Obstetrics: A medical-surgical specialty concerned with management and care of women during pregnancy, parturition, and the puerperium.Gynecology: A medical-surgical specialty concerned with the physiology and disorders primarily of the female genital tract, as well as female endocrinology and reproductive physiology.Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and management of services provided for obstetric and gynecologic patients.Obstetric Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the pregnant woman for conditions associated with pregnancy, labor, or the puerperium. It does not include surgery of the newborn infant.Diagnostic Techniques, Obstetrical and Gynecological: Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of conditions related to pregnancy, labor, and the puerperium and of diseases of the female genitalia. It includes also demonstration of genital and pregnancy physiology.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Insurance, Liability: Insurance against loss resulting from liability for injury or damage to the persons or property of others.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Malpractice: Failure of a professional person, a physician or lawyer, to render proper services through reprehensible ignorance or negligence or through criminal intent, especially when injury or loss follows. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Delivery, Obstetric: Delivery of the FETUS and PLACENTA under the care of an obstetrician or a health worker. Obstetric deliveries may involve physical, psychological, medical, or surgical interventions.Career Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.Physicians, Women: Women licensed to practice medicine.Obstetric Labor Complications: Medical problems associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR, such as BREECH PRESENTATION; PREMATURE OBSTETRIC LABOR; HEMORRHAGE; or others. These complications can affect the well-being of the mother, the FETUS, or both.Neonatology: A subspecialty of Pediatrics concerned with the newborn infant.Vaginal Fistula: An abnormal anatomical passage that connects the VAGINA to other organs, such as the bladder (VESICOVAGINAL FISTULA) or the rectum (RECTOVAGINAL FISTULA).Gynecologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the female genitalia.Endometrial Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of ENDOMETRIUM, the mucous lining of the UTERUS. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. Their classification and grading are based on the various cell types and the percent of undifferentiated cells.Anesthesia, Obstetrical: A variety of anesthetic methods such as EPIDURAL ANESTHESIA used to control the pain of childbirth.Ovarian Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.Cesarean Section: Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.Genital Neoplasms, Female: Tumor or cancer of the female reproductive tract (GENITALIA, FEMALE).Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Nurse Midwives: Professional nurses who have received postgraduate training in midwifery.Hysterectomy: Excision of the uterus.Pregnancy Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Uterine Cervical Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the UTERINE CERVIX.Women's Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Postpartum Hemorrhage: Excess blood loss from uterine bleeding associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR or CHILDBIRTH. It is defined as blood loss greater than 500 ml or of the amount that adversely affects the maternal physiology, such as BLOOD PRESSURE and HEMATOCRIT. Postpartum hemorrhage is divided into two categories, immediate (within first 24 hours after birth) or delayed (after 24 hours postpartum).Puerperal Infection: An infection occurring in PUERPERIUM, the period of 6-8 weeks after giving birth.Midwifery: The practice of assisting women in childbirth.Tocolysis: Any drug treatment modality designed to inhibit UTERINE CONTRACTION. It is used in pregnant women to arrest PREMATURE LABOR.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Genital Diseases, Female: Pathological processes involving the female reproductive tract (GENITALIA, FEMALE).Maternal-Fetal Relations: The bond or lack thereof between a pregnant woman and her FETUS.Defensive Medicine: The alterations of modes of medical practice, induced by the threat of liability, for the principal purposes of forestalling lawsuits by patients as well as providing good legal defense in the event that such lawsuits are instituted.Carcinoma, Endometrioid: An adenocarcinoma characterized by the presence of cells resembling the glandular cells of the ENDOMETRIUM. It is a common histological type of ovarian CARCINOMA and ENDOMETRIAL CARCINOMA. There is a high frequency of co-occurrence of this form of adenocarcinoma in both tissues.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Pregnancy Outcome: Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.Hospital Departments: Major administrative divisions of the hospital.Prenatal Care: Care provided the pregnant woman in order to prevent complications, and decrease the incidence of maternal and prenatal mortality.Liability, Legal: Accountability and responsibility to another, enforceable by civil or criminal sanctions.Clinical Clerkship: Undergraduate education programs for second- , third- , and fourth-year students in health sciences in which the students receive clinical training and experience in teaching hospitals or affiliated health centers.Eclampsia: Onset of HYPERREFLEXIA; SEIZURES; or COMA in a previously diagnosed pre-eclamptic patient (PRE-ECLAMPSIA).Perinatology: The branch of medicine dealing with the fetus and infant during the perinatal period. The perinatal period begins with the twenty-eighth week of gestation and ends twenty-eight days after birth. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Hospitals, Rural: Hospitals located in a rural area.Hospital Bed Capacity, under 100Extraction, Obstetrical: Extraction of the fetus by means of obstetrical instruments.Work Simplification: The construction or arrangement of a task so that it may be done with the greatest possible efficiency.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Obstetrical Forceps: Surgical instrument designed to extract the newborn by the head from the maternal passages without injury to it or the mother.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Ultrasonography, Prenatal: The visualization of tissues during pregnancy through recording of the echoes of ultrasonic waves directed into the body. The procedure may be applied with reference to the mother or the fetus and with reference to organs or the detection of maternal or fetal disease.Puerperal Disorders: Disorders or diseases associated with PUERPERIUM, the six-to-eight-week period immediately after PARTURITION in humans.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Maternal Mortality: Maternal deaths resulting from complications of pregnancy and childbirth in a given population.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Hospitals, Teaching: Hospitals engaged in educational and research programs, as well as providing medical care to the patients.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Alberta: A province of western Canada, lying between the provinces of British Columbia and Saskatchewan. Its capital is Edmonton. It was named in honor of Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, the fourth daughter of Queen Victoria. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p26 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p12)Labor, Obstetric: The repetitive uterine contraction during childbirth which is associated with the progressive dilation of the uterine cervix (CERVIX UTERI). Successful labor results in the expulsion of the FETUS and PLACENTA. Obstetric labor can be spontaneous or induced (LABOR, INDUCED).Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous: A malignant cystic or semicystic neoplasm. It often occurs in the ovary and usually bilaterally. The external surface is usually covered with papillary excrescences. Microscopically, the papillary patterns are predominantly epithelial overgrowths with differentiated and undifferentiated papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma cells. Psammoma bodies may be present. The tumor generally adheres to surrounding structures and produces ascites. (From Hughes, Obstetric-Gynecologic Terminology, 1972, p185)Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Professional Practice Location: Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.Fellowships and Scholarships: Stipends or grants-in-aid granted by foundations or institutions to individuals for study.Medical Staff, Hospital: Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Uterine Hemorrhage: Bleeding from blood vessels in the UTERUS, sometimes manifested as vaginal bleeding.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Women, Working: Women who are engaged in gainful activities usually outside the home.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)CA-125 Antigen: Carbohydrate antigen most commonly seen in tumors of the ovary and occasionally seen in breast, kidney, and gastrointestinal tract tumors and normal tissue. CA 125 is clearly tumor-associated but not tumor-specific.Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial: Neoplasms composed of glandular tissue, an aggregation of epithelial cells that elaborate secretions, and of any type of epithelium itself. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the various glands or in epithelial tissue.Pregnancy Complications, Infectious: The co-occurrence of pregnancy and an INFECTION. The infection may precede or follow FERTILIZATION.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.General Surgery: A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.Education, Medical, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.Carcinoma, Adenosquamous: A mixed adenocarcinoma and squamous cell or epidermoid carcinoma.Pregnancy, High-Risk: Pregnancy in which the mother and/or FETUS are at greater than normal risk of MORBIDITY or MORTALITY. Causes include inadequate PRENATAL CARE, previous obstetrical history (ABORTION, SPONTANEOUS), pre-existing maternal disease, pregnancy-induced disease (GESTATIONAL HYPERTENSION), and MULTIPLE PREGNANCY, as well as advanced maternal age above 35.Hospitals, University: Hospitals maintained by a university for the teaching of medical students, postgraduate training programs, and clinical research.Episiotomy: An incision of the posterior vaginal wall and a portion of the pudenda which enlarges the vaginal introitus to facilitate delivery and prevent lacerations.Vagina: The genital canal in the female, extending from the UTERUS to the VULVA. (Stedman, 25th ed)Fetal Monitoring: Physiologic or biochemical monitoring of the fetus. It is usually done during LABOR, OBSTETRIC and may be performed in conjunction with the monitoring of uterine activity. It may also be performed prenatally as when the mother is undergoing surgery.Blood Transfusion, Autologous: Reinfusion of blood or blood products derived from the patient's own circulation. (Dorland, 27th ed)Uterine Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the UTERUS.Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular: The co-occurrence of pregnancy and a cardiovascular disease. The disease may precede or follow FERTILIZATION and it may or may not have a deleterious effect on the pregnant woman or FETUS.Fetal Diseases: Pathophysiological conditions of the FETUS in the UTERUS. Some fetal diseases may be treated with FETAL THERAPIES.United StatesReview Literature as Topic: Published materials which provide an examination of recent or current literature. Review articles can cover a wide range of subject matter at various levels of completeness and comprehensiveness based on analyses of literature that may include research findings. The review may reflect the state of the art. It also includes reviews as a literary form.Workload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.Fetal Death: Death of the developing young in utero. BIRTH of a dead FETUS is STILLBIRTH.

Physician management in primary care. (1/647)

Minimal explicit consensus criteria in the management of patients with four indicator conditions were established by an ad hoc committee of primary care physicians practicing in different locations. These criteria were then applied to the practices of primary care physicians located in a single community by abstracting medical records and obtaining questionnaire data about patients with the indicator conditions. A standardized management score for each physician was used as the dependent variable in stepwise regression analysis with physician/practice and patient/disease characteristics as the candidate independent variables. For all physicians combined, the mean management scores were high, ranging from .78 to .93 for the four conditions. For two of the conditions, care of the normal infant and pregnant woman, the management scores were better for pediatricians and obstetricians respectively than for family physicians. For the other two conditions, adult onset diabetes and congestive heart failure, there were no differences between the management scores of family physicians and internists. Patient/disease characteristics did not contribute significantly to explaining the variation in the standardized management scores.  (+info)

The role of curriculum in influencing students to select generalist training: a 21-year longitudinal study. (2/647)

To determine if specific curricula or backgrounds influence selection of generalist careers, the curricular choices of graduates of Mount Sinai School of Medicine between 1970 and 1990 were reviewed based on admission category. Students were divided into three groups: Group 1, those who started their first year of training at the School of Medicine; Group 2, those accepted with advanced standing into their third year of training from the Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, a five-year program developed to select and produce students likely to enter primary care fields; and Group 3, those accepted with advanced standing into the third year who spent the first two years at a foreign medical school. All three groups took the identical last two years of clinical training at the School of Medicine. These were no significant differences with respect to initial choice of generalist training programs among all three groups, with 46% of the total cohort selecting generalist training. Of those students who chose generalist programs, 58% in Group 1, 51% in Group 2, and 41% in Group 3 remained in these fields rather than progressing to fellowship training. This difference was significant only with respect to Group 3. However, when an analysis was performed among those students providing only primary care as compared to only specialty care, there were no significant differences. Analysis by gender revealed women to be more likely to select generalist fields and remain in these fields without taking specialty training (P < .0001). Differentiating characteristics with respect to choosing generalist fields were not related to either Part I or Part II scores on National Board Examinations or selection to AOA. However, with respect to those specific specialties considered quite competitive (general surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, and ophthalmology), total test scores on Part I and Part II were significantly higher than those of all other students. The analysis indicated that, despite the diverse characteristics of students entering the third year at the School of Medicine, no one group produced a statistically greater proportion of generalists positions than any other, and academic performance while in medical school did not have a significant influence on whether a student entered a generalist field.  (+info)

Obstetrics anyone? How family medicine residents' interests changed. (3/647)

OBJECTIVE: To determine family medicine residents' attitudes and plans about practising obstetrics when they enter and when they graduate from their residency programs. DESIGN: Residents in each of 4 consecutive years, starting July 1991, were surveyed by questionnaire when they entered the program and again when they graduated (ending in June 1996). Only paired questionnaires were used for analysis. SETTING: Family medicine residency programs at the University of Toronto in Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Of 358 family medicine residents who completed the University of Toronto program, 215 (60%) completed questionnaires at entry and exit. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in attitudes and plans during the residency program as ascertained from responses to entry and exit questionnaires. RESULTS: Analysis was based on 215 paired questionnaires. Women residents had more interest in obstetric practice at entry: 58% of women, but only 31% of men were interested. At graduation, fewer women (49%) and men (22%) were interested in practising obstetrics. The intent to undertake rural practice was strongly associated with the intent to practise obstetrics. By graduation, residents perceived lifestyle factors and compensation as very important negative factors in relation to obstetric practice. Initial interest and the eventual decision to practise obstetrics were strongly associated. CONCLUSIONS: Intent to practise obstetrics after graduation was most closely linked to being a woman, intending to practise in a rural area, and having an interest in obstetrics prior to residency. Building on the interest in obstetrics that residents already have could be a better strategy for producing more physicians willing to practise obstetrics than trying to change the minds of those uninterested in such practice.  (+info)

Satisfaction with obstetric care. Patient survey in a family practice shared-call group. (4/647)

OBJECTIVE: To examine patients' satisfaction with their obstetric care in a family medicine shared-call group. DESIGN: A survey was given to a convenience sample of patients who came to see their doctors over a 6-week period. SETTING: Brameast Family Practice in Brampton, Ont, where eight doctors participate in a shared obstetrics call group with 16 other physicians, each taking call 1 day in 23 days. PARTICIPANTS: Mothers in the practice who had delivered in the previous 8 months. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Demographic data, interventions during delivery, and satisfaction ratings. RESULTS: Of the 70% of women who responded, 96% were delivered by a doctor other than their own. Eighty-eight percent of these women were satisfied with their medical care at delivery and 96% were satisfied with their prenatal care. Nearly 79% said they would choose this shared-call group again. CONCLUSIONS: This pilot study demonstrated a high level of patient satisfaction with obstetric care, despite the fact that most patients were delivered by a doctor other than their own. Family practice groups sharing obstetric call offer a feasible alternative for physicians who wish to avoid the interference with lifestyle and office appointments that practising obstetrics usually entails.  (+info)

Maternity care calendar wheel. Improved obstetric wheel developed in British Columbia. (5/647)

PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: Gestational calendar "wheels" are not well designed for routine prenatal care or for presenting the uncertainties of predicting date of delivery. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To design and pilot-test a new gestational calendar wheel that predicts the range of normal due dates in a way that reflects the biological realities of pregnancy. The calendar has prompts that could facilitate provision of antenatal care, support prenatal education, and guide the timing of induction for pregnancies past their due dates. MAIN COMPONENTS OF PROGRAM: The calendar sets out the key issues to be addressed with patients during pregnancy. It is designed to be photocopied while set to patients' dates: patients keep one copy; another is placed in their charts. The probability of delivering on a given date is presented graphically and as a percentage likelihood of giving birth during specified intervals. Twelve practising physicians, 12 residents, and 10 pregnant women pilot-tested and evaluated the wheel. Their responses were favourable. CONCLUSIONS: The Maternity Care Calendar wheel is a substantial advance on existing obstetric calendar wheels. It incorporates evidence-based information that should facilitate prenatal care, promote prenatal education, and foster realistic expectations about the likely timing of delivery. Early in the pregnancy, it can help establish the timing of induction for pregnancies past their due dates. Further testing of the calendar's effectiveness in improving patient outcomes is needed.  (+info)

Maternity Care Guidelines checklist. To assist physicians in implementing CPGs. (6/647)

PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: Implementing the recommended clinical practice guidelines for prenatal care can be difficult for busy practitioners because the guidelines are numerous and continually being revised. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To develop a checklist outlining the current recommended activities for prenatal care to assist practitioners in providing evidence-based interventions to pregnant women. MAIN COMPONENTS OF PROGRAM: We reviewed guidelines for prenatal care from the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination (CTFPHE) and from the report of the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). We searched MEDLINE for interventions commonly performed in pregnancy, but not reviewed by either task force. Interventions graded A or B are listed in bold type on the checklist. Interventions graded C by either task force or recommended by organizations not necessarily using the same rigorous criteria are listed in plain type. Recommended interventions are displayed along a time line under three headings: clinical maneuvers, investigations, and issues for discussion. Pilot testing by 12 practising physicians and 12 family practice residents showed that most respondents thought the checklist very useful. CONCLUSIONS: Providing a one-page checklist summarizing recommended clinical maneuvers, investigations, and topics for discussion should help physicians with implementing the many clinical practice guidelines for prenatal care.  (+info)

Childbirth customs in Orthodox Jewish traditions. (7/647)

OBJECTIVE: To describe cultural beliefs of Orthodox Jewish families regarding childbirth in order to help family physicians enhance the quality and sensitivity of their care. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: These findings were based on a review of the literature searched in MEDLINE (1966 to present), HEALTHSTAR (1975 to present), EMBASE (1988 to present), and Social Science Abstracts (1984 to present). Interviews with several members of the Orthodox Jewish community in Edmonton, Alta, and Vancouver, BC, were conducted to determine the accuracy of the information presented and the relevance of the paper to the current state of health care delivery from the recipients' point of view. MAIN MESSAGE: Customs and practices surrounding childbirth in the Orthodox Jewish tradition differ in several practical respects from expectations and practices within the Canadian health care system. The information presented was deemed relevant and accurate by those interviewed, and the subject matter was considered to be important for improving communication between patients and physicians. Improved communication and recognition of these differences can improve the quality of health care provided to these patients. CONCLUSIONS: Misunderstandings rooted in different cultural views of childbirth and the events surrounding it can adversely affect health care provided to women in the Orthodox Jewish community in Canada. A basic understanding of the cultural foundations of potential misunderstandings will help Canadian physicians provide effective health care to Orthodox Jewish women.  (+info)

Childbirth customs in Vietnamese traditions. (8/647)

OBJECTIVE: To examine and understand how differences in the cultural backgrounds of Canadian physicians and their Vietnamese patients can affect the quality and efficacy of prenatal and postnatal treatment. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: The information in this paper is based on a review of the literature, supplemented by interviews with members of the Vietnamese community in Edmonton, Alta. The literature was searched with MEDLINE (1966 to present), HEALTHSTAR (1975 to present), EMBASE (1988 to present), and Social Sciences Abstracts (1984 to present). Emphasis was placed on articles and other texts that dealt with Vietnamese customs surrounding childbirth, but information on health and health care customs was also considered. Interviews focused on the accuracy of information obtained from the research and the correlation of those data with personal experiences of Vietnamese community members. MAIN MESSAGE: Information in the texts used to research this paper suggests that traditional Vietnamese beliefs and practices surrounding birth are very different from the biomedical view of the Canadian medical system. The experiences and beliefs of the members of the Vietnamese community support this finding. Such cultural differences could contribute to misunderstandings between physicians and patients and could affect the quality and efficacy of health care provided. CONCLUSIONS: A sensitive and open approach to the patient's belief system and open and frank communication are necessary to ensure effective prenatal and postnatal treatment for recent Vietnamese immigrants and refugees. Education and awareness of cultural differences are necessary for physicians to provide the best and most effective health care possible.  (+info)

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology Specialists Clinic located in Block 5 with 5 rooms and 1 ultrasound examination room. (moh.gov.my)
  • As an OB-GYN, we can provide treatment for pregnant women by using obstetrics, VBAC (Vaginal Birth After Cesarean), high-risk pregnancy, C-section, infertility, prenatal care and natural labor. (glowbgyn.com)
  • Dr. Morales practices holistic, progressive obstetrics and goes above and beyond to offer her patients the birth experience they envision in a safe and unbiased environment. (kellymoralesobgyn.com)
  • Prior to her appointment at Virginia, Rice was a faculty member in obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive biology at Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School. (uwhealth.org)
  • Our Obstetrics and Gynecology physicians, medical staff, expert nurses, and allied health professionals are dedicated to serving the obstetrical and gynecological health needs of women, with an emphasis on comprehensive, compassionate, patient-oriented care. (bcm.edu)
  • In 2003, she received a National Faculty Award from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology and was featured in a National Institutes of Health (NIH) article celebrating America's women physicians. (uwhealth.org)
  • Obstetrics & Gynecology10(5):525-528, November 1957. (lww.com)
  • If you are an ACOG Fellow and have not logged in or registered to Obstetrics & Gynecology , please follow these step-by-step instructions to access journal content with your member subscription. (lww.com)
  • Services Princeton Plainsboro Obstetrics & Gynecology is a Gynecologist/Gynecological office located in Princeton, NJ 8540. (wellness.com)
  • Attorney Mark Russo, the court-appointed special master for the receivership process, said in a brief statement that obstetrics services will continue "at least up and until June 1. (theday.com)
  • Russo's announcement, she added, also seemed like "an abrupt reversal" of statements he made to the court on Monday, that a plan for sustaining obstetrics services was still being developed. (theday.com)