Goiter: Enlargement of the THYROID GLAND that may increase from about 20 grams to hundreds of grams in human adults. Goiter is observed in individuals with normal thyroid function (euthyroidism), thyroid deficiency (HYPOTHYROIDISM), or hormone overproduction (HYPERTHYROIDISM). Goiter may be congenital or acquired, sporadic or endemic (GOITER, ENDEMIC).Graves Disease: A common form of hyperthyroidism with a diffuse hyperplastic GOITER. It is an autoimmune disorder that produces antibodies against the THYROID STIMULATING HORMONE RECEPTOR. These autoantibodies activate the TSH receptor, thereby stimulating the THYROID GLAND and hypersecretion of THYROID HORMONES. These autoantibodies can also affect the eyes (GRAVES OPHTHALMOPATHY) and the skin (Graves dermopathy).Goiter, Nodular: An enlarged THYROID GLAND containing multiple nodules (THYROID NODULE), usually resulting from recurrent thyroid HYPERPLASIA and involution over many years to produce the irregular enlargement. Multinodular goiters may be nontoxic or may induce THYROTOXICOSIS.Goiter, Endemic: A form of IODINE deficiency disorders characterized by an enlargement of the THYROID GLAND in a significantly large fraction of a POPULATION GROUP. Endemic goiter is common in mountainous and iodine-deficient areas of the world where the DIET contains insufficient amount of iodine.Goiter, Substernal: An enlarged THYROID GLAND with at least 50% of the gland situated behind the STERNUM. It is an unusual presentation of an intrathoracic goiter. Substernal goiters frequently cause compression on the TRACHEA leading to deviation, narrowing, and respiratory symptoms.Iodine: A nonmetallic element of the halogen group that is represented by the atomic symbol I, atomic number 53, and atomic weight of 126.90. It is a nutritionally essential element, especially important in thyroid hormone synthesis. In solution, it has anti-infective properties and is used topically.Thyroid Gland: A highly vascularized endocrine gland consisting of two lobes joined by a thin band of tissue with one lobe on each side of the TRACHEA. It secretes THYROID HORMONES from the follicular cells and CALCITONIN from the parafollicular cells thereby regulating METABOLISM and CALCIUM level in blood, respectively.Thyroidectomy: Surgical removal of the thyroid gland. (Dorland, 28th ed)Thyroid Diseases: Pathological processes involving the THYROID GLAND.Hyperthyroidism: Hypersecretion of THYROID HORMONES from the THYROID GLAND. Elevated levels of thyroid hormones increase BASAL METABOLIC RATE.Thyrotropin: A glycoprotein hormone secreted by the adenohypophysis (PITUITARY GLAND, ANTERIOR). Thyrotropin stimulates THYROID GLAND by increasing the iodide transport, synthesis and release of thyroid hormones (THYROXINE and TRIIODOTHYRONINE). Thyrotropin consists of two noncovalently linked subunits, alpha and beta. Within a species, the alpha subunit is common in the pituitary glycoprotein hormones (TSH; LUTEINIZING HORMONE and FSH), but the beta subunit is unique and confers its biological specificity.Thyroid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the THYROID GLAND.Antithyroid Agents: Agents that are used to treat hyperthyroidism by reducing the excessive production of thyroid hormones.Thyroiditis: Inflammatory diseases of the THYROID GLAND. Thyroiditis can be classified into acute (THYROIDITIS, SUPPURATIVE), subacute (granulomatous and lymphocytic), chronic fibrous (Riedel's), chronic lymphocytic (HASHIMOTO DISEASE), transient (POSTPARTUM THYROIDITIS), and other AUTOIMMUNE THYROIDITIS subtypes.Saudi ArabiaTexasEndocrinology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the metabolism, physiology, and disorders of the ENDOCRINE SYSTEM.Transforming Growth Factor beta: A factor synthesized in a wide variety of tissues. It acts synergistically with TGF-alpha in inducing phenotypic transformation and can also act as a negative autocrine growth factor. TGF-beta has a potential role in embryonal development, cellular differentiation, hormone secretion, and immune function. TGF-beta is found mostly as homodimer forms of separate gene products TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2 or TGF-beta3. Heterodimers composed of TGF-beta1 and 2 (TGF-beta1.2) or of TGF-beta2 and 3 (TGF-beta2.3) have been isolated. The TGF-beta proteins are synthesized as precursor proteins.Hypothyroidism: A syndrome that results from abnormally low secretion of THYROID HORMONES from the THYROID GLAND, leading to a decrease in BASAL METABOLIC RATE. In its most severe form, there is accumulation of MUCOPOLYSACCHARIDES in the SKIN and EDEMA, known as MYXEDEMA.Thyroid Hormones: Natural hormones secreted by the THYROID GLAND, such as THYROXINE, and their synthetic analogs.Thyroid Nodule: A small circumscribed mass in the THYROID GLAND that can be of neoplastic growth or non-neoplastic abnormality. It lacks a well-defined capsule or glandular architecture. Thyroid nodules are often benign but can be malignant. The growth of nodules can lead to a multinodular goiter (GOITER, NODULAR).Thyroxine: The major hormone derived from the thyroid gland. Thyroxine is synthesized via the iodination of tyrosines (MONOIODOTYROSINE) and the coupling of iodotyrosines (DIIODOTYROSINE) in the THYROGLOBULIN. Thyroxine is released from thyroglobulin by proteolysis and secreted into the blood. Thyroxine is peripherally deiodinated to form TRIIODOTHYRONINE which exerts a broad spectrum of stimulatory effects on cell metabolism.WashingtonBritish Columbia: A province of Canada on the Pacific coast. Its capital is Victoria. The name given in 1858 derives from the Columbia River which was named by the American captain Robert Gray for his ship Columbia which in turn was named for Columbus. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p178 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p81-2)Academic Medical Centers: Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc.SwedenHospital Bed Capacity, 100 to 299United StatesHaplosporida: A phylum of EUKARYOTES in the RHIZARIA group. They are small endoparasites of marine invertebrates. Spores are structurally complex but without polar filaments or tubes.Bacteroides: A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria. Its organisms are normal inhabitants of the oral, respiratory, intestinal, and urogenital cavities of humans, animals, and insects. Some species may be pathogenic.Receptors, Thyrotropin: Cell surface proteins that bind pituitary THYROTROPIN (also named thyroid stimulating hormone or TSH) and trigger intracellular changes of the target cells. TSH receptors are present in the nervous system and on target cells in the thyroid gland. Autoantibodies to TSH receptors are implicated in thyroid diseases such as GRAVES DISEASE and Hashimoto disease (THYROIDITIS, AUTOIMMUNE).Immunoglobulin A: Represents 15-20% of the human serum immunoglobulins, mostly as the 4-chain polymer in humans or dimer in other mammals. Secretory IgA (IMMUNOGLOBULIN A, SECRETORY) is the main immunoglobulin in secretions.Immunoglobulin A, Secretory: The principle immunoglobulin in exocrine secretions such as milk, respiratory and intestinal mucin, saliva and tears. The complete molecule (around 400 kD) is composed of two four-chain units of IMMUNOGLOBULIN A, one SECRETORY COMPONENT and one J chain (IMMUNOGLOBULIN J-CHAINS).Bacteroides fragilis: Gram-negative bacteria occurring in the lower intestinal tracts of man and other animals. It is the most common species of anaerobic bacteria isolated from human soft tissue infections.Secretory Component: The extracellular moiety of the POLYMERIC IMMUNOGLOBULIN RECEPTOR found alone or complexed with IGA or IGM, in a variety of external secretions (tears, bile, colostrum.) Secretory component is derived by proteolytic cleavage of the receptor during transcytosis. When immunoglobulins IgA and IgM are bound to the receptor, during their transcytosis secretory component becomes covalently attached to them generating SECRETORY IMMUNOGLOBULIN A or secretory IMMUNOGLOBULIN M.Moles: Any of numerous burrowing mammals found in temperate regions and having minute eyes often covered with skin.Hydatidiform Mole: Trophoblastic hyperplasia associated with normal gestation, or molar pregnancy. It is characterized by the swelling of the CHORIONIC VILLI and elevated human CHORIONIC GONADOTROPIN. Hydatidiform moles or molar pregnancy may be categorized as complete or partial based on their gross morphology, histopathology, and karyotype.Color: The visually perceived property of objects created by absorption or reflection of specific wavelengths of light.Dermatology: A medical specialty concerned with the skin, its structure, functions, diseases, and treatment.Mole Rats: Any of several burrowing rodents of the families MURIDAE and Bathyergidae, found in eastern Europe, Africa, and Asia. They have short limbs, small eyes with permanently closed lids, and no tail. Three genera SPALAX (Muridae), Heterocephalus (Bathyergidae) and Cryptomys (Bathyergidae) are used frequently as experimental animals in biomedical research. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed)Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Pigmentation: Coloration or discoloration of a part by a pigment.Republic of BelarusThyroiditis, Autoimmune: Inflammatory disease of the THYROID GLAND due to autoimmune responses leading to lymphocytic infiltration of the gland. It is characterized by the presence of circulating thyroid antigen-specific T-CELLS and thyroid AUTOANTIBODIES. The clinical signs can range from HYPOTHYROIDISM to THYROTOXICOSIS depending on the type of autoimmune thyroiditis.Autoantibodies: Antibodies that react with self-antigens (AUTOANTIGENS) of the organism that produced them.Soil Pollutants: Substances which pollute the soil. Use for soil pollutants in general or for which there is no specific heading.Encephalomalacia: Softening or loss of brain tissue following CEREBRAL INFARCTION; cerebral ischemia (see BRAIN ISCHEMIA), infection, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, or other injury. The term is often used during gross pathologic inspection to describe blurred cortical margins and decreased consistency of brain tissue following infarction. Multicystic encephalomalacia refers to the formation of multiple cystic cavities of various sizes in the cerebral cortex of neonates and infants following injury, most notably perinatal hypoxia-ischemic events. (From Davis et al., Textbook of Neuropathology, 2nd ed, p665; J Neuropathol Exp Neurol, 1995 Mar;54(2):268-75)Vitamin D Deficiency: A nutritional condition produced by a deficiency of VITAMIN D in the diet, insufficient production of vitamin D in the skin, inadequate absorption of vitamin D from the diet, or abnormal conversion of vitamin D to its bioactive metabolites. It is manifested clinically as RICKETS in children and OSTEOMALACIA in adults. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1406)Vitamin D: A vitamin that includes both CHOLECALCIFEROLS and ERGOCALCIFEROLS, which have the common effect of preventing or curing RICKETS in animals. It can also be viewed as a hormone since it can be formed in SKIN by action of ULTRAVIOLET RAYS upon the precursors, 7-dehydrocholesterol and ERGOSTEROL, and acts on VITAMIN D RECEPTORS to regulate CALCIUM in opposition to PARATHYROID HORMONE.Calcifediol: The major circulating metabolite of VITAMIN D3. It is produced in the LIVER and is the best indicator of the body's vitamin D stores. It is effective in the treatment of RICKETS and OSTEOMALACIA, both in azotemic and non-azotemic patients. Calcifediol also has mineralizing properties.Cholecalciferol: Derivative of 7-dehydroxycholesterol formed by ULTRAVIOLET RAYS breaking of the C9-C10 bond. It differs from ERGOCALCIFEROL in having a single bond between C22 and C23 and lacking a methyl group at C24.Sunlight: Irradiation directly from the sun.Vitamins: Organic substances that are required in small amounts for maintenance and growth, but which cannot be manufactured by the human body.
240) Simple and unspecified goiter (240.9) Goiter, unspec. (241) Nontoxic nodular goiter (241.0) Thyroid nodule (241.9) Goiter ... nontoxic nodular (242) Thyrotoxicosis with or without goiter (242.0) Goiter toxic, diffuse (242.9) Hyperthyroidism, NOS (243) ...
Other conditions that can produce similar symptoms include Graves' disease and nontoxic nodular goiter. Hashimoto's thyroiditis ... If hypothyroidism is not present some may recommend no treatment while others may treat to try to reduce the size of the goiter ... On gross examination, there is often presentation of a hard goiter that is not painful to the touch; other symptoms seen with ... Surgery is rarely required to treat the goiter. Hashimoto's thyroiditis affects about 5% of the population at some point in ...
... toxic nodular goiter, and large nontoxic goiters with obstruction. Finally, office based thyroid blood hormone studies, such as ...
Toxic Nodular Goiter, and large obstructive Nontoxic Nodular Goiters. Academy of Clinical Thyroidologists corroborates research ...
People with non-toxic goiters have low thyroid levels (hypothyroidism) or normal thyroid levels. ... A goitre or goiter (Latin: struma), also called a bronchocele, is a swelling in the neck (just below Adam's apple or larynx). ... Toxic goiter is a goitre with hyperthyroidism. These most commonly caused by Graves disease, but they can also be caused by ... Any other type of goitre is called a non-toxic goitre. These may be caused by lithium, some kinds of autoimmune diseases, or ...
... is an enlarged thyroid without hyperthyroidism. It is often present for years before toxic nodular ... goiter occurs. In the United States it is the most common cause of a large thyroid affecting between 3 and 5% of the population ...
Non-toxic goiter IV or Oral I131-Iodide Thyroid carcinoma IV or Oral ...
Done in nontoxic MNG. Its role is controversial. Near total thyroidectomy-Both lobes are removed except for a small amount of ... Thyroid cancer Toxic thyroid nodule (produces too much thyroid hormone) Multinodular goiter (enlarged thyroid gland with many ... Done in nontoxic MNG. Hypothyroidism in up to 50% of patients after ten years.[citation needed] Laryngeal nerve injury in about ... or goiter. Other indications for surgery include cosmetic (very enlarged thyroid), or symptomatic obstruction (causing ...
The mammary gland actively concentrates iodine into milk for the benefit of the developing infant, and may develop a goiter- ... it becomes tri-iodide upon reacting with potassium iodide used in the solution and is non-toxic. Only a small amount of ... Felig, Philip; Frohman, Lawrence A. (2001). "Endemic Goiter". Endocrinology & metabolism. McGraw-Hill Professional. ISBN 978-0- ... "Self-reported goiter is associated with a significantly increased risk of gastric noncardia adenocarcinoma in a large ...
Nontoxic Lithium It is not known whether lithium has a physiological role in any species,[50] but nutritional studies in ... Required for synthesis of thyroid hormones, thyroxine and triiodothyronine and to prevent goiter: *Iodine in biology ...
Nontoxic nodular goiter is an enlarged thyroid without hyperthyroidism. It is often present for years before toxic nodular ... goiter occurs. In the United States it is the most common cause of a large thyroid affecting between 3 and 5% of the population ...
Endemic goiter is defined as thyroid enlargement that occurs in more than 10% of a population, and sporadic goiter is a result ... A nontoxic goiter is a diffuse or nodular enlargement of the thyroid gland that does not result from an inflammatory or ... Sporadic goiter is the most common cause of nontoxic goiter in the United States. The incidence of sporadic nontoxic goiter has ... encoded search term (Nontoxic Goiter) and Nontoxic Goiter What to Read Next on Medscape. Related Conditions and Diseases. * ...
Learn more about Nontoxic Nodular Goiter at Medical City Dallas DefinitionCausesRisk ... There are different types of goiters. This sheet focuses on nontoxic (or sporadic) goiter. It is a type of simple goiter that ... There is often normal thyroid function with a nontoxic goiter. Some possible causes of nontoxic goiter include:. *Family ... The exact causes of nontoxic goiter are not known. In general, goiters may be caused by too much or too little thyroid hormones ...
This review discusses current therapeutic options to treat diffuse and multinodular nontoxic benign goiters. ... This review discusses current therapeutic options to treat diffuse and multinodular nontoxic benign goiters. ... The use of levothyroxine (LT4) to reduce the volume of the goiter is still a controversial treatment for large goiters, and the ... The use of levothyroxine (LT4) to reduce the volume of the goiter is still a controversial treatment for large goiters, and the ...
ThyrOp: A Study of Individual Subclinical Hypothyroidism After Hemithyroidectomy for Benign Nontoxic Goiter (ThyrOp). The ... Is going to undergo hemithyroidectomy for nontoxic goiter at the department of otorhinolaryngology at Slagelse Hospital, ... ThyrOp: Individual Subclinical Hypothyroidism After Hemithyroidectomy for Benign Nontoxic Goiter - Focus on Weight Gain and ... Goiter. Body Weight Changes. Body Weight. Signs and Symptoms. Thyroid Diseases. Endocrine System Diseases. ...
The clinical presentation of patients with nontoxic multinodular goiter is variable and... ... Nodular goiter is caused by excessive replication of thyroid epithelial cell with formation of new follicles. ... Giovanella L. (2016) Nontoxic Multinodular Goiter. In: Giovanella L., Treglia G., Valcavi R. (eds) Atlas of Head and Neck ... The clinical presentation of patients with nontoxic multinodular goiter is variable and depends on the volume and location of ...
Patients with nontoxic nodular goiter were treated with T8, 50 µg/day, or T4, 200 µg/day, in a double-blind study. Their ... Comparison of L-Thyroxine (T4) and L-Triiodothyrone (T8) in Suppressive Therapy of Nontoxic Nodular Goiter. Katsutaro Shimaoka ... Comparison of L-Thyroxine (T4) and L-Triiodothyrone (T8) in Suppressive Therapy of Nontoxic Nodular Goiter.. Ann Intern Med. ; ... At the end of phase 1, decrease in goiter size was evident in 47% of the patients, who were carried on to phase 2 without ...
We have performed a genomic search on a single large Canadian family with 18 cases of nontoxic multinodular goiter in w … ... Familial forms of goiter in areas not known to feature iodine deficiency are much less common. ... Thyroid goiter is a common condition that is often associated with iodine deficiency. ... Familial nontoxic multinodular thyroid goiter locus maps to chromosome 14q but does not account for familial nonmedullary ...
Nontoxic (Sporadic). The cause of a nontoxic goiter is usually unknown, though it may be caused by medications like lithium. ... The Types of Goiters. Goiters have many causes. As a result, there are different types. These include:. Colloid Goiter (Endemic ... It generally forms as an extension of a simple goiter.. What Causes a Goiter?. Iodine deficiency is the main cause of goiters. ... Nontoxic goiters dont affect the production of thyroid hormone, and thyroid function is healthy. They are also benign. ...
If the goiter is very slow growing and long-standing, the patient may not notice the slow increase in size. However, some ... non-toxic multinodular goiter): Symptoms. This document is available in Spanish. Symptoms. Symptoms of nontoxic MNGNontoxic MNG ... multinodular goiter that produces normal levels of thyroid hormone may be nonexistent. If the goiterGoiter - enlarged thyroid ... Multinodular goiter; enlarged thyroid that contains multiple nodules that grow beneath the breastbone (i.e. substernal goiter). ...
Nontoxic means that the gland still depends on TSH stimulation *goiter becomes toxic when hyperplasia becomes independent of ...
Goiter, Nontoxic. Introduction. Goiter is the enlargement of the thyroid gland. Nontoxic goiter is thyroid gland enlargement ... Other cause of goiter that must be differentiated from nontoxic goiter include inflammatory goiter. Hashimoto thyroiditis, De ... Medical therapy for nontoxic goiter is controversial as it has little or no results in longstanding goiters. Non-emergent ... Nontoxic goiter must be differentiated from other causes of goiter. The most important issue here is to exclude malignancy. ...
Indications for treatment nontoxic diffuse goiter in Druskininkai, medical base, diagnostics, contraindications ... What kind ofprocedures and natural therapeutic factors are used in the treatment of nontoxic diffuse goiter in Druskininkai, ... Treatment nontoxic diffuse goiter in Druskininkai. Nontoxic goiter or euthyroid goiter - is a compensatory hyperplasia and ... Patients with non-toxic goiter should be treated with iodine-containing drugs, levityroxine. When the goiter reaches an ...
Simple (non-toxic) Goiter. Recommended starting dosage is 5 mcg daily. This dosage may be increased by 5 to 10 mcg daily every ... with or without the presence of goiter; and secondary (pituitary) or tertiary (hypothalamic) hypothyroidism (see WARNINGS). ... in the treatment or prevention of various types of euthyroid goiters, including thyroid nodules, subacute or chronic ... lymphocytic thyroiditis (Hashimotos) and multinodular goiter.. As diagnostic agents in suppression tests to differentiate ...
A simple goiter is an enlargement of the thyroid gland. It is usually not a tumor or cancer. ... So, a goiter can be a sign the thyroid is not able to make enough thyroid hormone. The use of iodized salt in the United States ... Goiter. In: Kliegman RM, St. Geme JW, Blum NJ, Shah SS, Tasker RC, Wilson KM, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 21st ed. ... A simple goiter may disappear on its own, or may become larger. Over time, the thyroid gland may stop making enough thyroid ...
The concentrations of transforming growth factor beta mRNA were lower in iodine-deficient nontoxic goiter than in Graves ... Transforming growth factor beta protein secretion by cultured thyroid follicular cells was also low in nontoxic goiter, but ... This inhibition was greater in Graves disease than in nontoxic goiter. These results suggest that transforming growth factor ... responsiveness to transforming growth factor beta may be cofactors in the pathogenesis of iodine-deficient nontoxic goiter. ...
nontoxic goiter (iodine deficiencies) neonatal goiter or cretinism Riedels thyroiditis. thyroidectomies. EXCESSES. toxic ... I-123 is the agent of choice when evaluating substernal goiters because there is usually substantial mediastinal blood pool ... Evaluation of Toxic Multinodular Goiter (Plummers Disease) *Hypothyroid patients recently treated with I-131 for Graves ... goiters or thyrotoxicosis (Graves disease) toxic nodular goiter neonatal hyperthyroidism iatrogenic hyperthyroidism. ...
In patients with nontoxic diffuse goiter or nodular thyroid disease, particularly the elderly or those with underlying ... Patients With Nontoxic Diffuse Goiter Or Nodular Thyroid Disease. Exercise caution when administering levothyroxine to patients ... In the treatment of benign nodules and nontoxic multinodular goiter, TSH is generally suppressed to a higher target (e.g., 0.1 ... with nontoxic diffuse goiter or nodular thyroid disease in order to prevent precipitation of thyrotoxicosis (see WARNINGS). If ...
There are many kinds of goiters (or bronchoceles), all of which are treatable by... ... what is the difference between toxic goiter and non-toxic goiter, and what are the causes of toxic and non-toxic goiter? Are ... What is the difference between the toxic and non-toxic goiter, what are the causes of toxic and non-toxic goiter? Are there any ... A nontoxic goiter does not include malignancies.. This type of swelling is thought to be caused by iodine deficiency in many ...
It may not cause any symptoms, but a large goiter can cause difficulty breathing or swallowing or be related to hyperthyroidism ... Learn more about the symptoms, causes, and treatments for multinodular goiter, and its relation to cancer here. ... A multinodular goiter is an enlarged thyroid gland with several nodules. ... One treatment for both toxic and non-toxic goiters is radioiodine therapy.. The medication helps reduce the size of thyroid ...
Simple goiter; Endemic goiter; Colloidal goiter; Nontoxic goiter. Causes. The thyroid gland is an important organ of the ... Goiter - simple. Definition. A simple goiter is an enlargement of the thyroid gland. It is usually not a tumor or cancer. ... So, a goiter can be a sign the thyroid is not able to make enough thyroid hormone. The use of iodized salt in the United States ... A simple goiter may disappear on its own, or may become larger. Over time, the thyroid gland may stop making enough thyroid ...
A 30-year perspective on radioiodine therapy of benign nontoxic multinodular goiter*. Bonnema, Steen J; Hegedüs, Laszlo ...
240) Simple and unspecified goiter (240.9) Goiter, unspec. (241) Nontoxic nodular goiter (241.0) Thyroid nodule (241.9) Goiter ... nontoxic nodular (242) Thyrotoxicosis with or without goiter (242.0) Goiter toxic, diffuse (242.9) Hyperthyroidism, NOS (243) ...
... , Toxic Multinodular Goiter, Non-Toxic Multinodular Goiter. ... Multinodular non-toxic goiter, Non-toxic multinodular goiter, Multinodular non-toxic goitre, Non-toxic multinodular goitre, Non ... goiter, multinodular, struma; nontoxic, multinodular, Goiter;multinodular;non toxic, non toxic multinodular goiter, non toxic ... Nontoxic multinodular goiter, Nontoxic multinodular goitre, nontoxic multinodular goiter (diagnosis), nontoxic multinodular ...
  • When urinary iodide falls below 25 micrograms per gram of creatinine, a palpable goiter occurs in 40-90% of the population, hypothyroidism occurs in 30-50% of the population, and cretinism occurs in 1-10% of the population. (medscape.com)
  • A decrease in iodide uptake by thyroid cells caused by estradiol has not been described previously and may have a role in goiter pathogenesis. (scielo.br)
  • iodide goiter that occurring in reaction to iodides at high concentrations, due to inhibition of iodide organification. (thefreedictionary.com)