Infrared Rays: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum usually sensed as heat. Infrared wavelengths are longer than those of visible light, extending into the microwave frequencies. They are used therapeutically as heat, and also to warm food in restaurants.Maxillary Sinus: The air space located in the body of the MAXILLARY BONE near each cheek. Each maxillary sinus communicates with the middle passage (meatus) of the NASAL CAVITY on the same side.Cranial Sinuses: Large endothelium-lined venous channels situated between the two layers of DURA MATER, the endosteal and the meningeal layers. They are devoid of valves and are parts of the venous system of dura mater. Major cranial sinuses include a postero-superior group (such as superior sagittal, inferior sagittal, straight, transverse, and occipital) and an antero-inferior group (such as cavernous, petrosal, and basilar plexus).Electronic Nose: A device used to detect airborne odors, gases, flavors, volatile substances or vapors.Paranasal Sinuses: Air-filled spaces located within the bones around the NASAL CAVITY. They are extensions of the nasal cavity and lined by the ciliated NASAL MUCOSA. Each sinus is named for the cranial bone in which it is located, such as the ETHMOID SINUS; the FRONTAL SINUS; the MAXILLARY SINUS; and the SPHENOID SINUS.Cavernous Sinus: An irregularly shaped venous space in the dura mater at either side of the sphenoid bone.Sinus of Valsalva: The dilatation of the aortic wall behind each of the cusps of the aortic valve.Nose Deformities, Acquired: Abnormalities of the nose acquired after birth from injury or disease.Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins: A conserved class of proteins that control APOPTOSIS in both VERTEBRATES and INVERTEBRATES. IAP proteins interact with and inhibit CASPASES, and they function as ANTI-APOPTOTIC PROTEINS. The protein class is defined by an approximately 80-amino acid motif called the baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis repeat.Carotid Sinus: The dilated portion of the common carotid artery at its bifurcation into external and internal carotids. It contains baroreceptors which, when stimulated, cause slowing of the heart, vasodilatation, and a fall in blood pressure.Paranasal Sinus Diseases: Diseases affecting or involving the PARANASAL SINUSES and generally manifesting as inflammation, abscesses, cysts, or tumors.Frontal Sinus: One of the paired, but seldom symmetrical, air spaces located between the inner and outer compact layers of the FRONTAL BONE in the forehead.Sphenoid Sinus: One of the paired air spaces located in the body of the SPHENOID BONE behind the ETHMOID BONE in the middle of the skull. Sphenoid sinus communicates with the posterosuperior part of NASAL CAVITY on the same side.Coronary Sinus: A short vein that collects about two thirds of the venous blood from the MYOCARDIUM and drains into the RIGHT ATRIUM. Coronary sinus, normally located between the LEFT ATRIUM and LEFT VENTRICLE on the posterior surface of the heart, can serve as an anatomical reference for cardiac procedures.Sinus Thrombosis, Intracranial: Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the CRANIAL SINUSES, large endothelium-lined venous channels situated within the SKULL. Intracranial sinuses, also called cranial venous sinuses, include the superior sagittal, cavernous, lateral, petrous sinuses, and many others. Cranial sinus thrombosis can lead to severe HEADACHE; SEIZURE; and other neurological defects.Ethmoid Sinus: The numerous (6-12) small thin-walled spaces or air cells in the ETHMOID BONE located between the eyes. These air cells form an ethmoidal labyrinth.Injections, Intramuscular: Forceful administration into a muscle of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle piercing the muscle and any tissue covering it.Sick Sinus Syndrome: A condition caused by dysfunctions related to the SINOATRIAL NODE including impulse generation (CARDIAC SINUS ARREST) and impulse conduction (SINOATRIAL EXIT BLOCK). It is characterized by persistent BRADYCARDIA, chronic ATRIAL FIBRILLATION, and failure to resume sinus rhythm following CARDIOVERSION. This syndrome can be congenital or acquired, particularly after surgical correction for heart defects.Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PARANASAL SINUSES.Tachycardia, Sinus: Simple rapid heartbeats caused by rapid discharge of impulses from the SINOATRIAL NODE, usually between 100 and 180 beats/min in adults. It is characterized by a gradual onset and termination. Sinus tachycardia is common in infants, young children, and adults during strenuous physical activities.Maxillary Sinus Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MAXILLARY SINUS. They represent the majority of paranasal neoplasms.Xanthine Dehydrogenase: An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of XANTHINE in the presence of NAD+ to form URIC ACID and NADH. It acts also on a variety of other purines and aldehydes.Transverse Sinuses: The two large endothelium-lined venous channels that begin at the internal occipital protuberance at the back and lower part of the CRANIUM and travels laterally and forward ending in the internal jugular vein (JUGULAR VEINS). One of the transverse sinuses, usually the right one, is the continuation of the SUPERIOR SAGITTAL SINUS. The other transverse sinus is the continuation of the straight sinus.Nasal Cavity: The proximal portion of the respiratory passages on either side of the NASAL SEPTUM. Nasal cavities, extending from the nares to the NASOPHARYNX, are lined with ciliated NASAL MUCOSA.Rhinoplasty: A plastic surgical operation on the nose, either reconstructive, restorative, or cosmetic. (Dorland, 28th ed)Superior Sagittal Sinus: The long large endothelium-lined venous channel on the top outer surface of the brain. It receives blood from a vein in the nasal cavity, runs backwards, and gradually increases in size as blood drains from veins of the brain and the DURA MATER. Near the lower back of the CRANIUM, the superior sagittal sinus deviates to one side (usually the right) and continues on as one of the TRANSVERSE SINUSES.Sinoatrial Node: The small mass of modified cardiac muscle fibers located at the junction of the superior vena cava (VENA CAVA, SUPERIOR) and right atrium. Contraction impulses probably start in this node, spread over the atrium (HEART ATRIUM) and are then transmitted by the atrioventricular bundle (BUNDLE OF HIS) to the ventricle (HEART VENTRICLE).Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases: Pathological processes of the ear, the nose, and the throat, also known as the ENT diseases.Nasal Mucosa: The mucous lining of the NASAL CAVITY, including lining of the nostril (vestibule) and the OLFACTORY MUCOSA. Nasal mucosa consists of ciliated cells, GOBLET CELLS, brush cells, small granule cells, basal cells (STEM CELLS) and glands containing both mucous and serous cells.Sinus Arrest, Cardiac: The omission of atrial activation that is caused by transient cessation of impulse generation at the SINOATRIAL NODE. It is characterized by a prolonged pause without P wave in an ELECTROCARDIOGRAM. Sinus arrest has been associated with sleep apnea (REM SLEEP-RELATED SINUS ARREST).Nasal Septum: The partition separating the two NASAL CAVITIES in the midplane. It is formed by the SEPTAL NASAL CARTILAGE, parts of skull bones (ETHMOID BONE; VOMER), and membranous parts.Electronics: The study, control, and application of the conduction of ELECTRICITY through gases or vacuum, or through semiconducting or conducting materials. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Cerebral Veins: Veins draining the cerebrum.Rhinitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA, the mucous membrane lining the NASAL CAVITIES.Nasal Obstruction: Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the nose. The obstruction may be unilateral or bilateral, and may involve any part of the NASAL CAVITY.Atrial Fibrillation: Abnormal cardiac rhythm that is characterized by rapid, uncoordinated firing of electrical impulses in the upper chambers of the heart (HEART ATRIA). In such case, blood cannot be effectively pumped into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES). It is caused by abnormal impulse generation.Otolaryngology: A surgical specialty concerned with the study and treatment of disorders of the ear, nose, and throat.Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Turbinates: The scroll-like bony plates with curved margins on the lateral wall of the NASAL CAVITY. Turbinates, also called nasal concha, increase the surface area of nasal cavity thus providing a mechanism for rapid warming and humidification of air as it passes to the lung.Petrosal Sinus Sampling: Sampling of blood levels of the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) by withdrawal of blood from the inferior petrosal sinus. The inferior petrosal sinus arises from the cavernous sinus and runs to the internal jugular vein. Sampling of blood at this level is a valuable tool in the differential diagnosis of Cushing disease, Cushing syndrome, and other adrenocortical diseases.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Lateral Sinus Thrombosis: Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the LATERAL SINUSES. This condition is often associated with ear infections (OTITIS MEDIA or MASTOIDITIS) without antibiotic treatment. In developed nations, lateral sinus thrombosis can result from CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; BRAIN NEOPLASMS; NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES; THROMBOPHILIA; and other conditions. Clinical features include HEADACHE; VERTIGO; and increased intracranial pressure.Cardiac Pacing, Artificial: Regulation of the rate of contraction of the heart muscles by an artificial pacemaker.Maxillary Sinusitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in the MAXILLARY SINUS. In many cases, it is caused by an infection of the bacteria HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE; STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE; or STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS.Histiocytosis, Sinus: Benign, non-Langerhans-cell, histiocytic proliferative disorder that primarily affects the lymph nodes. It is often referred to as sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Epistaxis: Bleeding from the nose.Heart Atria: The chambers of the heart, to which the BLOOD returns from the circulation.Bradycardia: Cardiac arrhythmias that are characterized by excessively slow HEART RATE, usually below 50 beats per minute in human adults. They can be classified broadly into SINOATRIAL NODE dysfunction and ATRIOVENTRICULAR BLOCK.Dura Mater: The outermost of the three MENINGES, a fibrous membrane of connective tissue that covers the brain and the spinal cord.Carotid-Cavernous Sinus Fistula: An acquired or spontaneous abnormality in which there is communication between CAVERNOUS SINUS, a venous structure, and the CAROTID ARTERIES. It is often associated with HEAD TRAUMA, specifically basilar skull fractures (SKULL FRACTURE, BASILAR). Clinical signs often include VISION DISORDERS and INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION.Central Pattern Generators: Networks of nerve cells that control the firing patterns of MOTOR NEURONS to produce rhythmic movements such as MASTICATION; WALKING; SWIMMING; RESPIRATION; and PERISTALSIS.Electroporation: A technique in which electric pulses of intensity in kilovolts per centimeter and of microsecond-to-millisecond duration cause a temporary loss of the semipermeability of CELL MEMBRANES, thus leading to ion leakage, escape of metabolites, and increased uptake by cells of drugs, molecular probes, and DNA.Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the ear and its parts, the nose and nasal cavity, or the throat, including surgery of the adenoids, tonsils, pharynx, and trachea.Lymphoma: A general term for various neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissue.Pacemaker, Artificial: A device designed to stimulate, by electric impulses, contraction of the heart muscles. It may be temporary (external) or permanent (internal or internal-external).Pressoreceptors: Receptors in the vascular system, particularly the aorta and carotid sinus, which are sensitive to stretch of the vessel walls.Face: The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.Catheter Ablation: Removal of tissue with electrical current delivered via electrodes positioned at the distal end of a catheter. Energy sources are commonly direct current (DC-shock) or alternating current at radiofrequencies (usually 750 kHz). The technique is used most often to ablate the AV junction and/or accessory pathways in order to interrupt AV conduction and produce AV block in the treatment of various tachyarrhythmias.Heart Conduction System: An impulse-conducting system composed of modified cardiac muscle, having the power of spontaneous rhythmicity and conduction more highly developed than the rest of the heart.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Sinus Pericranii: Rare vascular anomaly involving a communication between the intracranial and extracranial venous circulation via diploe, the central spongy layer of cranial bone. It is often characterized by dilated venous structures on the scalp due to abnormal drainage from the intracranial venous sinuses. Sinus pericranii can be congenital or traumatic in origin.Atrioventricular Node: A small nodular mass of specialized muscle fibers located in the interatrial septum near the opening of the coronary sinus. It gives rise to the atrioventricular bundle of the conduction system of the heart.Syncope: A transient loss of consciousness and postural tone caused by diminished blood flow to the brain (i.e., BRAIN ISCHEMIA). Presyncope refers to the sensation of lightheadedness and loss of strength that precedes a syncopal event or accompanies an incomplete syncope. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp367-9)Foreign Bodies: Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the body.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Central Nervous System Vascular Malformations: Congenital, inherited, or acquired abnormalities involving ARTERIES; VEINS; or venous sinuses in the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and MENINGES.Electric Countershock: An electrical current applied to the HEART to terminate a disturbance of its rhythm, ARRHYTHMIAS, CARDIAC. (Stedman, 25th ed)Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Pharynx: A funnel-shaped fibromuscular tube that conducts food to the ESOPHAGUS, and air to the LARYNX and LUNGS. It is located posterior to the NASAL CAVITY; ORAL CAVITY; and LARYNX, and extends from the SKULL BASE to the inferior border of the CRICOID CARTILAGE anteriorly and to the inferior border of the C6 vertebra posteriorly. It is divided into the NASOPHARYNX; OROPHARYNX; and HYPOPHARYNX (laryngopharynx).Coronary Vessel Anomalies: Malformations of CORONARY VESSELS, either arteries or veins. Included are anomalous origins of coronary arteries; ARTERIOVENOUS FISTULA; CORONARY ANEURYSM; MYOCARDIAL BRIDGING; and others.Heart Block: Impaired conduction of cardiac impulse that can occur anywhere along the conduction pathway, such as between the SINOATRIAL NODE and the right atrium (SA block) or between atria and ventricles (AV block). Heart blocks can be classified by the duration, frequency, or completeness of conduction block. Reversibility depends on the degree of structural or functional defects.Mouth Breathing: Abnormal breathing through the mouth, usually associated with obstructive disorders of the nasal passages.Skull Base: The inferior region of the skull consisting of an internal (cerebral), and an external (basilar) surface.Rhinometry, Acoustic: Diagnostic measurement of the nose and its cavity through acoustic reflections. Used to measure nasal anatomical landmarks, nasal septal deviation, and nasal airway changes in response to allergen provocation tests (NASAL PROVOCATION TESTS).Sinoatrial Block: Disturbance in the atrial activation that is caused by transient failure of impulse conduction from the SINOATRIAL NODE to the HEART ATRIA. It is characterized by a delayed in heartbeat and pauses between P waves in an ELECTROCARDIOGRAM.Orbital Diseases: Diseases of the bony orbit and contents except the eyeball.Orbit: Bony cavity that holds the eyeball and its associated tissues and appendages.Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea: Discharge of cerebrospinal fluid through the nose. Common etiologies include trauma, neoplasms, and prior surgery, although the condition may occur spontaneously. (Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 1997 Apr;116(4):442-9)Olfactory Mucosa: That portion of the nasal mucosa containing the sensory nerve endings for SMELL, located at the dome of each NASAL CAVITY. The yellow-brownish olfactory epithelium consists of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS; brush cells; STEM CELLS; and the associated olfactory glands.Anti-Arrhythmia Agents: Agents used for the treatment or prevention of cardiac arrhythmias. They may affect the polarization-repolarization phase of the action potential, its excitability or refractoriness, or impulse conduction or membrane responsiveness within cardiac fibers. Anti-arrhythmia agents are often classed into four main groups according to their mechanism of action: sodium channel blockade, beta-adrenergic blockade, repolarization prolongation, or calcium channel blockade.Ethmoid Bone: A light and spongy (pneumatized) bone that lies between the orbital part of FRONTAL BONE and the anterior of SPHENOID BONE. Ethmoid bone separates the ORBIT from the ETHMOID SINUS. It consists of a horizontal plate, a perpendicular plate, and two lateral labyrinths.Smell: The ability to detect scents or odors, such as the function of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS.Frontal Sinusitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in the FRONTAL SINUS. In many cases, it is caused by an infection of the bacteria STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE or HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE.Atrial Flutter: Rapid, irregular atrial contractions caused by a block of electrical impulse conduction in the right atrium and a reentrant wave front traveling up the inter-atrial septum and down the right atrial free wall or vice versa. Unlike ATRIAL FIBRILLATION which is caused by abnormal impulse generation, typical atrial flutter is caused by abnormal impulse conduction. As in atrial fibrillation, patients with atrial flutter cannot effectively pump blood into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES).Nasal Cartilages: Hyaline cartilages in the nose. There are five major nasal cartilages including two lateral, two alar, and one septal.Arachnoid: A delicate membrane enveloping the brain and spinal cord. It lies between the PIA MATER and the DURA MATER. It is separated from the pia mater by the subarachnoid cavity which is filled with CEREBROSPINAL FLUID.Ethmoid Sinusitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in the ETHMOID SINUS. It may present itself as an acute (infectious) or chronic (allergic) condition.Nasal Surgical Procedures: Surgical operations on the nose and nasal cavity.Respiration: The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).Volatile Organic Compounds: Organic compounds that have a relatively high VAPOR PRESSURE at room temperature.Nasal Sprays: Pharmacologic agents delivered into the nostrils in the form of a mist or spray.Skull: The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.Ear Diseases: Pathological processes of the ear, the hearing, and the equilibrium system of the body.Reflex: An involuntary movement or exercise of function in a part, excited in response to a stimulus applied to the periphery and transmitted to the brain or spinal cord.Endodermal Sinus Tumor: An unusual and aggressive tumor of germ-cell origin that reproduces the extraembryonic structures of the early embryo. It is the most common malignant germ cell tumor found in children. It is characterized by a labyrinthine glandular pattern of flat epithelial cells and rounded papillary processes with a central capillary (Schiller-Duval body). The tumor is rarely bilateral. Before the use of combination chemotherapy, the tumor was almost invariably fatal. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1189)Sphenoid Bone: An irregular unpaired bone situated at the SKULL BASE and wedged between the frontal, temporal, and occipital bones (FRONTAL BONE; TEMPORAL BONE; OCCIPITAL BONE). Sphenoid bone consists of a median body and three pairs of processes resembling a bat with spread wings. The body is hollowed out in its inferior to form two large cavities (SPHENOID SINUS).Abnormalities, MultipleAdministration, Intranasal: Delivery of medications through the nasal mucosa.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Cerebral Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.Conductometry: Determination of the quantity of a material present in a mixture by measurement of its effect on the electrical conductivity of the mixture. (Webster, 3d ed)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Skull Fractures: Fractures of the skull which may result from penetrating or nonpenetrating head injuries or rarely BONE DISEASES (see also FRACTURES, SPONTANEOUS). Skull fractures may be classified by location (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, BASILAR), radiographic appearance (e.g., linear), or based upon cranial integrity (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, DEPRESSED).Exophthalmos: Abnormal protrusion of both eyes; may be caused by endocrine gland malfunction, malignancy, injury, or paralysis of the extrinsic muscles of the eye.Gases: The vapor state of matter; nonelastic fluids in which the molecules are in free movement and their mean positions far apart. Gases tend to expand indefinitely, to diffuse and mix readily with other gases, to have definite relations of volume, temperature, and pressure, and to condense or liquefy at low temperatures or under sufficient pressure. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Vagus Nerve: The 10th cranial nerve. The vagus is a mixed nerve which contains somatic afferents (from skin in back of the ear and the external auditory meatus), visceral afferents (from the pharynx, larynx, thorax, and abdomen), parasympathetic efferents (to the thorax and abdomen), and efferents to striated muscle (of the larynx and pharynx).Volatilization: A phase transition from liquid state to gas state, which is affected by Raoult's law. It can be accomplished by fractional distillation.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Nasal Provocation Tests: Application of allergens to the nasal mucosa. Interpretation includes observation of nasal symptoms, rhinoscopy, and rhinomanometry. Nasal provocation tests are used in the diagnosis of nasal hypersensitivity, including RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL.Tachycardia: Abnormally rapid heartbeat, usually with a HEART RATE above 100 beats per minute for adults. Tachycardia accompanied by disturbance in the cardiac depolarization (cardiac arrhythmia) is called tachyarrhythmia.Arrhythmias, Cardiac: Any disturbances of the normal rhythmic beating of the heart or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. Cardiac arrhythmias can be classified by the abnormalities in HEART RATE, disorders of electrical impulse generation, or impulse conduction.Arteriovenous Fistula: An abnormal direct communication between an artery and a vein without passing through the CAPILLARIES. An A-V fistula usually leads to the formation of a dilated sac-like connection, arteriovenous aneurysm. The locations and size of the shunts determine the degree of effects on the cardiovascular functions such as BLOOD PRESSURE and HEART RATE.Polychondritis, Relapsing: An acquired disease of unknown etiology, chronic course, and tendency to recur. It is characterized by inflammation and degeneration of cartilage and can result in deformities such as floppy ear and saddle nose. Loss of cartilage in the respiratory tract can lead to respiratory obstruction.Elapidae: A family of extremely venomous snakes, comprising coral snakes, cobras, mambas, kraits, and sea snakes. They are widely distributed, being found in the southern United States, South America, Africa, southern Asia, Australia, and the Pacific Islands. The elapids include three subfamilies: Elapinae, Hydrophiinae, and Lauticaudinae. Like the viperids, they have venom fangs in the front part of the upper jaw. The mambas of Africa are the most dangerous of all snakes by virtue of their size, speed, and highly toxic venom. (Goin, Goin, and Zug, Introduction to Herpetology, 3d ed, p329-33)Atrial Function: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the HEART ATRIA.Vena Cava, Superior: The venous trunk which returns blood from the head, neck, upper extremities and chest.Pneumocephalus: Presence of air or gas within the intracranial cavity (e.g., epidural space, subdural space, intracerebral, etc.) which may result from traumatic injuries, fistulous tract formation, erosions of the skull from NEOPLASMS or infection, NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES, and other conditions.Ear: The hearing and equilibrium system of the body. It consists of three parts: the EXTERNAL EAR, the MIDDLE EAR, and the INNER EAR. Sound waves are transmitted through this organ where vibration is transduced to nerve signals that pass through the ACOUSTIC NERVE to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. The inner ear also contains the vestibular organ that maintains equilibrium by transducing signals to the VESTIBULAR NERVE.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Pulmonary Veins: The veins that return the oxygenated blood from the lungs to the left atrium of the heart.Nasal Lavage Fluid: Fluid obtained by THERAPEUTIC IRRIGATION or washout of the nasal cavity and NASAL MUCOSA. The resulting fluid is used in cytologic and immunologic assays of the nasal mucosa such as with the NASAL PROVOCATION TEST in the diagnosis of nasal hypersensitivity.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Tachycardia, Supraventricular: A generic expression for any tachycardia that originates above the BUNDLE OF HIS.Cranial Fossa, Middle: The compartment containing the anterior extremities and half the inferior surface of the temporal lobes (TEMPORAL LOBE) of the cerebral hemispheres. Lying posterior and inferior to the anterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, ANTERIOR), it is formed by part of the TEMPORAL BONE and SPHENOID BONE. It is separated from the posterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR) by crests formed by the superior borders of the petrous parts of the temporal bones.Facial Bones: The facial skeleton, consisting of bones situated between the cranial base and the mandibular region. While some consider the facial bones to comprise the hyoid (HYOID BONE), palatine (HARD PALATE), and zygomatic (ZYGOMA) bones, MANDIBLE, and MAXILLA, others include also the lacrimal and nasal bones, inferior nasal concha, and vomer but exclude the hyoid bone. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p113)Amorphophallus: A plant genus of the family ARACEAE. Members contain konjac glucomannan (MANNANS) and SEROTONIN.Tachycardia, Paroxysmal: Abnormally rapid heartbeats with sudden onset and cessation.Aortic Aneurysm: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of AORTA.Maxilla: One of a pair of irregularly shaped bones that form the upper jaw. A maxillary bone provides tooth sockets for the superior teeth, forms part of the ORBIT, and contains the MAXILLARY SINUS.Exhalation: The act of BREATHING out.Nuclear Receptor Coactivator 2: A transcription factor that partners with ligand bound GLUCOCORTICOID RECEPTORS and ESTROGEN RECEPTORS to stimulate GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION. It plays an important role in FERTILITY as well as in METABOLISM of LIPIDS.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Bundle of His: Small band of specialized CARDIAC MUSCLE fibers that originates in the ATRIOVENTRICULAR NODE and extends into the membranous part of the interventricular septum. The bundle of His, consisting of the left and the right bundle branches, conducts the electrical impulses to the HEART VENTRICLES in generation of MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION.Tanacetum: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. Some species of the CHRYSANTHEMUM and the old Pyrethrum genera have been reclassified to this genus. The common name of tansy usually refers to this but also forms part of the common name of other plants such as Tansy Ragwort (SENECIO) and Tansyaster (HAPLOPAPPUS).Rhinophyma: A manifestation of severe ROSACEA resulting in significant enlargement of the NOSE and occurring primarily in men. It is caused by hypertrophy of the SEBACEOUS GLANDS and surrounding CONNECTIVE TISSUE. The nose is reddened and marked with TELANGIECTASIS.Sphenoid Sinusitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in the SPHENOID SINUS. Isolated sphenoid sinusitis is uncommon. It usually occurs in conjunction with other paranasal sinusitis.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Sella Turcica: A bony prominence situated on the upper surface of the body of the sphenoid bone. It houses the PITUITARY GLAND.Alveolar Ridge Augmentation: Preprosthetic surgery involving rib, cartilage, or iliac crest bone grafts, usually autologous, or synthetic implants for rebuilding the alveolar ridge.Body Surface Potential Mapping: Recording of regional electrophysiological information by analysis of surface potentials to give a complete picture of the effects of the currents from the heart on the body surface. It has been applied to the diagnosis of old inferior myocardial infarction, localization of the bypass pathway in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, recognition of ventricular hypertrophy, estimation of the size of a myocardial infarct, and the effects of different interventions designed to reduce infarct size. The limiting factor at present is the complexity of the recording and analysis, which requires 100 or more electrodes, sophisticated instrumentation, and dedicated personnel. (Braunwald, Heart Disease, 4th ed)Carotid Body: A small cluster of chemoreceptive and supporting cells located near the bifurcation of the internal carotid artery. The carotid body, which is richly supplied with fenestrated capillaries, senses the pH, carbon dioxide, and oxygen concentrations in the blood and plays a crucial role in their homeostatic control.Surgical Flaps: Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Forehead: The part of the face above the eyes.Models, Anatomic: Three-dimensional representation to show anatomic structures. Models may be used in place of intact animals or organisms for teaching, practice, and study.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Chemoreceptor Cells: Cells specialized to detect chemical substances and relay that information centrally in the nervous system. Chemoreceptor cells may monitor external stimuli, as in TASTE and OLFACTION, or internal stimuli, such as the concentrations of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE in the blood.Fistula: Abnormal communication most commonly seen between two internal organs, or between an internal organ and the surface of the body.Cutaneous Fistula: An abnormal passage or communication leading from an internal organ to the surface of the body.Air: The mixture of gases present in the earth's atmosphere consisting of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and small amounts of other gases.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Echocardiography, Transesophageal: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues using a transducer placed in the esophagus.Massage: The systematic and methodical manipulations of body tissues best performed with the hands for the purpose of affecting the nervous and muscular systems and the general circulation.Electrochemotherapy: A treatment modality that uses pulsed electrical currents to permeabilize cell membranes (ELECTROPORATION) and thereby enhance the uptake of chemotherapeutic agents, vaccines, or genes into the body's cells.Dental Implantation, Endosseous: Insertion of an implant into the bone of the mandible or maxilla. The implant has an exposed head which protrudes through the mucosa and is a prosthodontic abutment.Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial: Inflammation of the mucous membrane of the nose similar to that found in hay fever except that symptoms persist throughout the year. The causes are usually air-borne allergens, particularly dusts, feathers, molds, animal fur, etc.Facial Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the soft tissue or bony portions of the face.Electrocardiography, Ambulatory: Method in which prolonged electrocardiographic recordings are made on a portable tape recorder (Holter-type system) or solid-state device ("real-time" system), while the patient undergoes normal daily activities. It is useful in the diagnosis and management of intermittent cardiac arrhythmias and transient myocardial ischemia.Atrial Appendage: Ear-shaped appendage of either atrium of the heart. (Dorland, 28th ed)Atrial Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the LEFT ATRIUM.Occipital Bone: Part of the back and base of the CRANIUM that encloses the FORAMEN MAGNUM.Atrioventricular Block: Impaired impulse conduction from HEART ATRIA to HEART VENTRICLES. AV block can mean delayed or completely blocked impulse conduction.Ear Cartilage: Cartilage of the EAR AURICLE and the EXTERNAL EAR CANAL.Cranial Nerves: Twelve pairs of nerves that carry general afferent, visceral afferent, special afferent, somatic efferent, and autonomic efferent fibers.Dissection: The separation and isolation of tissues for surgical purposes, or for the analysis or study of their structures.Maxillary Artery: A branch of the external carotid artery which distributes to the deep structures of the face (internal maxillary) and to the side of the face and nose (external maxillary).Sinusitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in one or more of the PARANASAL SINUSES.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Inhalation Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents by inhaling them.Pharyngeal Diseases: Pathological processes involving the PHARYNX.Humidity: A measure of the amount of WATER VAPOR in the air.Atrial Function, Right: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the RIGHT ATRIUM.Embolization, Therapeutic: A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.Mouth: The oval-shaped oral cavity located at the apex of the digestive tract and consisting of two parts: the vestibule and the oral cavity proper.Rhinomanometry: Technique for measuring air pressure and the rate of airflow in the nasal cavity during respiration.Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Olfactory Pathways: Set of nerve fibers conducting impulses from olfactory receptors to the cerebral cortex. It includes the OLFACTORY NERVE; OLFACTORY BULB; OLFACTORY TRACT; OLFACTORY TUBERCLE; ANTERIOR PERFORATED SUBSTANCE; and OLFACTORY CORTEX.Dental Implantation: The grafting or inserting of a prosthetic device of alloplastic material into the oral tissue beneath the mucosal or periosteal layer or within the bone. Its purpose is to provide support and retention to a partial or complete denture.Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.Craniotomy: Any operation on the cranium or incision into the cranium. (Dorland, 28th ed)Biosensing Techniques: Any of a variety of procedures which use biomolecular probes to measure the presence or concentration of biological molecules, biological structures, microorganisms, etc., by translating a biochemical interaction at the probe surface into a quantifiable physical signal.Inhalation: The act of BREATHING in.Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Aerosols: Colloids with a gaseous dispersing phase and either liquid (fog) or solid (smoke) dispersed phase; used in fumigation or in inhalation therapy; may contain propellant agents.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Tachycardia, Ectopic Atrial: Abnormally rapid heartbeats originating from one or more automatic foci (nonsinus pacemakers) in the HEART ATRIUM but away from the SINOATRIAL NODE. Unlike the reentry mechanism, automatic tachycardia speeds up and slows down gradually. The episode is characterized by a HEART RATE between 135 to less than 200 beats per minute and lasting 30 seconds or longer.Cephalometry: The measurement of the dimensions of the HEAD.Respiratory Tract DiseasesNeurosurgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.Skull Base Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the base of the skull specifically, differentiated from neoplasms of unspecified sites or bones of the skull (SKULL NEOPLASMS).Ear, External: The outer part of the hearing system of the body. It includes the shell-like EAR AURICLE which collects sound, and the EXTERNAL EAR CANAL, the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE, and the EXTERNAL EAR CARTILAGES.Intracranial Hypertension: Increased pressure within the cranial vault. This may result from several conditions, including HYDROCEPHALUS; BRAIN EDEMA; intracranial masses; severe systemic HYPERTENSION; PSEUDOTUMOR CEREBRI; and other disorders.Tachycardia, Ventricular: An abnormally rapid ventricular rhythm usually in excess of 150 beats per minute. It is generated within the ventricle below the BUNDLE OF HIS, either as autonomic impulse formation or reentrant impulse conduction. Depending on the etiology, onset of ventricular tachycardia can be paroxysmal (sudden) or nonparoxysmal, its wide QRS complexes can be uniform or polymorphic, and the ventricular beating may be independent of the atrial beating (AV dissociation).Receptors, Odorant: Proteins, usually projecting from the cilia of olfactory receptor neurons, that specifically bind odorant molecules and trigger responses in the neurons. The large number of different odorant receptors appears to arise from several gene families or subfamilies rather than from DNA rearrangement.Enophthalmos: Recession of the eyeball into the orbit.Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Environment, Controlled: A state in which the environs of hospitals, laboratories, domestic and animal housing, work places, spacecraft, and other surroundings are under technological control with regard to air conditioning, heating, lighting, humidity, ventilation, and other ambient features. The concept includes control of atmospheric composition. (From Jane's Aerospace Dictionary, 3d ed)Meningeal Arteries: Arteries which supply the dura mater.Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.
... tending to meet across nose; large eye sockets, but deep-set eyes; beaked or flat nose; strong jaw line; small and sloping ... large sinus cavities or bumpy face; tattoos on body; receding hairline; bumps on head, particularly above left ear; large ...
This includes the nose, sinuses, pharynx, and larynx. Typical infections of the upper respiratory tract include tonsillitis, ... Symptoms of URIs can include cough, sore throat, runny nose, nasal congestion, headache, low grade fever, facial pressure and ...
... infection of the sinuses around the nose (sinusitis); or from spread of an infection elsewhere through the blood. Periorbital ...
Stenner, Marcus; Rudak, Claudia (2014). "Diseases of the nose and paranasal sinuses in child". GMS Curr Top Otorhinolaryngol ...
Attempts to crawl in sinus cavities (nose, mouth, ears). Seen inhabiting multiple people whom they bestow invisibility on. ...
... ; S Raghunandhan (September 2009). "Saprophytic Mycotic Infections of the Nose and Paranasal Sinuses". ...
The presence of eosinophils in the mucous lining of the nose and paranasal sinuses has been demonstrated for many patients, and ... maxillary and sphenoidal sinuses. The ethmoidal sinuses are further subdivided into anterior and posterior ethmoid sinuses, the ... Sinusitis, also known as a sinus infection or rhinosinusitis, is inflammation of the sinuses resulting in symptoms. Common ... Edema and mucosal thickening appears in both maxillary sinuses. A computed tomograph showing infection of the ethmoid sinus ...
Symptoms of mold exposure may include nasal and sinus congestion; runny nose, eye irritation; itchy, red, watery eyes, ...
Comparative anatomy and physiology of the nose and paranasal sinuses. F. and S. Livingstone, Edinburgh Moore, W. J. 1981. The ... Particularly, the Brasilitherium nose had transitional features that help elucidate the emergence of protruding mammalian noses ... Accordingly, the dry noses of humans place them under the Haplorhini clade as well. More than 900 human OR genes and ... The nasal concha, or turbinates, is composed of little bones and soft tissue that provide structure to the nose and aid in the ...
2003). Endoscopic management of inverted papillomas of the nose and paranasal sinuses. Ear Nose Throat J. 82:317-20. Kumar A, ... Sooknundun M, Deka RC, Kacker SK & Kapila K. (1986) Congenital mid-line sinus of the dorsum of the nose. Two case reports with ... 2001). Tuberculosis of the maxillary sinus manifesting as a facial abscess. Ear Nose Throat J. 81:102-4. Thakar A, Anjaneyulu C ... Entomophthoromycosis of the nose and paranasal sinus. Indian J Pediatr. 67:307-10. Ahluwalia KB, Maheshwari N & Deka RC. (1997 ...
... sinus and nose pain develops. With more severe inhalation exposure, the airway becomes inflamed, pneumonia develops, and the ... Mild inhalation exposure causes rhinorrhea (runny nose), sneezing, barking cough (a harsh cough that sounds somewhat like a dog ...
Operations on the nose and paranasal sinuses 5-23...5-28: Operations on mouth and face 5-29...5-31: Operations on pharynx, ...
PMC 3179194 . Soler, Zachary M.; Schlosser, Rodney J. (1 January 2012). "The role of fungi in diseases of the nose and sinuses ... Though it is widely held that fungal infections of the nose and paranasal sinuses are not common, most agree that their ... growth of fungus seen on mucous crusts within sinus cavity. Sinus fungal ball - sequestration of fungal hyphae as densely ... The maxillary sinus is the most commonly involved. Fungi responsible for fungal sinusitis are Aspergillus fumigatus (90%), ...
Diseases of the nose, accessory sinuses, and nasopharynx RF460-547 Laryngology. Diseases of the throat RG104-104.7 Operative ...
... s (NP) are noncancerous growths within the nose or sinuses. Symptoms include trouble breathing through the nose, ... Murr, Andrew (2016). "Approach to the Patient with Nose, Sinus, and Ear Disorders". pp. 2585-2592. ISBN 978-1455750177. Missing ... Endoscopic sinus surgery is minimally-invasive and is done entirely through the nostril with the help of a camera. Surgery ... Diagnosis may occur by looking up the nose. A CT scan may be used to determine the number of polyps and help plan surgery. ...
Nach klinischen Vorträgen für Studierende und Ärzte (12th edition, 1930; with Otto Körner) - Textbook of ear, nose and throat ... meninges and sinuses. Lehrbuch der Ohren-, Nasen- und Kehlkopf-Krankheiten. ...
Culturing of the sinuses may be needed to direct antibiotic therapy. This can be done by an Ear Nose and Throat (ENT) ... Recurrent sinus and lung infections can lead to the development of chronic lung disease. Such infections should be treated with ... Some people have frequent infections of the upper (colds, sinus and ear infections) and lower (bronchitis and pneumonia) ... Problems with infections, especially of the ears, sinuses and lungs Increased incidence of cancer (primarily, but not ...
... is a viral infectious disease of the upper respiratory tract that primarily affects the nose. The throat, sinuses, and larynx ... Some zinc remedies directly applied to the inside of the nose have led to the loss of the sense of smell. Vitamin C's effect on ... Additionally, the influenza is less likely to result in a runny nose. There is no vaccine for the common cold. The primary ... The typical symptoms of a cold include a cough, a runny nose, nasal congestion and a sore throat, sometimes accompanied by ...
Kim JE, Kountakis SE (July 2007). "The prevalence of Samter's triad in patients undergoing functional endoscopic sinus surgery ... ". Ear, nose, & throat journal. 86 (7): 396-9. PMID 17702319. Salicylate Sensitivity Forums and Food/Product Guides Aspirin ...
... represents the most common benign neoplasm of the nose and paranasal sinuses. The cause of osteomata is uncertain, but ... "Management of a Large Frontoethmoid Osteoma with Sinus Cranialization and Cranial Bone Graft Reconstruction". International ... " "Chondro-osteoma" Osteoma of the frontal sinus seen on x-ray Osteoma of the frontal sinus on CT Osteoma Osteosclerosis ...
Later symptoms include pain in the nose/sinuses and inflammation of the airway. In severe cases, there may be epithelial ... Early symptoms include rhinorrhea (runny nose), epistaxis (nosebleed), toneless voice, sneezing, barking cough, and dyspnea (in ...
Infections mostly affect the respiratory tract (nose, sinuses, bronchi, lungs) and the ears; they can also occur at other sites ...
"AAAAI - rhinitis, sinusitis, hay fever, stuffy nose, watery eyes, sinus infection". Archived from the original on 16 November ... In these cases, symptoms arise in areas in contact with air, such as eyes, nose, and lungs. For instance, allergic rhinitis, ... Symptoms may include red eyes, an itchy rash, sneezing, a runny nose, shortness of breath, or swelling. Food intolerances and ... also known as hay fever, causes irritation of the nose, sneezing, itching, and redness of the eyes. Inhaled allergens can also ...
... s can have some sinus problems, snuffly noses and gingivitis. The amount of food should be controlled, so they do not ... It is a cat of Burmese type with a black coat, toes, nose, and copper or green eyes. The close-lying, sleek and glossy black ...
... s occur more easily at the thin squamous temporal and parietal bones, the sphenoid sinus, the foramen magnum (the ... leaking from the nose (rhinorrhea) or ears (otorrhea); periorbital ecchymosis often called 'raccoon eyes' (bruising of the ... The resulting complications may include suture diastasis, venous sinus thrombosis, and epidural hematoma. In young children, ... Basilar fractures have characteristic signs: blood in the sinuses; a clear fluid called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) ...
The vast majority of nose bleeds occur in the anterior (front) part of the nose from the nasal septum. This area is richly ... Surgery (e.g. septoplasty and functional endoscopic sinus surgery). Systemic factors[edit]. Most common factors[edit]. * ... The word epistaxis (/ˌɛpɪˈstæksɪs/) is from Greek: ἐπιστάζω epistazo, "to bleed from the nose" from ἐπί epi, "above, over" and ... A nosebleed, also known as epistaxis, is the common occurrence of bleeding from the nose. It is usually noticed when the blood ...
... nose and throat) (oto = ear, rhino = nose, larynx = throat). Otolaryngologists are medical or osteopathic doctors who have ... Physician, Health care help, Otolaryngology specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of ear, nose, throat, and also head AND ... Rhinology (sinus diseases and anterior skull base) *Environmental Allergies *Sinusitis - acute, chronic *Rhinitis *Empty Nose ... The commonly used term for this specialty is ENT (ear, nose and throat) (oto = ear, rhino = nose, larynx = throat). ...
Combining nose reshaping with septoplasty or endoscopic sinus surgery can effectively treat certain breathing problems, such as ... What is the recovery from nose surgery like?. For a short time after surgery, patients may experience puffiness, nose ache or a ... Rhinoplasty, or nose surgery, is one of the most common plastic surgery procedures performed today. It can reshape, reduce or ... Will I like the results of my nose surgery?. Patients with realistic goals for rhinoplasty are generally very happy with the ...
Can Rhinoplasty fix Sinus Problems Rhinoplasty or nose surgery to address the shape of the nose can also improve your breathing ... Sinus surgery can be performed at the same time of rhinoplasty. With sinus surgery, the opening between the sinus and nasal ... Many of my patients who come see me for rhinoplasty or a nose job have repeated sinus infections as well. Based on your history ... If you suffer from nasal allergies, you will likely continue to be allergic to the same substances after your nose surgery. ...
Nose / Sinus*Sinusitis and Endoscopic Sinus Surgery (FESS). *Minimally Invasive Procedures / Balloon Sinuplasty ... Rhinoplasty (nose surgery) is one of the most frequently performed plastic surgery procedures. During rhinoplasty, the nose is ... Rhinoplasty may be performed to correct a birth defect, or repair an injury such as a broken nose. It is also often performed ... Splints and nasal packing remain in the nose for a few days. During this period, the patient may experience some nasal pain or ...
... nose, and throat including issues related to sinuses. ... it rarely appears in nose and paranasal sinuses.. Case ... A paranasal sinuses CT scan was requested to characterize the injury and a biopsy was scheduled. CT scan revealed an expansive ... We present the case of a 50 year-old patient with an aspergilloma of the sphenoidal sinus that also revealed foreign material ... Vegetable Hairs Associated with a Sphenoid Sinus Aspergilloma. A Case Report. David Oddo*, Gonzalo P. Méndez, Pablo Villanueva ...
Kassir performs nose jobs, rhinoplasty, and revision rhinoplasty in NJ. The best rhinoplasty surgeon in NJ, he specializes in ... Do you have any problems breathing through your nose or do you have chronic nose or sinus complaints? Has a prior injury made ... Do you have any problems breathing through your nose or do you have chronic nose or sinus complaints? Has a prior injury made ... Can I make the bridge of my nose lower and flatter (Asian nose)?. A typical "Asian" nose can indeed be crafted via a shaving ...
Rhinoplasty is a surgical procedure performed to alter the function and appearance of the nose. Although the reasons for ... inferior turbinates and other aspects of the nose and sinuses. CT scans may be requested if sinusitis is suspected. ... When you wake up there will be tapes or a plastic splint on the outside of the nose and silicone splints inside the nose. There ... The nose usually looks OK by 2-3 weeks after the surgery but there is some delayed swelling especially around the tip of the ...
Differential diagnosis of saddle nose deformity / causes of saddle nose deformity are : -lepromatous leprosy ... Surgery Definition - What is Pilonidal Sinus? * Surgery Definition - What is Lipoma? * Surgery Definition -What is neurofibroma ... Saddle Nose Deformity Differential diagnosis of saddle nose deformity / causes of saddle nose deformity are :. -lepromatous ...
... the anatomy of the nose itself and any previous nose surgery or trauma are all things that can affect how a rhinoplasty is ... Endoscopic Sinus Surgery. *Balloon sinuplasty. *Nasal reconstruction. *Cleft rhinoplasty. *Revision/secondary/complex ... they should not rest on the nose for long periods during the first few weeks of recovery whilst the nose is still tender. ... as well as the nose externally. Each nose has its own individual anatomy, and this renders planning a rhinoplasty a very ...
Rhinoplasty (nose job or nose reshaping) is a procedure to reshape the nose and improve its appearance. Rhinoplasty is also ... An increase in sinus pressure could result depending on your procedure, however using a saline spray may help alleviate the ... Your nose may swell after the splint is removed, but with time it will decongest. The upper part of the nose settles in after ... Your nose is often the first thing people notice upon meeting you. If you are self-conscious about the appearance of your nose ...
Nose, Sinuses and Smell. The nose is commonly known as the organ that produces the sense of smell, yet it is the structures ... The role of the sinuses is less clear than the roles of the nose and olfactory epithelium. One known function of the sinuses is ... The nose plays many important roles in the conduction of air into the lungs. Air entering the nose from the bodys exterior is ... The maxillary sinuses are a pair of cavities within the maxillae of the face and are the largest of the paranasal sinuses. They ...
In severe cases, untreated dry sinuses can become infected and require antibiotics. Well explain what causes dry sinuses and ... Dry sinuses occur when the mucous membranes in your sinuses lack proper moisture. This can lead to dry nasal passages, ... What are the symptoms of dry sinuses?. Dry sinuses can cause many uncomfortable symptoms in your head, nose, mouth, and throat ... Irritation in the sinuses can also lead to headaches, aches and pains in the cheeks where the sinuses are located, and sinus ...
The Oregon Sinus Center at OHSU provides state of the art diagnosis and treatment options to patients with disorders of the ... The Oregon Sinus Center at OHSU provides state of the art diagnosis and treatment options to patients with disorders of the ... She has been treating rhinology and sinus related issues since 2004, and enjoys being a part of the Oregon Sinus Center.. ... Oregon Sinus Center Team. Timothy Smith, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.C.S. - Director. Timothy L. Smith, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.C.S. is ...
1. Nose and Sinus Exam. *Inspect the nose for skin changes, nodules, and deformities. Slight deviation of the septum is common ... 1. Nose and Sinus Exam. *Inspect the nose for skin changes, nodules, and deformities. Slight deviation of the septum is common ... Lets begin by reviewing the anatomy of the nose and sinuses. Functionally, the nose is involved in the sense of smell, and it ... Lets begin by reviewing the anatomy of the nose and sinuses. Functionally, the nose is involved in the sense of smell, and it ...
... D. Swaminath, R. Narayanan, M. A. Orellana- ... "Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Nose Complicated with Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis," Case Reports in Infectious Diseases, vol. 2014 ...
Cavernous sinus thrombosis as a complication of necrotizing fasciitis of the nose is a rapidly progressive and dangerous ... Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Nose Complicated with Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis. D. Swaminath, R. Narayanan, M. A. Orellana- ... We present a case of necrotizing fasciitis involving the nose complicated by cavernous sinus thrombosis. Few cases of septic ... In this case report we present a case of necrotizing fasciitis involving the nose complicated by cavernous sinus thrombosis. ...
... sinus pressure, drainage, plugged up ears, headache, and an off/on fever). Starting about two or three days ago the fev... ... For the past week I have been fighting off what I thought was a sinus infection ( ... blood in mucus, sinus pressure, tooth ache. For the past week I have been fighting off what I thought was a sinus infection ( ... 5 Important Reasons to Breathe Through Your Nose Dr. Steven Park reveals 5 reasons why breathing through your nose could change ...
Inflammation of a cats nose is referred to as rhinitis; sinusitis, meanwhile, refers to the inflammation in the nasal passages ... Decreased air flow (stuffy nose) in one or both nasal passages. *Reverse sneezing (when the animal takes in a gasp of air to ... Nasal polyps (nonmalignant tissue growth or tumor in nose). Diagnosis. Upon initial examination, it is likely that the ... Inflammation of a cats nose is referred to as rhinitis; sinusitis, meanwhile, refers to the inflammation in the nasal passages ...
Lets begin by reviewing the anatomy of the nose and sinuses. Functionally, the nose is involved in the sense of smell, and it ... Nose, sinuses, oral cavity and pharynx are interconnected structures and their functions play an integral role in maintenance ... Now that you are familiar with the anatomy of the nose and sinuses, lets go over the sequence of inspection and palpation ... Youve just watched JoVEs video on the, nose, sinuses and throat exam. You should now have a solid understanding of the ...
Sinus infection and sinusitis are infections or inflammation of the four sinus cavities. They can be caused by bacteria, ... Most sinus infections are not contagious and do not need treatment with antibiotics unless the infection is caused by bacteria ... OTC, natural, and home remedies can help relieve symptoms like sinus headache and pressure. Complications are infection that ... Sinus Infection (Sinusitis). Sinus infection (sinusitis) definition and facts. *Sinusitis or sinus infection is inflammation of ...
asian men getting skin infection on nose dutring flu ? can anyone tell me why this is ? Im a westerner ,but I never heard or ... Communities>Sinus Infections/Disorders>asian men getting skin infection on nose during flu ? ... asian men getting skin infection on nose during flu ? auto78900 asian men getting skin infection on nose dutring flu ? can ... 5 Important Reasons to Breathe Through Your Nose Dr. Steven Park reveals 5 reasons why breathing through your nose could change ...
University of Michigan Sinus Center is at the forefront of latest endoscopic research and state-of-the-art treatment for nasal ... Nose and Sinus Disorders. Chronic sinusitis affects 31 million people in the U.S. and accounts for more than 16 million ... We also use an endoscope to look at your nose, sinus and larynx. We may also perform a CT scan, if needed, to help diagnose ... which involves endoscopically inflating a small balloon in the sinus cavity to open blocked sinuses, which restores normal ...
It is common for a dog that has been affected with a squamous cell carcinoma of the nose or sinuses to have nasal discharge and ... Squamous cell carcinomas in the nose and sinuses are treated with a combination of surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy ... If your dog has surgery, the part of the sinuses that are affected by the tumor will be removed during surgery. After your dog ... Nose Cancer (Fibrosarcoma) in Dogs. Nasal and paranasal fibrosarcoma is characterized by a malignant tumor based in the ...
Nose, Sinus & Allergy Center. The Nose, Sinus & Allergy Center is a leading-edge medical care resource in northeast Ohio for ... Treating Sinus and Nasal Conditions. Additionally, experts at the Nose, Sinus & Allergy Center have the expertise and ... For patients with nose or sinus tumors or other cancers, our board-certified otolaryngologists work with a multidisciplinary ... The Nose, Sinus & Allergy Center provides low- and high-tech treatment, including microdebriders and transillumination, for all ...
Purchase Surgery of the Nose and Paranasal Sinuses: Principles and Concepts, An Issue of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics ... nose, throat and sinuses, imaging of the paranasal sinuses, microbiology of the paranasal sinuses, surgery of the paranasal ... Surgery of the Nose and Paranasal Sinuses: Principles and Concepts, An Issue of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics ... Surgery of the Nose and Paranasal Sinuses: Principles and Concepts, An Issue of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics, Volume ...
  • This allows excellent visualisation and access to the cartilage and bone which form the structure and underlying shape of the nose. (entsunshinecoast.com.au)
  • If alar base reduction is performed, there is a further incision on each side in the groove between the side of the nose and the face. (entsunshinecoast.com.au)
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