of 100 kHz to 300 GHz.

Exposure to EMFs has been linked to a variety of health effects, including increased risk of cancer, reproductive problems, neurological disorders, and oxidative stress. However, more research is needed to fully understand the potential health risks associated with exposure to EMFs and to establish safe exposure limits.

Demography is the statistical study of populations, particularly in terms of size, distribution, and characteristics such as age, race, gender, and occupation. In medical contexts, demography is often used to analyze health-related data and trends within specific populations. This can include studying the prevalence of certain diseases or conditions, identifying disparities in healthcare access and outcomes, and evaluating the effectiveness of public health interventions. Demographic data can also be used to inform policy decisions and allocate resources to address population health needs.

Industrial-Organizational Psychology (I-O Psychology) is a subfield of psychology that applies psychological principles, theories, and research to the workplace and organizations. Its primary focus is on understanding how workers and work systems interact, with the goal of improving the well-being and performance of employees while also enhancing organizational effectiveness.

I-O psychologists study a wide range of topics, including:

1. Job analysis and design: Identifying the important tasks, responsibilities, and requirements of jobs to improve job satisfaction, productivity, and safety.
2. Personnel selection and assessment: Developing and implementing methods for selecting, evaluating, and promoting employees, such as interviews, tests, and simulations.
3. Training and development: Designing, delivering, and evaluating training programs to enhance employee skills, knowledge, and abilities.
4. Motivation and performance management: Understanding what motivates employees and developing strategies for improving performance, engagement, and job satisfaction.
5. Leadership and organizational culture: Examining the impact of leadership styles and organizational cultures on employee attitudes, behaviors, and performance.
6. Work-life balance and well-being: Investigating ways to promote work-life balance and improve employee well-being, including stress management and work-family conflict.
7. Organizational development and change: Assessing and improving organizational effectiveness through interventions such as team building, organizational restructuring, and culture change.

I-O psychologists work in a variety of settings, including corporations, government agencies, consulting firms, and academic institutions. They use scientific methods to conduct research, analyze data, and develop evidence-based solutions to real-world problems in the workplace.

Carcinogens are agents that can cause cancer. According to the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), environmental carcinogens refer to "cancer-causing agents that people encounter in their daily lives, including substances or exposures in air, water, food, and in the workplace." These carcinogens can increase the risk of cancer by damaging DNA or interfering with cellular processes that control growth.

Examples of environmental carcinogens include:

* Air pollution: Certain pollutants in the air, such as diesel exhaust particles and secondhand smoke, have been linked to an increased risk of lung cancer.
* Radon: A naturally occurring radioactive gas that can accumulate in homes and other buildings, radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States.
* UV radiation: Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun or tanning beds can lead to skin cancer.
* Certain chemicals: Some chemicals found in the workplace or in consumer products, such as asbestos, benzene, and vinyl chloride, have been linked to an increased risk of cancer.
* Infectious agents: Certain viruses, bacteria, and parasites can increase the risk of cancer. For example, human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major cause of cervical cancer, and hepatitis B and C viruses are leading causes of liver cancer.

It's important to note that exposure to environmental carcinogens does not guarantee that a person will develop cancer. The risk depends on many factors, including the level and duration of exposure, as well as individual susceptibility. However, reducing exposure to these agents can help reduce the overall risk of cancer.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Military Personnel" is not a medical term. It refers to individuals who serve in the military forces of a country, including the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard. Medical terms typically refer to specific conditions, diagnoses, treatments, or anatomical features related to healthcare. If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help clarify!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "India" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country in South Asia, the second-most populous country in the world, known for its rich history, diverse culture, and numerous contributions to various fields including medicine. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to help answer them!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "life style" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It generally refers to the way an individual or group lives, including their habits, behaviors, and preferences in areas such as diet, exercise, recreation, and stress management. Some lifestyle factors can have a significant impact on health outcomes and risk for certain diseases. However, it is not a medical term with a specific clinical meaning.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Work Schedule Tolerance" is not a recognized term in the medical field. It may be a term used in occupational health or human resources to refer to an employee's ability to adapt to different work schedules, such as night shifts, rotating shifts, or irregular hours. However, it is not a medical diagnosis or condition. If you have any concerns about your work schedule and how it affects your health, I would recommend speaking with a healthcare provider or occupational health professional.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Wood" is not a medical term. It is a common name for various hard, fibrous tissues that make up the trunks and branches of trees and shrubs, as well as a term used for a wide range of items made from these materials. If you have any medical concerns or questions, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

"Marital status" is not a medical term, but it is often used in medical records and forms to indicate whether a person is single, married, divorced, widowed, or in a civil union. It is a social determinant of health that can have an impact on a person's access to healthcare, health behaviors, and health outcomes. For example, research has shown that people who are unmarried, divorced, or widowed may have worse health outcomes than those who are married. However, it is important to note that this relationship is complex and influenced by many other factors, including socioeconomic status, age, and overall health.

"Sick leave" is not a medical term, but rather a term used in the context of employment and human resources. It refers to the time off from work that an employee is allowed to take due to illness or injury, for which they may still receive payment. The specific policies regarding sick leave, such as how much time is granted and whether it is paid or unpaid, can vary based on the employer's policies, labor laws, and collective bargaining agreements.

A "Nurse Aide", also known as a "Nursing Assistant," is a healthcare worker who provides basic care and assistance to patients in various healthcare settings under the supervision of licensed nurses. Nurse aides are responsible for performing routine tasks such as monitoring vital signs, assisting with personal hygiene, helping with mobility, serving meals, making beds, and answering patient calls. They play a critical role in maintaining a safe and comfortable environment for patients and supporting the overall care team.

It is important to note that the specific duties and responsibilities of nurse aides may vary depending on the state or country where they work, as well as the specific healthcare setting. In some cases, nurse aides may be required to complete a state-approved training program and pass a certification exam in order to practice.

Follow-up studies are a type of longitudinal research that involve repeated observations or measurements of the same variables over a period of time, in order to understand their long-term effects or outcomes. In medical context, follow-up studies are often used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of medical treatments, interventions, or procedures.

In a typical follow-up study, a group of individuals (called a cohort) who have received a particular treatment or intervention are identified and then followed over time through periodic assessments or data collection. The data collected may include information on clinical outcomes, adverse events, changes in symptoms or functional status, and other relevant measures.

The results of follow-up studies can provide important insights into the long-term benefits and risks of medical interventions, as well as help to identify factors that may influence treatment effectiveness or patient outcomes. However, it is important to note that follow-up studies can be subject to various biases and limitations, such as loss to follow-up, recall bias, and changes in clinical practice over time, which must be carefully considered when interpreting the results.

A census is a official count or survey of a population, typically conducted by a governmental authority to gather information about the demographics, economic characteristics, and other important data about the people living within its borders. In the medical context, censuses may refer to counts or surveys of specific populations, such as patients in a hospital or residents of a particular geographic area, to gather health-related data. This information can be used to inform public health policy, allocate resources, and plan for future healthcare needs.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "hydrocarbons" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. Hydrocarbons are organic compounds consisting entirely of hydrogen and carbon. They are primarily used in industry as fuel, lubricants, and as raw materials for the production of plastics, fibers, and other chemicals.

However, in a broader scientific context, hydrocarbons can be relevant to medical discussions. For instance, in toxicology, exposure to certain types of hydrocarbons (like those found in gasoline or solvents) can lead to poisoning and related health issues. In environmental medicine, the pollution of air, water, and soil with hydrocarbons is a concern due to potential health effects.

But in general clinical medicine, 'hydrocarbons' wouldn't have a specific definition.

Anthropology is the scientific study of humans, human behavior, and societies in the past and present. It includes the study of language, culture, biology, and archaeology. In a medical context, anthropologists may study how cultural factors influence health and illness, health care practices and beliefs, and the impact of medical systems on individuals and communities. This field is known as medical anthropology.

The "cause of death" is a medical determination of the disease, injury, or event that directly results in a person's death. This information is typically documented on a death certificate and may be used for public health surveillance, research, and legal purposes. The cause of death is usually determined by a physician based on their clinical judgment and any available medical evidence, such as laboratory test results, autopsy findings, or eyewitness accounts. In some cases, the cause of death may be uncertain or unknown, and the death may be classified as "natural," "accidental," "homicide," or "suicide" based on the available information.

Risk assessment in the medical context refers to the process of identifying, evaluating, and prioritizing risks to patients, healthcare workers, or the community related to healthcare delivery. It involves determining the likelihood and potential impact of adverse events or hazards, such as infectious diseases, medication errors, or medical devices failures, and implementing measures to mitigate or manage those risks. The goal of risk assessment is to promote safe and high-quality care by identifying areas for improvement and taking action to minimize harm.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "parents" is not a term that has a medical definition. In general usage, parents are the two people (typically) who bring up and care for a child, or who have given birth to or adopted a child. They are responsible for the child's housing, food, clothing, education, and medical care. Is there a specific medical or healthcare-related context you had in mind? I would be happy to help further if I can.

Regression analysis is a statistical technique used in medicine, as well as in other fields, to examine the relationship between one or more independent variables (predictors) and a dependent variable (outcome). It allows for the estimation of the average change in the outcome variable associated with a one-unit change in an independent variable, while controlling for the effects of other independent variables. This technique is often used to identify risk factors for diseases or to evaluate the effectiveness of medical interventions. In medical research, regression analysis can be used to adjust for potential confounding variables and to quantify the relationship between exposures and health outcomes. It can also be used in predictive modeling to estimate the probability of a particular outcome based on multiple predictors.

The Musculoskeletal System is a complex system composed of the bones, joints, muscles, tendons, ligaments, and associated tissues that work together to provide form, support, stability, and movement to the body. It serves various functions including:

1. Protection: The musculoskeletal system protects vital organs by encasing them in bones, such as the ribcage protecting the lungs and heart, and the skull protecting the brain.
2. Support and Movement: Muscles and bones work together to enable movement and maintain posture. Muscles contract to pull on bones, causing joint motion and producing movements like walking, running, or jumping.
3. Storage: Bones act as a reservoir for essential minerals like calcium and phosphorus, which can be released into the bloodstream when needed.
4. Hematopoiesis: Within the bone marrow, hematopoietic cells produce blood cells, including red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
5. Endocrine Function: Bone tissue is also an endocrine organ, producing hormones like osteocalcin and FGF23 that regulate various physiological processes, such as energy metabolism and mineral homeostasis.

Dysfunctions or injuries in the musculoskeletal system can result in conditions like arthritis, fractures, muscle strains, tendonitis, and other painful or debilitating ailments that impact an individual's quality of life and mobility.

Paleontology is not a medical field, but rather it is a branch of earth sciences and biology that deals with the study of prehistoric life forms through the examination of plant and animal fossils, including those of extinct organisms. It involves various disciplines such as stratigraphy, geochronology, and systematics to understand the evolutionary history of life on Earth.

However, I understand that you are looking for information related to a non-medical topic, so here is some additional context:

Paleontology can be divided into several subdisciplines, including vertebrate paleontology (the study of fossilized animals with backbones), invertebrate paleontology (the study of fossilized animals without backbones), paleobotany (the study of fossil plants), micropaleontology (the study of microscopic fossils), and taphonomy (the study of the processes that occur after an organism's death, leading to its preservation as a fossil).

Paleontologists use various techniques to study fossils, including comparative anatomy, histology (the study of tissue structure), and geochemistry. They also rely on other scientific fields such as genetics, physics, and chemistry to help them interpret the data they collect from fossils.

Through their research, paleontologists can learn about the morphology, behavior, ecology, and evolutionary relationships of extinct organisms, providing valuable insights into the history of life on Earth.

I must clarify that I can't provide a "medical definition" of marriage, as the concept of marriage is a social, legal, and often religious institution, rather than a medical one. However, I can tell you that there are no medical definitions associated with the term "marriage." It is typically defined in terms of a committed relationship between two individuals, recognized by law and/or religion, which may involve shared responsibilities, rights, and obligations.

Alcoholic Liver Cirrhosis is a medical condition characterized by irreversible scarring (fibrosis) and damage to the liver caused by excessive consumption of alcohol over an extended period. The liver's normal structure and function are progressively impaired as healthy liver tissue is replaced by scarred tissue, leading to the formation of nodules (regenerative noduli).

The condition typically develops after years of heavy drinking, with a higher risk for those who consume more than 60 grams of pure alcohol daily. The damage caused by alcoholic liver cirrhosis can be life-threatening and may result in complications such as:

1. Ascites (accumulation of fluid in the abdomen)
2. Encephalopathy (neurological dysfunction due to liver failure)
3. Esophageal varices (dilated veins in the esophagus that can rupture and bleed)
4. Hepatorenal syndrome (kidney failure caused by liver disease)
5. Increased susceptibility to infections
6. Liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma)
7. Portal hypertension (increased blood pressure in the portal vein that supplies blood to the liver)

Abstaining from alcohol and managing underlying medical conditions are crucial for slowing down or halting disease progression. Treatment may involve medications, dietary changes, and supportive care to address complications. In severe cases, a liver transplant might be necessary.

Pneumoconiosis is a group of lung diseases caused by inhaling dust particles, leading to fibrosis or scarring of the lungs. The type of pneumoconiosis depends on the specific dust inhaled. Examples include coal worker's pneumoconiosis (from coal dust), silicosis (from crystalline silica dust), and asbestosis (from asbestos fibers). These diseases are generally preventable by minimizing exposure to harmful dusts through proper engineering controls, protective equipment, and workplace safety regulations.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Japan" is not a medical term. Japan is the name of a country, officially known as Nippon-koku or Nihon-koku in Japanese, and is located in East Asia. It is an island nation in the Pacific Ocean with a population of about 126 million people.

If you have any medical questions or terms that you would like me to define, please let me know!

I'm happy to help, but I need to clarify that "residence characteristics" is not a commonly used medical term. It is more related to the field of public health or epidemiology. However, if you are asking for the characteristics of a residence that could be relevant to medical or health research, they might include:

1. Housing type (single-family home, apartment, mobile home, etc.)
2. Age and condition of the housing unit
3. Presence of environmental hazards (lead paint, asbestos, radon, etc.)
4. Quality of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems
5. Access to clean water and sanitation facilities
6. Safety features (smoke detectors, carbon monoxide detectors, etc.)
7. Presence of pests (rodents, cockroaches, bed bugs, etc.)
8. Neighborhood characteristics (crime rates, access to healthy food options, walkability, etc.)

These factors can all have an impact on the health outcomes of individuals and communities, and are often studied in public health research.

Emigration is the process of leaving one's country of origin or habitual residence to settle in another country. It involves giving up the rights and privileges associated with citizenship in the country of origin and acquiring new rights and responsibilities as a citizen or resident of the destination country. Emigrants are people who choose to leave their native land to live elsewhere, often driven by factors such as economic opportunities, political instability, or conflict.

Immigration, on the other hand, is the process of entering and settling in a new country with the intention of becoming a permanent resident or citizen. Immigrants are individuals who come from another country to live in a new place, often seeking better job opportunities, education, or quality of life. They must comply with the immigration laws and regulations of the host country and may be required to undergo medical examinations, background checks, and other screening processes before being granted permission to enter and reside in the country.

In summary, emigration refers to leaving one's home country, while immigration refers to entering and settling in a new country.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

I am not aware of any medical definition for the term "Delaware." Delaware is one of the 50 states in the United States, located on the East Coast. It is named after the Delaware River and Delaware Bay, which were named after Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr, who was an English nobleman and colonial governor.

If you have any specific medical context or terminology related to Delaware that you would like me to help define or explain, please let me know!

Mortality, in medical terms, refers to the state or condition of being mortal; the quality or fact of being subject to death. It is often used in reference to the mortality rate, which is the number of deaths in a specific population, divided by the size of that population, per a given time period. This can be used as a measure of the risk of death among a population.

A wound is a type of injury that occurs when the skin or other tissues are cut, pierced, torn, or otherwise broken. Wounds can be caused by a variety of factors, including accidents, violence, surgery, or certain medical conditions. There are several different types of wounds, including:

* Incisions: These are cuts that are made deliberately, often during surgery. They are usually straight and clean.
* Lacerations: These are tears in the skin or other tissues. They can be irregular and jagged.
* Abrasions: These occur when the top layer of skin is scraped off. They may look like a bruise or a scab.
* Punctures: These are wounds that are caused by sharp objects, such as needles or knives. They are usually small and deep.
* Avulsions: These occur when tissue is forcibly torn away from the body. They can be very serious and require immediate medical attention.

Injuries refer to any harm or damage to the body, including wounds. Injuries can range from minor scrapes and bruises to more severe injuries such as fractures, dislocations, and head trauma. It is important to seek medical attention for any injury that is causing significant pain, swelling, or bleeding, or if there is a suspected bone fracture or head injury.

In general, wounds and injuries should be cleaned and covered with a sterile bandage to prevent infection. Depending on the severity of the wound or injury, additional medical treatment may be necessary. This may include stitches for deep cuts, immobilization for broken bones, or surgery for more serious injuries. It is important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully to ensure proper healing and to prevent complications.

I apologize, but "Brazil" is not a medical term or condition. It is the largest country in both South America and Latin America by land area and population. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health concerns, please provide more information and I will do my best to help.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "job satisfaction" is not a medical term or concept. It falls under the domain of occupational or organizational psychology and refers to the degree to which employees like their jobs and are content with their role in the organization. High job satisfaction is generally associated with positive outcomes such as increased productivity, lower turnover rates, and better mental health. However, low job satisfaction can contribute to stress, burnout, and other negative health outcomes.

Respiratory tract diseases refer to a broad range of medical conditions that affect the respiratory system, which includes the nose, throat (pharynx), windpipe (trachea), bronchi, bronchioles, and lungs. These diseases can be categorized into upper and lower respiratory tract infections based on the location of the infection.

Upper respiratory tract infections affect the nose, sinuses, pharynx, and larynx, and include conditions such as the common cold, flu, sinusitis, and laryngitis. Symptoms often include nasal congestion, sore throat, cough, and fever.

Lower respiratory tract infections affect the trachea, bronchi, bronchioles, and lungs, and can be more severe. They include conditions such as pneumonia, bronchitis, and tuberculosis. Symptoms may include cough, chest congestion, shortness of breath, and fever.

Respiratory tract diseases can also be caused by allergies, irritants, or genetic factors. Treatment varies depending on the specific condition and severity but may include medications, breathing treatments, or surgery in severe cases.

Coal mining is the process of extracting coal from the ground. Coal is a fossil fuel that is formed from the accumulation and decomposition of plants over millions of years. It is primarily used as a source of energy for electricity generation, as well as for heating and industrial processes.

There are two main types of coal mining: surface mining and underground mining. Surface mining involves removing the soil and rock above the coal seam to access the coal, while underground mining involves sinking shafts and tunnels into the earth to reach the coal. Both methods have their own set of benefits and challenges, and the choice of which method to use depends on various factors such as the depth and location of the coal seam, the geology of the area, and environmental concerns.

Coal mining can be a dangerous occupation, with risks including accidents, explosions, and exposure to harmful dust and gases. As a result, it is essential that coal miners receive proper training and equipment to minimize these risks and ensure their safety. Additionally, coal mining has significant environmental impacts, including deforestation, habitat destruction, and water pollution, which must be carefully managed to minimize harm.

I am not aware of a specific medical definition for the term "engineering." However, in general, engineering refers to the application of scientific and mathematical principles to design, build, and maintain structures, machines, devices, systems, and solutions. This can include various disciplines such as biomedical engineering, which involves applying engineering principles to medicine and healthcare.

Biomedical engineering combines knowledge from fields like mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, computer science, chemistry, and materials science with medical and biological sciences to develop solutions for healthcare challenges. Biomedical engineers design and develop medical devices, artificial organs, imaging systems, biocompatible materials, and other technologies used in medical treatments and diagnostics.

In summary, while there is no specific medical definition for "engineering," the term can refer to various disciplines that apply scientific and mathematical principles to solve problems related to healthcare and medicine.

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

'Hospital Personnel' is a general term that refers to all individuals who are employed by or provide services on behalf of a hospital. This can include, but is not limited to:

1. Healthcare professionals such as doctors, nurses, pharmacists, therapists, and technicians.
2. Administrative staff who manage the hospital's operations, including human resources, finance, and management.
3. Support services personnel such as maintenance workers, food service workers, housekeeping staff, and volunteers.
4. Medical students, interns, and trainees who are gaining clinical experience in the hospital setting.

All of these individuals play a critical role in ensuring that the hospital runs smoothly and provides high-quality care to its patients.

Hair preparations refer to cosmetic or grooming products that are specifically formulated to be applied to the hair or scalp for various purposes such as cleansing, conditioning, styling, coloring, or promoting hair growth. These preparations can come in different forms, including shampoos, conditioners, hair masks, serums, gels, mousses, sprays, and dyes. They may contain a wide range of ingredients, such as detergents, moisturizers, proteins, vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients that can help improve the health, appearance, and manageability of the hair. Some hair preparations may also contain medications or natural extracts that have therapeutic properties for treating specific hair or scalp conditions, such as dandruff, dryness, oiliness, thinning, or hair loss.

Back pain is a common symptom characterized by discomfort or soreness in the back, often occurring in the lower region of the back (lumbago). It can range from a mild ache to a sharp stabbing or shooting pain, and it may be accompanied by stiffness, restricted mobility, and difficulty performing daily activities. Back pain is typically caused by strain or sprain to the muscles, ligaments, or spinal joints, but it can also result from degenerative conditions, disc herniation, spinal stenosis, osteoarthritis, or other medical issues affecting the spine. The severity and duration of back pain can vary widely, with some cases resolving on their own within a few days or weeks, while others may require medical treatment and rehabilitation.

Unemployment is an economic concept rather than a medical one. It refers to the situation where individuals who are actively seeking employment are unable to find work. The World Health Organization (WHO) and other medical bodies do not provide a specific medical definition for unemployment. However, unemployment can have significant impacts on both physical and mental health, leading to issues such as stress, anxiety, depression, and poor physical health.

Career mobility, in a medical context, refers to the ability of healthcare professionals to advance or move between different roles, positions, or departments within a healthcare organization or field. It can include lateral moves (changing to a similar position in another department) or vertical moves (promotion to a higher-level position). Career mobility is often facilitated by continuing education, professional development opportunities, and the acquisition of new skills and experiences. High career mobility can lead to better job satisfaction, increased compensation, and improved patient care.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Forestry" is not a medical term. Forestry is the science and practice of managing forests, plantations, and associated resources for timber, wildlife, recreation, conservation, and other benefits. It involves the application of ecological principles, silvicultural techniques, and management strategies to ensure the sustainability and health of forest ecosystems.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Michigan" is not a medical term or concept. It is a geographical location, referring to the state of Michigan in the United States. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you!

An economic recession is a significant decline in economic activity that spreads across the economy and lasts more than a few months. It is typically defined as a decrease in gross domestic product (GDP) for two or more consecutive quarters. A recession can also be characterized by high unemployment, declining retail sales, and falling industrial production. Recessions are usually caused by a combination of factors, including financial panics, monetary policy mistakes, and external shocks such as wars or natural disasters. The severity and duration of a recession can vary widely, with some being relatively mild and short-lived, while others can be more severe and prolonged. In general, recessions are a normal part of the business cycle and are typically followed by periods of economic expansion.

Chronic bronchitis is a long-term inflammation of the airways (bronchi) in the lungs. It is characterized by a persistent cough that produces excessive mucus or sputum. The cough and mucus production must be present for at least three months in two consecutive years to meet the diagnostic criteria for chronic bronchitis.

The inflammation of the airways can lead to narrowing, obstructing the flow of air into and out of the lungs, resulting in shortness of breath and wheezing. Chronic bronchitis is often associated with exposure to irritants such as tobacco smoke, dust, or chemical fumes over an extended period.

It is a significant component of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which also includes emphysema. While there is no cure for chronic bronchitis, treatments can help alleviate symptoms and slow the progression of the disease. These may include bronchodilators, corticosteroids, and pulmonary rehabilitation. Quitting smoking is crucial in managing this condition.

I'm happy to help, but it seems there might be a slight misunderstanding in your question. "Nurses" is not a medical term per se, but rather a job title or professional role within the healthcare field. Here's a brief description of what nurses do:

Nurses are healthcare professionals who work closely with patients to provide and coordinate care, education, and support. They play a critical role in promoting health, preventing illness, and helping patients cope with various medical conditions. Nurses can be found in various settings such as hospitals, clinics, private practices, long-term care facilities, community health centers, and patient homes.

There are different nursing specialties and levels of education, including:

1. Registered Nurse (RN): Typically holds an associate's or bachelor's degree in nursing and has passed a licensing exam. RNs provide direct patient care, administer medications, and coordinate treatment plans.
2. Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN): Has completed additional education and training beyond the RN level, often earning a master's or doctoral degree. APRNs can specialize in areas such as nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, certified registered nurse anesthetist, or certified nurse-midwife.
3. Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) or Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN): Holds a diploma or certificate from a practical nursing program and has passed a licensing exam. LPNs/LVNs provide basic patient care under the supervision of RNs and physicians.

These definitions are not exhaustive, but they should give you an idea of what nurses do and their roles within the healthcare system.

I believe you may be looking for the term "human factors engineering" or "ergonomics," as there is no widely recognized medical definition for "human engineering." Human factors engineering is a multidisciplinary field that focuses on the design and integration of systems, products, and environments to optimize human well-being and overall system performance. This includes considering human capabilities, limitations, and characteristics in the design process to ensure safe, efficient, and effective interactions between humans and technology.

Cumulative Trauma Disorders (CTDs) are a group of conditions that result from repeated exposure to biomechanical stressors, often related to work activities. These disorders can affect the muscles, tendons, nerves, and joints, leading to symptoms such as pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, and reduced range of motion.

CTDs are also known as repetitive strain injuries (RSIs) or overuse injuries. They occur when there is a mismatch between the demands placed on the body and its ability to recover from those demands. Over time, this imbalance can lead to tissue damage and inflammation, resulting in chronic pain and functional limitations.

Examples of CTDs include carpal tunnel syndrome, tendonitis, epicondylitis (tennis elbow), rotator cuff injuries, and trigger finger. Prevention strategies for CTDs include proper ergonomics, workstation design, body mechanics, taking regular breaks to stretch and rest, and performing exercises to strengthen and condition the affected muscles and joints.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Norway" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country in Northern Europe, known officially as the Kingdom of Norway. If you have any questions about medical topics or definitions, I would be happy to help!

I'm happy to help, but I must clarify that the term "leisure activities" is quite broad and can encompass many different types of activities. It generally refers to activities that people do in their free time for enjoyment or relaxation. Leisure activities can include hobbies, sports, games, socializing, travel, and creative pursuits, among other things.

In a medical context, leisure activities are often discussed in relation to their potential health benefits. For example, research has shown that engaging in regular leisure activities can help reduce stress, improve mood, boost cognitive function, and even increase longevity. However, it's important to note that the specific health benefits of leisure activities may vary depending on the type and frequency of activity.

Here are some medical definitions related to leisure activities:

* Physical activity: Any bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles that requires energy expenditure. This can include structured exercise, sports, or other forms of physical exertion during leisure time.
* Exercise: A subset of physical activity that is planned, structured, and repetitive with the goal of improving or maintaining physical fitness.
* Social support: The perception and actuality of being cared for, valued, and part of a social network. Engaging in social activities during leisure time can provide a sense of connection and belonging, which has been linked to numerous health benefits.
* Creative expression: The process of using creative skills and imagination to express oneself through various forms of art, music, writing, or other creative outlets. Creative pursuits have been shown to have numerous mental and emotional health benefits.
* Relaxation techniques: Practices that help reduce stress and promote relaxation, such as meditation, deep breathing, yoga, or progressive muscle relaxation. These techniques can be particularly beneficial during leisure time for those who struggle with anxiety or stress-related disorders.

Neoplasms are abnormal growths of cells or tissues in the body that serve no physiological function. They can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are typically slow growing and do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant neoplasms are aggressive, invasive, and can metastasize to distant sites.

Neoplasms occur when there is a dysregulation in the normal process of cell division and differentiation, leading to uncontrolled growth and accumulation of cells. This can result from genetic mutations or other factors such as viral infections, environmental exposures, or hormonal imbalances.

Neoplasms can develop in any organ or tissue of the body and can cause various symptoms depending on their size, location, and type. Treatment options for neoplasms include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy, among others.

In the context of medical and biological sciences, a "binding site" refers to a specific location on a protein, molecule, or cell where another molecule can attach or bind. This binding interaction can lead to various functional changes in the original protein or molecule. The other molecule that binds to the binding site is often referred to as a ligand, which can be a small molecule, ion, or even another protein.

The binding between a ligand and its target binding site can be specific and selective, meaning that only certain ligands can bind to particular binding sites with high affinity. This specificity plays a crucial role in various biological processes, such as signal transduction, enzyme catalysis, or drug action.

In the case of drug development, understanding the location and properties of binding sites on target proteins is essential for designing drugs that can selectively bind to these sites and modulate protein function. This knowledge can help create more effective and safer therapeutic options for various diseases.

Coal tar is a thick, dark liquid that is a byproduct of coal manufacturing processes, specifically the distillation of coal at high temperatures. It is a complex mixture of hundreds of different compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are known to be carcinogenic.

In medical terms, coal tar has been used topically for various skin conditions such as psoriasis, eczema, and seborrheic dermatitis due to its anti-inflammatory and keratolytic properties. Coal tar can help reduce scaling, itching, and inflammation of the skin. However, its use is limited due to potential side effects such as skin irritation, increased sun sensitivity, and potential risk of cancer with long-term use. Coal tar products should be used under the guidance of a healthcare provider and according to the instructions on the label.

Data collection in the medical context refers to the systematic gathering of information relevant to a specific research question or clinical situation. This process involves identifying and recording data elements, such as demographic characteristics, medical history, physical examination findings, laboratory results, and imaging studies, from various sources including patient interviews, medical records, and diagnostic tests. The data collected is used to support clinical decision-making, inform research hypotheses, and evaluate the effectiveness of treatments or interventions. It is essential that data collection is performed in a standardized and unbiased manner to ensure the validity and reliability of the results.

Health status is a term used to describe the overall condition of an individual's health, including physical, mental, and social well-being. It is often assessed through various measures such as medical history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and self-reported health assessments. Health status can be used to identify health disparities, track changes in population health over time, and evaluate the effectiveness of healthcare interventions.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but Poisson Distribution is actually a statistical concept rather than a medical term. Here's a general definition:

Poisson Distribution is a discrete probability distribution that expresses the probability of a given number of events occurring in a fixed interval of time or space, as long as these events occur with a known average rate and independently of each other. It is often used in fields such as physics, engineering, economics, and medical research to model rare events or low-probability phenomena.

In the context of medical research, Poisson Distribution might be used to analyze the number of adverse events that occur during a clinical trial, the frequency of disease outbreaks in a population, or the rate of successes or failures in a series of experiments.

In medical terms, "fossils" do not have a specific or direct relevance to the field. However, in a broader scientific context, fossils are the remains or impressions of prehistoric organisms preserved in petrified form or as a mold or cast in rock. They offer valuable evidence about the Earth's history and the life forms that existed on it millions of years ago.

Paleopathology is a subfield of paleontology that deals with the study of diseases in fossils, which can provide insights into the evolution of diseases and human health over time.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "housing" is not a term that has a medical definition. In a general sense, housing refers to a place where someone lives, such as a house or apartment. If you have any questions related to healthcare, medicine, or health-related topics, I would be happy to try to help answer them.

Health status disparities refer to differences in the health outcomes that are observed between different populations. These populations can be defined by various sociodemographic factors such as race, ethnicity, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, disability, income, education level, and geographic location. Health status disparities can manifest as differences in rates of illness, disease prevalence or incidence, morbidity, mortality, access to healthcare services, and quality of care received. These disparities are often the result of systemic inequities and social determinants of health that negatively impact certain populations, leading to worse health outcomes compared to other groups. It is important to note that health status disparities are preventable and can be addressed through targeted public health interventions and policies aimed at reducing health inequities.

Czechoslovakia was a sovereign state in Central Europe that existed from October 28, 1918, when it declared its independence from the Austro-Hungarian Empire, until January 1, 1993. On that date, Czechoslovakia underwent a "velvet divorce" into two separate countries, the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

The medical definition of 'Czechoslovakia' is not applicable as it was a country and not a medical term or condition.

Rural health is a branch of healthcare that focuses on the unique health challenges and needs of people living in rural areas. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines rural health as "the state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity, in the rural population."

Rural populations often face disparities in healthcare access and quality compared to their urban counterparts. Factors such as geographic isolation, poverty, lack of transportation, and a shortage of healthcare providers can contribute to these disparities. Rural health encompasses a broad range of services, including primary care, prevention, chronic disease management, mental health, oral health, and emergency medical services.

The goal of rural health is to improve the health outcomes of rural populations by addressing these unique challenges and providing high-quality, accessible healthcare services that meet their needs. This may involve innovative approaches such as telemedicine, mobile health clinics, and community-based programs to reach people in remote areas.

The "Healthy Worker Effect" is not a formally recognized medical term, but it is a concept that is often discussed in occupational and public health research. It refers to the observation that workers, as a group, tend to be healthier than non-workers (e.g., unemployed individuals or those who have retired). This phenomenon can arise due to several reasons, including:

1. Self-selection: Healthier individuals are more likely to seek and maintain employment, while those with chronic illnesses or disabilities may be less able to work.
2. Healthier lifestyle habits: Workers may engage in healthier behaviors than non-workers, such as regular exercise, better nutrition, and reduced substance use, due to factors like social norms at the workplace or access to wellness programs.
3. Early detection and intervention: Employers may provide health screenings and preventive care that can lead to earlier identification and management of health issues among workers.
4. Protection from harmful exposures: Some workplaces have regulations and safety measures in place to protect workers from hazardous substances or conditions, which can reduce the risk of certain health problems.

The Healthy Worker Effect is important to consider when interpreting studies that compare the health status of workers and non-workers, as it may introduce bias and lead to an underestimation of the true health risks associated with specific jobs or work environments. Researchers often use statistical techniques to control for this effect and better isolate the relationship between work and health outcomes.

Physical exertion is defined as the act of applying energy to physically demandable activities or tasks, which results in various body systems working together to produce movement and maintain homeostasis. It often leads to an increase in heart rate, respiratory rate, and body temperature, among other physiological responses. The level of physical exertion can vary based on the intensity, duration, and frequency of the activity.

It's important to note that engaging in regular physical exertion has numerous health benefits, such as improving cardiovascular fitness, strengthening muscles and bones, reducing stress, and preventing chronic diseases like obesity, diabetes, and heart disease. However, it is also crucial to balance physical exertion with adequate rest and recovery time to avoid overtraining or injury.

Longitudinal studies are a type of research design where data is collected from the same subjects repeatedly over a period of time, often years or even decades. These studies are used to establish patterns of changes and events over time, and can help researchers identify causal relationships between variables. They are particularly useful in fields such as epidemiology, psychology, and sociology, where the focus is on understanding developmental trends and the long-term effects of various factors on health and behavior.

In medical research, longitudinal studies can be used to track the progression of diseases over time, identify risk factors for certain conditions, and evaluate the effectiveness of treatments or interventions. For example, a longitudinal study might follow a group of individuals over several decades to assess their exposure to certain environmental factors and their subsequent development of chronic diseases such as cancer or heart disease. By comparing data collected at multiple time points, researchers can identify trends and correlations that may not be apparent in shorter-term studies.

Longitudinal studies have several advantages over other research designs, including their ability to establish temporal relationships between variables, track changes over time, and reduce the impact of confounding factors. However, they also have some limitations, such as the potential for attrition (loss of participants over time), which can introduce bias and affect the validity of the results. Additionally, longitudinal studies can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, requiring significant resources and a long-term commitment from both researchers and study participants.

'Alcohol drinking' refers to the consumption of alcoholic beverages, which contain ethanol (ethyl alcohol) as the active ingredient. Ethanol is a central nervous system depressant that can cause euphoria, disinhibition, and sedation when consumed in small to moderate amounts. However, excessive drinking can lead to alcohol intoxication, with symptoms ranging from slurred speech and impaired coordination to coma and death.

Alcohol is metabolized in the liver by enzymes such as alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). The breakdown of ethanol produces acetaldehyde, a toxic compound that can cause damage to various organs in the body. Chronic alcohol drinking can lead to a range of health problems, including liver disease, pancreatitis, cardiovascular disease, neurological disorders, and increased risk of cancer.

Moderate drinking is generally defined as up to one drink per day for women and up to two drinks per day for men, where a standard drink contains about 14 grams (0.6 ounces) of pure alcohol. However, it's important to note that there are no safe levels of alcohol consumption, and any level of drinking carries some risk to health.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

I am not a medical professional, but I can provide you with some general information about the concept of "education" in the context of health and medicine.

In this context, education generally refers to the process of acquiring knowledge, skills, values, and attitudes related to maintaining and improving one's health and well-being, as well as preventing and managing diseases and injuries. Health education can take place in various settings, such as schools, healthcare facilities, workplaces, and communities.

Health education aims to empower individuals and populations to make informed decisions about their health and promote healthy behaviors and lifestyle choices. It covers a wide range of topics, including:

1. Anatomy and physiology
2. Nutrition and diet
3. Exercise and physical activity
4. Mental health and well-being
5. Substance use and abuse
6. Sexual and reproductive health
7. Personal hygiene and infection control
8. Chronic disease management
9. Injury prevention and safety
10. Environmental health

Health education is often delivered by healthcare professionals, educators, and community leaders, using various methods such as lectures, workshops, demonstrations, simulations, and digital media. The ultimate goal of health education is to improve overall health outcomes and reduce health disparities in populations.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Turkey" is not a medical term. It is a common name for the country located in Eastern Europe and Western Asia, as well as a type of large bird native to North America that is often eaten as a holiday meal. If you have any questions about medical terminology or health-related topics, I'd be happy to try and help answer them!

Mortuary practice, also known as mortuary science or funeral service, is a field that deals with the handling, preparation, and disposal of dead human bodies. This can include tasks such as:

1. The removal and transportation of the body from the place of death to the mortuary.
2. The cleaning and sanitization of the body.
3. The reconstruction of the body, if necessary, to make it presentable for viewing.
4. The application of cosmetics to restore a natural appearance to the deceased.
5. The dressing and casketing of the body.
6. The coordination of funeral services, such as memorial services or viewings.
7. The completion of necessary paperwork, such as death certificates and burial permits.

Mortuary practitioners may work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, funeral homes, and coroner's offices. They must have a strong understanding of anatomy, physiology, and infection control, as well as excellent communication and interpersonal skills to provide support and guidance to grieving families.

It is important to note that mortuary practices can vary depending on cultural, religious, and personal beliefs, so practitioners must be respectful and sensitive to the needs and wishes of each family they serve.

"West Germany" is not a medical term. It is a geopolitical term that refers to the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) which existed from 1949 to 1990. The FRG was established in the western part of defeated Nazi Germany and was supported by the Western Allies (the United States, the United Kingdom, and France) after World War II.

In medical contexts, references to "West Germany" might appear in older studies or publications that compare health outcomes, disease prevalence, or healthcare systems between different regions or countries, including East and West Germany before reunification in 1990. However, it is essential to understand that such distinctions are historical and do not have current medical relevance.

... occupations such as entertainers and prostitutes. The four occupations were not a hereditary system. The four occupations ... The four occupations (simplified Chinese: 士农工商; traditional Chinese: 士農工商; pinyin: Shì nóng gōng shāng), or "four categories of ... However, it is now known that the classification of four occupations as Ban Gu understood it did not exist until the 2nd ... However, he notes that although no statute in the Qin or Han law codes specifically mentions the four occupations, some laws ...
Graphic design careers include creative director, art director, art production manager, brand identity developer, illustrator and layout artist. The following are positions or responsibilities and usually titles, held by experienced graphic designers in related management roles:[citation needed] A creative director's range of experience can be broad and encompass a number of disciplines; visual design; copywriting, art direction, advertising account director, film/video director[citation needed]. A Creative Director's job is to initiate the creative concept of a project and drive the direction of the project. The role of a Creative Director is to formulate creative concepts, whether it is an advertising campaign, brand identity, TV commercial, marketing campaign. A Creative Director was often referred to the 'Ideas Guy' and works with a team of 'creatives' - art director, graphic designer, copywriter, film director to produce the concept and final production. Art directors make sure that ...
Flight crew occupations Weapons crew occupations Cargo crew occupations Passenger crew occupations Specialist crew occupations ... occupations Air control occupations Air communications occupations Air search occupations Air target acquisition occupations ... Military aviation occupations are types of work either shared with commercial aviation or unique to military aviation, that ... Military aviation occupations can be subdivided as follows: Military aviation engineering design Airframe engineers Fuel ...
The N2 Gateway Occupations saw large numbers of government-built houses occupied illegally by local residents of Delft in the ... After the occupation, it emerged that a local DA councillor, Frank Martin, had encouraged local families to occupy the houses. ... As part of the order, the judge also faulted Frank Martin for instigating the occupation and who pledge no contest to ... This was the largest occupation of houses in South Africa's history. The BNG houses were originally promised to backyard ...
List of artistic occupations List of dance occupations List of entertainer occupations List of film and television occupations ... List of sewing occupations List of computer occupations List of healthcare occupations List of scientific occupations List of ... List of education occupations List of corporate titles List of industrial occupations List of metalworking occupations List of ... The following are lists of occupations grouped by category. ... List of theatre personnel List of writing occupations ...
... aims to provide a perspective on the dynamics of the workplace and to examine international approaches to ... Work and Occupations is a peer-reviewed academic journal that publishes papers in the field of Industrial Relations. The ... Work and Occupations is abstracted and indexed in, among other databases: SCOPUS, and the Social Sciences Citation Index. ...
This is a list of writing occupations organized alphabetically. These are positions, jobs and occupations that typically entail ...
An entertainer is someone who provides entertainment in various different forms. Acrobat Actor Archimime Athlete Barker Beatboxer Benshi Bouffon Circus performer Clown Club Hostess/Host Comedian Dancer Drag queen Drag king DJ Emcee Filmmaker Flag throwing Flair bartender Flatulist Geisha Go-go dancer Harlequin Host Illusionist Impressionist Internet celebrity Itinerant poet Japanese idol Jester Kobzar Lirnyk Online streamer Magician Master of ceremonies Mime Minstrel Monologist Musician Painter Party princess Performer Photographer Podcaster Poet Promotional model Radio personality Rapper Rhapsode Ring girl Ringmaster Scop Shamakhi dancers Showgirl Showman Showrunner Singer Skomorokh Streamer Street performer Stunt performer Theatre practitioner TikToker TV celebrity Vedette Writer YouTuber (Articles with short description, Short description is different from Wikidata, Articles lacking sources from July 2018, All articles lacking sources, Articles using small message boxes, Incomplete lists from ...
The German occupation of Luxembourg in World War I (1914-1918). The German occupation of Luxembourg in World War II (1940-1944 ... The French occupation of Luxembourg before and during the War of the Grand Alliance (1684-1697). The Prussian occupation of ... There have been several military occupations of Luxembourg through the ages. Amongst them have been: The French occupation of ... Thus, Luxembourg was occupied by Prussian soldiers until the 1867 Treaty of London ordered an end to the occupation and the ...
Metalworking occupations include: Smith (a.k.a. metalsmith), such as blacksmith or silversmith Jeweler Founder Production ... Tool and die maker and related machining occupations: Moldmaker Patternmaker Modelmaker Steel erector, also known as an ... semiskilled workers who support metalworking operations and who often develop their skills to move into the other occupations ... machinist, which may involve various related machining occupations that often overlap: Manual machine tool operator CNC ...
See Russian occupation of Donetsk Oblast. See Russian occupation of Luhansk Oblast. As of November 2022, Russia does not ... as a military occupation. Benvenisti, Eyal (2012-02-23). The International Law of Occupation. OUP Oxford. ISBN 978-0-19-958889- ... The occupation of Donetsk and Luhansk Oblasts occurred in two stages. The south of Luhansk Oblast and the southeast of Donetsk ... An occupation is supposed to be a temporary status, but current reality shows that territory may be occupied for decades; the ...
Healthcare occupations in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Media related to Healthcare occupations at Wikimedia Commons ( ... Health care occupations, Lists of occupations, Health-related lists). ...
Microfilmed data about occupations furnished by the Labor Department was punched into IBM cards by the Social Security ... The Selected Characteristics of Occupations (SCO) is a companion volume to the U.S. Department of Labor's Dictionary of ... This Supplement, entitled Selected Characteristics of Occupations, was published in 1966 and proved to be a valuable tool in ... These volumes were intended to provide a detailed representation of thousands of individual occupations in the United States, ...
The occupations are of debatable historical importance. Despite their brevity, they marked the first time in over 250 years ... In his 1952 evaluation of the events, William Persen played down the occupation, describing it simply as a "new force of ... The importance of this short-lived occupation remains a subject of debate among the relatively few historians and scholars who ... Persen, William (1955). "The Russian occupations of Beirut, 1772-74". Journal of the Royal Central Asian Society. 42 (3-4): 275 ...
List of occupations requiring sewing skills. Bookbinder Cordwainer Corsetier Draper Dressmaker Embroiderer Glover Hatter ...
The Bungehuis occupation lasted 11 days, from February 13 to February 24, 2015, and the Maagdenhuis occupation (2015) began on ... The Bungehuis and Maagdenhuis occupations were a protest occupation movement at first the Bungehuis Building of the University ... The occupation received significant support from within the UvA, staff, members of Parliament, public figures such as Freek de ... Even before the occupation, the various protests had resulted in the university's abandonment of Profiel 2016 as it was ...
Lists of occupations, Ballet occupations, Dance occupations, Ballet-related lists, Dance-related lists). ... This is a list of dancing and dance-related occupations assumed by various individuals involved in this line of work. Ballet ...
The following is a list of industrial occupations. Industrial occupations are generally characterized by being manual-labour- ... Lists of occupations, Industrial occupations, Industry-related lists, All stub articles, Industry stubs). ...
Traditional occupations of Pernem, video Presentation: Traditional Occupations of Goa by Pantaleao Fernandes Traditional Goa, ... "Traditional Occupations of Goa". Retrieved 2018-07-03. "Book Highlights Decline of Goa's Traditional Occupations". Retrieved ... Pro X 7 (2017-02-24), Documentry-Traditional occupations of goa, retrieved 2018-07-03 "[Goanet] Goa's traditional occupations: ... Traditional occupations of Goa refers to the work and jobs which the people of Goa undertook in the earlier times, which might ...
This is a list of science and science-related occupations, which include various scientific occupations and careers based upon ... Anthropologist Economist Historian Linguist Political scientist Sociologist Urban planner Science portal Lists of occupations ...
This is a list of artistic and creative occupations related to the creation of artistic displays. Accessory designer ...
Contents: Top 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A/B tester Application analyst Business analyst Computer operator Computer repair technician Computer scientist Computer analyst Data entry clerk Database administrator Data analyst Data designer Data scientist Hardware engineer Information systems technician IT assistant IT consultant Network analyst Network administrator Programmer Product manager Project manager Rapid prototyper Scrum master Security engineer Software analyst Software architect Software design Software engineer Software project manager Software quality analyst Software test engineer (Tester) Solution architect Support technician (Help Desk) System administrator Systems analyst Systems architect Test engineer User experience designer User interaction designer User researcher Video game developer Visual designer Virtual assistant Web developer Website administrator Bureau of Labor Statistics jobs list database in text (Articles with short description, Short ...
... use of a building Occupation or The Occupation may also refer to: Occupation (2018 film), an Australian film Occupation (2021 ... Look up occupation or occupy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Occupation commonly refers to: Occupation (human activity), or ... "The Occupation" (Star Wars Rebels), a 2017 television episode The Occupation, a 2019 video game The Occupation, a 2019 novel by ... an occupation to which a person is specially drawn All pages with titles containing Occupation This disambiguation page lists ...
The HOBET (Health Occupations Basic Entrance Test) is an entrance exam used in the United States to determine if a person is ... qualified to enter a health occupation worker. The HOBET covers the following topics: Reading Paragraph and Passage ...
Many occupations - such as training and development officer - are common across all three branches, while others - such as ... The following is a list of the current military occupations across all three branches ("elements") of the Canadian military: ... The Canadian Armed Forces currently lists 84 military occupations that are performed by either officer or non-commissioned ... The following list contains former occupations that have either been renamed or removed altogether: "FORCES.CA - Browse Jobs". ...
This is a list of railway industry occupations, but it also includes transient functional job titles according to activity. ... Secondman Signal maintainer Signalman Station agent Station master Track foreman Rail transport operations Lists of occupations ...
The Council for Maintaining the Occupations (French: Conseil pour le Maintien des Occupations), or CMDO, was a revolutionary ... by supporters of the Sorbonne Occupation Committee. Sorbonne Occupation Committee On the Poverty of Student Life May 1968 in ... Enragés and Situationists in the Occupations Movement (Paris, May 1968). Translated by Loren Goldner and Paul Sieveking. Guy ... The council favored the continuation of wildcat general strikes and factory occupations across France, maintaining them through ...
... and assemblers Elementary occupations Armed forces occupations Each major group is further organized into sub-major, minor and ... The ISCO is the basis for many national occupation classifications as well as applications in specific domains such as ... Resolution Concerning Updating the International Standard Classification of Occupations. Adopted at the Tripartite Meeting of ... Classifying health workers: Mapping occupations to the international standard classification, retrieved 29 March 2011. Hunter D ...
An usher is a person who welcomes and shows people where to sit, especially at a church, theatre or when attending a wedding. The word comes from the Latin ostiarius ("porter", "doorman") through Norman French, and is a cognate of the French huissier. Ushers were servants or courtiers who showed or ushered visitors in and out of meetings in large houses or palaces.[citation needed] In the United Kingdom, a variety of titles for courtiers in the Royal Household include the word usher. In England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland, from the early sixteenth century until at least the end of the nineteenth century, the term denoted an assistant to a schoolmaster or head-teacher; an under-master, assistant-master. In such use, however, the term is now rare. Ushers assist visitors by formally showing the way in a large building or to their appropriate seats. This may coincide with a security role.[citation needed] At weddings, friends of the groom and bride may be recruited to direct guests at the ceremony, ...
The term "computer", in use from the early 17th century (the first known written reference dates from 1613), meant "one who computes": a person performing mathematical calculations, before electronic computers became commercially available. Alan Turing described the "human computer" as someone who is "supposed to be following fixed rules; he has no authority to deviate from them in any detail." Teams of people, often women from the late nineteenth century onwards, were used to undertake long and often tedious calculations; the work was divided so that this could be done in parallel. The same calculations were frequently performed independently by separate teams to check the correctness of the results. Since the end of the 20th century, the term "human computer" has also been applied to individuals with prodigious powers of mental arithmetic, also known as mental calculators. Astronomers in Renaissance times used that term about as often as they called themselves "mathematicians" for their ...
Workplace Safety & Health Topics, Directory of Industries and Occupations
... comprises the following occupations: First-Line Supervisors of Construction Trades and ... National estimates for Construction and Extraction Occupations. Industry profile for Construction and Extraction Occupations. ... Geographic profile for Construction and Extraction Occupations. National estimates for Construction and Extraction Occupations ... Top paying states for Construction and Extraction Occupations: State Employment (1) Employment per thousand jobs Location ...
... occupations such as entertainers and prostitutes. The four occupations were not a hereditary system. The four occupations ... The four occupations (simplified Chinese: 士农工商; traditional Chinese: 士農工商; pinyin: Shì nóng gōng shāng), or "four categories of ... However, it is now known that the classification of four occupations as Ban Gu understood it did not exist until the 2nd ... However, he notes that although no statute in the Qin or Han law codes specifically mentions the four occupations, some laws ...
Info about Occupation 101. List of awards from other film festivals. *^ "Occupation takes home Golden Palm". By Gregg Kilday ... the Israeli military occupation of the West Bank and Gaza, and the ethics of US monetary involvement.[1] Occupation 101 ... Occupation 101: Voice of the Silenced Majority is a 2006 documentary film on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict directed by ... Occupation 101 :: Interviewees. From official Occupation101.tv site. *^ Screenings and awards. From official Occupation101.com ...
Health Occupations Also called: Health careers, Health professions, Medical occupations, Medical professions ... To work in a health occupation, you often must have special training. Some, like doctors, must have more than 4 years of ...
Find Occupations Bright Outlook Career Cluster Hot Technology Industry Job Family Job Zone STEM All Occupations ... Find Occupations Bright Outlook Career Cluster Hot Technology Industry Job Family Job Zone STEM All Occupations ... Related Occupations for DWA 29-2099.08 - Patient Representatives Bright Outlook Interview employees, customers, or others to ... Related Occupations for DWA by U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration is licensed under a Creative ...
ARTICLES WEIRD WORLD 17 FACTS ABOUT RESPECTED OCCUPATIONS 17 Facts About Respected Occupations. By:. AM Smiley January 23 ...
The Unborn Victims of Occupation. Rampant violence and a curfew that makes nighttime medical aid unrealistic at best are ...
Room occupation by track. All times are CET (UTC+1, Brussels time). For a less graphical and colorful overview of the rooms and ...
Find salaries, employment projections, typical training, job duties and more for any occupation. ... Information on licensed occupations is gathered in each state by Labor Market Information units under a grant from the U.S. ... Learn details about any occupation including what you might do on the job, how much you might earn, and how much education or ... This chart shows you a range of how much most workers in this occupation earn per hour, in the location that you selected. ...
... and Occupations Activities resources for your classroom. Download free today! ...
This alis occupation may not reflect the entire NOC group it is part of. Data for the NOC group can apply across multiple ... In Alberta, this occupation is part of 1 or more 2006 National Occupational Classification (NOC) groups. If there are multiple ... In Alberta, this occupation is part of 1 or more 2016 National Occupational Classification (NOC) groups. If there are multiple ... In Alberta, this occupation is part of 1 or more 2016 National Occupational Classification (NOC) groups. If there are multiple ...
Farming, fishing, & forestry occupations. 864. 0.12%. 139. 0.02%. Construction, extraction, & maintenance occupations:. 78,931 ... INDUSTRY & OCCUPATION. Not only has the makeup of the American workforce evolved over the past fifty years as more and more ... Healthcare practitioners & technical occupations:. 7,245. 1.02%. 15,829. 2.23%. Health diagnosing, treating practitioners, & ... Production, transportation, & material moving occupations:. 56,667. 7.98%. 12,991. 1.83%. Production. 19,785. 2.79%. 7,099. ...
If CM is evidence of human occupation, it was likely brief and died out. Lost in a storm at sea and shipwrecked? The odds of ... If CM is evidence of human occupation, it was likely brief and died out. Lost in a storm at sea and shipwrecked? The odds of ... But, the rejection of occupation as early as 130,000 years ago because we have no evidence of anything half that old requires ... In other words, a bunch of chomped up elephant bones down the way from clear unambiguous human occupation on a landscape with ...
Match the arrestee with their reported occupation. Just drag the respective occupations into the squares beneath each suspect. ...
Alice Hills, Britain and the Occupation of Austria, 1943-1945. New York: St. Martins Press, 2000. 222 pp. $69.95. This book ... To complicate matters further, nobody could predict whether the occupation would begin before or after a cease-fire, and it was ... Hills shows that planning for the occupation was complicated by many factors, not least that the British knew almost nothing ... It was a fundamental assumption among Britains strategic planners and policymakers that occupation of Austria would be ...
Since Hamass deadly attack on Oct. 7, Israel has increased arrests, raids and restricted movement in the West Bank.
Grasty on cost of occupation: This cost is $60,000 to $70,000 a day and were going to send Mr. Bundy the bill. # ... Man holds his son at Harney County Committee of Safety town hall called to discuss the occupation of the Malheur National ... their continuing occupation is costing taxpayers dearly." ... The Daily Cost of the Bundy Occupation. By Laurel Raymond, ... their continuing occupation is costing taxpayers dearly. ... their continuing occupation is costing taxpayers dearly. ...
... whether they work in occupations predominantly done by women, occupations predominantly done by men, or occupations with a more ... Womens median earnings are lower than mens in nearly all occupations, ... whether they work in occupations predominantly done by women, occupations predominantly done by men, or occupations with a more ... Womens median earnings are lower than mens in nearly all occupations, ...
An Israeli airstrike caused massive carnage in Gaza in May 2021.
VPAP is a trusted, nonpartisan source for information about Virginia politics.. Sign Up Now. Its free!. VPAP is a trusted, nonpartisan source for information about Virginia politics.. Sign Up Now. Its free!. VPAP is supported entirely by tax-deductible contributions.. Donate Now. ...
Vocabulary worksheets , Jobs/occupations/professions , Jobs , jobs and occupations jobs and occupations. Very simple and ... Jobs and Occupations: Multiple Choices. Level: elementary. Age: 7-12. Downloads: 1333 Jobs and occupations (1 of 8). Level: ... Jobs and occupations (2 of 8). Level: elementary. Age: 12-17. Downloads: 1618 What do they do? (2 of 2). Level: elementary. Age ... Jobs and occupations (3 of 8). Level: elementary. Age: 12-17. Downloads: 866 Job Cards - Set 1. Level: elementary. Age: 11-17. ...
Cancer: Occupations / Financial Profile - Zodiacal signs explained. Astrology of Cancer: Occupations / Financial Profile. Your ... Cancer: Occupations / Financial Profile · zodiacal signs explained · April 17, 2024, 22:28 GMT ASTROLOGY WEEKLY ... so you will eventually find yourself making a nice living in any occupation that requires this expertise. If you currently ...
Undercover Israeli police officers arrested prominent Israeli anti-occupation activist Jonathan Pollak at his workplace ... Undercover Police Arrest Israeli Anti-occupation Activist. January 7, 2020 News Israeli anti-occupation Jonathan Pollack. ( ... At least two Palestinians were injured today when Israeli occupation forces attacked the weekly protest against illegal Jewish ... Undercover Israeli police officers arrested prominent Israeli anti-occupation activist Jonathan Pollak at his workplace ...
you attempt to justify and give credence to your occupations,. Palestine is my land, and I wont let you take it. and while you ... The Definition of Occupation, is included. Thank you. ... Nakba NATO Nonviolence Nuclear war Nuclear Weapons Occupation ... Rights Inequality Inspirational International Relations Invasion Israel Israeli Apartheid Israeli Army Israeli occupation Joke ...
... classify usual residents aged 16 years and over in employment the week before the census in England and Wales by occupation. ... Occupation (current). Classifies what people aged 16 years and over do as their main job. Their job title or details of ... Industry and occupation, England and Wales: Census 2021 Industries that people are employed in, types of work people do as ... We advised users that two occupation classifications "5221 Metal forming, welding and related trades" and "5222 Tool makers, ...
With the problem occupation seeks to address or highlight, the precise aim of an occupation will vary. Some occupations may ... Occupation is a form of direct action where protesters take over and occupy a public building or space. Occupation is usually ... Other occupations, such as the 2011 occupation of Tahrir Square in Cairo protested specifically against the then political ... A very very brief history of occupation tactics. Occupation as refrain: territory and beyond in Occupy London. Privatization ...
Officials Call For End To 4th Precinct Occupation, Protesters Vow To Stay. November 30, 2015 / 6:41 PM CST. / CBS Minnesota ... Hodges said the two-week-old occupation outside the 4th Precinct must end. ...
The Dangerous Liaisons of French Banks with the Israeli Occupation. by CounterPunch News Service ... While the year 2017 marks the 50th anniversary of the Israeli occupation in the Occupied Palestinian Territories, the Israeli ...
  • This information is used to code responses to an occupation using the Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) 2020. (ons.gov.uk)
  • Women in elementary occupations , with low skill level, and in paid employment not classified elsewhere, had the lowest BCS, while professionals, those with the highest skill level and belonging to top management and independent profession category had the highest BCS. (bvsalud.org)
  • Considering elementary occupations as reference, all occupations but Craft and related trades had a hazard ratio (HR) below 1. (bvsalud.org)
  • While the year 2017 marks the 50th anniversary of the Israeli occupation in the Occupied Palestinian Territories, the Israeli government's colonization project in the West Bank and East Jerusalem has accelerated dramatically. (counterpunch.org)
  • pinyin: sì mín), was an occupation classification used in ancient China by either Confucian or Legalist scholars as far back as the late Zhou dynasty and is considered a central part of the fengjian social structure (c. 1046-256 BC). (wikipedia.org)
  • However, it is now known that the classification of four occupations as Ban Gu understood it did not exist until the 2nd century BC. (wikipedia.org)
  • Anthony J. Barbieri-Low, Professor of Early Chinese History at the University of California, Santa Barbara, writes that the classification of "four occupations" can be viewed as a mere rhetorical device that had no effect on government policy. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Canada, the federal government groups and organizes occupations based on a National Occupational Classification (NOC) system. (alberta.ca)
  • Methods: This population-based study investigated were shown to be statistically associated with the development an occupation that was classified according to the International of cancer of the oropharynx with Odds Ratio (OR) ranging from Standard Classification of Occupations. (bvsalud.org)
  • The present article lends itself to analyzing the occupation held at the Federal Fluminense University between November 2016 and January 2017. (bvsalud.org)
  • Data and information the videos are from the Occupational Outlook Handbook and O*NET OnLine's Occupation Information . (careeronestop.org)
  • Industries with the highest published employment and wages for Construction and Extraction Occupations are provided. (bls.gov)
  • For a list of all industries with employment in Construction and Extraction Occupations, see the Create Customized Tables function. (bls.gov)
  • Among professionals, technicians and associate professionals, and clerks, the protective effect of occupation was statistically significant and remained unchanged after adjustment for age, calendar period, registry , nationality , and histological type. (bvsalud.org)
  • ynx (OSCC)11 Workers in mechanical and industrial workshops, Studies have analyzed the relationship between occupation- such as metal works and petrochemical plants, as well as paint- al exposure and risk for cancer of the oral cavity2-10. (bvsalud.org)
  • Breast cancer and occupation: Non-parametric and parametric net survival analyses among Swiss women (1990-2014). (bvsalud.org)
  • Occupation can contribute to differences in risk and stage at diagnosis of breast cancer . (bvsalud.org)
  • This study aimed at determining whether occupation , along with skill level and the socio-professional category, affect the breast cancer survival (BCS) up to 10 years after diagnosis . (bvsalud.org)
  • The university occupation took place - under the inspiration of other movements, such as the Occupy Wall Street and the secondary occupations of São Paulo - with the urgent intention of facing the PEC number 55/2016, which proposed the freezing of public investments - mostly in health and education - for twenty years. (bvsalud.org)
  • We concluded that occupations express the resistance power against the capitalist diagram. (bvsalud.org)
  • "NeoFlix welcomes 'Occupation 101' - May 4, 2007" Archived March 12, 2018, at the Wayback Machine . (wikipedia.org)
  • A more specific example is the 2018 occupation by University of Sheffield students of one of the university's main buildings, in support of university faculty on strike against proposed pension cuts. (participedia.net)
  • 2 For further information, see http://www.who.int/hrh/network/en/ (accessed 10 October 2018). (who.int)
  • To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/be/deed.en or send a letter to Creative Commons, 444 Castro Street, Suite 900, Mountain View, California, 94041, USA. (fosdem.org)
  • This dataset provides Census 2021 estimates that classify usual residents aged 16 years and over in employment the week before the census in England and Wales by occupation. (ons.gov.uk)
  • Occupation plays a significant role in this prioritization, as sleep fragmentation and daytime sleepiness can lead to workplace and vehicular accidents. (medscape.com)
  • To work in a health occupation, you often must have special training. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Title : Selected health characteristics by occupation, United States, July 1961-June 1963 Personal Author(s) : Gleeson, Geraldine A. Corporate Authors(s) : National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.) Published Date : August 1965 Series : Vital and health statistics. (cdc.gov)
  • This alis occupation may not reflect the entire NOC group it is part of. (alberta.ca)
  • Data for the NOC group can apply across multiple occupations. (alberta.ca)
  • Government forms and labour market data may group and refer to an occupation differently, depending on the system used. (alberta.ca)
  • We conducted two group interviews with occupations participants. (bvsalud.org)
  • Raymond writes: "Although the armed occupiers of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge facility may seem to have done little more than camp out with guns and demand snacks, their continuing occupation is costing taxpayers dearly. (readersupportednews.org)
  • Despite the 1943 Moscow Declaration, which proposed to treat Austria as a victim of Nazi aggression, the British Foreign Office justified its decision to plan for occupation on the grounds that all parties had a stake in ensuring that "abolition of the Nazi regime not be followed by chaos" (p.4). (jhu.edu)
  • Using the experience of a student and a teacher, with their different perspectives and positions in the occupation, the article operates a narrative policy under which alternately presents and problematizes some important elements and events of this political movement - with conceptual discussions that provide more tone and complexity to the discussion. (bvsalud.org)
  • The commercialization of Chinese society in the Song and Ming periods further blurred the lines between these four occupations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Women's median earnings are lower than men's in nearly all occupations, whether they work in occupations predominantly done by women, occupations predominantly done by men, or occupations with a more even mix of men and women. (vawnet.org)
  • Therefore, further larger studies are needed for more detailed analyses of at risk occupations and working conditions and assessing the potential interaction between work -related variables and tumor stage. (bvsalud.org)
  • Industry and occupation text are often collected on surveys, death certificates, and medical records. (cdc.gov)
  • Statistics on disability, illness, and medical services among persons in the labor force, by occupation and other personal, social, and economic characteristics. (cdc.gov)
  • You should include the occupation in the patient's profile. (medscape.com)
  • To complicate matters further, nobody could predict whether the occupation would begin before or after a cease-fire, and it was not certain which Allied units would be the first to enter Austria. (jhu.edu)
  • Editorials and articles originated on TMS may be freely reprinted, disseminated, translated and used as background material, provided an acknowledgement and link to the source, TMS: The Definition of Occupation , is included. (transcend.org)
  • Related Occupations for DWA by U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License . (onetonline.org)
  • It classifies people who were in employment between 15 March and 21 March 2021, by the SOC code that represents their current occupation. (ons.gov.uk)
  • The four occupations were not a hereditary system. (wikipedia.org)
  • The four occupations system differed from those of European feudalism in that people were not born into the specific classes, such that, for example, a son born to a gong craftsman was able to become a part of the shang merchant class, and so on. (wikipedia.org)
  • Occupation is a tactic used by protesters or social movements whereby groups literally occupy a public space or building in protest of a situation and/or in a campaign for political or social change. (participedia.net)
  • Occupation is usually pursued in protest against a particular policy, societal or political inequalities and injustices, or simply against an objectionable status quo. (participedia.net)
  • The Occupy Wall Street Movement, for example, began with an occupation of Zucotti Park in Manhattan's financial district[1], in a general protest against global capitalism and its concomitant inequality. (participedia.net)
  • Objective Describe differences in smoking behaviors associated with occupation, workplace rules against smoking, and workplace smoking cessation programs. (who.int)
  • However, he notes that although no statute in the Qin or Han law codes specifically mentions the four occupations, some laws did treat these broadly classified social groups as separate units with different levels of legal privilege. (wikipedia.org)
  • NIOCCS is a free web application that converts industry and occupation text into standardized codes. (cdc.gov)
  • Beneath the four occupations were the "mean people" (Chinese: 賤民 jiànmín), outcasts from "humiliating" occupations such as entertainers and prostitutes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Or, click "List of Occupations" to select from a list of careers. (careeronestop.org)
  • [1] Occupation 101 includes interviews with mostly American and Israeli scholars, religious leaders, humanitarian workers, and NGO representatives-more than half of whom are Jewish -who are critical of the injustices and human rights abuses stemming from Israeli policy in the West Bank, East Jerusalem , and Gaza. (wikipedia.org)
  • Man holds his son at Harney County Committee of Safety town hall called to discuss the occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. (readersupportednews.org)
  • Conclusions Social or cultural effects related to occupation are important determinants of smoking. (who.int)
  • The recent political movements of urban occupations seem to bring something new in the field of political mobilization. (bvsalud.org)
  • Learn details about any occupation including what you might do on the job, how much you might earn, and how much education or training you might need. (careeronestop.org)
  • This article aims to know the discourses of school occupations participants in Goiás, to discuss the configurations of forces in their political practices. (bvsalud.org)
  • Here is how this occupation has been classified over time. (alberta.ca)
  • Other occupations, such as the 2011 occupation of Tahrir Square in Cairo protested specifically against the then political regime in Egypt,[3] and as part of a broader movement resulted in the demise of President Hosni Mubarak. (participedia.net)
  • Although occupation has been used as a form of collective action for many years, the past decade has seen renewed action and interest through the Occupy Movement which began on Wall Street and subsquently spread to many cities throughout the world. (participedia.net)
  • With the problem occupation seeks to address or highlight, the precise aim of an occupation will vary. (participedia.net)
  • Some occupations may serve to draw attention to a particular problem and highlight its importance. (participedia.net)
  • In the past, many occupations entailed exposures to arsenic (see Table 3). (cdc.gov)
  • The tion and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in a Brazilian variables marital status, occupation, alcoholism and smoking population. (bvsalud.org)