A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to the nutritional status of a human population within a given geographic area. Data from these surveys are used in preparing NUTRITION ASSESSMENTS.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Philippines" is not a medical term; it is the name of a country located in Southeast Asia. It seems there might be some misunderstanding in your question. If you have a medical query related to the Philippines or its people, I'd be happy to help clarify that for you.
A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Mexico" is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. It is the name of a country located in North America, known officially as the United Mexican States. If you have any questions related to medical topics or terminology, I would be happy to help answer those!
The administering of nutrients for assimilation and utilization by a patient who cannot maintain adequate nutrition by enteral feeding alone. Nutrients are administered by a route other than the alimentary canal (e.g., intravenously, subcutaneously).
The delivery of nutrients for assimilation and utilization by a patient whose sole source of nutrients is via solutions administered intravenously, subcutaneously, or by some other non-alimentary route. The basic components of TPN solutions are protein hydrolysates or free amino acid mixtures, monosaccharides, and electrolytes. Components are selected for their ability to reverse catabolism, promote anabolism, and build structural proteins.
Guidelines and objectives pertaining to food supply and nutrition including recommendations for healthy diet.
The geographic area of the southwestern region of the United States. The states usually included in this region are Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah.
Disorders caused by nutritional imbalance, either overnutrition or undernutrition.
Nutritional support given via the alimentary canal or any route connected to the gastrointestinal system (i.e., the enteral route). This includes oral feeding, sip feeding, and tube feeding using nasogastric, gastrostomy, and jejunostomy tubes.
Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.
State of the body in relation to the consumption and utilization of nutrients.
Evaluation and measurement of nutritional variables in order to assess the level of nutrition or the NUTRITIONAL STATUS of the individual. NUTRITION SURVEYS may be used in making the assessment.
Total number of calories taken in daily whether ingested or by parenteral routes.
Nutritional physiology of children aged 2-12 years.
The study of NUTRITION PROCESSES as well as the components of food, their actions, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease.
A condition produced by dietary or metabolic deficiency. The term includes all diseases caused by an insufficient supply of essential nutrients, i.e., protein (or amino acids), vitamins, and minerals. It also includes an inadequacy of calories. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Stedman, 25th ed)
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.
A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.
Systematic collections of factual data pertaining to the diet of a human population within a given geographic area.
The technique that deals with the measurement of the size, weight, and proportions of the human or other primate body.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
## I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Japan" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country located in Asia, known as Nihon-koku or Nippon-koku in Japanese, and is renowned for its unique culture, advanced technology, and rich history. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to help answer them!
Improving health status of an individual by adjusting the quantities, qualities, and methods of nutrient intake.
Acquired or learned food preferences.
The term "United States" in a medical context often refers to the country where a patient or study participant resides, and is not a medical term per se, but relevant for epidemiological studies, healthcare policies, and understanding differences in disease prevalence, treatment patterns, and health outcomes across various geographic locations.
The processes and properties of living organisms by which they take in and balance the use of nutritive materials for energy, heat production, or building material for the growth, maintenance, or repair of tissues and the nutritive properties of FOOD.
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
Conditions with abnormally low levels of ALPHA-LIPOPROTEINS (high-density lipoproteins) in the blood. Hypoalphalipoproteinemia can be associated with mutations in genes encoding APOLIPOPROTEIN A-I; LECITHIN CHOLESTEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE; and ATP-BINDING CASSETTE TRANSPORTERS.
An imbalanced nutritional status resulted from insufficient intake of nutrients to meet normal physiological requirement.
A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).
Records of nutrient intake over a specific period of time, usually kept by the patient.
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
The amounts of various substances in food needed by an organism to sustain healthy life.
A status with BODY WEIGHT that is above certain standard of acceptable or desirable weight. In the scale of BODY MASS INDEX, overweight is defined as having a BMI of 25.0-29.9 kg/m2. Overweight may or may not be due to increases in body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE), hence overweight does not equal "over fat".
A nutritional condition produced by a deficiency of magnesium in the diet, characterized by anorexia, nausea, vomiting, lethargy, and weakness. Symptoms are paresthesias, muscle cramps, irritability, decreased attention span, and mental confusion, possibly requiring months to appear. Deficiency of body magnesium can exist even when serum values are normal. In addition, magnesium deficiency may be organ-selective, since certain tissues become deficient before others. (Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 12th ed, p1936)
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.
The distance from the sole to the crown of the head with body standing on a flat surface and fully extended.
The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
The study of NUTRITION PROCESSES as well as the components of food, their actions, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease of children, infants or adolescents.
A state of insufficient flesh on the body usually defined as having a body weight less than skeletal and physical standards. Depending on age, sex, and genetic background, a BODY MASS INDEX of less than 18.5 is considered as underweight.
The at-home administering of nutrients for assimilation and utilization by a patient who cannot maintain adequate nutrition by enteral feeding alone. Nutrients are administered via a route other than the alimentary canal (e.g., intravenously, subcutaneously).
Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.
The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.
Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.
Proteins obtained from foods. They are the main source of the ESSENTIAL AMINO ACIDS.
Individual members of North American ethnic groups with ancient historic ancestral origins in Asia.
Great Britain is not a medical term, but a geographical name for the largest island in the British Isles, which comprises England, Scotland, and Wales, forming the major part of the United Kingdom.
A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.
Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.
The process whereby a representation of past experience is elicited.
Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.
The consumption of edible substances.
The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
The administration of nutrients for assimilation and utilization by a patient by means other than normal eating. It does not include FLUID THERAPY which normalizes body fluids to restore WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE.
Fats present in food, especially in animal products such as meat, meat products, butter, ghee. They are present in lower amounts in nuts, seeds, and avocados.
Disorders caused by nutritional imbalance, either overnutrition or undernutrition, occurring in children ages 2 to 12 years.
Specialized solutions for PARENTERAL NUTRITION. They may contain a variety of MICRONUTRIENTS; VITAMINS; AMINO ACIDS; CARBOHYDRATES; LIPIDS; and SALTS.
The application of nutritional principles to regulation of the diet and feeding persons or groups of persons.
A cluster of metabolic risk factors for CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES and TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS. The major components of metabolic syndrome X include excess ABDOMINAL FAT; atherogenic DYSLIPIDEMIA; HYPERTENSION; HYPERGLYCEMIA; INSULIN RESISTANCE; a proinflammatory state; and a prothrombotic (THROMBOSIS) state. (from AHA/NHLBI/ADA Conference Proceedings, Circulation 2004; 109:551-556)
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
A metallic element with atomic symbol Fe, atomic number 26, and atomic weight 55.85. It is an essential constituent of HEMOGLOBINS; CYTOCHROMES; and IRON-BINDING PROTEINS. It plays a role in cellular redox reactions and in the transport of OXYGEN.
Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.
Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.
Use of written, printed, or graphic materials upon or accompanying a food or its container or wrapper. The concept includes ingredients, NUTRITIONAL VALUE, directions, warnings, and other relevant information.
Nutritional physiology of children from birth to 2 years of age.
Disorders caused by nutritional imbalance, either overnutrition or undernutrition, occurring in infants ages 1 month to 24 months.
Functions, equipment, and facilities concerned with the preparation and distribution of ready-to-eat food.
Nutritional physiology of animals.
The production and movement of food items from point of origin to use or consumption.
Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).
Food and dietary formulations including elemental (chemically defined formula) diets, synthetic and semisynthetic diets, space diets, weight-reduction formulas, tube-feeding diets, complete liquid diets, and supplemental liquid and solid diets.
Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Any substances taken in by the body that provide nourishment.
Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
The study of the relationship between NUTRITIONAL PHYSIOLOGY and genetic makeup. It includes the effect of different food components on GENE EXPRESSION and how variations in GENES effect responses to food components.
The study of NUTRITION PROCESSES, as well as the components of food, their actions, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease in animals.
Nutrition of a mother which affects the health of the FETUS and INFANT as well as herself.
Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.
Products in capsule, tablet or liquid form that provide dietary ingredients, and that are intended to be taken by mouth to increase the intake of nutrients. Dietary supplements can include macronutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates, and fats; and/or MICRONUTRIENTS, such as VITAMINS; MINERALS; and PHYTOCHEMICALS.
An indication of the contribution of a food to the nutrient content of the diet. This value depends on the quantity of a food which is digested and absorbed and the amounts of the essential nutrients (protein, fat, carbohydrate, minerals, vitamins) which it contains. This value can be affected by soil and growing conditions, handling and storage, and processing.
Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.
A malabsorption syndrome resulting from extensive operative resection of the SMALL INTESTINE, the absorptive region of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.
A food group comprised of EDIBLE PLANTS or their parts.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but 'Europe' is a geographical continent and not a medical term; therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.
The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.
Educational institutions.
Nutritional physiology of children aged 13-18 years.
Essential dietary elements or organic compounds that are required in only small quantities for normal physiologic processes to occur.
The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.
Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)
Biological actions and events that constitute the steps by which living organisms take in and assimilate NUTRIENTS.
A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with improving and maintaining farm income and developing and expanding markets for agricultural products. Through inspection and grading services it safeguards and insures standards of quality in food supply and production.
A course of study offered by an educational institution.
Organic substances that are required in small amounts for maintenance and growth, but which cannot be manufactured by the human body.
Emulsions of fats or lipids used primarily in parenteral feeding.
Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Food or financial assistance for food given to those in need.
Disorders caused by nutritional imbalance, either overnutrition or undernutrition, in the FETUS in utero.
A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.
An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight [14.00643; 14.00728]. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.
A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.
Persons living in the United States of Mexican descent.
Nutrition of FEMALE during PREGNANCY.
Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.

Validation of measures of food insecurity and hunger. (1/2452)

The most recent survey effort to determine the extent of food insecurity and hunger in the United States, the Food Security Supplement, included a series of questions to assess this complex phenomenon. The primary measure developed from this Food Security Supplement was based on measurement concepts, methods and items from two previously developed measures. This paper presents the evidence available that questionnaire-based measures, in particular the national food security measure, provide valid measurement of food insecurity and hunger for population and individual uses. The paper discusses basic ideas about measurement and criteria for establishing validity of measures and then uses these criteria to structure an examination of the research results available to establish the validity of food security measures. The results show that the construction of the national food security measure is well grounded in our understanding of food insecurity and hunger, its performance is consistent with that understanding, it is precise within usual performance standards, dependable, accurate at both group and individual levels within reasonable performance standards, and its accuracy is attributable to the well-grounded understanding. These results provide strong evidence that the Food Security Supplement provides valid measurement of food insecurity and hunger for population and individual uses. Further validation research is required for subgroups of the population, not yet studied for validation purposes, to establish validity for monitoring population changes in prevalence and to develop and validate robust and contextually sensitive measures in a variety of countries that reflect how people experience and think about food insecurity and hunger.  (+info)

Measuring food insecurity and hunger in the United States: development of a national benchmark measure and prevalence estimates. (2/2452)

Since 1992, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) has led a collaborative effort to develop a comprehensive benchmark measure of the severity and prevalence of food insecurity and hunger in the United States. Based on prior research and wide consultation, a survey instrument specifically relevant to U.S. conditions was designed and tested. Through its Current Population Survey (CPS), the U.S. Bureau of the Census has fielded this instrument each year since 1995. A measurement scale was derived from the data through fitting, testing and validating a Rasch scale. The unidimensional Rasch model corresponds to the form of the phenomenon being measured, i.e., the severity of food insufficiency due to inadequate resources as directly experienced and reported in U.S. households. A categorical measure reflecting designated ranges of severity on the scale was constructed for consistent comparison of prevalence estimates over time and across population groups. The technical basis and initial results of the new measure were reported in September 1997. For the 12 months ending April 1995, an estimated 11.9% of U.S. households (35 million persons) were food insecure. Among these, 4.1% of households (with 6.9 million adults and 4.3 million children) showed a recurring pattern of hunger due to inadequate resources for one or more of their adult and/or child members sometime during the period. The new measure has been incorporated into other federal surveys and is being used by researchers throughout the U.S. and Canada.  (+info)

Economic determinants and dietary consequences of food insecurity in the United States. (3/2452)

This paper reviews recent research on the economic determinants and dietary consequences of food insecurity and hunger in the United States. The new Current Population Study (CPS) food insecurity and hunger measure shows that hunger rates decline sharply with rising incomes. Despite this strong relationship, confirmed in other national datasets, a one-to-one correspondence between poverty-level incomes and hunger does not exist. In 1995, 13.1% of those in poverty experienced hunger and half of those experiencing hunger had incomes above the poverty level. Panel data indicate that those who are often food insufficient are much more likely than food-sufficient households to have experienced recent events that stress household budgets, such as losing a job, gaining a household member or losing food stamps. Cross-sectional work also demonstrates the importance of food stamps because benefit levels are inversely related to food insufficiency. Concern for the dietary consequences of domestic food insufficiency is well placed; recent research shows that the odds of consuming intakes <50% of the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) are higher for adult women and elderly individuals from food-insufficient households. Preschoolers from food-insufficient households do not consume significantly lower amounts than those from food-sufficient households, but mean intakes for the rest of members in those very same households are significantly lower for the food insufficient. This research highlights the importance of food insecurity and hunger indicators, further validates the use of self-reported measures and points to areas of need for future research and interventions.  (+info)

Validity and reproducibility of a quantitative food frequency questionnaire for a cohort study in Japan. (4/2452)

BACKGROUND: A self-administered quantitative food frequency questionnaire (Qx) was developed for a population-based cohort study on cancer in Takayama, Japan. METHODS: The Qx was tested among 58 male and 59 female volunteers. Average daily nutrient intakes for the previous year calculated from the Qx were compared with those from 3-day food records and four 24-h recalls. The Qx was also validated among 37 volunteers by comparing the nutrient intakes calculated from the Qx with 12 1-day food records during a year. We also calculated the intra-class correlation coefficients for various nutrients between the Qx and the second Qx administered by the same volunteers 1 year after the first survey. RESULTS: Pearson correlation coefficients between total energy from the Qx and 3-day records were 0.38 for men and 0.25 for women and those between the Qx and 24-h recalls were 0.19 and -0.02 for men and women, respectively. Correlations between the several nutrients from the Qx and 3-day records ranged from 0.2 to 0.5 for both men and women. These correlations after energy adjustment ranged from 0.2 to 0.6 for men and from 0.1 to 0.7 for women. In general, the correlations for various nutrients between the Qx and 12 1-day records were higher than those described above. The intra-class correlation coefficients ranged from 0.46 to 0.78 in men and from 0.36 to 0.67, except for vitamin C in women. When the information on portion size was excluded, almost all of the above indices showed somewhat lower figures. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that our food frequency questionnaire with portion size information can be used to estimate nutrient intakes of each individual.  (+info)

Serum and red blood cell folate concentrations, race, and education: findings from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. (5/2452)

BACKGROUND: Little is known about the relations between race or ethnicity, educational attainment, and serum and red blood cell folate concentrations. OBJECTIVE: We examined the relation between educational attainment and serum and red blood cell folate concentrations in 8457 white, African American, and Mexican American men and women aged > or = 17 y. DESIGN: We performed a cross-sectional analysis using data from Phase 1 of the third National health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1991). RESULTS: White men had significantly higher adjusted serum and red blood cell folate concentrations (16.9 and 502.6 nmol/L, respectively) than did African American men (15.6 and 423.3 nmol/L, respectively) or Mexican American men (16.0 and 457.0 nmol/L, respectively); white women had significantly higher concentrations (18.4 and 515.9 nmol/L, respectively) than did African American women (16.3 and 415.4 nmol/L, respectively) or Mexican American women (15.9 and 455.7 nmol/L, respectively). For the entire sample, rank correlation coefficients between educational attainment and serum and red blood cell folate were 0.11 and 0.12, respectively, and were larger in white participants than in other participants. No significant linear trends between adjusted serum or red blood cell folate and educational attainment were found. Among participants with > 12 y of education, the mean adjusted concentrations of serum folate were 15% and 18% lower and those of red blood cell were 18% and 22% lower in African American men and women than in white men and women, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: African Americans and Mexican Americans could benefit most from public health programs to boost folate intakes by encouraging increased intake of folate-rich foods and vitamin supplements.  (+info)

Serum total homocysteine concentrations in adolescent and adult Americans: results from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. (6/2452)

BACKGROUND: The elevation of circulating total homocysteine concentrations in a fasting state is associated with an increased risk of occlusive vascular disease. OBJECTIVE: The primary goals of this study were to describe the distribution of serum total homocysteine concentrations in the United States and to test for differences in homocysteine concentrations among sex, age, and race-ethnicity categories. DESIGN: Using surplus sera from phase 2 of the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, we measured serum total homocysteine concentrations for a nationally representative sample of 3766 males and 4819 females aged > or = 12 y. RESULTS: Age-adjusted geometric mean total homocysteine concentrations were 9.6 and 7.9 mmol/L in non-Hispanic white males and females, 9.8 and 8.2 mmol/L in non-Hispanic black males and females, and 9.4 and 7.4 mmol/L in Mexican American males and females, respectively. Age-adjusted geometric mean total homocysteine concentrations were significantly lower in females than in males in each race-ethnicity group (P < 0.01) and were significantly lower in Mexican American females than in non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black females (P < 0.01). There was a significant age-sex interaction (P < 0.01), reflecting the fact that homocysteine concentrations in females tended to diverge from those in males at younger ages and converge with those in males at older ages. CONCLUSIONS: The first data on homocysteine concentrations in a nationally representative sample of Americans confirm the age and sex differences reported previously in nonrepresentative samples. These data also indicate that differences between Mexican American and non-Hispanic females may influence circulating homocysteine concentrations.  (+info)

Body mass index, weight change, and incidence of self-reported physician-diagnosed arthritis among women. (7/2452)

OBJECTIVES: This study examined the relationship between body mass index (BMI), weight change, and arthritis in women. METHODS: Data were taken from the 1982-1984 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Epidemiologic Follow-Up Study of 3617 women, aged 25 to 74 years. RESULTS: Women with a BMI greater than 32 at initial interview were at significantly higher risk of developing arthritis than women with a BMI of 19 to 21.9. Compared with stable-weight women with a BMI of less than 25, women who were obese at initial interview (BMI > 29) and who subsequently maintained their weight or gained more than 10% of their body weight were at significantly higher risk of developing arthritis. CONCLUSIONS: Attaining and maintaining a healthy weight may reduce the risk of developing arthritis.  (+info)

Racial and ethnic differences in glycemic control of adults with type 2 diabetes. (8/2452)

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate glycemic control in a representative sample of U.S. adults with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey included national samples of non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, and Mexican Americans aged > or = 20 years. Information on medical history and treatment of diabetes was obtained to determine those who had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes by a physician before the survey (n = 1,480). Fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c were measured, and the frequencies of sociodemographic and clinical variables related to glycemic control were determined. RESULTS: A higher proportion of non-Hispanic blacks were treated with insulin and a higher proportion of Mexican Americans were treated with oral agents compared with non-Hispanic whites, but the majority of adults in each racial or ethnic group (71-83%) used pharmacologic treatment for diabetes. Use of multiple daily insulin injections was more common in whites. Blood glucose self-monitoring was less common in Mexican Americans, but most patients had never self-monitored. HbA1c values in the nondiabetic range were found in 26% of non-Hispanic whites, 17% of non-Hispanic blacks, and 20% of Mexican Americans. Poor glycemic control (HbA1c > 8%) was more common in non-Hispanic black women (50%) and Mexican-American men (45%) compared with the other groups (35-38%), but HbA1c for both sexes and for all racial and ethnic groups was substantially higher than normal levels. Those with HbA1c > 8% included 52% of insulin-treated patients and 42% of those taking oral agents. There was no relationship of glycemic control to socioeconomic status or access to medical care in any racial or ethnic group. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that many patients with type 2 diabetes in the U.S. have poor glycemic control, placing them at high risk of diabetic complications. Non-Hispanic black women, Mexican-American men, and patients treated with insulin and oral agents were disproportionately represented among those in poor glycemic control. Clinical, public health, and research efforts should focus on more effective methods to control blood glucose in patients with diabetes.  (+info)

A nutrition survey is not a medical term per se, but it is a research method used in the field of nutrition and public health. Here's a definition:

A nutrition survey is a study design that systematically collects and analyzes data on dietary intake, nutritional status, and related factors from a defined population or sample. It aims to describe the nutritional situation, identify nutritional problems, and monitor trends in a population over time. Nutrition surveys can be cross-sectional, longitudinal, or community-based and may involve various data collection methods such as interviews, questionnaires, observations, physical measurements, and biological samples. The results of nutrition surveys are used to inform nutrition policies, programs, and interventions aimed at improving the nutritional status and health outcomes of populations.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Philippines" is not a medical term. It is the name of a country located in Southeast Asia, comprised of over 7,000 islands. If you have any questions about medical conditions or terms, I would be happy to help clarify those for you.

Health surveys are research studies that collect data from a sample population to describe the current health status, health behaviors, and healthcare utilization of a particular group or community. These surveys may include questions about various aspects of health such as physical health, mental health, chronic conditions, lifestyle habits, access to healthcare services, and demographic information. The data collected from health surveys can be used to monitor trends in health over time, identify disparities in health outcomes, develop and evaluate public health programs and policies, and inform resource allocation decisions. Examples of national health surveys include the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS).

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Mexico" is not a medical term or concept. It is the name of a country located in North America. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a medical term used to describe the delivery of nutrients directly into a patient's bloodstream through a vein, bypassing the gastrointestinal tract. It is a specialized medical treatment that is typically used when a patient cannot receive adequate nutrition through enteral feeding, which involves the ingestion and digestion of food through the mouth or a feeding tube.

PN can be used to provide essential nutrients such as carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals, and electrolytes to patients who have conditions that prevent them from absorbing nutrients through their gut, such as severe gastrointestinal tract disorders, malabsorption syndromes, or short bowel syndrome.

PN is administered through a catheter that is inserted into a vein, typically in the chest or arm. The nutrient solution is prepared under sterile conditions and delivered through an infusion pump to ensure accurate and controlled delivery of the solution.

While PN can be a life-saving intervention for some patients, it also carries risks such as infection, inflammation, and organ damage. Therefore, it should only be prescribed and administered by healthcare professionals with specialized training in this area.

Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN) is a medical term used to describe a specialized nutritional support system that is delivered through a vein (intravenously). It provides all the necessary nutrients that a patient needs, such as carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, and minerals. TPN is typically used when a patient cannot eat or digest food through their gastrointestinal tract for various reasons, such as severe malabsorption, intestinal obstruction, or inflammatory bowel disease. The term "total" indicates that the nutritional support is complete and meets all of the patient's nutritional needs.

Nutrition policy refers to a set of guidelines, regulations, or laws established by governmental or organizational bodies to promote healthy eating habits and reduce the risk of diet-related chronic diseases. These policies aim to create an environment that supports and encourages individuals to make healthier food choices. Nutrition policies can cover various aspects such as food labeling, nutrition education, food safety, agricultural practices, and access to affordable and nutritious foods. They may also address issues related to marketing and advertising of unhealthy food products, particularly to children. The ultimate goal of nutrition policy is to improve public health by creating a food environment that supports optimal nutrition and well-being.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Southwestern United States" is not a term that has a medical definition. It generally refers to a geographic region in the western part of the United States, consisting of Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, as well as portions of California, Colorado, Nevada, and Utah. If you're looking for medical information, I'd be happy to help if you could provide more context or specify a medical topic.

Nutrition disorders refer to conditions that result from eating, drinking, or absorbing nutrients in a way that is not consistent with human physiological needs. These disorders can manifest as both undernutrition and overnutrition. Undernutrition includes disorders such as protein-energy malnutrition, vitamin deficiencies, and mineral deficiencies, while overnutrition includes conditions such as obesity and diet-related noncommunicable diseases like diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and certain types of cancer.

Malnutrition is the broad term used to describe a state in which a person's nutrient intake is insufficient or excessive, leading to negative consequences for their health. Malnutrition can be caused by a variety of factors, including poverty, food insecurity, lack of education, cultural practices, and chronic diseases.

In addition to under- and overnutrition, disordered eating patterns such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, and other specified feeding or eating disorders can also be considered nutrition disorders. These conditions are characterized by abnormal eating habits that can lead to serious health consequences, including malnutrition, organ damage, and mental health problems.

Overall, nutrition disorders are complex conditions that can have significant impacts on a person's physical and mental health. They require careful assessment, diagnosis, and treatment by healthcare professionals with expertise in nutrition and dietetics.

Enteral nutrition refers to the delivery of nutrients to a person through a tube that is placed into the gastrointestinal tract, specifically into the stomach or small intestine. This type of nutrition is used when a person is unable to consume food or liquids by mouth due to various medical conditions such as swallowing difficulties, malabsorption, or gastrointestinal disorders.

Enteral nutrition can be provided through different types of feeding tubes, including nasogastric tubes, which are inserted through the nose and down into the stomach, and gastrostomy or jejunostomy tubes, which are placed directly into the stomach or small intestine through a surgical incision.

The nutrients provided through enteral nutrition may include commercially prepared formulas that contain a balance of carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, and minerals, or blenderized whole foods that are pureed and delivered through the feeding tube. The choice of formula or type of feed depends on the individual's nutritional needs, gastrointestinal function, and medical condition.

Enteral nutrition is a safe and effective way to provide nutrition support to people who are unable to meet their nutritional needs through oral intake alone. It can help prevent malnutrition, promote wound healing, improve immune function, and enhance overall health and quality of life.

A diet, in medical terms, refers to the planned and regular consumption of food and drinks. It is a balanced selection of nutrient-rich foods that an individual eats on a daily or periodic basis to meet their energy needs and maintain good health. A well-balanced diet typically includes a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, and low-fat dairy products.

A diet may also be prescribed for therapeutic purposes, such as in the management of certain medical conditions like diabetes, hypertension, or obesity. In these cases, a healthcare professional may recommend specific restrictions or modifications to an individual's regular diet to help manage their condition and improve their overall health.

It is important to note that a healthy and balanced diet should be tailored to an individual's age, gender, body size, activity level, and any underlying medical conditions. Consulting with a healthcare professional, such as a registered dietitian or nutritionist, can help ensure that an individual's dietary needs are being met in a safe and effective way.

Nutritional status is a concept that refers to the condition of an individual in relation to their nutrient intake, absorption, metabolism, and excretion. It encompasses various aspects such as body weight, muscle mass, fat distribution, presence of any deficiencies or excesses of specific nutrients, and overall health status.

A comprehensive assessment of nutritional status typically includes a review of dietary intake, anthropometric measurements (such as height, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure), laboratory tests (such as serum albumin, total protein, cholesterol levels, vitamin and mineral levels), and clinical evaluation for signs of malnutrition or overnutrition.

Malnutrition can result from inadequate intake or absorption of nutrients, increased nutrient requirements due to illness or injury, or excessive loss of nutrients due to medical conditions. On the other hand, overnutrition can lead to obesity and related health problems such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and certain types of cancer.

Therefore, maintaining a good nutritional status is essential for overall health and well-being, and it is an important consideration in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of various medical conditions.

A Nutrition Assessment is a systematic and comprehensive evaluation of an individual's nutritional status, which is carried out by healthcare professionals such as registered dietitians or nutritionists. The assessment typically involves collecting and analyzing data related to various factors that influence nutritional health, including:

1. Anthropometric measurements: These include height, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, and other physical measures that can provide insights into an individual's overall health status and risk of chronic diseases.
2. Dietary intake assessment: This involves evaluating an individual's dietary patterns, food preferences, and eating habits to determine whether they are meeting their nutritional needs through their diet.
3. Biochemical assessments: These include blood tests and other laboratory measures that can provide information about an individual's nutrient status, such as serum levels of vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients.
4. Clinical assessment: This involves reviewing an individual's medical history, current medications, and any symptoms or health conditions that may be impacting their nutritional health.
5. Social and economic assessment: This includes evaluating an individual's access to food, income, education level, and other social determinants of health that can affect their ability to obtain and consume a healthy diet.

The goal of a Nutrition Assessment is to identify any nutritional risks or deficiencies and develop a personalized nutrition plan to address them. This may involve making dietary recommendations, providing education and counseling, or referring the individual to other healthcare professionals for further evaluation and treatment.

"Energy intake" is a medical term that refers to the amount of energy or calories consumed through food and drink. It is an important concept in the study of nutrition, metabolism, and energy balance, and is often used in research and clinical settings to assess an individual's dietary habits and health status.

Energy intake is typically measured in kilocalories (kcal) or joules (J), with one kcal equivalent to approximately 4.184 J. The recommended daily energy intake varies depending on factors such as age, sex, weight, height, physical activity level, and overall health status.

It's important to note that excessive energy intake, particularly when combined with a sedentary lifestyle, can lead to weight gain and an increased risk of chronic diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. On the other hand, inadequate energy intake can lead to malnutrition, decreased immune function, and other health problems. Therefore, it's essential to maintain a balanced energy intake that meets individual nutritional needs while promoting overall health and well-being.

"Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena" is a broad term that refers to various physical and biological processes related to nutrition in children. While I couldn't find a precise medical definition for this specific phrase, I can provide you with some key physiological phenomena associated with child nutrition. These include:

1. Growth and Development: Proper nutrition is crucial for normal growth and development in children. Adequate intake of essential nutrients, vitamins, and minerals supports physical growth, brain development, and overall well-being.
2. Digestion and Absorption: The gastrointestinal tract undergoes significant changes during childhood, affecting the ability to digest and absorb various nutrients. For example, lactase production decreases in some children after weaning, leading to lactose intolerance.
3. Energy Metabolism: Children have higher energy requirements per unit of body weight compared to adults due to their rapid growth and development. Proper nutrition ensures efficient energy metabolism and prevents issues like obesity or undernutrition.
4. Immune Function: Nutrition plays a vital role in supporting the immune system. Adequate intake of nutrients like vitamin C, vitamin D, iron, zinc, and protein helps maintain immune function and resistance to infections.
5. Micronutrient Deficiencies: Inadequate nutrition can lead to micronutrient deficiencies, which may impair children's growth, cognitive development, and overall health. Examples include iron deficiency anemia, vitamin A deficiency, and iodine deficiency disorders.
6. Overnutrition and Obesity: Excessive energy intake, coupled with reduced physical activity, can lead to overweight and obesity in children. This increases the risk of developing non-communicable diseases like diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and certain types of cancer later in life.
7. Food Allergies and Intolerances: Children are more prone to food allergies and intolerances than adults. These can manifest as various symptoms, such as skin rashes, digestive issues, or respiratory problems, and may require dietary modifications.
8. Eating Behaviors and Preferences: Childhood is a critical period for shaping eating behaviors and food preferences. Exposure to a variety of healthy foods during this stage can help establish lifelong healthy eating habits.

Nutritional Sciences is a field of study that deals with the scientific examination and understanding of nutrients in food, how the body uses them, and the relationship between diet, health, and disease. It encompasses various disciplines including biochemistry, physiology, molecular biology, epidemiology, and clinical nutrition.

The field covers several key areas such as:

1. Nutrient metabolism: This involves studying how nutrients are digested, absorbed, transported, stored, and utilized in the body for energy production, growth, maintenance, and reproduction.
2. Diet and disease prevention: Nutritional sciences investigate the role of diet in preventing or managing various health conditions like obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer.
3. Functional foods and nutraceuticals: This area focuses on studying the potential health benefits of specific foods or food components beyond their basic nutritional value, including functional foods (foods that have demonstrated health benefits) and nutraceuticals (nutrient-rich supplements derived from food sources).
4. Public health nutrition: Nutritional sciences also address population-wide nutrition issues, such as malnutrition, food insecurity, and the development of public policies related to food and health.
5. Clinical nutrition: This subfield applies nutritional principles and research findings to patient care, focusing on developing individualized dietary plans for patients with various medical conditions.

Overall, Nutritional Sciences aims to provide a solid scientific foundation for making informed dietary choices and promoting optimal health outcomes across populations and individuals.

Deficiency diseases are a group of medical conditions that occur when an individual's diet lacks essential nutrients, such as vitamins and minerals. These diseases develop because the body needs these nutrients to function correctly, and without them, various bodily functions can become impaired, leading to disease.

Deficiency diseases can manifest in many different ways, depending on which nutrient is lacking. For example:

* Vitamin A deficiency can lead to night blindness and increased susceptibility to infectious diseases.
* Vitamin C deficiency can result in scurvy, a condition characterized by fatigue, swollen gums, joint pain, and anemia.
* Vitamin D deficiency can cause rickets in children, a disease that leads to weakened bones and skeletal deformities.
* Iron deficiency can result in anemia, a condition in which the blood lacks adequate healthy red blood cells.

Preventing deficiency diseases involves eating a balanced diet that includes a variety of foods from all the major food groups. In some cases, supplements may be necessary to ensure adequate nutrient intake, especially for individuals who have restricted diets or medical conditions that affect nutrient absorption.

Prevalence, in medical terms, refers to the total number of people in a given population who have a particular disease or condition at a specific point in time, or over a specified period. It is typically expressed as a percentage or a ratio of the number of cases to the size of the population. Prevalence differs from incidence, which measures the number of new cases that develop during a certain period.

Health care surveys are research tools used to systematically collect information from a population or sample regarding their experiences, perceptions, and knowledge of health services, health outcomes, and various other health-related topics. These surveys typically consist of standardized questionnaires that cover specific aspects of healthcare, such as access to care, quality of care, patient satisfaction, health disparities, and healthcare costs. The data gathered from health care surveys are used to inform policy decisions, improve healthcare delivery, identify best practices, allocate resources, and monitor the health status of populations. Health care surveys can be conducted through various modes, including in-person interviews, telephone interviews, mail-in questionnaires, or online platforms.

I am not aware of a specific medical definition for the term "China." Generally, it is used to refer to:

1. The People's Republic of China (PRC), which is a country in East Asia. It is the most populous country in the world and the fourth largest by geographical area. Its capital city is Beijing.
2. In a historical context, "China" was used to refer to various dynasties and empires that existed in East Asia over thousands of years. The term "Middle Kingdom" or "Zhongguo" (中国) has been used by the Chinese people to refer to their country for centuries.
3. In a more general sense, "China" can also be used to describe products or goods that originate from or are associated with the People's Republic of China.

If you have a specific context in which you encountered the term "China" related to medicine, please provide it so I can give a more accurate response.

A diet survey is a questionnaire or interview designed to gather information about an individual's eating habits and patterns. It typically includes questions about the types and quantities of foods and beverages consumed, meal frequency and timing, and any dietary restrictions or preferences. The purpose of a diet survey is to assess an individual's nutritional intake and identify areas for improvement or intervention in order to promote health and prevent or manage chronic diseases. Diet surveys may also be used in research settings to gather data on the eating habits of larger populations.

Anthropometry is the scientific study of measurements and proportions of the human body. It involves the systematic measurement and analysis of various physical characteristics, such as height, weight, blood pressure, waist circumference, and other body measurements. These measurements are used in a variety of fields, including medicine, ergonomics, forensics, and fashion design, to assess health status, fitness level, or to design products and environments that fit the human body. In a medical context, anthropometry is often used to assess growth and development, health status, and disease risk factors in individuals and populations.

A cross-sectional study is a type of observational research design that examines the relationship between variables at one point in time. It provides a snapshot or a "cross-section" of the population at a particular moment, allowing researchers to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition and identify potential risk factors or associations.

In a cross-sectional study, data is collected from a sample of participants at a single time point, and the variables of interest are measured simultaneously. This design can be used to investigate the association between exposure and outcome, but it cannot establish causality because it does not follow changes over time.

Cross-sectional studies can be conducted using various data collection methods, such as surveys, interviews, or medical examinations. They are often used in epidemiology to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition in a population and to identify potential risk factors that may contribute to its development. However, because cross-sectional studies only provide a snapshot of the population at one point in time, they cannot account for changes over time or determine whether exposure preceded the outcome.

Therefore, while cross-sectional studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying potential associations between variables, further research using other study designs, such as cohort or case-control studies, is necessary to establish causality and confirm any findings.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Japan" is not a medical term. Japan is the name of a country, officially known as Nippon-koku or Nihon-koku in Japanese, and is located in East Asia. It is an island nation in the Pacific Ocean with a population of about 126 million people.

If you have any medical questions or terms that you would like me to define, please let me know!

Nutrition therapy is a medical treatment that focuses on providing adequate and balanced nutrition to help patients manage various medical conditions, promote recovery, improve overall health, and enhance quality of life. It involves the use of a personalized dietary plan, supplements, and enteral or parenteral nutrition support, as needed, under the guidance of healthcare professionals such as registered dietitians or nutritionists.

The goals of nutrition therapy may include:

1. Meeting nutritional needs and optimizing growth and development in children and adolescents.
2. Preventing or treating malnutrition due to illness, injury, or surgery.
3. Managing chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease, liver disease, or gastrointestinal disorders by controlling risk factors, reducing symptoms, and slowing the progression of the condition.
4. Supporting patients during cancer treatment to maintain strength, promote healing, and improve their response to therapy.
5. Providing nutrition support for individuals with eating disorders, food allergies, or intolerances.
6. Enhancing overall health and well-being through education on healthy eating habits and lifestyle modifications.

Nutrition therapy is an essential component of comprehensive healthcare and should be tailored to each individual's unique needs, preferences, and medical history.

"Food habits" refer to the established patterns or behaviors that individuals develop in relation to their food choices and eating behaviors. These habits can include preferences for certain types of foods, meal timing, portion sizes, and dining experiences. Food habits are influenced by a variety of factors including cultural background, personal beliefs, taste preferences, social norms, and economic resources. They can have significant impacts on an individual's nutritional status, overall health, and quality of life.

It is important to note that while "food habits" may not be a formal medical term, it is often used in the context of nutrition and public health research and interventions to describe the behaviors related to food choices and eating patterns.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "United States" is a geopolitical entity, specifically the name of the country consisting of 50 states, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, I can't provide a medical definition for it. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or biology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Nutritional Physiological Phenomena" is not a widely recognized or established medical term. It seems to be a very specific phrase that may refer to the physiological processes and phenomena related to nutrition.

Nutrition, in a medical context, refers to the process of providing or obtaining food necessary for health and growth. Physiological phenomena, on the other hand, refer to the functional manifestations of living organisms and their parts.

So, "Nutritional Physiological Phenomena" could hypothetically refer to the various physiological processes that occur in the body in relation to nutrition, such as digestion, absorption, metabolism, transportation, and storage of nutrients. However, I would recommend consulting the specific source or context where this term was used for a more accurate definition.

"Sex factors" is a term used in medicine and epidemiology to refer to the differences in disease incidence, prevalence, or response to treatment that are observed between males and females. These differences can be attributed to biological differences such as genetics, hormones, and anatomy, as well as social and cultural factors related to gender.

For example, some conditions such as autoimmune diseases, depression, and osteoporosis are more common in women, while others such as cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancer are more prevalent in men. Additionally, sex differences have been observed in the effectiveness and side effects of various medications and treatments.

It is important to consider sex factors in medical research and clinical practice to ensure that patients receive appropriate and effective care.

Hypoalphalipoproteinemia is a condition characterized by decreased levels of alpha-lipoproteins, particularly the alpha-1 lipoprotein called high-density lipoprotein (HDL), in the blood. HDL plays a crucial role in removing excess cholesterol from tissues and carrying it back to the liver for excretion or recycling. Low levels of HDL are considered a risk factor for developing cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis, because they may lead to an accumulation of cholesterol in the blood vessels.

There are different types and causes of hypoalphalipoproteinemias, including:

1. Familial Hypoalphalipoproteinemia (FHA): An inherited condition characterized by low HDL levels due to mutations in the APOA1, APOC3, or ABCA1 genes, which are involved in HDL metabolism. FHA is often associated with an increased risk of premature cardiovascular disease.
2. Tangier Disease: A rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in the ABCA1 gene, leading to extremely low HDL levels and the accumulation of cholesterol deposits in various tissues, including the liver, spleen, and nerves. Tangier disease is characterized by enlarged, orange-colored tonsils, neuropathy, and an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases.
3. Secondary Hypoalphalipoproteinemia: Low HDL levels can also be caused by secondary factors such as obesity, physical inactivity, smoking, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, hypothyroidism, nephrotic syndrome, and the use of certain medications (e.g., corticosteroids, progestins, and beta-blockers).

In summary, hypoalphalipoproteinemia refers to a group of conditions characterized by decreased levels of alpha-lipoproteins, particularly HDL, in the blood. This can be due to genetic factors or secondary causes and may increase the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases.

Malnutrition is a condition that results from eating a diet in which one or more nutrients are either not enough or are too much such that the body's function is not maintained. It can also refer to a deficiency or excess of vitamins, minerals, protein, energy, and/or water. This condition can have negative effects on physical and mental health. Malnutrition includes undernutrition (wasting, stunting, underweight), overnutrition (overweight, obesity) and micronutrient deficiencies or excesses.

It's important to note that malnutrition is different from malabsorption, which is the inability to absorb nutrients from food. Malabsorption can also lead to malnutrition if it results in a lack of necessary nutrients for the body's function.

Obesity is a complex disease characterized by an excess accumulation of body fat to the extent that it negatively impacts health. It's typically defined using Body Mass Index (BMI), a measure calculated from a person's weight and height. A BMI of 30 or higher is indicative of obesity. However, it's important to note that while BMI can be a useful tool for identifying obesity in populations, it does not directly measure body fat and may not accurately reflect health status in individuals. Other factors such as waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and blood sugar levels should also be considered when assessing health risks associated with weight.

Diet records are documents used to track and record an individual's food and beverage intake over a specific period. These records may include details such as the type and quantity of food consumed, time of consumption, and any related observations or notes. Diet records can be used for various purposes, including assessing dietary habits and patterns, identifying potential nutritional deficiencies or excesses, and developing personalized nutrition plans. They are often used in research, clinical settings, and weight management programs.

Socioeconomic factors are a range of interconnected conditions and influences that affect the opportunities and resources a person or group has to maintain and improve their health and well-being. These factors include:

1. Economic stability: This includes employment status, job security, income level, and poverty status. Lower income and lack of employment are associated with poorer health outcomes.
2. Education: Higher levels of education are generally associated with better health outcomes. Education can affect a person's ability to access and understand health information, as well as their ability to navigate the healthcare system.
3. Social and community context: This includes factors such as social support networks, discrimination, and community safety. Strong social supports and positive community connections are associated with better health outcomes, while discrimination and lack of safety can negatively impact health.
4. Healthcare access and quality: Access to affordable, high-quality healthcare is an important socioeconomic factor that can significantly impact a person's health. Factors such as insurance status, availability of providers, and cultural competency of healthcare systems can all affect healthcare access and quality.
5. Neighborhood and built environment: The physical conditions in which people live, work, and play can also impact their health. Factors such as housing quality, transportation options, availability of healthy foods, and exposure to environmental hazards can all influence health outcomes.

Socioeconomic factors are often interrelated and can have a cumulative effect on health outcomes. For example, someone who lives in a low-income neighborhood with limited access to healthy foods and safe parks may also face challenges related to employment, education, and healthcare access that further impact their health. Addressing socioeconomic factors is an important part of promoting health equity and reducing health disparities.

Nutritional requirements refer to the necessary amount of nutrients, including macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, and fats) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals), that an individual requires to maintain good health, support normal growth and development, and promote optimal bodily functions. These requirements vary based on factors such as age, sex, body size, pregnancy status, and physical activity level. Meeting one's nutritional requirements typically involves consuming a balanced and varied diet, with additional consideration given to any specific dietary restrictions or medical conditions that may influence nutrient needs.

Medically, 'overweight' is a term used to describe a person whose body weight is greater than what is considered healthy for their height. This excess weight often comes from fat, muscle, bone, or water accumulation. The most commonly used measure to define overweight is the Body Mass Index (BMI), which is calculated by dividing a person's weight in kilograms by the square of their height in meters. A BMI of 25.0 to 29.9 is considered overweight, while a BMI of 30.0 or higher is considered obese. However, it's important to note that BMI doesn't directly measure body fat and may not accurately reflect health status for all individuals, such as athletes with high muscle mass.

Magnesium deficiency, also known as hypomagnesemia, is a condition characterized by low levels of magnesium in the blood. Magnesium is an essential mineral that plays a crucial role in many bodily functions, including muscle and nerve function, heart rhythm, bone strength, and immune system regulation.

Hypomagnesemia can occur due to various factors, such as poor dietary intake, malabsorption syndromes, chronic alcoholism, diabetes, certain medications (such as diuretics), and excessive sweating or urination. Symptoms of magnesium deficiency may include muscle cramps, tremors, weakness, heart rhythm abnormalities, seizures, and mental status changes.

It is important to note that mild magnesium deficiency may not cause any symptoms, and the diagnosis typically requires blood tests to measure magnesium levels. Treatment for hypomagnesemia usually involves oral or intravenous magnesium supplementation, along with addressing the underlying causes of the deficiency.

"Age factors" refer to the effects, changes, or differences that age can have on various aspects of health, disease, and medical care. These factors can encompass a wide range of issues, including:

1. Physiological changes: As people age, their bodies undergo numerous physical changes that can affect how they respond to medications, illnesses, and medical procedures. For example, older adults may be more sensitive to certain drugs or have weaker immune systems, making them more susceptible to infections.
2. Chronic conditions: Age is a significant risk factor for many chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and arthritis. As a result, age-related medical issues are common and can impact treatment decisions and outcomes.
3. Cognitive decline: Aging can also lead to cognitive changes, including memory loss and decreased decision-making abilities. These changes can affect a person's ability to understand and comply with medical instructions, leading to potential complications in their care.
4. Functional limitations: Older adults may experience physical limitations that impact their mobility, strength, and balance, increasing the risk of falls and other injuries. These limitations can also make it more challenging for them to perform daily activities, such as bathing, dressing, or cooking.
5. Social determinants: Age-related factors, such as social isolation, poverty, and lack of access to transportation, can impact a person's ability to obtain necessary medical care and affect their overall health outcomes.

Understanding age factors is critical for healthcare providers to deliver high-quality, patient-centered care that addresses the unique needs and challenges of older adults. By taking these factors into account, healthcare providers can develop personalized treatment plans that consider a person's age, physical condition, cognitive abilities, and social circumstances.

Body Mass Index (BMI) is a measure used to assess whether a person has a healthy weight for their height. It's calculated by dividing a person's weight in kilograms by the square of their height in meters. Here is the medical definition:

Body Mass Index (BMI) = weight(kg) / [height(m)]^2

According to the World Health Organization, BMI categories are defined as follows:

* Less than 18.5: Underweight
* 18.5-24.9: Normal or healthy weight
* 25.0-29.9: Overweight
* 30.0 and above: Obese

It is important to note that while BMI can be a useful tool for identifying weight issues in populations, it does have limitations when applied to individuals. For example, it may not accurately reflect body fat distribution or muscle mass, which can affect health risks associated with excess weight. Therefore, BMI should be used as one of several factors when evaluating an individual's health status and risk for chronic diseases.

A rural population refers to people who live in areas that are outside of urban areas, typically defined as having fewer than 2,000 residents and lacking certain infrastructure and services such as running water, sewage systems, and paved roads. Rural populations often have less access to healthcare services, education, and economic opportunities compared to their urban counterparts. This population group can face unique health challenges, including higher rates of poverty, limited access to specialized medical care, and a greater exposure to environmental hazards such as agricultural chemicals and industrial pollutants.

"Body height" is a measure of the vertical length of a person's body from the top of their head to the bottom of their feet. It is typically measured in units such as centimeters (cm) or inches (in). In medical settings, body height is often used as a basic anthropometric measurement to assess overall health status, growth and development, nutritional status, and aging-related changes.

There are different methods for measuring body height, but the most common one involves having the person stand upright against a vertical surface (such as a wall or a stadiometer) with their heels, buttocks, shoulders, and head touching the surface. The measurement is taken at the point where the top of the person's head meets the surface.

Body height can be influenced by various factors, including genetics, nutrition, health status, and environmental conditions. Changes in body height over time can provide important insights into a person's health trajectory and potential health risks. For example, a significant decrease in body height may indicate bone loss or spinal compression, while a rapid increase in height during childhood or adolescence may suggest optimal growth and development.

Body weight is the measure of the force exerted on a scale or balance by an object's mass, most commonly expressed in units such as pounds (lb) or kilograms (kg). In the context of medical definitions, body weight typically refers to an individual's total weight, which includes their skeletal muscle, fat, organs, and bodily fluids.

Healthcare professionals often use body weight as a basic indicator of overall health status, as it can provide insights into various aspects of a person's health, such as nutritional status, metabolic function, and risk factors for certain diseases. For example, being significantly underweight or overweight can increase the risk of developing conditions like malnutrition, diabetes, heart disease, and certain types of cancer.

It is important to note that body weight alone may not provide a complete picture of an individual's health, as it does not account for factors such as muscle mass, bone density, or body composition. Therefore, healthcare professionals often use additional measures, such as body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and blood tests, to assess overall health status more comprehensively.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

Child Nutrition Sciences is a field of study focused on the nutritional needs and dietary habits of children from infancy through adolescence. This interdisciplinary field incorporates aspects of nutrition, pediatrics, psychology, sociology, and public health to promote optimal growth, development, and overall health in children.

The scope of Child Nutrition Sciences includes:

1. Understanding the unique nutritional requirements during various stages of childhood, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, early childhood, school-age, and adolescence.
2. Examining how cultural, socioeconomic, and environmental factors influence children's dietary patterns and food choices.
3. Investigating the role of nutrition in preventing chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, which often originate in childhood.
4. Developing and implementing evidence-based interventions to improve children's diets, promote healthy eating behaviors, and reduce health disparities.
5. Assessing the effectiveness of nutrition education programs for children, families, and communities.
6. Collaborating with policymakers, educators, healthcare providers, and community organizations to create supportive environments that encourage healthy eating and physical activity.
7. Conducting research on the safety, efficacy, and quality of food products, supplements, and fortified foods marketed for children.
8. Advocating for policies and regulations that protect children from marketing tactics that promote unhealthy food choices and contribute to poor diet-related health outcomes.

Overall, Child Nutrition Sciences aims to improve the nutritional status of children, enhance their overall well-being, and reduce the burden of diet-related diseases throughout the lifespan.

"Thinness" is not a term that is typically used in medical definitions. However, it generally refers to having a lower than average body weight or low body mass index (BMI) for a person's height. In medical terms, being significantly underweight might be defined as having a BMI of less than 18.5. It's important to note that while low body weight can be a sign of health issues like malnutrition or eating disorders, being thin does not necessarily equate to being healthy. A person's overall health is determined by a variety of factors, including diet, exercise, genetics, and the presence or absence of chronic diseases.

Parenteral Nutrition, Home (HPN) is a medical definition referring to the specialized medical treatment in which nutrients are delivered directly into a patient's bloodstream through a vein outside of the gastrointestinal tract. This technique is used when a patient cannot receive adequate nutrition through enteral feeding or oral intake alone, often due to conditions such as severe malabsorption, intestinal failure, or chronic bowel disorders.

HPN specifically refers to the administration of parenteral nutrition in the home setting rather than in a hospital or healthcare facility. This approach allows patients to receive ongoing nutritional support while maintaining their quality of life and independence. HPN requires careful monitoring by healthcare professionals, including regular laboratory tests and clinical assessments, to ensure that the patient is receiving appropriate nutrition and to minimize potential complications such as infection, dehydration, or electrolyte imbalances.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "income" is not a medical term. Income is an economic term that refers to the inflow of monetary resources or earnings that an individual or household receives from various sources, such as employment, investments, or government benefits. It is typically used in financial and economic contexts rather than medical ones. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help with those!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Urban Population" is not a medical term. It is a demographic term used to describe the portion of a country's population that lives in areas classified as urban. The United Nations defines an urban area as a city, town, or other agglomeration with a population of 20,000 or more. However, the specific definition can vary by country and organization.

In contrast, medical terms typically refer to conditions, diseases, symptoms, treatments, or healthcare-related concepts. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to help if I can!

Longitudinal studies are a type of research design where data is collected from the same subjects repeatedly over a period of time, often years or even decades. These studies are used to establish patterns of changes and events over time, and can help researchers identify causal relationships between variables. They are particularly useful in fields such as epidemiology, psychology, and sociology, where the focus is on understanding developmental trends and the long-term effects of various factors on health and behavior.

In medical research, longitudinal studies can be used to track the progression of diseases over time, identify risk factors for certain conditions, and evaluate the effectiveness of treatments or interventions. For example, a longitudinal study might follow a group of individuals over several decades to assess their exposure to certain environmental factors and their subsequent development of chronic diseases such as cancer or heart disease. By comparing data collected at multiple time points, researchers can identify trends and correlations that may not be apparent in shorter-term studies.

Longitudinal studies have several advantages over other research designs, including their ability to establish temporal relationships between variables, track changes over time, and reduce the impact of confounding factors. However, they also have some limitations, such as the potential for attrition (loss of participants over time), which can introduce bias and affect the validity of the results. Additionally, longitudinal studies can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, requiring significant resources and a long-term commitment from both researchers and study participants.

Dietary proteins are sources of protein that come from the foods we eat. Protein is an essential nutrient for the human body, required for various bodily functions such as growth, repair, and immune function. Dietary proteins are broken down into amino acids during digestion, which are then absorbed and used to synthesize new proteins in the body.

Dietary proteins can be classified as complete or incomplete based on their essential amino acid content. Complete proteins contain all nine essential amino acids that cannot be produced by the human body and must be obtained through the diet. Examples of complete protein sources include meat, poultry, fish, eggs, dairy products, soy, and quinoa.

Incomplete proteins lack one or more essential amino acids and are typically found in plant-based foods such as grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds. However, by combining different incomplete protein sources, it is possible to obtain all the essential amino acids needed for a complete protein diet. This concept is known as complementary proteins.

It's important to note that while dietary proteins are essential for good health, excessive protein intake can have negative effects on the body, such as increased stress on the kidneys and bones. Therefore, it's recommended to consume protein in moderation as part of a balanced and varied diet.

"Native Americans" is the preferred term for the indigenous peoples of the continental United States, including those from Alaska and Hawaii. The term "Indians" is often used to refer to this group, but it can be seen as misleading or inaccurate since it implies a connection to India rather than recognition of their unique cultures and histories. However, some Native Americans prefer to use the term "Indian" to describe themselves.

It's important to note that there is no single medical definition for this group, as they are not a homogeneous population. Instead, they consist of hundreds of distinct tribes with diverse cultures, languages, and traditions. Each tribe may have its own unique genetic makeup, which can influence health outcomes and responses to medical treatments.

Therefore, when discussing medical issues related to Native Americans, it's essential to consider the specific tribal affiliations and cultural factors that may impact their health status and healthcare needs.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Great Britain" is not a medical concept or condition. It is a geographical and political term referring to the largest island in the British Isles, on which the majority of England, Scotland, and Wales are located. It's also used to refer to the political union of these three countries, which is called the United Kingdom. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "social class" is not a term that has a medical definition. It is a sociological concept that refers to the grouping of individuals in a society based on their shared economic and social positions. This can include factors such as income, education, occupation, and wealth.

However, social class can have an impact on health outcomes and access to healthcare. For example, people in lower socioeconomic groups are more likely to experience chronic diseases, mental health disorders, and have limited access to quality healthcare services compared to those in higher socioeconomic groups. This relationship is often referred to as the "social determinants of health."

Data collection in the medical context refers to the systematic gathering of information relevant to a specific research question or clinical situation. This process involves identifying and recording data elements, such as demographic characteristics, medical history, physical examination findings, laboratory results, and imaging studies, from various sources including patient interviews, medical records, and diagnostic tests. The data collected is used to support clinical decision-making, inform research hypotheses, and evaluate the effectiveness of treatments or interventions. It is essential that data collection is performed in a standardized and unbiased manner to ensure the validity and reliability of the results.

"Mental recall," also known as "memory recall," refers to the ability to retrieve or bring information from your memory storage into your conscious mind, so you can think about, use, or apply it. This process involves accessing and retrieving stored memories in response to certain cues or prompts. It is a fundamental cognitive function that allows individuals to remember and recognize people, places, events, facts, and experiences.

In the context of medical terminology, mental recall may be used to assess an individual's cognitive abilities, particularly in relation to memory function. Impairments in memory recall can be indicative of various neurological or psychological conditions, such as dementia, Alzheimer's disease, or amnesia.

Educational status refers to the level or stage of education that a person has reached. It can be used to describe an individual's educational background, achievements, and qualifications. Educational status can be categorized in various ways, including by level (e.g., elementary school, high school, college, graduate school), years of schooling completed, or type of degree earned (e.g., bachelor's, master's, doctoral).

In medical settings, educational status may be used as a demographic variable to describe the characteristics of a patient population or to identify potential disparities in health outcomes based on education level. Research has shown that higher levels of education are often associated with better health outcomes, including lower rates of chronic diseases and improved mental health. Therefore, understanding a patient's educational status can help healthcare providers tailor their care and education strategies to meet the unique needs and challenges of each individual.

The medical definition of "eating" refers to the process of consuming and ingesting food or nutrients into the body. This process typically involves several steps, including:

1. Food preparation: This may involve cleaning, chopping, cooking, or combining ingredients to make them ready for consumption.
2. Ingestion: The act of taking food or nutrients into the mouth and swallowing it.
3. Digestion: Once food is ingested, it travels down the esophagus and enters the stomach, where it is broken down by enzymes and acids to facilitate absorption of nutrients.
4. Absorption: Nutrients are absorbed through the walls of the small intestine and transported to cells throughout the body for use as energy or building blocks for growth and repair.
5. Elimination: Undigested food and waste products are eliminated from the body through the large intestine (colon) and rectum.

Eating is an essential function that provides the body with the nutrients it needs to maintain health, grow, and repair itself. Disorders of eating, such as anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa, can have serious consequences for physical and mental health.

"Sex distribution" is a term used to describe the number of males and females in a study population or sample. It can be presented as a simple count, a percentage, or a ratio. This information is often used in research to identify any differences in health outcomes, disease prevalence, or response to treatment between males and females. Additionally, understanding sex distribution can help researchers ensure that their studies are representative of the general population and can inform the design of future studies.

Logistic models, specifically logistic regression models, are a type of statistical analysis used in medical and epidemiological research to identify the relationship between the risk of a certain health outcome or disease (dependent variable) and one or more independent variables, such as demographic factors, exposure variables, or other clinical measurements.

In contrast to linear regression models, logistic regression models are used when the dependent variable is binary or dichotomous in nature, meaning it can only take on two values, such as "disease present" or "disease absent." The model uses a logistic function to estimate the probability of the outcome based on the independent variables.

Logistic regression models are useful for identifying risk factors and estimating the strength of associations between exposures and health outcomes, adjusting for potential confounders, and predicting the probability of an outcome given certain values of the independent variables. They can also be used to develop clinical prediction rules or scores that can aid in decision-making and patient care.

Nutritional support is medical care that focuses on providing nutrition to individuals who are unable to consume or absorb adequate nutrients through their regular diet. This may include patients with chronic illnesses, eating disorders, swallowing difficulties, or those recovering from surgery or injury. Nutritional support can take many forms, including oral supplements, enteral feeding (tube feeding), and parenteral nutrition (intravenous feeding). The goal of nutritional support is to maintain or improve the patient's nutritional status, promote healing and recovery, enhance quality of life, and reduce complications associated with malnutrition.

Dietary fats, also known as fatty acids, are a major nutrient that the body needs for energy and various functions. They are an essential component of cell membranes and hormones, and they help the body absorb certain vitamins. There are several types of dietary fats:

1. Saturated fats: These are typically solid at room temperature and are found in animal products such as meat, butter, and cheese, as well as tropical oils like coconut and palm oil. Consuming a high amount of saturated fats can raise levels of unhealthy LDL cholesterol and increase the risk of heart disease.
2. Unsaturated fats: These are typically liquid at room temperature and can be further divided into monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. Monounsaturated fats, found in foods such as olive oil, avocados, and nuts, can help lower levels of unhealthy LDL cholesterol while maintaining levels of healthy HDL cholesterol. Polyunsaturated fats, found in foods such as fatty fish, flaxseeds, and walnuts, have similar effects on cholesterol levels and also provide essential omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids that the body cannot produce on its own.
3. Trans fats: These are unsaturated fats that have been chemically modified to be solid at room temperature. They are often found in processed foods such as baked goods, fried foods, and snack foods. Consuming trans fats can raise levels of unhealthy LDL cholesterol and lower levels of healthy HDL cholesterol, increasing the risk of heart disease.

It is recommended to limit intake of saturated and trans fats and to consume more unsaturated fats as part of a healthy diet.

Child nutrition disorders refer to a range of conditions that are caused by an improper or imbalanced diet during childhood. These disorders can have long-term effects on a child's growth, development, and overall health. Some common examples of child nutrition disorders include:

1. Malnutrition: This occurs when a child does not get enough nutrients for proper growth and development. It can result from inadequate food intake, digestive problems, or certain medical conditions that affect nutrient absorption.
2. Obesity: This is a condition characterized by excessive body fat accumulation to the point where it negatively affects a child's health. Obesity can lead to a range of health problems, including diabetes, heart disease, and orthopedic issues.
3. Vitamin deficiencies: Children who do not get enough vitamins in their diet may develop deficiencies that can lead to a range of health problems. For example, a lack of vitamin D can lead to rickets, while a lack of vitamin C can cause scurvy.
4. Food allergies and intolerances: Some children have allergic reactions or intolerances to certain foods, which can cause a range of symptoms, including digestive problems, skin rashes, and respiratory difficulties.
5. Eating disorders: Children may develop eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or binge eating disorder, which can have serious consequences for their physical and mental health.

Preventing child nutrition disorders involves providing children with a balanced diet that includes a variety of foods from all the major food groups, encouraging regular exercise, and promoting healthy eating habits. Regular medical check-ups can also help identify any nutritional deficiencies or other health problems early on, allowing for prompt treatment.

Parenteral nutrition solutions are medically formulated preparations that provide nutritional support through routes other than the gastrointestinal tract, usually via intravenous infusion. These solutions typically contain carbohydrates, proteins (or amino acids), lipids, electrolytes, vitamins, and trace elements to meet the essential nutritional requirements of patients who cannot receive adequate nutrition through enteral feeding.

The composition of parenteral nutrition solutions varies depending on individual patient needs, but they generally consist of dextrose monohydrate or cornstarch for carbohydrates, crystalline amino acids for proteins, and soybean oil, safflower oil, olive oil, or a combination thereof for lipids. Electrolytes like sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium, and magnesium are added to maintain fluid and electrolyte balance. Vitamins (fat-soluble and water-soluble) and trace elements (e.g., zinc, copper, manganese, chromium, and selenium) are also included in the solution to support various metabolic processes and overall health.

Parenteral nutrition solutions can be tailored to address specific patient conditions or requirements, such as diabetes, renal insufficiency, or hepatic dysfunction. Close monitoring of patients receiving parenteral nutrition is necessary to ensure appropriate nutrient delivery, prevent complications, and achieve optimal clinical outcomes.

Dietetics is the branch of knowledge concerned with the diet and its effects on health, especially in the prevention and treatment of disease. According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, dietetics is defined as "the integration and application of principles derived from nutrition science, biochemistry, food management, and behavioral and social sciences to achieve and maintain people's health."

Dietitians are healthcare professionals who evaluate individual nutritional needs and develop personalized eating plans to promote health and manage medical conditions. They may work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, private practice, community health programs, and food service management. Dietitians often collaborate with other healthcare providers, such as doctors, nurses, and pharmacists, to provide comprehensive care for patients.

The goals of dietetics include promoting optimal nutrition, preventing chronic diseases, managing medical conditions, and enhancing overall health and well-being. Dietitians may provide education and counseling on topics such as healthy eating habits, meal planning, weight management, food safety, and supplement use. They may also conduct research, develop nutrition policies and programs, and advocate for improved food and nutrition policies and practices.

Metabolic syndrome, also known as Syndrome X, is a cluster of conditions that increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. It is not a single disease but a group of risk factors that often co-occur. According to the American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, a person has metabolic syndrome if they have any three of the following five conditions:

1. Abdominal obesity (waist circumference of 40 inches or more in men, and 35 inches or more in women)
2. Triglyceride level of 150 milligrams per deciliter of blood (mg/dL) or greater
3. HDL cholesterol level of less than 40 mg/dL in men or less than 50 mg/dL in women
4. Systolic blood pressure of 130 millimeters of mercury (mmHg) or greater, or diastolic blood pressure of 85 mmHg or greater
5. Fasting glucose level of 100 mg/dL or greater

Metabolic syndrome is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic and lifestyle factors, such as physical inactivity and a diet high in refined carbohydrates and unhealthy fats. Treatment typically involves making lifestyle changes, such as eating a healthy diet, getting regular exercise, and losing weight if necessary. In some cases, medication may also be needed to manage individual components of the syndrome, such as high blood pressure or high cholesterol.

A cohort study is a type of observational study in which a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure are followed up over time to determine the incidence of a specific outcome or outcomes. The cohort, or group, is defined based on the exposure status (e.g., exposed vs. unexposed) and then monitored prospectively to assess for the development of new health events or conditions.

Cohort studies can be either prospective or retrospective in design. In a prospective cohort study, participants are enrolled and followed forward in time from the beginning of the study. In contrast, in a retrospective cohort study, researchers identify a cohort that has already been assembled through medical records, insurance claims, or other sources and then look back in time to assess exposure status and health outcomes.

Cohort studies are useful for establishing causality between an exposure and an outcome because they allow researchers to observe the temporal relationship between the two. They can also provide information on the incidence of a disease or condition in different populations, which can be used to inform public health policy and interventions. However, cohort studies can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, and they may be subject to bias if participants are not representative of the population or if there is loss to follow-up.

Regression analysis is a statistical technique used in medicine, as well as in other fields, to examine the relationship between one or more independent variables (predictors) and a dependent variable (outcome). It allows for the estimation of the average change in the outcome variable associated with a one-unit change in an independent variable, while controlling for the effects of other independent variables. This technique is often used to identify risk factors for diseases or to evaluate the effectiveness of medical interventions. In medical research, regression analysis can be used to adjust for potential confounding variables and to quantify the relationship between exposures and health outcomes. It can also be used in predictive modeling to estimate the probability of a particular outcome based on multiple predictors.

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

In the context of medicine, iron is an essential micromineral and key component of various proteins and enzymes. It plays a crucial role in oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and energy production within the body. Iron exists in two main forms: heme and non-heme. Heme iron is derived from hemoglobin and myoglobin in animal products, while non-heme iron comes from plant sources and supplements.

The recommended daily allowance (RDA) for iron varies depending on age, sex, and life stage:

* For men aged 19-50 years, the RDA is 8 mg/day
* For women aged 19-50 years, the RDA is 18 mg/day
* During pregnancy, the RDA increases to 27 mg/day
* During lactation, the RDA for breastfeeding mothers is 9 mg/day

Iron deficiency can lead to anemia, characterized by fatigue, weakness, and shortness of breath. Excessive iron intake may result in iron overload, causing damage to organs such as the liver and heart. Balanced iron levels are essential for maintaining optimal health.

Hypertension is a medical term used to describe abnormally high blood pressure in the arteries, often defined as consistently having systolic blood pressure (the top number in a blood pressure reading) over 130 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number) over 80 mmHg. It is also commonly referred to as high blood pressure.

Hypertension can be classified into two types: primary or essential hypertension, which has no identifiable cause and accounts for about 95% of cases, and secondary hypertension, which is caused by underlying medical conditions such as kidney disease, hormonal disorders, or use of certain medications.

If left untreated, hypertension can lead to serious health complications such as heart attack, stroke, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. Therefore, it is important for individuals with hypertension to manage their condition through lifestyle modifications (such as healthy diet, regular exercise, stress management) and medication if necessary, under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are a class of diseases that affect the heart and blood vessels. They are the leading cause of death globally, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). The term "cardiovascular disease" refers to a group of conditions that include:

1. Coronary artery disease (CAD): This is the most common type of heart disease and occurs when the arteries that supply blood to the heart become narrowed or blocked due to the buildup of cholesterol, fat, and other substances in the walls of the arteries. This can lead to chest pain, shortness of breath, or a heart attack.
2. Heart failure: This occurs when the heart is unable to pump blood efficiently to meet the body's needs. It can be caused by various conditions, including coronary artery disease, high blood pressure, and cardiomyopathy.
3. Stroke: A stroke occurs when the blood supply to a part of the brain is interrupted or reduced, often due to a clot or a ruptured blood vessel. This can cause brain damage or death.
4. Peripheral artery disease (PAD): This occurs when the arteries that supply blood to the limbs become narrowed or blocked, leading to pain, numbness, or weakness in the legs or arms.
5. Rheumatic heart disease: This is a complication of untreated strep throat and can cause damage to the heart valves, leading to heart failure or other complications.
6. Congenital heart defects: These are structural problems with the heart that are present at birth. They can range from mild to severe and may require medical intervention.
7. Cardiomyopathy: This is a disease of the heart muscle that makes it harder for the heart to pump blood efficiently. It can be caused by various factors, including genetics, infections, and certain medications.
8. Heart arrhythmias: These are abnormal heart rhythms that can cause the heart to beat too fast, too slow, or irregularly. They can lead to symptoms such as palpitations, dizziness, or fainting.
9. Valvular heart disease: This occurs when one or more of the heart valves become damaged or diseased, leading to problems with blood flow through the heart.
10. Aortic aneurysm and dissection: These are conditions that affect the aorta, the largest artery in the body. An aneurysm is a bulge in the aorta, while a dissection is a tear in the inner layer of the aorta. Both can be life-threatening if not treated promptly.

It's important to note that many of these conditions can be managed or treated with medical interventions such as medications, surgery, or lifestyle changes. If you have any concerns about your heart health, it's important to speak with a healthcare provider.

Food labeling is the practice of providing written information about the characteristics and contents of food products, typically on the packaging or container in which they are sold. In a medical context, accurate and clear food labeling is essential for individuals with dietary restrictions due to medical conditions such as food allergies, intolerances, or chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes).

Standardized food labeling guidelines help consumers make informed decisions about the foods they consume, allowing them to avoid potential health risks and maintain a balanced diet. Components of food labels often include:

1. Product identity: The name of the food product and its intended use.
2. Net quantity declaration: The amount of the food product contained in the package, expressed in both metric and customary units (e.g., grams or ounces).
3. Ingredient list: A comprehensive list of all ingredients included in the food product, arranged in descending order by weight. This is particularly important for individuals with food allergies or intolerances, as it allows them to identify and avoid specific allergens (e.g., milk, eggs, peanuts).
4. Nutrition facts panel: A standardized format presenting the nutritional content of the food product per serving, including information on calories, total fat, saturated and trans fats, cholesterol, sodium, total carbohydrates, dietary fiber, sugars, protein, and various vitamins and minerals.
5. Nutrient content claims: Voluntary statements made by manufacturers regarding the level of a nutrient in a food product (e.g., "low fat," "high fiber"). These claims must adhere to strict guidelines established by regulatory bodies to ensure accuracy and consistency.
6. Health claims: Statements linking a specific food or food component to a reduced risk of a particular disease or health-related condition (e.g., "a diet rich in whole grains may reduce the risk of heart disease"). Like nutrient content claims, health claims are subject to strict regulatory oversight.
7. Special dietary statements: Labeling statements indicating that a food product is suitable for specific dietary uses or restrictions (e.g., "gluten-free," "kosher," "vegan"). These statements help consumers with special dietary needs quickly identify appropriate food options.
8. Allergen labeling: Mandatory identification of the presence of any of the eight major food allergens (milk, eggs, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat, and soybeans) in a food product. This information must be clearly displayed in the ingredient list or as a separate "contains" statement.
9. Warning statements: Required labeling of specific health risks associated with the consumption of certain food products (e.g., "consuming raw or undercooked meats, poultry, seafood, shellfish, or eggs may increase your risk of foodborne illness").
10. Country of origin labeling: Identification of the country where a food product was produced, grown, or packaged. This information helps consumers make informed decisions about their food purchases based on factors such as quality, safety, and environmental concerns.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena" is not a standard or widely recognized medical term. It seems to be a very specific phrase that may relate to various physiological processes and phenomena related to infant nutrition.

To try and provide some clarity, I can offer a brief explanation of the individual terms:

1. Infant: A young child, typically under one year of age.
2. Nutritional: Relating to food or nourishment, particularly in relation to energy and the balance of essential nutrients required for growth, repair, and maintenance of bodily functions.
3. Physiological: Describing processes and functions that occur within a living organism as part of normal bodily function, including biochemical reactions, organ function, and responses to environmental stimuli.
4. Phenomena: Observable events or occurrences.

So, "Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena" could refer to observable events or processes related to an infant's nutrition and physiology. However, without further context, it is difficult to provide a more precise definition. Examples of such phenomena might include the development of feeding skills, growth patterns, or changes in metabolism related to dietary intake.

Infant nutrition disorders refer to a group of conditions that occur when an infant's diet does not provide adequate nutrients for growth, development, and health. These disorders can result from various factors such as inadequate feeding practices, poor nutrient quality or composition of the diet, food intolerances or allergies, and medical conditions affecting nutrient absorption or metabolism.

Examples of infant nutrition disorders include:

1. Failure to thrive (FTT): A condition characterized by an infant's failure to gain weight or height at the expected rate due to inadequate nutrition.
2. Malnutrition: A condition resulting from a deficiency, excess, or imbalance of nutrients in an infant's diet.
3. Obesity: A condition characterized by excessive body fat accumulation in an infant due to poor dietary habits and lack of physical activity.
4. Food intolerances or allergies: Adverse reactions to specific foods or food components that can cause digestive, skin, or respiratory symptoms in infants.
5. Vitamin and mineral deficiencies: A condition resulting from an insufficient intake or absorption of essential vitamins and minerals required for normal growth and development.
6. Metabolic disorders: Inborn errors of metabolism that affect the body's ability to process specific nutrients, leading to a buildup of toxic substances in the body.

Infant nutrition disorders can have serious consequences on an infant's health and development, and it is essential to identify and address them promptly through appropriate medical interventions and feeding practices.

"Food Services" in a medical context typically refers to the provision and delivery of food and nutrition services to patients in hospitals, clinics, or other healthcare facilities. This can include:

1. Nutrition assessment and care planning by registered dietitians.
2. Food preparation and meal service that meet the dietary needs and restrictions of patients.
3. Special diets for patients with specific medical conditions (e.g., diabetes, heart disease, food allergies).
4. Enteral and parenteral nutrition support for patients who cannot eat or digest food normally.
5. Education for patients and their families about diet and nutrition.
6. Implementation of food safety and sanitation practices to prevent infection and ensure the quality of food.

The goal of food services in healthcare facilities is to promote optimal nutritional status, support recovery, and enhance patient satisfaction and well-being.

"Animal nutritional physiological phenomena" is not a standardized medical or scientific term. However, it seems to refer to the processes and functions related to nutrition and physiology in animals. Here's a breakdown of the possible components:

1. Animal: This term refers to non-human living organisms that are multicellular, heterotrophic, and have a distinct nervous system.
2. Nutritional: This term pertains to the nourishment and energy requirements of an animal, including the ingestion, digestion, absorption, transportation, metabolism, and excretion of nutrients.
3. Physiological: This term refers to the functions and processes that occur within a living organism, including the interactions between different organs and systems.
4. Phenomena: This term generally means an observable fact or event.

Therefore, "animal nutritional physiological phenomena" could refer to the observable events and processes related to nutrition and physiology in animals. Examples of such phenomena include digestion, absorption, metabolism, energy production, growth, reproduction, and waste elimination.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Food Supply" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a more general term related to the availability and distribution of food. However, in a broader public health context, "food supply" can refer to the overall system and infrastructure that provides food to a population, including agricultural practices, food processing, distribution, and accessibility. Ensuring a safe and adequate food supply is an important aspect of public health and preventive medicine.

"Health Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices" (HKAP) is a term used in public health to refer to the knowledge, beliefs, assumptions, and behaviors that individuals possess or engage in that are related to health. Here's a brief definition of each component:

1. Health Knowledge: Refers to the factual information and understanding that individuals have about various health-related topics, such as anatomy, physiology, disease processes, and healthy behaviors.
2. Attitudes: Represent the positive or negative evaluations, feelings, or dispositions that people hold towards certain health issues, practices, or services. These attitudes can influence their willingness to adopt and maintain healthy behaviors.
3. Practices: Encompass the specific actions or habits that individuals engage in related to their health, such as dietary choices, exercise routines, hygiene practices, and use of healthcare services.

HKAP is a multidimensional concept that helps public health professionals understand and address various factors influencing individual and community health outcomes. By assessing and addressing knowledge gaps, negative attitudes, or unhealthy practices, interventions can be designed to promote positive behavior change and improve overall health status.

"Formulated food" is a term used in the field of clinical nutrition to refer to foods that are specially manufactured and designed to meet the nutritional needs of specific patient populations. These foods often come in the form of shakes, bars, or pouches and are intended to be used as a sole source or supplementary source of nutrition for individuals who have difficulty meeting their nutritional needs through traditional food sources alone.

Formulated foods may be indicated for patients who have medical conditions that affect their ability to eat or digest regular food, such as dysphagia (swallowing difficulties), malabsorption syndromes, or chronic inflammatory bowel disease. They may also be used in patients who require additional nutritional support during times of illness, injury, or recovery from surgery.

Formulated foods are typically designed to provide a balance of macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, and fats) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) that meet the recommended dietary intakes for specific patient populations. They may also contain additional ingredients such as fiber, probiotics, or other nutraceuticals to provide additional health benefits.

It is important to note that formulated foods should only be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional, such as a registered dietitian or physician, to ensure that they are appropriate for an individual's specific medical and nutritional needs.

Health promotion is the process of enabling people to increase control over their health and its determinants, and to improve their health. It moves beyond a focus on individual behavior change to include social and environmental interventions that can positively influence the health of individuals, communities, and populations. Health promotion involves engaging in a wide range of activities, such as advocacy, policy development, community organization, and education that aim to create supportive environments and personal skills that foster good health. It is based on principles of empowerment, participation, and social justice.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

A medical definition of 'food' would be:

"Substances consumed by living organisms, usually in the form of meals, which contain necessary nutrients such as carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals, and water. These substances are broken down during digestion to provide energy, build and repair tissues, and regulate bodily functions."

It's important to note that while this is a medical definition, it also aligns with common understanding of what food is.

Health education is the process of providing information and strategies to individuals and communities about how to improve their health and prevent disease. It involves teaching and learning activities that aim to empower people to make informed decisions and take responsible actions regarding their health. Health education covers a wide range of topics, including nutrition, physical activity, sexual and reproductive health, mental health, substance abuse prevention, and environmental health. The ultimate goal of health education is to promote healthy behaviors and lifestyles that can lead to improved health outcomes and quality of life.

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

Nutrigenomics is a branch of nutrition research that studies the relationship between genes, nutrition, and health. It focuses on understanding how individual genetic variations can affect the way we respond to nutrients in our diet and how these responses may contribute to the risk of developing certain diseases. By examining these gene-diet interactions, nutrigenomics aims to provide personalized nutrition recommendations that can help improve overall health, prevent chronic diseases, and optimize athletic performance.

In simpler terms, nutrigenomics explores how our genes influence our nutritional needs and how our dietary choices can impact the expression of our genes. This knowledge can be used to develop targeted nutritional strategies for individuals based on their unique genetic profiles.

Animal nutrition sciences is a field of study that focuses on the nutritional requirements, metabolism, and digestive processes of non-human animals. It involves the application of basic scientific principles to the practice of feeding animals in order to optimize their health, growth, reproduction, and performance. This may include the study of various nutrients such as proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, and minerals, as well as how they are absorbed, utilized, and excreted by different animal species. The field also encompasses the development and evaluation of animal feeds and feeding strategies, taking into account factors such as animal age, sex, weight, production stage, and environmental conditions. Overall, the goal of animal nutrition sciences is to promote sustainable and efficient animal agriculture while ensuring the health and well-being of animals.

Maternal nutritional physiological phenomena refer to the various changes and processes that occur in a woman's body during pregnancy, lactation, and postpartum periods to meet the increased nutritional demands and support the growth and development of the fetus or infant. These phenomena involve complex interactions between maternal nutrition, hormonal regulation, metabolism, and physiological functions to ensure optimal pregnancy outcomes and offspring health.

Examples of maternal nutritional physiological phenomena include:

1. Adaptations in maternal nutrient metabolism: During pregnancy, the mother's body undergoes various adaptations to increase the availability of essential nutrients for fetal growth and development. For instance, there are increased absorption and utilization of glucose, amino acids, and fatty acids, as well as enhanced storage of glycogen and lipids in maternal tissues.
2. Placental transfer of nutrients: The placenta plays a crucial role in facilitating the exchange of nutrients between the mother and fetus. It selectively transports essential nutrients such as glucose, amino acids, fatty acids, vitamins, and minerals from the maternal circulation to the fetal compartment while removing waste products.
3. Maternal weight gain: Pregnant women typically experience an increase in body weight due to the growth of the fetus, placenta, amniotic fluid, and maternal tissues such as the uterus and breasts. Adequate gestational weight gain is essential for ensuring optimal pregnancy outcomes and reducing the risk of adverse perinatal complications.
4. Changes in maternal hormonal regulation: Pregnancy is associated with significant changes in hormonal profiles, including increased levels of estrogen, progesterone, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), and other hormones that regulate various physiological functions such as glucose metabolism, appetite regulation, and maternal-fetal immune tolerance.
5. Lactation: Following childbirth, the mother's body undergoes further adaptations to support lactation and breastfeeding. This involves the production and secretion of milk, which contains essential nutrients and bioactive components that promote infant growth, development, and immunity.
6. Nutrient requirements: Pregnancy and lactation increase women's nutritional demands for various micronutrients such as iron, calcium, folate, vitamin D, and omega-3 fatty acids. Meeting these increased nutritional needs is crucial for ensuring optimal pregnancy outcomes and supporting maternal health during the postpartum period.

Understanding these physiological adaptations and their implications for maternal and fetal health is essential for developing evidence-based interventions to promote positive pregnancy outcomes, reduce the risk of adverse perinatal complications, and support women's health throughout the reproductive lifespan.

Health behavior can be defined as a series of actions and decisions that individuals take to protect, maintain or promote their health and well-being. These behaviors can include activities such as engaging in regular exercise, eating a healthy diet, getting sufficient sleep, practicing safe sex, avoiding tobacco and excessive alcohol consumption, and managing stress.

Health behaviors are influenced by various factors, including knowledge and attitudes towards health, beliefs and values, cultural norms, social support networks, environmental factors, and individual genetic predispositions. Understanding health behaviors is essential for developing effective public health interventions and promoting healthy lifestyles to prevent chronic diseases and improve overall quality of life.

A dietary supplement is a product that contains nutrients, such as vitamins, minerals, amino acids, herbs or other botanicals, and is intended to be taken by mouth, to supplement the diet. Dietary supplements can include a wide range of products, such as vitamin and mineral supplements, herbal supplements, and sports nutrition products.

Dietary supplements are not intended to treat, diagnose, cure, or alleviate the effects of diseases. They are intended to be used as a way to add extra nutrients to the diet or to support specific health functions. It is important to note that dietary supplements are not subject to the same rigorous testing and regulations as drugs, so it is important to choose products carefully and consult with a healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns about using them.

Nutritive value is a term used to describe the amount and kind of nutrients, such as carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals, and water, that a food provides. It refers to the ability of a food to supply the necessary components for growth, repair, maintenance, and energy in the body. The nutritive value of a food is usually expressed in terms of its content of these various nutrients per 100 grams or per serving. Foods with high nutritive value are those that provide a significant amount of essential nutrients in relation to their calorie content.

The "attitude of health personnel" refers to the overall disposition, behavior, and approach that healthcare professionals exhibit towards their patients or clients. This encompasses various aspects such as:

1. Interpersonal skills: The ability to communicate effectively, listen actively, and build rapport with patients.
2. Professionalism: Adherence to ethical principles, confidentiality, and maintaining a non-judgmental attitude.
3. Compassion and empathy: Showing genuine concern for the patient's well-being and understanding their feelings and experiences.
4. Cultural sensitivity: Respecting and acknowledging the cultural backgrounds, beliefs, and values of patients.
5. Competence: Demonstrating knowledge, skills, and expertise in providing healthcare services.
6. Collaboration: Working together with other healthcare professionals to ensure comprehensive care for the patient.
7. Patient-centeredness: Focusing on the individual needs, preferences, and goals of the patient in the decision-making process.
8. Commitment to continuous learning and improvement: Staying updated with the latest developments in the field and seeking opportunities to enhance one's skills and knowledge.

A positive attitude of health personnel contributes significantly to patient satisfaction, adherence to treatment plans, and overall healthcare outcomes.

Short Bowel Syndrome (SBS) is a malabsorption disorder that occurs when a significant portion of the small intestine has been removed or is functionally lost due to surgical resection, congenital abnormalities, or other diseases. The condition is characterized by an inability to absorb sufficient nutrients, water, and electrolytes from food, leading to diarrhea, malnutrition, dehydration, and weight loss.

The small intestine plays a crucial role in digestion and absorption of nutrients, and when more than 50% of its length is affected, the body's ability to absorb essential nutrients becomes compromised. The severity of SBS depends on the extent of the remaining small intestine, the presence or absence of the ileocecal valve (a sphincter that separates the small and large intestines), and the functionality of the residual intestinal segments.

Symptoms of Short Bowel Syndrome include:

1. Chronic diarrhea
2. Steatorrhea (fatty stools)
3. Dehydration
4. Weight loss
5. Fat-soluble vitamin deficiencies (A, D, E, and K)
6. Electrolyte imbalances
7. Malnutrition
8. Anemia
9. Bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine
10. Osteoporosis due to calcium and vitamin D deficiencies

Treatment for Short Bowel Syndrome typically involves a combination of nutritional support, medication, and sometimes surgical interventions. Nutritional management includes oral or enteral feeding with specially formulated elemental or semi-elemental diets, as well as parenteral nutrition (intravenous feeding) to provide essential nutrients that cannot be absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract. Medications such as antidiarrheals, H2 blockers, proton pump inhibitors, and antibiotics may also be used to manage symptoms and prevent complications. In some cases, intestinal transplantation might be considered for severe SBS patients who do not respond to other treatments.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "vegetables" is not a term that has a medical definition. It is a dietary category that includes various plant-based foods, typically referring to the edible parts of herbaceous plants excluding fruit (but including seeds), such as leaves, stems, roots, tubers, and bulbs.

However, in a nutritional or clinical context, vegetables are often defined by their nutrient content. For example, they may be classified as foods that are high in certain vitamins, minerals, and fiber, and low in calories and fat. Different healthcare professionals or organizations might have slightly different definitions or classifications of what constitutes a vegetable, but there is no single medical definition for this term.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Europe" is a geographical and political designation, rather than a medical one. It refers to the continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere. It is bordered by the Arctic Ocean to the north, the Atlantic Ocean to the west, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. Europe is made up of approximately 50 countries, depending on how one defines a "country."

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I'd be happy to help answer them!

Health status is a term used to describe the overall condition of an individual's health, including physical, mental, and social well-being. It is often assessed through various measures such as medical history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and self-reported health assessments. Health status can be used to identify health disparities, track changes in population health over time, and evaluate the effectiveness of healthcare interventions.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Schools" is not a medical term. It generally refers to educational institutions where children or adults receive instruction in various subjects. If you are asking about a medical condition that might be associated with the word "school," it's possible you could mean "psychological disorders that first present or become evident during the school-aged period (approximately 5-18 years of age)." These disorders can include, but are not limited to, ADHD, learning disabilities, anxiety disorders, and mood disorders. However, without more context, it's difficult for me to provide a more specific answer.

I cannot provide a specific medical definition for the term "Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena" as it is quite broad and can encompass various aspects related to nutrition and physiological changes that occur during adolescence. However, I can provide some insight into the nutritional and physiological changes that typically occur during adolescence.

Adolescence is a critical period of growth and development, and proper nutrition is essential to support these changes. During this time, adolescents experience significant increases in height, weight, and muscle mass, as well as sexual maturation and reproductive development. As a result, their nutrient needs are higher than those of children or adults.

Some key nutritional physiological phenomena that occur during adolescence include:

1. Increased energy needs: Adolescents require more calories to support their rapid growth and development. The estimated daily calorie needs for boys aged 14-18 years are 2,500-3,000 calories, while for girls aged 14-18 years, the estimated daily calorie needs are 2,200-2,400 calories.
2. Increased protein needs: Protein is essential for building and repairing tissues, including muscle mass. Adolescents require more protein to support their growth and development, with an estimated daily need of 46 grams for girls aged 14-18 years and 52 grams for boys aged 14-18 years.
3. Increased calcium needs: Calcium is essential for building and maintaining strong bones and teeth. Adolescents undergo significant bone growth during this time, making it crucial to meet their increased calcium needs. The recommended daily intake of calcium for adolescents is 1,300 milligrams.
4. Increased iron needs: Iron is essential for the production of red blood cells and the transport of oxygen throughout the body. Adolescent girls, in particular, have increased iron needs due to menstruation. The recommended daily intake of iron for adolescents is 8 mg for boys aged 14-18 years and 15 mg for girls aged 14-18 years.
5. Increased nutrient needs: Adolescents require a variety of vitamins and minerals to support their growth and development, including vitamin D, vitamin B12, folate, and magnesium. A balanced diet that includes a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, and dairy products can help meet these needs.

In summary, adolescents have increased nutrient needs to support their growth and development. Meeting these needs requires a balanced diet that includes a variety of foods from all food groups. It is essential to ensure adequate intake of protein, calcium, iron, and other vitamins and minerals during this critical period of growth and development.

Micronutrients are essential nutrients that our body requires in small quantities to support various bodily functions, such as growth, development, and overall health. They include vitamins and minerals, which are vital for the production of hormones, enzymes, and other substances necessary for optimal health.

Unlike macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, and fats), micronutrients do not provide energy or calories but play a crucial role in maintaining the balance and functioning of our body systems. They support immune function, bone health, wound healing, eyesight, skin health, and reproductive processes, among other functions.

Examples of micronutrients include vitamins A, C, D, E, and K, as well as minerals like calcium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and iodine. While our bodies need only small amounts of these nutrients, deficiencies in any of them can lead to serious health problems over time. Therefore, it's essential to consume a balanced and varied diet that includes adequate amounts of micronutrients to support overall health and well-being.

I apologize, but "Canada" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country located in North America, known for its vast wilderness, multicultural cities, and significant natural resources. If you have any questions related to healthcare or medical terms, I would be happy to help answer those!

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "fruit" is not a medical term per se. It is a common term used to describe the part of a plant that develops from the ovary after flowering and contains seeds. However, in a nutritional or dietary context, "fruits" are often referred to as foods that are typically sweet and juicy, and come from plants' flowers. They are rich in fiber, vitamins, and minerals, making them an essential part of a healthy diet. But in a strict medical sense, there isn't a specific definition for "fruit."

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "life style" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It generally refers to the way an individual or group lives, including their habits, behaviors, and preferences in areas such as diet, exercise, recreation, and stress management. Some lifestyle factors can have a significant impact on health outcomes and risk for certain diseases. However, it is not a medical term with a specific clinical meaning.

Nutrition processes refer to the series of actions and reactions involved in the intake, absorption, transportation, assimilation, biosynthesis, and excretion of nutrients by our body. These processes are essential for growth, repair, maintenance, energy production, and overall health and well-being.

The nutrition process begins with the ingestion of food, which is then broken down into simpler molecules during digestion. These molecules are absorbed into the bloodstream and transported to various cells and tissues throughout the body. Once inside the cells, they undergo further chemical reactions to produce energy, synthesize new proteins and DNA, and maintain cellular function.

The waste products generated from these processes are then excreted from the body through various routes such as urine, feces, sweat, and breath. Proper nutrition processes are critical for optimal health, and any disruptions or imbalances in these processes can lead to diseases and other health complications.

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is not a medical organization or entity, so it does not provide medical definitions. However, I can give you some information about what the USDA is and what it does.

The USDA is a federal executive department of the U.S. government responsible for developing and executing federal laws related to farming, forestry, and food. It was established in 1862 by President Abraham Lincoln and is headed by the Secretary of Agriculture, who is a member of the President's cabinet.

The USDA has several key missions, including:

* Promoting agricultural trade and production
* Ensuring the safety of the food supply
* Providing nutrition assistance to vulnerable populations
* Protecting natural resources and the environment
* Promoting rural development and economic stability

In terms of food and nutrition, the USDA plays an important role in setting dietary guidelines for Americans, establishing standards for school meals and other federal food programs, and regulating the safety of meat, poultry, and egg products. The agency also conducts research on agricultural and food-related topics and provides education and outreach to farmers, ranchers, and consumers.

In the context of medical education, a curriculum refers to the planned and organized sequence of experiences and learning opportunities designed to achieve specific educational goals and objectives. It outlines the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that medical students or trainees are expected to acquire during their training program. The curriculum may include various components such as lectures, small group discussions, clinical rotations, simulations, and other experiential learning activities. It is typically developed and implemented by medical education experts and faculty members in consultation with stakeholders, including learners, practitioners, and patients.

Vitamins are organic substances that are essential in small quantities for the normal growth, development, and maintenance of life in humans. They are required for various biochemical functions in the body such as energy production, blood clotting, immune function, and making DNA.

Unlike macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, and fats), vitamins do not provide energy but they play a crucial role in energy metabolism. Humans require 13 essential vitamins, which can be divided into two categories: fat-soluble and water-soluble.

Fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K) are stored in the body's fat tissues and liver, and can stay in the body for a longer period of time. Water-soluble vitamins (B-complex vitamins and vitamin C) are not stored in the body and need to be replenished regularly through diet or supplementation.

Deficiency of vitamins can lead to various health problems, while excessive intake of certain fat-soluble vitamins can also be harmful due to toxicity. Therefore, it is important to maintain a balanced diet that provides all the essential vitamins in adequate amounts.

Fat emulsions for intravenous use are a type of parenteral nutrition solution that contain fat in the form of triglycerides, which are broken down and absorbed into the body to provide a source of energy and essential fatty acids. These emulsions are typically used in patients who are unable to consume food orally or enterally, such as those with gastrointestinal tract disorders, malabsorption syndromes, or severe injuries.

The fat emulsion is usually combined with other nutrients, such as carbohydrates and amino acids, to create a complete parenteral nutrition solution that meets the patient's nutritional needs. The emulsion is administered through a vein using a sterile technique to prevent infection.

Fat emulsions are typically made from soybean oil or a mixture of soybean and medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) oils. MCTs are more easily absorbed than long-chain triglycerides (LCTs), which are found in soybean oil, and may be used in patients with malabsorption syndromes or other conditions that affect fat absorption.

It is important to monitor patients receiving intravenous fat emulsions for signs of complications such as infection, hyperlipidemia (elevated levels of fats in the blood), and liver function abnormalities.

Smoking is not a medical condition, but it's a significant health risk behavior. Here is the definition from a public health perspective:

Smoking is the act of inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning tobacco that is commonly consumed through cigarettes, pipes, and cigars. The smoke contains over 7,000 chemicals, including nicotine, tar, carbon monoxide, and numerous toxic and carcinogenic substances. These toxins contribute to a wide range of diseases and health conditions, such as lung cancer, heart disease, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and various other cancers, as well as adverse reproductive outcomes and negative impacts on the developing fetus during pregnancy. Smoking is highly addictive due to the nicotine content, which makes quitting smoking a significant challenge for many individuals.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

"Food assistance" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, in general, it refers to various programs and initiatives designed to help individuals and families access and afford nutritious food. These programs may be run by government agencies, non-profit organizations, or community groups and can include things like:

* Food banks and pantries, which provide free or low-cost groceries to those in need
* Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps), which provides financial assistance to eligible low-income individuals and families to purchase food
* Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program, which provides nutrition education, healthy food, and breastfeeding support to low-income pregnant and postpartum women, infants, and children up to age five
* School meal programs, which provide free or reduced-price meals to eligible school-aged children
* Senior nutrition programs, which provide meals and nutrition assistance to older adults.

Medical professionals may refer patients to food assistance resources as part of a comprehensive approach to addressing social determinants of health, such as food insecurity, which can have significant impacts on physical and mental health outcomes.

Fetal nutrition disorders refer to conditions that occur when a fetus fails to receive adequate nutrients for proper growth and development during pregnancy. This can result from various factors, such as maternal malnutrition, placental insufficiency, or genetic abnormalities. Some examples of fetal nutrition disorders include intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), small for gestational age (SGA), and birth defects related to nutrient deficiencies. These conditions can lead to a range of complications, including premature birth, low birth weight, developmental delays, and long-term health problems. It is essential to monitor fetal growth and nutrition during pregnancy to identify and manage these disorders early on.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "poverty" is not a medical condition or term. It is a social condition defined by the World Bank as "pronounced deprivation in well-being," and measured through indicators such as income, consumption, and access to basic services. Poverty can have significant impacts on health outcomes and healthcare access, but it is not considered a medical diagnosis. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to try my best to help answer them!

Nitrogen is not typically referred to as a medical term, but it is an element that is crucial to medicine and human life.

In a medical context, nitrogen is often mentioned in relation to gas analysis, respiratory therapy, or medical gases. Nitrogen (N) is a colorless, odorless, and nonreactive gas that makes up about 78% of the Earth's atmosphere. It is an essential element for various biological processes, such as the growth and maintenance of organisms, because it is a key component of amino acids, nucleic acids, and other organic compounds.

In some medical applications, nitrogen is used to displace oxygen in a mixture to create a controlled environment with reduced oxygen levels (hypoxic conditions) for therapeutic purposes, such as in certain types of hyperbaric chambers. Additionally, nitrogen gas is sometimes used in cryotherapy, where extremely low temperatures are applied to tissues to reduce pain, swelling, and inflammation.

However, it's important to note that breathing pure nitrogen can be dangerous, as it can lead to unconsciousness and even death due to lack of oxygen (asphyxiation) within minutes.

An ethnic group is a category of people who identify with each other based on shared ancestry, language, culture, history, and/or physical characteristics. The concept of an ethnic group is often used in the social sciences to describe a population that shares a common identity and a sense of belonging to a larger community.

Ethnic groups can be distinguished from racial groups, which are categories of people who are defined by their physical characteristics, such as skin color, hair texture, and facial features. While race is a social construct based on physical differences, ethnicity is a cultural construct based on shared traditions, beliefs, and practices.

It's important to note that the concept of ethnic groups can be complex and fluid, as individuals may identify with multiple ethnic groups or switch their identification over time. Additionally, the boundaries between different ethnic groups can be blurred and contested, and the ways in which people define and categorize themselves and others can vary across cultures and historical periods.

I must clarify that "Mexican Americans" is not a medical term. It is a demographic term used to describe individuals who identify as having Mexican ancestry and who are residents or citizens of the United States. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Mexican American refers to a person of Mexican origin or descent who is living in the United States.

However, it's important to note that Mexican Americans, like any other ethnic group, can experience various health conditions and disparities. Therefore, medical professionals should be aware of and sensitive to the unique cultural, linguistic, and socioeconomic factors that may influence the health and healthcare experiences of Mexican American patients.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena" is not a standard or widely recognized medical term. It seems to be a rather broad and vague phrase that combines several concepts: prenatal (occurring before birth), nutritional (relating to nutrition), physiological (relating to the functioning of living organisms and their parts), and phenomena (observable events or occurrences).

If you're interested in a specific aspect of maternal and fetal nutrition, physiology, or related processes during pregnancy, I would be happy to help further if you could provide a more precise term or question. For example, prenatal nutritional physiological phenomena could refer to the process of how certain nutrients are transported across the placenta, how maternal nutrition affects fetal growth and development, or how various hormonal and metabolic changes occur during pregnancy.

Population surveillance in a public health and medical context refers to the ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of health-related data for a defined population over time. It aims to monitor the health status, identify emerging health threats or trends, and evaluate the impact of interventions within that population. This information is used to inform public health policy, prioritize healthcare resources, and guide disease prevention and control efforts. Population surveillance can involve various data sources, such as vital records, disease registries, surveys, and electronic health records.

The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is a survey research program conducted by the National Center for ... "National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)". faqs.org. Advameg, Inc. Retrieved 17 March 2010. [1] DSDR page for ... National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging "About the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey". CDC/National ... National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Caloric Energy Intake Data, 1971-2010 [6] (Articles with short description, ...
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Nutritional surveys; Nutrition for the elderly; Child-nutrition surveillance; Diarrheal disease of children; Smoking and health ... disease surveillance National report on occupational disease National report on outbreaks of food poisoning National survey ...
ZIP Code Lookup "A Short History of SNAP , Food and Nutrition Service". www.fns.usda.gov. Retrieved September 1, 2022. Climate ... "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. October 25, 2007. Retrieved January 31, 2008. ...
Expand the national nutrition survey; Create the Food and Nutrition Service to administer food assistance and nutrition efforts ... the first National Nutrition Survey was mandated in 1967. Preliminary survey results were released in January 1969, in time to ... Better nutrition and food safety standards. According to Mayer, the White House Conference on Food, Nutrition and Health ... The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as Food Stamps), Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for ...
Dosedel, Erik (2021-11-01). "Compensation and Benefits Survey 2021". Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. 121 (11 ... "Certified Nutrition Coach," "Certified Nutrition Professional," "Registered Nutrition Professional," and "Certified Nutrition ... Nutrition Security and Food Safety, and Nutrition Care and Health Systems. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the ADA ... Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. "About Us". www.eatrightpro.org. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Archived from the ...
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... conducts a biannual survey of its member readers to determine reader needs and satisfaction. According to the 2010 survey, the ... It covers research in nutritional science, medical nutrition therapy, public health nutrition, food science and biotechnology, ... The Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal of the Academy of ... ISBN 978-0-88091-038-5. "Journal of American Dietetic Association becomes Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics" ( ...
"National Nutrition Survey final report". The United Nations Office in DPR Korea. 19 March 2013. Archived from the original on ... Smith, Hazel (2016). "Nutrition and Health in North Korea: What's New, What's Changed and Why It Matters". North Korea Review. ... Children's health and nutrition is significantly better on a number of indicators than in many other Asian countries. The ... "Survey Report on Political Prisoners' Camps in North Korea (p. 58-73)" (PDF). National Human Rights Commission of Korea, ...
He was chairman of the Department of Nutrition at Loma Linda University School of Public Health. Register was born in West ... "Ulma Doyle Register" (PDF). Madison Survey and Alumni News. 78 (3): 15. 1997. "First International Congress on Vegetarian ... In 1974, he was invited by the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Research Council to write their statement on vegetarian ... During 1944-1992 he authored 62 scientific papers on nutrition. Register died from an accidental fall at his home in Loma Linda ...
Conducts research and surveys related to nutrition. Monitors the nutritional status of the people of Antigua and Barbuda. ... The Antigua and Barbuda Nutrition Unit was established in 2002 by the first Chief Nutrition Officer, Juanita James. The unit is ... Develops and monitors nutrition related policies Provides education and counseling about nutrition to the public Provides ... "Nutrition Unite". Ministry of Health. 15 October 2020. "Tobacco Control Act" (PDF). Ministry of Health. (Articles with short ...
Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. Retrieved 27 October 2016. "expanded survey". Food and Drug Administration. ... A 1937 survey revealed that over 50% of teenage girls fought with their parents over lipstick. In the mid-1940s, several teen ... A 1951 survey revealed that two-thirds of teenage girls wore lipstick. In 1950 chemist Hazel Bishop formed a company, Hazel ... In 2011, the FDA conducted an expanded survey on its previous study, which broadened the testing to 400 lipsticks that were ...
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National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey". Journal of Periodontology. 71 (5): 743-51. doi:10.1902/jop.2000.71.5.743. ...
unicef (September 2002). "SANAAG REGION NUTRITION SURVEY REPORT" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2021-07-11. ... 451-457 A General survey of the Somaliland protectorate 1944-1950, pp.164, 166, 167 Mohamud Omar Ali; Koss Mohammed; Michael ...
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It also houses the China Health and Nutrition Survey, the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey, the Russia ... "Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey". www.cpc.unc.edu. Retrieved 21 April 2020. "Russia Longitudinal Monitoring ... Survey of HSE". www.cpc.unc.edu. Retrieved 21 April 2020. "Home". The Global Food Research Program. Retrieved 2021-10-01. The ... Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RMLS), the Global Food Research Program, data from family planning and reproductive health ...
National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Anthropometry Procedures Manual. CDC: Atlanta, USA; 2007. Komlos, John (2010 ... ISO 8559: Garment construction and anthropometric surveys - Body dimensions, International Organization for Standardization, ... Anthropometric Survey of Army Personnel: Methods and Summary Statistics 1988 ISO 7250: Basic human body measurements for ...
Somaliland portal unicef (September 2002). "SANAAG REGION NUTRITION SURVEY REPORT" (PDF). Retrieved 2021-07-11. "Gudmo Biyo Cas ...
In PROCEEDINGS-NUTRITION SOCIETY OF LONDON (Vol. 58, No. 4, pp. 791-798). CABI Publishing; 1999. Marriott, B. M. (Ed.). (1993 ... "IFIC 2011 Food & Health Survey" (PDF). Retrieved 2014-08-14. 2011 FMI US Grocery Shopper Trends Archived November 12, 2013, at ... It has been suggested that this variety effect may be evolutionarily adaptive, as complete nutrition cannot be found in a ... Stroebele, N.; De Castro, J. M. (2004). "Effect of ambience on food intake and food choice". Nutrition. 20 (9): 821-838. doi: ...
"SANAAG REGION NUTRITION SURVEY REPORT" (PDF). Retrieved 2021-07-11. "The Impact of Drought on Protection Concerns in IDP Sites ...
Somaliland portal unicef (September 2002). "SANAAG REGION NUTRITION SURVEY REPORT" (PDF). Retrieved 2021-07-11. Megalommatis, ... A General Survey of the Somaliland Protectorate 1944-1950: Final Report on "An Economic Survey and Reconnaissance of the ...
unicef (September 2002). "SANAAG REGION NUTRITION SURVEY REPORT" (PDF). Retrieved 2021-07-11. "Regions, districts, and their ... "SANAAG REGION NUTRITION SURVEY REPORT" (PDF). Retrieved 2021-07-11. Hodd, Michael (1994). East African Handbook. Trade & Travel ...
"Sanaag region nutrition survey report" (PDF). UNICEF: 6. September 2002. "The Puntland Speaker visiting Badhan district". ...
"Medical Survey of Nutrition in Newfoundland". Canadian Medical Association Journal. 52 (3): 227-250. PMC 1582114. PMID 20323369 ... He served "at various times on the editorial board of the Journal of Nutrition and the Archives of Internal Medicine, the ... At the Mayo Clinic he investigated clinical problems of metabolism and nutrition. In 1950 he retired from the Mayo Clinic and ... In 1954 he received the American Medical Association's Joseph Goldberger Award in Clinical Nutrition. In 1956 he was the ...
"SANAAG REGION NUTRITION SURVEY REPORT" (PDF). Retrieved 2021-07-11. A.H. Keane, Man, Past and Present, (Cambridge University ...
National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey". Journal of Periodontology. 71 (5): 743-51. doi:10.1902/jop.2000.71.5.743. ... National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey". Journal of Periodontology. 71 (5): 743-51. doi:10.1902/jop.2000.71.5.743. ...
Harris, Leslie J; Abbasy, M. A. (1937-12-18). "Nutrition Surveys a Simplified Procedure for the Vitamin-C Urine Test". The ... Harris, L. J.; Kodicek, E. (June 1946). "The Vitamin B Complex: Introductory Survey". Proceedings of the Nutrition Society. 4 ( ... Paul, Alison A. (1987). "60 years of research at the Dunn Nutrition Unit". Nutrition Bulletin. 12 (2): 116-121. doi:10.1111/j. ... He was instrumental in setting up the (British) Nutrition Society, and the International Union of Nutrition Societies. His ...
unicef (September 2002). "SANAAG REGION NUTRITION SURVEY REPORT" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2021-07-11. ... Hunt, John Anthony (1951). A General Survey of the Somaliland Protectorate 1944-1950: Final Report on "An Economic Survey and ...
"SANAAG REGION NUTRITION SURVEY REPORT" (PDF). Retrieved 2021-07-11. Mire, Sada (2015). "Mapping the Archaeology of Somaliland: ... Hunt, John Anthony (1951). A General Survey of the Somaliland Protectorate 1944-1950: Final Report on "An Economic Survey and ...
Documentation for the following datasets were updated to reflect the correct units of the reported analyte values for thyroid stimulating hormone (LBXTSH) as "µIU/mL". No changes were made to the actual data points of any analytes in these datasets.. ...
Create your own online survey now with SurveyMonkeys expert certified FREE templates. ... We invite you to fill out this quick survey and tell us more about yourself and your topics of interest in nutrition and ... One of Nutrition Health Reviews (NHR) new year resolutions is to learn more about our audience to better tailor our content to ...
Create your own online survey now with SurveyMonkeys expert certified FREE templates. ... The Office of Food and Nutrition Services wants to provide you with the best food service program possible. You may also ... translate the survey by clicking on the dropdown in the top right corner of the page. ...
The results of the Comprehensive National Nutrition Survey 2016-18, which were recently released by the Union health ministry, ... The results of the Comprehensive National Nutrition Survey 2016-18, which were recently released by the Union health ministry, ... The survey again underlines the fact that education of women is an essential requisite not only for the betterment of their ... The survey also found that children of highly educated and working women received meals less frequently and were prone to ...
... nutrition surveys - Featured Topics from the National Center for Health Statistics ... Tags dietary recommendations, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, nutrition, nutrition surveys, protein ... Tags anthropometry, body measures, National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, nutrition surveys ... March is National Nutrition month, making it a great time to look at where America stands in its nutrition and diet. One ...
... understanding and reported behaviors relating to a variety of food safety and nutrition related topics. ... The FDA is releasing the latest results of its Food Safety and Nutrition Survey (FSANS) designed to assess consumers awareness ... The survey combines the previously separate Food Safety Survey and Health and Diet Survey, which were last conducted in 2016 ... The FDA is releasing the latest results of its Food Safety and Nutrition Survey (FSANS) designed to assess consumers awareness ...
The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is a survey research program conducted by the National Center for ... "National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)". faqs.org. Advameg, Inc. Retrieved 17 March 2010. [1] DSDR page for ... National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging "About the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey". CDC/National ... National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Caloric Energy Intake Data, 1971-2010 [6] (Articles with short description, ...
Health and Nutrition Examination Survey - Hispanic This page last reviewed: Thursday, January 28, 2016 This information is ... Health and Nutrition Examination Survey - I *HANES I Epidemiologic Followup Study *Health and Nutrition Examination Survey - II ...
The Kabul survey only found 132 children in the 900 families surveyed. If we had wanted to survey 900 infants the survey would ... Including infants in nutrition surveys. Experiences of ACF in Kabul city. Claudine Prudhon is the head of the nutrition ... This survey was carried out in conjunction with an anthropometric survey of 6-59 months old children, using a cluster survey ... FEX: Comment on: Including infants in nutrition surveys. Experiences of ACF in Kabul city By Michael Golden, Department of ...
Although medical doctors are seen as experts in nutrition and their advice is regularly followed, data are lacking on the ... amount of nutrition education in European medical school curricula. In line with US research, we distri … ... Nutrition education in European medical schools: results of an international survey Eur J Clin Nutr. 2014 Jul;68(7):844-6. doi ... In line with US research, we distributed a survey on required and/or optional nutrition contact hours to medical education ...
The objective of the survey is to understand what barriers pantry guests face in accessing food and to understand if clients ... Additionally, the survey will be used by the Manistee Food Pantry coalition to understand if clients are receiving the food ... Top four nutrition education topics preferred by participants include: healthy food budgeting, healthy snack options, reading ... Most participants took the survey from BACN, Manistee Senior Center- Council on Aging, and Matthew 23:35 at St. Joseph Catholic ...
Data collection includes in-depth, in-person surveys, physical and physiological examinations, and laboratory tests. Survey ... findings from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999 to 2004. Nguyen NT, Magno CP, Lane KT, Hinojosa MW, ... audiometric evidence from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999 to 2004. Bainbridge KE, Hoffman HJ, Cowie ... Nutrition • Obesity • Oral health • Osteoporosis • Physical fitness and physical functioning • Reproductive history and sexual ...
It is an annual standardized, expanded nutrition survey report covering all five refugee camps in the Melkadida Sub-Office, ...
It is an annual standardized, expanded nutrition survey report covering all the five camps in Melkadia, Somali Region. ...
KiESEL - The Childrens Nutrition Survey to Record Food Consumption. The BfR. has carried out a nationwide representative study ... The Childrens Nutrition Survey to Record Food Consumption).. The KiESEL study recorded the food consumption of infants, ... The surveys on food consumption were carried out by the BfR. s KiESEL study team from 2014 until the end of 2017. ... The KiESEL study is a cross-sectional study and a module of the "German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children ...
... Am J Med. 2005 Dec ... Results: Never smokers represented 42% of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey population aged 30 to 80 ... in US adults aged 30 to 80 years interviewed in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey with valid ...
The School of Medicine, Medical Sciences and Nutrition. *News. In This Section. *Newsletters ... Nationwide survey reveals healthcare postcode lottery for older people in Scotland. *University Home ...
UK food consumption and nutrient intakes from the first year of the rolling programme and comparisons with previous surveys - ... 1995) National Diet and Nutrition Survey: Children Aged 1 1/2 to 4 1/2 Years. Volume 1. Report of the Diet and Nutrition Survey ... 1998) National Diet and Nutrition Survey: People Aged 65 Years and Over. Volume 1: Report of the Diet and Nutrition Survey. ... The current National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS) is a cross-sectional survey of people aged 1·5 years and above, designed ...
The overall objective of the UNHCR led Standardized Expanded Nutrition Survey (SENS) is to assess the nutrition status of the ... refugee population and formulate workable recommendations for appropriate nutrition and public health interventions in refugee ...
Development and validation of reduced item food audit tools based on the Nutrition Environment Measures Surveys for stores and ... Development and validation of reduced item food audit tools based on the Nutrition Environment Measures Surveys for stores and ... Development and validation of reduced item food audit tools based on the Nutrition Environment Measures Surveys for stores and ...
Nutrition data use and needs: Findings from an online survey of global nutrition stakeholders. View this article as a pdf ... Nutrition data use and needs: Findings from an online survey of global nutrition stakeholders. Field Exchange 65, May 2021. p66 ... Nutrition data use and needs: Findings from an online survey of global nutrition stakeholders. Journal of global health, 10(2 ... FEX: Contextual data collection in nutrition surveys in Ethiopia. Women carrying grass grown in the Awassa region of Ethiopia, ...
National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2016 Journal Article Overview abstract * Objective: To provide updated ... enrolled in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2001-2016), we assessed the age-adjusted prevalence of self- ...
This cross-sectional study included 10,898 adults from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007-2010 ... Analyses accounted for complex survey design; logistic regression models controlled for gender, race, education, smoking, and ... Nutrition Is the Subject Area "Nutrition" applicable to this article? Yes. No. ...
Indicators of Family Care for Development for Use in Multicountry Surveys. Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition, 30(4), ... Indicators of Family Care for Development for Use in Multicountry Surveys Authors. * Patricia Kariger Community Health and ... Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition. ISSN 1606-0997 eISSN 2072-1315 ... were included in the core module of UNICEFs Multiple Cluster Indictor Survey 3. The other items were included in optional ...
HPV seropositivity in the USA among 14-59-year-olds using the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. ... Prevaccine era human papillomavirus types 6, 11, 16 and 18 seropositivity in the USA, National Health and Nutrition Examination ... Prevaccine era human papillomavirus types 6, 11, 16 and 18 seropositivity in the USA, National Health and Nutrition Examination ...
Coverage of nutrition and health interventions in Uttarakhand: Insights from the National Family Health Survey-4 ...
Title : Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care in New York - 2011 mPINC Survey Corporate Authors(s) : National Center ... Title : Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care in South Carolina - 2011 mPINC Survey Corporate Authors(s) : National ... Title : Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care in Montana - 2011 mPINC Survey Corporate Authors(s) : National Center ... Title : Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care in Arizona - 2011 mPINC Survey Corporate Authors(s) : National Center ...
Title : Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care in Iowa- 2009 mPINC Survey Corporate Authors(s) : National Center for ... Title : Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care in Utah- 2009 mPINC Survey Corporate Authors(s) : National Center for ... Title : Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care in North Dakota - 2009 mPINC Survey Corporate Authors(s) : National ... Title : Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care in Arizona - 2009 mPINC Survey Corporate Authors(s) : National Center ...
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  • The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III), 1988-94, Series 11, No. 10A (Hepatitis C Virus Genotype Data and Documentation) Data Release. (cdc.gov)
  • The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is a periodic survey conducted by NCHS. (cdc.gov)
  • Survey (NHANES III), conducted from 1988 through 1994, was the seventh in a series of these surveys based on a complex, multi-stage sample plan. (cdc.gov)
  • All of the NHANES III public use data files are linked with the common survey participant identification number (SEQN). (cdc.gov)
  • Merging information from multiple NHANES III data files using this variable ensures that the appropriate information for each survey participant is linked correctly. (cdc.gov)
  • The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is a survey research program conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the United States, and to track changes over time. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eight hundred twenty-four men, 40+ yr old without prostate cancer, who participated in the 2001-2004 NHANES surveys, were included in the analysis. (uzh.ch)
  • The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys ( NHANES ) 2007-2010 formed the setting for the present study. (bvsalud.org)
  • Methods We describe HPV seropositivity in the USA among 14-59-year-olds using the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. (bmj.com)
  • From 1960 to 1994, a total of seven national examination surveys have been conducted. (cdc.gov)
  • Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and hypertension in premenopausal and postmenopausal women: National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 2007-2010. (bvsalud.org)
  • Zhou J, Britigan DH, Wang H, Rajaram SS, Su D (2017) Leisure Time Physical Activity and Hypertension: Evidence from the China Health & Nutrition Survey, 2004-2011. (omicsonline.org)
  • A cross-sectional population survey conducted by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , National Center for Health Statistics . (bvsalud.org)
  • One of Nutrition Health Review's (NHR) new year resolutions is to learn more about our audience to better tailor our content to the topics that are most relevant to you. (surveymonkey.com)
  • The results of the Comprehensive National Nutrition Survey 2016-18, which were recently released by the Union health ministry, are important for the light they throw on the nutritional status of children in the country and the factors that influence it. (deccanherald.com)
  • The survey again underlines the fact that education of women is an essential requisite not only for the betterment of their social and economic status but also for improving the health and welfare of children. (deccanherald.com)
  • They should help to formulate better policies to improve the nutrition of children and education of girls and to take care of the health of the young generation. (deccanherald.com)
  • The survey combines the previously separate Food Safety Survey and Health and Diet Survey , which were last conducted in 2016 and 2014, respectively. (fda.gov)
  • The KiESEL study is a cross-sectional study and a module of the "German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents" ("KiGGS Wave 2") study that was carried out by the Robert Koch Institute (RKI). (bund.de)
  • 0.70) in US adults aged 30 to 80 years interviewed in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey with valid spirometry who had never smoked. (nih.gov)
  • Never smokers represented 42% of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey population aged 30 to 80 years, with obstruction prevalence of 91 per 1000. (nih.gov)
  • Of those who accessed country-specific data in the last year, Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) were the most common (74%) followed by Multiple-Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS). (ennonline.net)
  • Routine facility data sources such as the Health Management Information System (HMIS) were less accessed compared to household surveys. (ennonline.net)
  • Objective: To provide updated prevalence estimates of asthma and asthma medication use for women of childbearing age in the United States.Methods: Using data from 11,383 women aged 18-44, including a subset of 1,245 pregnant women, enrolled in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2001-2016), we assessed the age-adjusted prevalence of self-reported diagnosed asthma. (healthpartners.com)
  • Results: Of the 409 respondents, 83% believed that nutrition affects skin health. (cdlib.org)
  • Briefly, the survey was commissioned by the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Foods (MAFF) and the Department of Health, and undertaken collaboratively with University College London and the Dunn Nutrition Unit, Cambridge. (bmj.com)
  • Financial support for the New York City Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NYC HANES) was primarily provided by the de Beaumont Foundation with additional support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, and the Robin Hood foundation. (nyu.edu)
  • CrossCurrents, a national mental health and addiction magazine published by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, is doing an issue about nutrition and mental health issues. (nnmh.ca)
  • We invite you to answer a short survey to tell us what you think about the connection between mental health issues and food and what challenges you face in accessing healthy food. (nnmh.ca)
  • Participants included adults without self-reported diabetes or chronic kidney disease in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2006 who were aged ≥18 years of age and had complete blood counts, iron studies, and A1C levels. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • A total of 2029 adults without anti-hypertensive medicine, aged ≥19 years old participated in the 2013-2016 National Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan. (atlantis-press.com)
  • Money issues, losing weight and baby's health are the top concerns of expectant moms, according to a nationwide survey* released today by Whole Foods Market, the world's leading natural and organic foods supermarket. (wholefoodsmarket.com)
  • The overall aim of this survey was to assess the general nutrition and health status of refugee population and formulate workable recommendations for appropriate nutritional and public health interventions. (worldbank.org)
  • The health and nutrition examination survey. (cdc.gov)
  • That's one of the surprising findings from the My Health My Community survey results being released today. (vch.ca)
  • The My Health My Community survey data has been compiled into community profiles, which give a snapshot of each community's health and wellbeing. (vch.ca)
  • With 33,000 responses, this is the largest community health survey ever conducted in B.C. We want this rich and granular data to spark community level dialogue about creating health promoting environments and reducing health inequities. (vch.ca)
  • All survey results can be viewed on the My Health My Community website at www.myhealthmycommunity.org . (vch.ca)
  • Nationally representative samples of adolescents from over 30 countries completed an anonymous, standardized questionnaire as part of the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children 2001/2002 survey. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Infant feeding : 1980 / a survey carried out on behalf of the Dept. of Health and Social Security and the Scottish Home and Health Dept. (who.int)
  • Demographic and Health Surveys. (who.int)
  • On the other hand, the results of two national surveys on the prevalence of obesity among males and females indicated that the dietary pattern associated with an affluent lifestyle has been blamed for the increasing prevalence of health problems associated with overnutrition [5,6]. (who.int)
  • The Public Health Agency conducts a national public health survey annually (biannually from 2016) titled 'Health on equal terms? (who.int)
  • The aim of the survey is to monitor how people in general perceive their health and to monitor changes in the population over time. (who.int)
  • The FDA is releasing the latest results of its Food Safety and Nutrition Survey (FSANS) designed to assess consumers' awareness, knowledge, understanding and reported behaviors relating to a variety of food safety and nutrition related topics. (fda.gov)
  • Based on the responses from a 32 member college student focus group and a field test, a 19 item survey was used to assess energy drink consumption patterns of 496 randomly surveyed college students attending a state university in the Central Atlantic region of the United States. (biomedcentral.com)
  • It is difficult to assess the effect of the oil boom on the nutritional status of the Kuwaiti population because limited data are available to describe the food and nutrition situation before 1979. (who.int)
  • Such data are greatly needed in order to assess the present situation after the Gulf War, and for use as baseline data in the planning and evaluation of nutrition intervention programmes. (who.int)
  • This survey was carried out in conjunction with an anthropometric survey of 6-59 months old children, using a cluster survey methodology. (ennonline.net)
  • A total of six survey teams composed of four members each (one team leader, one haemoglobin measurer, one anthropometric measurer/translator and one anthropometric/haemoglobin measurement assistant) were included in each survey. (worldbank.org)
  • STUDY OBJECTIVE To investigate the prevalence and nature of low energy reporting in a dietary survey of British adults over 65 years of age. (bmj.com)
  • Beginning in 1999, the survey will be conducted continuously. (cdc.gov)
  • The survey also found that children of highly educated and working women received meals less frequently and were prone to lifestyle diseases caused by the consumption of sugary and unhealthy food. (deccanherald.com)
  • has carried out a nationwide representative study known as the "KiESEL study", which stands for " Ki nder- E rnährungs s tudie zur E rfassung des L ebensmittelverzehrs" (The Children's Nutrition Survey to Record Food Consumption). (bund.de)
  • The KiESEL study updates and expands the knowledge on food consumption from the child's nutrition study (VELS study) carried out between 2001 and 2002. (bund.de)
  • National Diet and Nutrition Survey: UK food consumption. (cambridge.org)
  • The National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS) is a cross-sectional survey designed to gather data representative of the UK population on food consumption, nutrient intakes and nutritional status. (cambridge.org)
  • Differences in median daily food consumption and nutrient intakes between the surveys were compared by sex and age group (4-10 years, 11-18 years and 19-64 years). (cambridge.org)
  • In a previous survey of the UK adult population the reported consumption of biscuits, cakes and pastries differed most strongly between those defined as low energy reporters and other participants. (bmj.com)
  • Caffeine Consumption in Switzerland: Results from the First National Nutrition Survey MenuCH. (unil.ch)
  • The survey was sent by mail to respondents, who could then submit it online or by mail. (fda.gov)
  • Most consumers are familiar with the Nutrition Facts label - 87% of respondents have looked at the Nutrition Facts label on food packages. (fda.gov)
  • In total, respondents from 32 medical schools (14.7%) from 10 countries indicated that nutrition education, in some form, was required in 68.8% of schools where, on average, 23.68 h of required nutrition education was provided. (nih.gov)
  • Respondents were asked their professional background, how they use data in their work, which nutrition indicators and data sources they had accessed in the previous year and unmet data needs. (ennonline.net)
  • The survey was completed by 235 respondents, the majority of whom were from non-governmental organisations and research entities. (ennonline.net)
  • Most respondents had accessed at least one source of consolidated data in the last 12 months (75%) of which the most common was the Global Nutrition Report (GNR). (ennonline.net)
  • Household survey performed in the urban area of Parintins in 2017, visiting new households in each interview, completing the census universe. (bvsalud.org)
  • A total of 157 adults completed the food pantry client survey electronically through Qualtrics. (msu.edu)
  • The profiles are based on survey results from adults aged 18 and up in 40 communities across FH and VCH, conducted during 2013 and 2014. (vch.ca)
  • Information on population-level nutritional status and nutritional determinants are typically collected through periodic national and sub-national surveys. (ennonline.net)
  • The survey evaluated nutritional status on the basis of diet diversity, meal frequency and minimum acceptable diet and found inadequacies in all these respects. (deccanherald.com)
  • March is National Nutrition month, making it a great time to look at where America stands in its nutrition and diet. (cdc.gov)
  • Identified gaps in data include diet quality indicators, nutrition-sensitive intervention coverage and infant and young child feeding promotion coverage. (ennonline.net)
  • A major problem in self reported dietary studies is people who under-report their true habitual food intake, or change their diet, during the period of the survey. (bmj.com)
  • Pryer 3 explored low energy reporting in the adult British population using data from the National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS) of those aged 16-64 years. (bmj.com)
  • The National Diet and Nutrition Survey of people over 65 years of age comprised 1632 free living people and 428 subjects living in institutions. (bmj.com)
  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has released FSANS Explorer, a web-based tool that allows users to interact with the Food Safety and Nutrition Survey data at any time to find answers to their specific questions. (fda.gov)
  • Although medical doctors are seen as experts in nutrition and their advice is regularly followed, data are lacking on the amount of nutrition education in European medical school curricula. (nih.gov)
  • Data collection includes in-depth, in-person surveys, physical and physiological examinations, and laboratory tests. (sgim.org)
  • To fill this gap, the authors conducted an online survey of nutrition professionals working in low- and middle- income countries to identify the nutrition indicators and data sources widely used and the current unmet nutrition information needs. (ennonline.net)
  • Results point to the continued need for timely, high-quality nutrition data and greater investment in surveys. (ennonline.net)
  • Summary of research1 Settlements of new arrivals in the outskirts of Dadaab Routine monitoring data are available from the many nutrition programmes operating in camps. (ennonline.net)
  • This report provides data from the 2011 mPINC survey for Tennessee. (cdc.gov)
  • This report provides data from the 2009 mPINC survey for Pennsylvania. (cdc.gov)
  • In this study we have investigated low energy reporting in a survey of the more elderly population, using data from the NDNS of the British population over 65 years of age, a separate survey using similar methodology. (bmj.com)
  • The UNHCR Standardized Expanded Nutrition Surveys (SENS) provide regular nutrition data that plays a key role in delivering effective and timely interventions to ensure good nutritional outcomes among populations affected by forced displacement. (worldbank.org)
  • Data from these surveys are used in preparing NUTRITION ASSESSMENTS. (bvsalud.org)
  • A total of 174 subjects participated in the survey, 42% being overweight. (bvsalud.org)
  • The Office of Food and Nutrition Services wants to provide you with the best food service program possible. (surveymonkey.com)
  • The primary objective of the survey is to understand what barriers pantry guests face in accessing food. (msu.edu)
  • Additionally, the survey will be used by the Manistee Food Pantry coalition to understand if clients are receiving the food they want, an adequate amount of food, and how clients want the food presented. (msu.edu)
  • Top four nutrition education topics preferred by participants include: healthy food budgeting, healthy snack options, reading nutrition facts and ingredient lists and choosing foods with lower added fats, sugar and sodium. (msu.edu)
  • Les contenus en minéraux des aliments tibétains ont ensuite été comparés à la composition d'aliments similaires provenant de tables de composition alimentaire : USDA National Nutrient Database (USDA Food Search for Windows , Version 1.0, database version SR23) et China Food Composition (livre 1, 2 e édition). (ac.be)
  • By a mile, the top issues for grocery shoppers are affordable and nutritious food, according to a nationwide survey commissioned by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. (thefern.org)
  • The 1986 national nutrition survey of the Kingdom of Tonga : summary report prepared for the National Food and Nutrition Committee / Elizabeth Maclean, François Bach, Jacqui Badcock. (who.int)
  • National Food and Nutrition Committee. (who.int)
  • The mother of each child was privately interviewed at her home by two research assistants from the staff of the Food and Nutrition Administration. (who.int)
  • A cross-sectional survey was conducted using simple random sampling. (worldbank.org)
  • Results of a nationwide cross-sectional survey on school students showed that the rate of growth was close to international standards. (who.int)
  • A national cross-sectional survey of Kuwaiti preschool children aged 6-59 months was conducted. (who.int)
  • UNHCR and WVI carried out a nutrition survey in Makpandu from 7 to 10 October 2019. (worldbank.org)
  • It was the first survey of its kind and covered about 1.2 lakh children and adolescents in the 0-19 age group. (deccanherald.com)
  • Many of the findings reaffirm what is already known about the poor state of nutrition and its impact on the body and mind of children. (deccanherald.com)
  • Guidelines on nutritional survey methodologies currently stipulate that children between 6 to 59 months should be surveyed. (ennonline.net)
  • One of the main reasons for excluding children under six months of age from surveys has been the assumption that malnutrition will be rare amongst this age group as they are predominantly breastfed. (ennonline.net)
  • The Kabul survey only found 132 children in the 900 families surveyed. (ennonline.net)
  • Of the surveyed children 74% were exclusively breastfed. (ennonline.net)
  • Since previous surveys there have been some positive changes in intakes especially in younger children. (cambridge.org)
  • The survey combines interviews, physical examinations and laboratory tests. (wikipedia.org)
  • To reduce non-response rate and ensure results were representative of people living in the settlement at the time of the survey, empty households, as verified through neighbours were not labelled and thus not be included in the sampling frame. (worldbank.org)
  • Results of search for 'su:{Nutrition surveys. (who.int)
  • The results from the survey are published in a report called "Skolelevers drogvanor" (Alcohol and Drug Use Among Students). (who.int)
  • Our findings may help improve how dermatologists counsel patients about nutrition. (cdlib.org)
  • European Journal of Nutrition. (lu.se)
  • The problem of accuracy in dietary surveys. (bmj.com)
  • RAMS project : rural assessment and manpower surveys. (who.int)
  • Additionally, some variables have been recoded to protect the confidentiality of the survey participants. (cdc.gov)
  • Most participants took the survey from BACN, Manistee Senior Center- Council on Aging, and Matthew 23:35 at St. Joseph Catholic Church. (msu.edu)