Nitrogen Fixation: The process in certain BACTERIA; FUNGI; and CYANOBACTERIA converting free atmospheric NITROGEN to biologically usable forms of nitrogen, such as AMMONIA; NITRATES; and amino compounds.Nitrogenase: An enzyme system that catalyzes the fixing of nitrogen in soil bacteria and blue-green algae (CYANOBACTERIA). EC 1.18.6.1.Gluconacetobacter: A genus in the family ACETOBACTERACEAE comprised of acetate-oxidizing bacteria.Nitrogen Cycle: The circulation of nitrogen in nature, consisting of a cycle of biochemical reactions in which atmospheric nitrogen is compounded, dissolved in rain, and deposited in the soil, where it is assimilated and metabolized by bacteria and plants, eventually returning to the atmosphere by bacterial decomposition of organic matter.Azotobacter vinelandii: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria first isolated from soil in Vineland, New Jersey. Ammonium and nitrate are used as nitrogen sources by this bacterium. It is distinguished from other members of its genus by the ability to use rhamnose as a carbon source. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)Molybdoferredoxin: A non-heme iron-sulfur protein isolated from Clostridium pasteurianum and other bacteria. It is a component of NITROGENASE, which is active in nitrogen fixation, and consists of two subunits with molecular weights of 59.5 kDa and 50.7 kDa, respectively.Nitrogen: An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight [14.00643; 14.00728]. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.Symbiosis: The relationship between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other or a relationship between different species where both of the organisms in question benefit from the presence of the other.Nitrogen Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain nitrogen as an integral part of the molecule.Nitrogen Isotopes: Stable nitrogen atoms that have the same atomic number as the element nitrogen, but differ in atomic weight. N-15 is a stable nitrogen isotope.Blood Urea Nitrogen: The urea concentration of the blood stated in terms of nitrogen content. Serum (plasma) urea nitrogen is approximately 12% higher than blood urea nitrogen concentration because of the greater protein content of red blood cells. Increases in blood or serum urea nitrogen are referred to as azotemia and may have prerenal, renal, or postrenal causes. (From Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984)Nitrogen Dioxide: Nitrogen oxide (NO2). A highly poisonous gas. Exposure produces inflammation of lungs that may only cause slight pain or pass unnoticed, but resulting edema several days later may cause death. (From Merck, 11th ed) It is a major atmospheric pollutant that is able to absorb UV light that does not reach the earth's surface.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Reactive Nitrogen Species: Nitrogenous products of NITRIC OXIDE synthases, ranging from NITRIC OXIDE to NITRATES. These reactive nitrogen intermediates also include the inorganic PEROXYNITROUS ACID and the organic S-NITROSOTHIOLS.Carbon: A nonmetallic element with atomic symbol C, atomic number 6, and atomic weight [12.0096; 12.0116]. It may occur as several different allotropes including DIAMOND; CHARCOAL; and GRAPHITE; and as SOOT from incompletely burned fuel.Fertilizers: Substances or mixtures that are added to the soil to supply nutrients or to make available nutrients already present in the soil, in order to increase plant growth and productivity.Nitrogen Oxides: Inorganic oxides that contain nitrogen.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Soil: The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.Ammonia: A colorless alkaline gas. It is formed in the body during decomposition of organic materials during a large number of metabolically important reactions. Note that the aqueous form of ammonia is referred to as AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE.Biomass: Total mass of all the organisms of a given type and/or in a given area. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990) It includes the yield of vegetative mass produced from any given crop.PII Nitrogen Regulatory Proteins: A family of signal transducing adaptor proteins that control the METABOLISM of NITROGEN. They are primarily found in prokaryotes.Nitrates: Inorganic or organic salts and esters of nitric acid. These compounds contain the NO3- radical.Phosphorus: A non-metal element that has the atomic symbol P, atomic number 15, and atomic weight 31. It is an essential element that takes part in a broad variety of biochemical reactions.Nutritive Value: An indication of the contribution of a food to the nutrient content of the diet. This value depends on the quantity of a food which is digested and absorbed and the amounts of the essential nutrients (protein, fat, carbohydrate, minerals, vitamins) which it contains. This value can be affected by soil and growing conditions, handling and storage, and processing.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Digestion: The process of breakdown of food for metabolism and use by the body.Amino Acids: Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.Energy Intake: Total number of calories taken in daily whether ingested or by parenteral routes.Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of animals.Nutritional Requirements: The amounts of various substances in food needed by an organism to sustain healthy life.Food: Any substances taken in by the body that provide nourishment.Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: The processes and properties of living organisms by which they take in and balance the use of nutritive materials for energy, heat production, or building material for the growth, maintenance, or repair of tissues and the nutritive properties of FOOD.Quaternary Ammonium Compounds: Derivatives of ammonium compounds, NH4+ Y-, in which all four of the hydrogens bonded to nitrogen have been replaced with hydrocarbyl groups. These are distinguished from IMINES which are RN=CR2.Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Animal Feed: Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.Plant Roots: The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Biological Products: Complex pharmaceutical substances, preparations, or matter derived from organisms usually obtained by biological methods or assay.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Biological Assay: A method of measuring the effects of a biologically active substance using an intermediate in vivo or in vitro tissue or cell model under controlled conditions. It includes virulence studies in animal fetuses in utero, mouse convulsion bioassay of insulin, quantitation of tumor-initiator systems in mouse skin, calculation of potentiating effects of a hormonal factor in an isolated strip of contracting stomach muscle, etc.Urea: A compound formed in the liver from ammonia produced by the deamination of amino acids. It is the principal end product of protein catabolism and constitutes about one half of the total urinary solids.Glutamate-Ammonia Ligase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of ATP, L-glutamate, and NH3 to ADP, orthophosphate, and L-glutamine. It also acts more slowly on 4-methylene-L-glutamate. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 6.3.1.2.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Fermentation: Anaerobic degradation of GLUCOSE or other organic nutrients to gain energy in the form of ATP. End products vary depending on organisms, substrates, and enzymatic pathways. Common fermentation products include ETHANOL and LACTIC ACID.Energy Metabolism: The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Biological Therapy: Treatment of diseases with biological materials or biological response modifiers, such as the use of GENES; CELLS; TISSUES; organs; SERUM; VACCINES; and humoral agents.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Eating: The consumption of edible substances.Glucose: A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.Poaceae: A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.Minerals: Native, inorganic or fossilized organic substances having a definite chemical composition and formed by inorganic reactions. They may occur as individual crystals or may be disseminated in some other mineral or rock. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed; McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Eutrophication: The enrichment of a terrestrial or aquatic ECOSYSTEM by the addition of nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphorus, that results in a superabundant growth of plants, ALGAE, or other primary producers. It can be a natural process or result from human activity such as agriculture runoff or sewage pollution. In aquatic ecosystems, an increase in the algae population is termed an algal bloom.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Glutamine: A non-essential amino acid present abundantly throughout the body and is involved in many metabolic processes. It is synthesized from GLUTAMIC ACID and AMMONIA. It is the principal carrier of NITROGEN in the body and is an important energy source for many cells.Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.Nitrogen Mustard Compounds: A group of alkylating agents derived from mustard gas, with the sulfur replaced by nitrogen. They were formerly used as toxicants and vesicants, but now function as antineoplastic agents. These compounds are also powerful mutagens, teratogens, immunosuppressants, and carcinogens.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
"Nitrogen Response of Fluted Pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis Hook. F) Grown Sole or Intercropped with Banana." Nutrient Cycling ... "Fluted Pumpkin, Telfairia occidentalis: West African Vegetable Crop." School of Biological Sciences, University of Port- ...
Nitrogen is a common element in nature and an essential plant nutrient. Approximately 78% of Earth's atmosphere is nitrogen (N2 ... As nitrogen naturally cycles through the air, water and soil it undergoes various chemical and biological transformations. ... Regional increases of nitrogen fertilizer use are expected to be 67% by Asia, 18% by the Americas, 10% by Europe, 3% by Africa, ... Nitrogen promotes plant growth. Livestock then eat the crops producing manure, which is returned to the soil, adding organic ...
Olsen, C. (1970) On biological nitrogen fixation in nature, particularly in blue-green algae. Comptes Rendus des Travaux du ... Olsen, C. (1958) Iron uptake in different plant species as a function of the pH value of the nutrient solution. Physiologia ... Olsen, C. (1932) Studier on nitrogen fixation. I. Nitrogen fixation in the dead leaves of forest beds. Comptes Rendus des ... Olsen, C. (1948). The mineral, nitrogen and sugar contents of beech leaves and beech leaf sap at various times. Comptes Rendus ...
Due to excessive nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphorus, these water bodies are able to support an abundance of aquatic ... Mesotrophic soils have moderate nutrient levels. A eutrophic body of water, commonly a lake or pond, has high biological ... The quantities of nitrogen, phosphorus, and other biologically useful nutrients are the primary determinants of a body of ... A water body situated in a nutrient-rich region with high net primary productivity may be naturally eutrophic. Nutrients ...
Without the nutrients available, some species that provide important biological niches to the ecosystem may be eradicated. In ... As it slowly decomposes, it supplies nutrients, particularly potassium, phosphorus, and nitrogen, that are necessary for the ... They often mix the nutrients into the soil, out of the reach of all but the deeper tree roots. Nutrients may then be leached ... By redistributing nutrients, mixing soil layers, and creating pores in the soil, they can affect the characteristics of the ...
... also contains the nutrients nitrogen and phosphorus. Sewage contains human feces, and therefore often contains pathogens ... The organic matter of sewage is measured by determining its biological oxygen demand (BOD) or the chemical oxygen demand (COD ... Sewage contains nutrients that may cause eutrophication of receiving water bodies; and can lead to ecotoxicity. A system of ...
Whales carry nutrients such as nitrogen from the depths back to the surface. This functions as an upward biological pump, ... reversing an earlier presumption that whales accelerate the loss of nutrients to the bottom. This nitrogen input in the Gulf of ... Whales defecate at the ocean's surface; their excrement is important for fisheries because it is rich in iron and nitrogen. The ... Loss of the habitat and nutrients provided by kelp forests leads to profound cascade effects on the marine ecosystem. North ...
Although crop residues contain both macro- and micro nutrients, only values for the macro nutrients nitrogen, phosphorus, ... The biological processes involved in soil nutrient cycles are complex. As a rough guide, cereal straw releases about 10 to 15 ... Nutrients from residue are not fully recovered by crops. Just like fertilizer nutrients, nutrients released from crop residue ... whereas cereal straw would reduce next year's soil supply of available nutrients. Over time, the nutrients fixed by soil ...
These organisms may provide crops valuable nutrients, such as through nitrogen fixation. There are several ways in which ... Additionally, reducing the homogeneity of the crop can potentially increase the barriers against biological dispersal of pest ... Some plants are used to suppress weeds or provide nutrients. Delicate or light-sensitive plants may be given shade or ... It is particularly important not to have crops competing with each other for physical space, nutrients, water, or sunlight. ...
Eutrophication - an increase in chemical nutrients - typically compounds containing nitrogen or phosphorus - in an ecosystem. ... Fronts are usually associated with high biological activity and high abundance of highly migratory resources such as tuna. They ... Nutrient upwelling - Nutrient upwelling is the 'welling-up' of deeper water that is usually richer in nutrients than surface ... Upwelling - the process by which water, usually cold and nutrient-rich, rises from a deeper to a shallower depth. This is often ...
Macro- and mesofauna break down plant residues to release Nitrogen as part of nutrient cycling. "Macrofauna and Mesofauna". ... In agricultural soils, most of the biological activity occurs in the top 20 centimetres (7.9 in), the soil biomantle or plow ... Animal residues are higher in nitrogen than plant residues with respect to the total carbon in the residue. Some Nitrogen ... may considerably increase Nitrogen mineralization because the bacteria are broken down and the nitrogen is released. ...
The nitrogen materials react as bases by themselves, or after decomposition. The addition of ammonia or urea causes numerous ... Chemical and Biological Effects of Buried Human Remains. Boca Raton: CRC. pp. 67-107. ISBN 1-4200-6991-8. Raut JK, Suzuki A, ... the high alkaline conditions interrupts the process of nutrient recycling. The mechanisms of colonization, establishment, and ... fungi are fungi that develop fruit bodies exclusively or relatively abundantly on soil that has had ammonia or other nitrogen- ...
However, fungi are able to take up the nutrients produced by biological soil crusts at lower water potentials, and keep them in ... Nitrogen cycling mediated by biological soil crusts and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Ecology 84: 1553-1562. Skujins, R.G. 1976 ... In the bare soil between plants, biological soil crusts are often present. Crust microorganisms can fix carbon and nitrogen ... Fungi are an integral part of the biological soil crust community, and similar fungal taxa have been found in biological soil ...
... relative to nitrogen (N) has tremendous consequences for the ocean biological production. The change in nutrient ratios ... Silicate, or silicic acid (H4SiO4), is an important nutrient in the ocean. Unlike the other major nutrients such as phosphate, ... The Pacific (characterized by nutrient poor surface waters, and deep nutrient rich waters) and Atlantic Ocean circulations, are ... Some equatorial regions of upwelling, where nutrients are abundant and productivity is high, are also characterized by local ...
Thus CWD is important actor contributing to soil nutrients cycles. CWD, while itself not particularly rich in nitrogen, ... Scientific studies show that coarse woody debris can be a significant contributor to biological carbon sequestration. Trees ... contributes nitrogen to the ecosystem by acting as a host for nonsymbiotic free-living nitrogen-fixing bacteria. ... Coarse woody debris and its subsequent decomposition recycles nutrients that are essential for living organisms, such as carbon ...
Flood tides coming from the ocean bring coastal nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus into the estuary. During mixing events, ... and biological processes. Yaquina Bay experiences mixed semidiurnal tides, ranging from 1.9-2.5 m (6.2-8.2 ft) daily. The ... The river provides nutrients for the Bay and supports a variety of biology. Sediments that are found within Yaquina Bay are ... Mud shrimp also live in mudflats, and they play an important role in nutrient cycling within the estuary. Burrows in the mud ...
This is generally true of freshwater environments, whereas nitrogen is more often the limiting nutrient in marine (seawater) ... In biological systems, phosphorus is found as a free phosphate ion[when defined as?] in solution and is called inorganic ... Once used, it is often a limiting nutrient in environments, and its availability may govern the rate of growth of organisms. ... An important occurrence of phosphates in biological systems is as the structural material of bone and teeth. These structures ...
Nitrogen fertilizers whose consumption has doubled between 1980 and 1993 present another source of pollution. Water hyacinth ... It is combated with mechanical and biological technologies. Salinity is another important water quality issue. Drainage return ... flourishing at the downstream of water ways due to increased nutrients lead to clogging of canals. ... Groundwater is contaminated from nitrogen and fertilisers (the use of which has quadrupled between 1960 and 1988) and the ...
... and heterotrophic bacteria mediate carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and other nutrient fluxes in marine ecosystems. It ... Algae Bacterioplankton Biological pump Fungus Phytoplankton Zooplankton Jones, E.B.G., Hyde, K.D., & Pang, K.-L., eds. (2014). ... Furthermore, this difference in distribution may vary between seasons due to nutrient availability. Aquatic fungi survive in a ... Similar to bacterioplankton, these aquatic fungi play a significant role in heterotrophic mineralization and nutrient cycling. ...
Nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus can cause or exacerbate eutrophication of fresh water bodies such as lakes and rivers ... Organic matter dissolved in fresh water, measured by biological oxygen demand (BOD), changes ecological characteristics. ... Nitrogen oxides (NOx) sulfur oxides (SOx) and carbon dioxide (CO2) are all emitted during pulp and paper manufacturing. NOx and ... Wastewater discharges for a pulp and paper mill contains solids, nutrients and dissolved organic matter such as lignin. It also ...
See main article Nutrient pollution.) Seaweed farming can be an actor in biological carbon sequestration. The practice of ... is the practice of farming and harvesting shellfish and seaweed for the purpose of removing nitrogen and other nutrients from ... "Nutrient bioextraction" is the preferred term for bioremediation involving cultured plants and animals. Nutrient bioextraction ... The nutrients from the river would help the seaweed to grow. In the 1940s, the Japanese improved this method by placing nets of ...
Additional nitrogen and other nutrients are also made available for root uptake by decomposing organic matter in the substrate ... Appropriate handling of the nitrogen cycle, along with a balanced food supply and consideration of biological loading, is ... Activated carbon filters absorb nitrogen compounds and other toxins from the water. Biological filters provide a medium ... Although called the nitrogen "cycle" by hobbyists, in aquaria the cycle is not complete: nitrogen must be added (usually ...
... and nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus. Physical treatments include coarse sand, sedimentation, and screening through ... Biological processes include the use of ultraviolet for disinfection, membrane bioreactors, RBC, and SBR. Reverse osmosis is a ... Other cities in the state began using sewage for irrigation, too, recognizing it as a source of water and nutrients in an arid ... Secondary: Biological process of removing organic matter and suspended material. Tertiary: Can involve physical and chemical ...
This explains the high rate of nutrient turnover in deep sea sediments. The release of nutrients from infected bacteria ... Marine viruses may play an important role in the carbon cycle by increasing the efficiency of the biological pump. The argument ... nitrogen and phosphorus cycles, but the exact influences are currently not understood. ... This would increase the efficiency of the biological pump. Mann, NH (2005-05-17). "The Third Age of Phage". PLoS Biol. United ...
Appropriate handling of the nitrogen cycle, along with supplying an adequately balanced food supply and considered biological ... Several nutrient cycles are important in the aquarium. Dissolved oxygen enters the system at the surface water-air interface. ... When plants metabolize nitrogen compounds, they remove nitrogen from the water by using it to build biomass that decays more ... Biologically, biological loading refers to the rate of biological decay in proportion to tank volume. Adding plants to an ...
Main article: Nutrient cycle. Many of the Earth's elements and minerals (or mineral nutrients) are contained within the tissues ... Linkages connect to nodes in a food web, which are aggregates of biological taxa called trophic species. Trophic species are ... Ecologists employ stoichiometry to analyze the ratios of the main elements found in all organisms: carbon (C), nitrogen (N), ... Bacteria that live in detrital sediments create and cycle nutrients and biominerals.[51] Food web models and nutrient cycles ...
Amide Nitrogen Fertilizer. Other Names:. Ammonium Sulfate. Mf:. (Nh4)2so4. Trademark:. ML. Transport Package:. 50kg/PP. ... It can also be used as raw materials for biological fertilizer, compound fertilizer, organic fertilizer, etc.. Our Services: ... The grass clippings help to add essential nutrients back into the soil ...
it provides wide span organic nutrient to plants, including rich content of organic nitrogen, humic acid, fulvic acid as well ... When stored under normal conditions in original unopened containers, no change of its physical, chemical and biological ... Nutrients comprehensive.. High fulvic and humic acid content with lower moisture, strong effect.. More functional groups, more ...
... evaluation of a biological filter to meet low total nitrogen discharge limits. New regulations aiming to reduce total pollutant ... loads entering receiving waters are emphasizing more stringent nutrient discharge ... ... Addressing the nutrient crisis: evaluation of a biological filter to meet low total nitrogen discharge limits. 0 ... No comments were found for Addressing the nutrient crisis: evaluation of a biological filter to meet low total nitrogen ...
show that microbes aid ants by recycling nitrogen into bio-available amino acids. This function is conserved across the turtle ... Nitrogen acquisition is a major challenge for herbivorous animals, and the repeated origins of herbivory across the ants have ... What do we know about biological nitrogen fixation in insects? Evidence and implications for the insect and the ecosystem * ... Herbivorous turtle ants obtain essential nutrients from a conserved nitrogen-recycling gut microbiome. *Yi Hu. ORCID: orcid.org ...
Biological Nitrogen Fixation Associated with Rice Production by Azit Kumar Podder, 9780792341970, available at Book Depository ... Nutrient Uptake and Cycling in Forest Ecosystems L.O. Nilsson 05 Nov 2012 ... Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) has become important in rice farming systems because this process diminishes the need for ... Opportunities for Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Rice and Other Non-Legumes J. K. Ladha ...
Article Three Stage Biological Filter Process to Achieve Extremely Low Total Nitrogen Discharge to the Long Island Sound. ... to simulate nutrient limited and two nutrient supplemented conditions, respectively. Research found that air-scour versus water ... Three Stage Biological Filter Process to Achieve Extremely Low Total Nitrogen Discharge to the Long Island Sound. 0 ... No comments were found for Three Stage Biological Filter Process to Achieve Extremely Low Total Nitrogen Discharge to the Long ...
Make research projects and school reports about Nitrogen Fixation easy with credible articles from our FREE, online ... and pictures about Nitrogen Fixation at Encyclopedia.com. ... Nitrogen Fixation. Biological nitrogen (N2) fixation is the ... typically plants of poorly drained and nutrient-depleted habitats, form symbiotic associations with nitrogen-fixing ... Nitrogen Fixation Biology COPYRIGHT 2002 The Gale Group Inc.. Nitrogen Fixation. Nitrogen fixation refers to the conversion of ...
Addressing poverty alleviation via the expanded use of biological nitrogen fixation in agriculture was the theme of the 15th ... International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation. Because nitrogen-fixation ... Plant Growth-Promoting Diazotrophs: Optimising their Role as Key Agents in Achieving More Efficient Nutrient Use by Field Crops ... Biological Nitrogen Fixation: Towards Poverty Alleviation through Sustainable Agriculture. Book Subtitle. Proceedings of the ...
... behavior of nitrogen in the soil; nutrient availability to plants; agricultural waste management; biological control of insects ... A Master of Science degree in an appropriate agricultural, environmental, biological, or physical science. Satisfactory scores ...
... behavior of nitrogen in the soil; nutrient availability to plants; agricultural waste management; biological control of insects ...
Soil nitrogen transformations and losses; Nutrient uptake and use by the plant; Stable isotopes in studies of plant metabolism ... The 15N natural abundance method for measurement of biological nitrogen fixation; Applications of 15N methods to measurement of ... biological nitrogen fixation; Stable isotopes in soil organic matter studies; ... Measurement of biological nitrogen fixation using 15N additions; ... Soil nitrogen transformations and losses; Nutrient uptake and ...
contribution to nitrogen balance. Plant Soil 141:41-55. Roper MM, Ladha JK (1995) Biological N2 fixation by heterotrophic and ... Evaluation of rice-legume-rice cropping system on grain yield, nutrient uptake, nitrogen fixation, and chemical, physical, and ... 2009) Evaluation of rice-legume-rice cropping system on grain yield, nutrient uptake, nitrogen fixation, and chemical, physical ... Choudhury ATMA, Kennedy IR (2004) Prospects and potentials for systems of biological. nitrogen fixation in sustainable rice ...
Nutrient balance and nitrogen use nitrogen toxicity in plants. Dinitrogen fixation in Leguminous crop plants. Enhancing ... Optimization of biological recycling of plant nutrients in livestock waste by utilizing waste heat from cooling water by ... Use of nitrogen from manue. Diagnosis of nitrogen deficiency in plants. Nitrogen and yield potential. Efficient use of nitrogen ... Plant use of soil nitrogen. Conventional nitrogen fertilizers. Slow-Release nitrogen fertilizers. Use of nitrogen from ...
Use of the 15N natural abundance technique to quantify biological nitrogen fixation by woody perennials. Nutrient Cycles ... Factors influencing nitrogen fixation and nitrogen release in biological soil crusts. In: Belnap J, Lange OL (eds) Biological ... Nitrogen Input Pathways into Sand Dunes: Biological Fixation and Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition. ... and the biological fixation of atmospheric nitrogen N2. Biological fixation is carried out by free-living bacteria, Fabaceae- ...
These materials produced eluates with lower concentrations of nutrients than the leachates from barley grains. However, as ... an adequately high carbon-to-nitrogen (C : N) ratio is key to sustain denitrification. We evaluated three natural materials ( ... and peanut shells released carbon rather steadily and so they would not require frequent replenishment from biological reactors ... woodchips yielded lower amounts of suspended solids, they constitute an adequate exogenous source for the biological treatment ...
The two major nutrients are nitrogen and phosphorus. Nitrogen is created by biological fixation, and phosphorus is created by ... Energy and nutrients in the form of dead organic material *Large population oscillations ... It is noted for its frost-molded landscapes, extremely low temperatures, little precipitation, poor nutrients, and short ... Dead organic material functions as a nutrient pool. ...
Nitrogen is arguably the most important nutrient required by plants. However, the availability of nitrogen is limited in many ... Section 18 Nitrogen Fixation and Cereals. Chapter 108. The Quest for Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Cereals : A Perspective ... Biological nitrogen fixation is an alternative to nitrogen fertilizer. It is carried out by prokaryotes using an enzyme complex ... Biological Nitrogen Fixation, 2 Volume Set. Frans J. de Bruijn (Editor). ISBN: 978-1-118-63721-0 June 2015 Wiley-Blackwell 2250 ...
... producing oxygen through photosynthesis while conducting oxygen-sensitive nitrogen fixation. How nutr ... Some bacteria perform a biological juggling act, producing oxygen through photosynthesis while conducting oxygen-sensitive ... Capone noted that the technique was unique in allowing visualization of nitrogen in the cell using nitrogen-15 instead of the ... the researchers added carbon dioxide and nitrogen gas enriched in the stable isotopes carbon-13 and nitrogen-15, respectively. ...
Right) The biological conditions associated with each microarray are shown as blue elements. Only annotations that were ... nitrogen depletion (P , 8.13 × 10-5), stationary phase (P , 4.17 × 10-8), and response to glucose starvation (P , 2.4 × 10-4). ... The TOR pathway is active in favorable nutrient conditions and promotes cell growth. When nutrients become limiting (or cells ... Sfp1 is a stress- and nutrient-sensitive regulator of ribosomal protein gene expression. Rosa M. Marion, Aviv Regev, Eran Segal ...
... are limited nutrients in terrestrial ecosystems, and their limitation patterns are being changed by the increase in N ... 2015) Signatures of nutrient limitation and co-limitation: responses of autotroph internal nutrient concentrations to nitrogen ... Use of Nitrogen to Phosphorus Ratios in Plant Tissue as an Indicator of Nutrient Limitation and Nitrogen Saturation. Journal of ... Nutrient limitation Nitrogenphosphorus Nitrogen deposition Soil enzyme Dryhot valley Dodonaea viscosa This is a preview of ...
Indicators of eutrophication: nutrients (eg. nitrogen and phosphorus), and various biological effect variables (eg. chlorophyll ... Biological indicator organisms and analysis of the various biological communities are used to assess the ecological state of ... Investigation of biological organisms such as macroinvertebrates in rivers and zoobenthos in lakes and marine areas is usually ... a 50 per cent reduction of nitrogen loading to surface waters, no pesticides in drinking water, etc.), and the purpose of ...
Biological Nitrogen Fixation 5. Application of Vermiculture Biotechnology 6. Composting of Agricultural and Industrial Wastes 7 ... Integrated Nutrient Management towards Sustainable Agriculture 11. Integrated Farming Systems 12. Case Studies Printed Pages: ... integrated nutrient management, farming systems and case studies of organic farming. Selected literature is presented for ... Biological Nitrogen Fixation 5. Application of Vermiculture Biotechnology 6. Composting of Agricultural and Industrial Wastes 7 ...
Biological Sciences. keywords. ultraviolet-B radiation, nutrition, maoze. in Scientific World Journal. volume. 2012. publisher ... Ultraviolet-B radiation and nitrogen affect nutrient concentrations and the amount of nutrients acquired by above-ground organs ... Ultraviolet-B radiation and nitrogen affect nutrient concentrations and the amount of nutrients acquired by above-ground organs ... Nutrient uptake decreased under high UV-B and increased with increasing... (More). UV-B radiation effects on nutrient ...
5.2 Sources of nitrogen and phosphorus to soil-plant systems 134. 5.3 Chemical and biological processes of nutrient cycling, ... 5 Nitrogen and phosphorus cycles and their management 132. Phil M. Haygarth, Richard D. Bardgett, and Leo M. Condron ... 11 Sustainable management of soil and plant health by optimising soil biological function 366. Dominic Standing and Ken Killham ... Subject areas covered range from crop science and genetics; soil fertility and organic matter; nitrogen and phosphoros cycles ...
The increase of this nutrient, known as fixed nitrogen, was studied in coral. The findings give researchers new insight into ... New evidence suggests that a nutrient that is both essential to life and an environmental scourge when present in large ... Humans carry out a non-biological form of the reaction to make fertilizer for agriculture. However, too much fixed nitrogen can ... Nitrogen is a nutrient essential to the health of the ocean. Phytoplankton rely on fixed nitrogen to photosynthesize and grow, ...
  • Hierarchical cluster analysis based on similarity matrix of DGGE profiles revealed changes in bacterial community composition in soils due to differences in nutrient management, and these changes were seen to occur according to the states of C and N dynamics in acidic soil under RLR rotation. (warwick.ac.uk)
  • Nitrogen Use in flooded rice soils. (worldcat.org)
  • However, the availability of nitrogen is limited in many soils and although the earth's atmosphere consists of 78.1% nitrogen gas (N2) plants are unable to use this form of nitrogen. (wiley.com)
  • However, little information concerns the plant growth and the soil biological responses to N and P additions among different soils simultaneously, and these responses may contribute to understand plant-soil interaction and predict plant performance under global change. (springer.com)
  • Nitrate and Nitrite ions naturally occur in soils and waters as part of the earth's nitrogen cycle. (cdc.gov)
  • Nitrogen exists naturally in soils, typically bound to organic matter and mineral soil material. (cdc.gov)
  • 1321 words - 5 pages Influences on Soil Nitrogen Mineralization: Implications for Soil Restoration and Revegetation Introduction Nitrogen is a macronutrient essential to the growth of plants and is also one of the most deficient nutrients in most soils. (brightkite.com)
  • Emissions of both sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides deposit in water, on vegetation and on soils as "acid rain", thereby increasing their acidity with adverse effects on flora and fauna. (unece.org)
  • De-composition and nutrient release from leaf litter in Eucalyptus grandis plantations on three different soils in Entre Rios, Argentina. (academicjournals.org)
  • Olsen, C. (1929) On the determination of nitrogen in soils: with special reference to the presence of nitrates and nitrites. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ultra-premium scientific formula provides optimum levels of primary essential plant nutrients, including micronutrients and multi-minerals. (groworganic.com)
  • This research project examined the applicability of the anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) process in lab-scale and full-scale systems, focusing on different aspects of biological nitrogen removal through anammox. (waterrf.org)
  • Abstract:Upon initiating our investigation, the hypothesis was that the legume (peapod) seedlings would progress at a better rate using a nitrogen-based nutrient solution and a plant growth inoculum. (brightkite.com)
  • Liming effects on nitrogen use and efficiency. (worldcat.org)
  • Efficiency of fertilizer nitrogen use as related to aplication methods. (worldcat.org)
  • Using a library of more than 10,000 deep-sea corals collected by Caltech's Jess Adkins , an international team of scientists has shown that periods of colder climates are associated with higher phytoplankton efficiency and a reduction in nutrients in the surface of the Southern Ocean (the ocean surrounding the Antarctic), which is related to an increase in carbon sequestration in the deep ocean. (caltech.edu)
  • In most parts of the modern ocean, phytoplankton deplete all of the available nutrients in the surface ocean, and the biological pump operates at maximum efficiency. (caltech.edu)
  • To track the efficiency of the biological pump over the span of the past 40,000 years, Adkins and his colleagues collected more than 10,000 fossils of the coral Desmophyllum dianthus . (caltech.edu)
  • New regulations aiming to reduce total pollutant loads entering receiving waters are emphasizing more stringent nutrient discharge limits for wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents. (environmental-expert.com)
  • apling nitrogen in irrigation waters. (worldcat.org)
  • a 50 per cent reduction of nitrogen loading to surface waters, no pesticides in drinking water, etc.), and the purpose of monitoring is to supply data and information on the water quality in relation to these regulatory actions. (europa.eu)
  • The worldwide increase in red tides and other blooms of toxic algae in coastal ocean waters has been linked to nutrient enrichment coming from coastal rivers. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Nutrients are present naturally in lakes and streams, but human activity has greatly increased the amounts going into surface waters. (encyclopedia.com)
  • However, in the modern Southern Ocean, there is a limited amount of iron-which means that there are not enough phytoplankton to fully consume the nitrogen and phosphorus in the surface waters. (caltech.edu)
  • It is well known that microbes, plankton, and fish recycle nutrients in ocean waters, but whales and other marine mammals have largely been ignored in this cycle. (redorbit.com)
  • Phytoplankton rely on fixed nitrogen to photosynthesize and grow, in turn feeding the entire ecosystem. (princeton.edu)
  • Without the wind there would be no upwelling, without the upwelling there would be no abundance of nutrients, and without the growth of phytoplankton from the nutrients there would be no fisheries. (reefkeeping.com)
  • There, phytoplankton, the base of the food chain, has a brake on its productivity when nitrogen is used up in the otherwise productive summer months. (redorbit.com)
  • And everything that we do to enhance recovery and restoration of the great whales to something like pre-harvest levels works against other deleterious effects that humans are causing in the oceans," says McCarthy, like the decline of overall ocean productivity as climate change drives up water temperatures, which, in turn, causes a decline in nutrients for phytoplankton. (redorbit.com)
  • Nitrates are produced by natural biological and physical oxidations and therefore are ubiquitous in the environment (Ridder and Oehme 1974). (globalsecurity.org)
  • Ettershank G, Ettershank JA, Bryant M, Whitford WG (1978) Effects of nitrogen fertilization on primary production in a Chihuahuan Desert ecosystem. (springer.com)
  • By utilizing spatiotemporal biological parameterizations, the adjoint variational method was applied to a 3D marine ecosystem dynamical model. (hindawi.com)
  • This session is designed to bring together scientists, aquatic resource managers, policymakers, and other stakeholders to evaluate progress in developing DNA-based methods and indicators for aquatic ecosystem monitoring and biological condition assessment, and to explore possibilities for wider implementation and utilization of these tools in monitoring programs. (nalms.org)
  • The Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic) project is supported by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in the DOE Office of Science. (ornl.gov)
  • The Terrestrial Ecosystem Science program is sponsored by the Climate and Environmental Sciences Division of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research . (ornl.gov)
  • They are responsible for soil formation, ecosystem biogeochemistry, cycling of nutrients and degradation of plant residues and xenobiotics. (scirp.org)
  • The nutrient cycle is considered to be a critical ecosystem function essential to life. (scirp.org)
  • Despite the problems of coastal eutrophication -- like the infamous "dead zones" in the Gulf of Mexico caused by excess nitrogen washing down the Mississippi River -- many places in the ocean of the Northern Hemisphere have a limited nitrogen supply. (redorbit.com)
  • The book contains chapters on organic manures (including green manures), recycling of organic wastes, vermiculture, biofertilizers, organic methods of pest and weed management, integrated nutrient management, farming systems and case studies of organic farming. (abebooks.com)
  • Integrated Nutrient Management towards Sustainable Agriculture 11. (abebooks.com)
  • Hundreds of wastewater treatment facilities throughout the Chesapeake Bay region are being upgraded to reduce the amount of nutrients flowing into local waterways. (chesapeakebay.net)
  • He worked at Chesapeake Biological laboratory of University of Maryland Center for Environmental Sciences for his PostDoc under Professor Edward D. Houde from 2002 to 2006. (pices.int)
  • Several recent studies have been conducted on the creek in order to view how aeration affects sediment nitrogen and oxygen fluxes, but less emphasis was placed on the associated production of problematic compounds. (umd.edu)
  • Volume 1 explores the chemistry and biochemistry of nitrogenases, nif gene regulation, the taxonomy, evolution, and genomics of nitrogen fixing organisms, as well as their physiology and metabolism. (wiley.com)
  • Studies in budding yeast have provided important insights into the physiological role and regulation of the TOR pathway and its connection to cell size and growth control, revealing that TOR regulates cell growth in response to nutrient availability ( 5 , 6 ). (pnas.org)
  • Water quality issues in the Sound have led to the assignment of nitrogen waste load allocations (WLAs) by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to communities surrounding the Sound. (environmental-expert.com)
  • As the rice grows above the water surface, it shades out the fern, which dies, releasing the stored nitrogen. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Nitrogen or water stress: their interrelationships. (worldcat.org)
  • When considering the water quality of lakes and streams, two important questions come to mind: "What are nutrients? (encyclopedia.com)
  • in contrast, the nutrients can be carried away in moving water. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Septic systems may contribute large amounts of nutrients, particularly if located close to the water. (encyclopedia.com)
  • As water resource recovery facilities (WRRFs) continue to face nutrient management challenges, there is a need for guidance on the wide range of nutrient control techniques. (waterrf.org)
  • Using PCR primers designed to specifically target archaeal amoA , we find AOA to be pervasive in areas of the ocean that are critical for the global nitrogen cycle, including the base of the euphotic zone, suboxic water columns, and estuarine and coastal sediments. (pnas.org)
  • Two reasons: first, as it grows, coral accretes a skeleton around itself, precipitating calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) and other trace elements (including nitrogen) out of the water around it. (caltech.edu)
  • Recently, the Water Environment Federation, Environmental Defense Fund and Johnston Foundation at Wingspread began working together to create a roadmap to implement a nutrient management vision, primarily for nitrogen and phosphorus. (waterworld.com)
  • The partnership's 25-year goal is developing a "Nutrient Roadmap" to achieve smarter nutrient removal and recovery at water resource recovery facilities. (waterworld.com)
  • As such, the report indicated that the partnership's "aspirational goal, or 25-year challenge, is informing the development of a Nutrient Roadmap, which will serve a short-term need for achieving smarter nutrient removal and recovery at water resource recovery facilities (WRRFs). (waterworld.com)
  • Addressing key challenges and sharing practical experience for dealing with comparability of biological data across a variety of water body types and taxonomic groups. (nalms.org)
  • The water is treated by removing the methanol via biological digestion in a bioreactor, separating a majority of the contaminants from the water by reverse osmosis and removing the boron that passes through the reverse osmosis system with a boron-removing ion exchange resin. (google.com)
  • Upwelling of deep oceanic water results in a high availability of nitrogen and phosphorus. (reefkeeping.com)
  • Sponge filters can help combat nutrient levels in the water. (mypets.net.au)
  • In their world water report 2017, the United Nations even refer to it as resource providing clean water, energy, nutrients and other useful by-products for the reutilization. (schott.com)
  • Some cover crops fix nitrogen but many more require nitrogen to grow. (gov.on.ca)
  • Grass cover crops like rye and Brassicas like oilseed radish are excellent scavengers of nitrogen left behind by the main crop or from manure applications. (gov.on.ca)
  • Nitrogen ' catch crops ' are used to prevent winter injury to perennial crops such as grapes and fruit trees. (gov.on.ca)
  • Cover crops such as rye seeded in late summer and early fall take up the excess nitrogen preventing the perennial crop from continuing vegetative growth and encouraging hardening off for the winter. (gov.on.ca)
  • The researchers also reported that their observed measurements are lower than those predicted by atmospheric chemistry models, offering the possibility that improved combustion technology and the adoption of renewable energy sources in the region may be able to curb the nitrogen contamination before it influences open ocean biology significantly. (princeton.edu)
  • In addition the lecturer will support the education portfolio of the Soil Biology Group by contributing to thesis projects on the topic of nutrient management. (wur.nl)
  • It is a hands-on guide to understanding the biology and biological conditions that occur at each treatment unit. (google.it)
  • Originally cross-trained in oceanography, quantitative population biology, and ecology at University of California, Sydeman now works on physical-biological interactions on a variety of taxa from seabirds and marine mammals to krill and forage fish. (pices.int)
  • Numerous state Departments of Environmental Quality and Protection have proposed regulations to lower nitrogen pollutant discharge load, especially in environmentally sensitive regions such as the Chesapeake Bay and Long Island Sound watersheds. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Trees and other vegetation absorb pollutants such as excessive nitrogen dioxide, ozone and particulate matter, through their leaves and needles and thereby help to improve air quality. (unece.org)
  • But the real threat of autos was to society en masse - the accumulated exposure to their minute pollutants and ability to kill others at high speeds, not to mention the disruptions of suburbs, and long commutes - all second order effects. (kk.org)