Sleep-Wake Transition Disorders: Parasomnias characterized by behavioral abnormalities that occur during the transition between wakefulness and sleep (or between sleep and wakefulness).Sleep: A readily reversible suspension of sensorimotor interaction with the environment, usually associated with recumbency and immobility.Wakefulness: A state in which there is an enhanced potential for sensitivity and an efficient responsiveness to external stimuli.Sleep Disorders: Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Sleep, REM: A stage of sleep characterized by rapid movements of the eye and low voltage fast pattern EEG. It is usually associated with dreaming.Narcolepsy: A condition characterized by recurrent episodes of daytime somnolence and lapses in consciousness (microsomnias) that may be associated with automatic behaviors and AMNESIA. CATAPLEXY; SLEEP PARALYSIS, and hypnagogic HALLUCINATIONS frequently accompany narcolepsy. The pathophysiology of this disorder includes sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, which normally follows stage III or IV sleep. (From Neurology 1998 Feb;50(2 Suppl 1):S2-S7)Sleep Stages: Periods of sleep manifested by changes in EEG activity and certain behavioral correlates; includes Stage 1: sleep onset, drowsy sleep; Stage 2: light sleep; Stages 3 and 4: delta sleep, light sleep, deep sleep, telencephalic sleep.Polysomnography: Simultaneous and continuous monitoring of several parameters during sleep to study normal and abnormal sleep. The study includes monitoring of brain waves, to assess sleep stages, and other physiological variables such as breathing, eye movements, and blood oxygen levels which exhibit a disrupted pattern with sleep disturbances.Circadian Rhythm: The regular recurrence, in cycles of about 24 hours, of biological processes or activities, such as sensitivity to drugs and stimuli, hormone secretion, sleeping, and feeding.Cataplexy: A condition characterized by transient weakness or paralysis of somatic musculature triggered by an emotional stimulus or physical exertion. Cataplexy is frequently associated with NARCOLEPSY. During a cataplectic attack, there is a marked reduction in muscle tone similar to the normal physiologic hypotonia that accompanies rapid eye movement sleep (SLEEP, REM). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p396)Sleep Deprivation: The state of being deprived of sleep under experimental conditions, due to life events, or from a wide variety of pathophysiologic causes such as medication effect, chronic illness, psychiatric illness, or sleep disorder.Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: Disorders characterized by impairment of the ability to initiate or maintain sleep. This may occur as a primary disorder or in association with another medical or psychiatric condition.Arousal: Cortical vigilance or readiness of tone, presumed to be in response to sensory stimulation via the reticular activating system.Chronobiology Disorders: Disruptions of the rhythmic cycle of bodily functions or activities.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Melatonin: A biogenic amine that is found in animals and plants. In mammals, melatonin is produced by the PINEAL GLAND. Its secretion increases in darkness and decreases during exposure to light. Melatonin is implicated in the regulation of SLEEP, mood, and REPRODUCTION. Melatonin is also an effective antioxidant.Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm: Dyssomnias associated with disruption of the normal 24 hour sleep wake cycle secondary to travel (e.g., JET LAG SYNDROME), shift work, or other causes.Disorders of Excessive Somnolence: Disorders characterized by hypersomnolence during normal waking hours that may impair cognitive functioning. Subtypes include primary hypersomnia disorders (e.g., IDIOPATHIC HYPERSOMNOLENCE; NARCOLEPSY; and KLEINE-LEVIN SYNDROME) and secondary hypersomnia disorders where excessive somnolence can be attributed to a known cause (e.g., drug affect, MENTAL DISORDERS, and SLEEP APNEA SYNDROME). (From J Neurol Sci 1998 Jan 8;153(2):192-202; Thorpy, Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine, 2nd ed, p320)Electrooculography: Recording of the average amplitude of the resting potential arising between the cornea and the retina in light and dark adaptation as the eyes turn a standard distance to the right and the left. The increase in potential with light adaptation is used to evaluate the condition of the retinal pigment epithelium.Actigraphy: The measurement and recording of MOTOR ACTIVITY to assess rest/activity cycles.Fatigue: The state of weariness following a period of exertion, mental or physical, characterized by a decreased capacity for work and reduced efficiency to respond to stimuli.Body Temperature: The measure of the level of heat of a human or animal.Blood Pressure Monitors: Devices for continuously measuring and displaying the arterial blood pressure.Orexin Receptors: G-protein-coupled NEUROPEPTIDE RECEPTORS that have specificity for OREXINS and play a role in appetite control, and sleep-wake cycles. Two principle receptor types exist, each having a specificity for OREXIN A and OREXIN B peptide subtypes.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Sleep Apnea, Obstructive: A disorder characterized by recurrent apneas during sleep despite persistent respiratory efforts. It is due to upper airway obstruction. The respiratory pauses may induce HYPERCAPNIA or HYPOXIA. Cardiac arrhythmias and elevation of systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures may occur. Frequent partial arousals occur throughout sleep, resulting in relative SLEEP DEPRIVATION and daytime tiredness. Associated conditions include OBESITY; ACROMEGALY; MYXEDEMA; micrognathia; MYOTONIC DYSTROPHY; adenotonsilar dystrophy; and NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p395)Sleep Apnea Syndromes: Disorders characterized by multiple cessations of respirations during sleep that induce partial arousals and interfere with the maintenance of sleep. Sleep apnea syndromes are divided into central (see SLEEP APNEA, CENTRAL), obstructive (see SLEEP APNEA, OBSTRUCTIVE), and mixed central-obstructive types.Receptors, Neuropeptide: Cell surface receptors that bind specific neuropeptides with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Many neuropeptides are also hormones outside of the nervous system.Jet Lag Syndrome: A chronobiologic disorder resulting from rapid travel across a number of time zones, characterized by insomnia or hypersomnolence, fatigue, behavioral symptoms, headaches, and gastrointestinal disturbances. (From Cooper, Sleep, 1994, pp593-8)Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Neuropeptides: Peptides released by NEURONS as intercellular messengers. Many neuropeptides are also hormones released by non-neuronal cells.Bipolar Disorder: A major affective disorder marked by severe mood swings (manic or major depressive episodes) and a tendency to remission and recurrence.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Monitoring, Ambulatory: The use of electronic equipment to observe or record physiologic processes while the patient undergoes normal daily activities.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)EncyclopediasParasomnias: Movements or behaviors associated with sleep, sleep stages, or partial arousals from sleep that may impair sleep maintenance. Parasomnias are generally divided into four groups: arousal disorders, sleep-wake transition disorders, parasomnias of REM sleep, and nonspecific parasomnias. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p191)Panic Disorder: A type of anxiety disorder characterized by unexpected panic attacks that last minutes or, rarely, hours. Panic attacks begin with intense apprehension, fear or terror and, often, a feeling of impending doom. Symptoms experienced during a panic attack include dyspnea or sensations of being smothered; dizziness, loss of balance or faintness; choking sensations; palpitations or accelerated heart rate; shakiness; sweating; nausea or other form of abdominal distress; depersonalization or derealization; paresthesias; hot flashes or chills; chest discomfort or pain; fear of dying and fear of not being in control of oneself or going crazy. Agoraphobia may also develop. Similar to other anxiety disorders, it may be inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.Panic: A state of extreme acute, intense anxiety and unreasoning fear accompanied by disorganization of personality function.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Tetragastrin: L-Tryptophyl-L-methionyl-L-aspartyl-L-phenylalaninamide. The C-terminal tetrapeptide of gastrin. It is the smallest peptide fragment of gastrin which has the same physiological and pharmacological activity as gastrin.Agoraphobia: Obsessive, persistent, intense fear of open places.Dictionaries, MedicalDictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Dictionaries, ChemicalReinforcement Schedule: A schedule prescribing when the subject is to be reinforced or rewarded in terms of temporal interval in psychological experiments. The schedule may be continuous or intermittent.Nocturnal Enuresis: Involuntary discharge of URINE during sleep at night after expected age of completed development of urinary control.Enuresis: Involuntary discharge of URINE after expected age of completed development of urinary control. This can happen during the daytime (DIURNAL ENURESIS) while one is awake or during sleep (NOCTURNAL ENURESIS). Enuresis can be in children or in adults (as persistent primary enuresis and secondary adult-onset enuresis).Antidiuretic Agents: Agents that reduce the excretion of URINE, most notably the octapeptide VASOPRESSINS.Deamino Arginine Vasopressin: A synthetic analog of the pituitary hormone, ARGININE VASOPRESSIN. Its action is mediated by the VASOPRESSIN receptor V2. It has prolonged antidiuretic activity, but little pressor effects. It also modulates levels of circulating FACTOR VIII and VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR.Diurnal Enuresis: Involuntary discharge of URINE during the daytime while one is awake.Renal Agents: Drugs used for their effects on the kidneys' regulation of body fluid composition and volume. The most commonly used are the diuretics. Also included are drugs used for their antidiuretic and uricosuric actions, for their effects on the kidneys' clearance of other drugs, and for diagnosis of renal function.
... showed that enuretic children were harder to wake up. Some literature does show a possible connection between sleep disorders ... Insufficient ADH might make it more difficult to transition from light sleep to being awake. Food allergies For some patients, ... Wetting episodes can cause lost sleep if the child wakes and/or cries, waking the parents. A European study estimated that a ... The condition is divided into 2 types: primary nocturnal enuresis (PNE) and secondary nocturnal enuresis. Primary nocturnal ...
It may be that the transition from sleep to waking acts as a trigger to a seizure focus in the medial temporal lobe. ... TEA is related to sleep in nearly three-quarters of cases, and persistent memory problems could be the result of nocturnal, ... Diagnostic criteria for the disorder were adopted in the 2007 study of 50 case emphasized clinical features that distinguish ... Seizure activity Seizures in TEA patients commonly occur upon waking suggesting a link between TEA and sleep. It is possible ...
... sleep bruxism MeSH C10.886.659.700 --- sleep-wake transition disorders MeSH C10.900.250.300 --- carotid artery injuries MeSH ... nocturnal paroxysmal dystonia MeSH C10.886.659.633 --- rem sleep parasomnias MeSH C10.886.659.633.700 --- rem sleep behavior ... sleep disorders, circadian rhythm MeSH C10.886.425.200.500 --- jet lag syndrome MeSH C10.886.425.800 --- sleep disorders, ... sleep paralysis MeSH C10.886.659.634 --- restless legs syndrome MeSH C10.886.659.635 --- sleep arousal disorders MeSH C10.886. ...
Sleep drunkenness G47.83 Sleep-wake transition disorders Excl. nocturnal leg cramps (R25.20) G47.830 Sleep related rhythmic ... Sleep Disorders Extrinsic Sleep Disorders Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders Arousal Disorders Sleep-Wake Transition Disorders ... Insomnia Hypersomnia Sleep wake schedule disorder Nightmare disorder Sleep terror Sleep walking The DSM-5 Sleep-Wake Disorders ... G47.23 Irregular sleep-wake pattern G47.24 Non 24 hour sleep wake cycle G47.28 Other disorder of sleep wake schedule Sleep ...
... sleep bruxism MeSH F03.870.664.700 --- sleep-wake transition disorders MeSH F03.875.300 --- conversion disorder MeSH F03.875. ... sleep initiation and maintenance disorders MeSH F03.870.664 --- parasomnias MeSH F03.870.664.627 --- nocturnal paroxysmal ... sleep disorders, circadian rhythm MeSH F03.870.400.200.500 --- jet lag syndrome MeSH F03.870.400.800 --- sleep disorders, ... rem sleep behavior disorder MeSH F03.870.664.633.800 --- sleep paralysis MeSH F03.870.664.634 --- restless legs syndrome MeSH ...
sleep-wake transition disorders. *parasomnias associated with REM sleep. Symptoms[edit]. Symptoms of sexsomnia include, but are ... Sexual behaviors that result from sexsomnia are not to be mistaken with normal nocturnal sexual behaviors, which do not occur ... "Sleep Sex - Sexsomnia Causes And Treatment , Sleep Disorder Symptoms". Sleep Disorders , all About Sleep Deprivation. Retrieved ... Central sleep apnea, Sleep-related hypoventilation, Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders, Non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep ...
Sleep related eating disorder (SRED)Edit. Main article: Nocturnal sleep related eating disorder ... or cognitive processes during sleep or sleep-wake transitions.[1]. Some NREM parasomnias (sleep-walking, night-terrors, and ... REM sleep behavior disorderEdit. REM sleep behavior disorder or RBD is the most common REM sleep parasomnia in which muscle ... Recurrent Isolated Sleep Paralysis is an inability to perform voluntary movements at sleep onset, or upon waking from sleep.[14 ...
... the transgenic mice could successfully transition from slow-wave sleep (SWS), which is commonly known as "deep sleep," to long- ... Mutations in the Opn4 gene can lead to clinical disorders, such as Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). According to one study, ... melanopsin can be used as a therapeutic target for controlling the sleep-wake cycle. In a paper published by Ye and colleagues ... It is thought that this event can be explained by the fact that this occurred during the time in which nocturnal mammals were ...
... hypnagogic hallucinations before entering slow-wave sleep, or sleep paralysis while waking. Other psychiatric disorders ... As sleep cycles continue, they shift towards a higher proportion of REM sleep. The transition to REM sleep brings marked ... Sleep can be distributed throughout the day or clustered during one part of the rhythm: in nocturnal animals, during the day, ... although humans are more likely to wake from REM sleep than from NREM sleep. Snyder hypothesized that REM sleep activates an ...
... a breathing-related sleep disorder, a circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorder, a parasomnia). ... "Event-Related Potentials During the Transition to Sleep for Individuals with Sleep-Onset Insomnia". Behavioral Sleep Medicine. ... Deviated nasal septum and nocturnal breathing disorders.[24]. *Restless legs syndrome, which can cause sleep onset insomnia due ... 81 major sleep disorder diagnostic categories.[55] Patients with some disorders, including delayed sleep phase disorder, are ...
This discovery has become the foundation for our understanding of many medical problems such as aging, sleep disorders, and jet ... After over twenty years of tracking sleep-wake cycles, body temperature, urine output, and other physiological and behavioral ... 1) An increase in the duration of sunset advances the phase of an organism for nocturnal and diurnal animals. 2) An increase in ... Comas M, Beersma DG, Hut RA, Daan S (2008). "Circadian Phase Resetting in Response to Light-Dark and Dark-Light Transitions". J ...
Erections during sleep or when waking up are medically known as nocturnal penile tumescence and colloquially referred to as ... Regular washing under the foreskin was found by Krueger and Osborn (1986) to reduce the risk of numerous penile disorders, ... wherein adolescence is the period of mental transition from childhood to adulthood, which overlaps much of the body's period of ... The penis can regularly get erect during sleep and men or boys often wake up with an erection. Once a boy reaches his teenage ...
See FDA label index page for updates Lemmer B (2007). "The sleep-wake cycle and sleeping pills". Physiol. Behav. 90 (2-3): 285- ... "Sleep and sex: what can go wrong? A review of the literature on sleep related disorders and abnormal sexual behaviors and ... "Effect of zolpidem on the sleep arousal response to nocturnal esophageal acid exposure". Clin. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. 7 (9): ... The transition from medical use of zolpidem to high-dose addiction or drug dependence can occur with use, but some believe it ...
... states that Jung considers Hermes the archetype for narcissistic disorder; however, he lends the disorder a "positive" ( ... It was said to have the power to make people fall asleep or wake up, and also made peace between litigants, and is a visible ... Hermes placed a charm on Argus's eyes with the caduceus to cause the giant to sleep, after this he slew the giant. Argus' eyes ... all the roles Hermes held in ancient Greek thought all considered reveals Hermes to be a guide or observer of transition. For ...
... is increased by waking and during REM sleep. Similarly, TSH increases during nocturnal sleep and decreases with prolonged ... Some common sleep disorders include insomnia (chronic inability to sleep), sleep apnea (abnormally low breathing during sleep ... Sleep regulation refers to the control of when an organism transitions between sleep and wakefulness. The key questions here ... Sleep disorders are broadly classified into dyssomnias, parasomnias, circadian rhythm sleep disorders, and other disorders ...
... and how many times they wake up during a single night. Poor sleep quality disrupts the cycle of transition between the ... Other disorders. Sleep disorders include narcolepsy, periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD), restless leg syndrome (RLS), upper ... 1997). Effects of early and late nocturnal sleep on declarative and procedural memory. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 9(4 ... "Sleep architecture", "Waking up", "Asleep", and "Slept" redirect here. For other uses, see Waking Up (disambiguation), Asleep ( ...
Advanced sleep phase disorder. *Delayed sleep phase disorder. *Irregular sleep-wake rhythm ... Stage 3 - previously divided into stages 3 and 4, is deep sleep, slow-wave sleep (SWS). Stage 3 was formerly the transition ... Plihal W., Born J. (1997). "Effects of early and late nocturnal sleep on declarative and procedural memory". Journal of ... sleep talking), sleep eating, nightmares or night terrors, sleep paralysis, and sexsomnia (or "sleep sex"). Many of these have ...
... is a long-term neurological disorder that involves a decreased ability to regulate sleep-wake cycles. Symptoms ... sleep paralysis, and disturbed nocturnal sleep patterns. Malenka RC, Nestler EJ, Hyman SE (2009). "Chapter 12: Sleep and ... The system which regulates sleep, arousal, and transitions between these states in humans is composed of three interconnected ... Excessive daytime sleepiness can also be caused by other sleep disorders such as sleep apnea, major depressive disorder, anemia ...
"Optimizing sleep/wake schedules in space: Sleep during chronic nocturnal sleep restriction with and without diurnal naps". Acta ... Shift work sleep disorder is a circadian rhythm sleep disorder characterized by insomnia, excessive sleepiness, or both. Shift ... "Shift Work, Role Overload, and the Transition to Parenthood". Journal of Marriage and the Family. 69 (1): 123-138. doi:10.1111 ... metabolic disorders, gastrointestinal disorders, musculoskeletal disorders, and reproductive disorders.[6] ...
30 minutes after the sleep group had been woken up; a sleep which had been rich in slow-wave sleep (SWS). Results showed that ... and memories better consolidated by nocturnal sleep and even daytime naps. Certain sleep stages have been demonstrated as ... These waves are most clearly seen during the transition from non-REM to REM sleep. Although these phasic waves are observed in ... "Sleep and quantitative EEG in neurodegenerative disorders". Journal of Psychosomatic Research. 56 (5): 487-496. doi:10.1016/j. ...
A serious nervous disorder appeared in 1877 and protracted insomnia was a consequence, which Marx fought with narcotics. The ... He had been left alone for scarcely two minutes, and when we came back we found him in his armchair, peacefully gone to sleep ... Corresponding to this is also a political transition period in which the state can be nothing but the revolutionary ... Both Marx and Auguste Comte set out to develop scientifically justified ideologies in the wake of European secularisation and ...
"Sleep-to-wake transition movement disorders". Sleep medicine. 12. doi:10.1016/j.sleep.2011.10.005.. ... Sleep paralysis. *Sleep inertia. *Somnolence. *Nocturnal clitoral tumescence. *Nocturnal penile tumescence. *Nocturnal emission ... Sleep paralysis. References[edit]. *^ "Brain Basics: Understanding Sleep" (PDF). National Institute of Neurological Disorders ... "Basics of Sleep Behavior: NREM and REM Sleep". Sleep Stllabus. Archived from the original on 2011-07-18. Retrieved 2019-07-03. ...
... hypnagogic hallucinations before entering slow-wave sleep, or sleep paralysis while waking.[50] Other psychiatric disorders ... As sleep cycles continue, they shift towards a higher proportion of REM sleep. The transition to REM sleep brings marked ... Erections of the penis (nocturnal penile tumescence or NPT) normally accompany REM sleep in rats and humans.[35] If a male has ... although humans are more likely to wake from REM sleep than from NREM sleep. Snyder hypothesized that REM sleep activates an ...
Advanced sleep phase disorder. *Delayed sleep phase disorder. *Irregular sleep-wake rhythm ... Barrett, D.L. (1979). "The Hypnotic Dream: Its Content in Comparison to Nocturnal Dreams and Waking Fantasy". Journal of ... Unlike many dream worlds, Carroll's logic is like that of actual dreams, with transitions and flexible causality. ... Since waking up usually happens during rapid eye movement sleep (REM), the vivid bizarre REM sleep dreams are the most common ...
Cvetkovic, Dean; Cosic, Irena (2011-06-22). States of Consciousness: Experimental Insights into Meditation, Waking, Sleep and ... A night terror, also known as a sleep terror or pavor nocturnus, is a parasomnia disorder that predominantly affects children, ... Barrett, D. L. (1979). "The Hypnotic Dream: Its Content in Comparison to Nocturnal Dreams and Waking Fantasy". Journal of ... Unlike many dream worlds, Carroll's logic is like that of actual dreams, with transitions and flexible causality. ...
... and how many times they wake up during a single night. Poor sleep quality disrupts the cycle of transition between the ... Other disorders. Sleep disorders include narcolepsy, periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD), restless leg syndrome (RLS), upper ... "Sleep architecture", "Waking up", "Asleep", and "Slept" redirect here. For other uses, see Waking Up (disambiguation), Asleep ( ... "Gene Cuts Need for Sleep - Sleep Disorders Including, Sleep Apnea, Narcolepsy, Insomnia, Snoring and Nightmares on MedicineNet. ...
Make research projects and school reports about Sleep Disorders easy with credible articles from our FREE, online encyclopedia ... and pictures about Sleep Disorders at Encyclopedia.com. ... the sleep stage, or the transition from sleeping to waking. ... Nocturnal myoclonus is sometimes called periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD).. Non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep- A type of ... Sleep Disorders Complete Human Diseases and Conditions COPYRIGHT 2008 Gale Group. Sleep Disorders. Why Are Sleep Disorders ...
Nocturnal panic attacks are common and they do wake people out of sleep. I believe they tend to occur unconsciously during ... You may want to try the National Sleep Disorders, or a similar, website to get some tips about how you can perhaps avoid ... transition from one sleep phase to another. People who are prone to worrying get them and you are clearly very worried about ... my question to that is can a panic attack happen while you are asleep ?? Would it wake you out of a deep sleep ?? And, can ...
Disorders of sleep-wake schedule explanation free. What is Disorders of sleep-wake schedule? Meaning of Disorders of sleep-wake ... What does Disorders of sleep-wake schedule mean? ... Looking for online definition of Disorders of sleep-wake ... sleep disorders in which the patients behavior is affected by specific sleep stages or transitions between sleeping and waking ... Nocturnal myoclonus is sometimes called periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD).. Non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep - A type ...
... showed that enuretic children were harder to wake up. Some literature does show a possible connection between sleep disorders ... Insufficient ADH might make it more difficult to transition from light sleep to being awake. Food allergies For some patients, ... Wetting episodes can cause lost sleep if the child wakes and/or cries, waking the parents. A European study estimated that a ... The condition is divided into 2 types: primary nocturnal enuresis (PNE) and secondary nocturnal enuresis. Primary nocturnal ...
... once woken, sufferers can generally recall a dream narrative. REM sleep behaviour disorder is associated with a range of ... Physiological findings characteristically include a reduced mean sleep latency and an early transition to REM sleep (sleep ... cataplexy and sleep paralysis both reflect inappropriate activation of REM sleep atonia) but the disturbed nocturnal sleep of ... ACQUIRED DISORDERS. Neurodegenerative disorders. CNS degenerative disorders are commonly associated with neuropsychiatric ...
... sleep-wake transition disorders, parasomnias of REM sleep, and nonspecific parasomnias. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine ... A sleep disorder of central nervous system origin characterized by prolonged nocturnal sleep and periods of daytime drowsiness ... sleep onset, drowsy sleep; Stage 2: light sleep; Stages 3 and 4: delta sleep, light sleep, deep sleep, telencephalic sleep. ... abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders ...
It may be that the transition from sleep to waking acts as a trigger to a seizure focus in the medial temporal lobe. ... TEA is related to sleep in nearly three-quarters of cases, and persistent memory problems could be the result of nocturnal, ... Diagnostic criteria for the disorder were adopted in the 2007 study of 50 case emphasized clinical features that distinguish ... Seizure activity Seizures in TEA patients commonly occur upon waking suggesting a link between TEA and sleep. It is possible ...
... clinicaltrials.gov The purpose of this pilot study is to assess the impact of sleep workshops on sleep, mood, anxiety and well- ... sleep-wake transition disorders, parasomnias of REM sleep, and nonspecific parasomnias. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine ... A sleep disorder of central nervous system origin characterized by prolonged nocturnal sleep and periods of daytime drowsiness ... sleep onset, drowsy sleep; Stage 2: light sleep; Stages 3 and 4: delta sleep, light sleep, deep sleep, telencephalic sleep. ...
Excessive sleepiness: under-recognized and essential marker for sleep/wake disorder management.. Roth, T., Bogan, R. K., ... Nocturnal leg cramps. Monderer, R. S., Wu, W. P. & Thorpy, M. J., Jan 1 2010, In : Current neurology and neuroscience reports. ... Classification of Sleep Disorders. Thorpy, M. J., Oct 1 2012, In : Neurotherapeutics. 9, 4, p. 687-701 15 p.. Research output: ... Sleep disorders. Thorpy, M. J., Jan 1 1991, In : Current Opinion in Neurology and Neurosurgery. 4, 2, p. 265-270 6 p.. Research ...
B. Sleep-Wake Transition Disorders. 1. Rhythmic movement Disorder. 2. Sleep Starts. 3. Sleep Talking. 4. Nocturnal Leg Cramps ... Sleep Health. , Sleep Disorder Classifications. Sleep Disorder Classifications. Might you have a sleep disorder? There are over ... Stimulant-Dependent Sleep Disorder. 12. Alcohol-Dependent Sleep Disorder. 13. Toxin-Induced Sleep Disorder. 14. Extrinsic Sleep ... sleep-wake transition disorders, parasomnias of REM sleep, and nonspecific parasomnias. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine ...
Criteria in diagnosing nocturnal leg cramps: a systematic review. Hallegraeff, J., de Greef, M., Krijnen, W. & van der Schans, ...
The patient is medically intractable, with repetitive seizures at sleep-wake transition at bedtime most nights that have not ... Video montage of REM sleep behavior disorder demonstrating vigorous, aggressive, and violent behaviors during REM sleep in an ... Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy Seizure Creator: Nancy Foldvary-Schaefer, DO, MS, FAASM ... Video demonstrates REM sleep behavior disorder in an adult man. Note the purposeful body movements correlating with dream ...
... sleep-wake transitions, wake and sleep stability, occurrence and morphology of sleep spindles, and electrooculography measures ... sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia characterized by a history of recurrent nocturnal dream enactment behavior and ... Several other sleep-related abnormalities have recently been identified in patients with RBD/Parkinsons disease who experience ... loss of skeletal muscle atonia and increased phasic muscle activity during REM sleep: REM sleep without atonia. RBD and ...
Sleep-Wake Transition Disorders, drug therapy, epidemiology ... Quinine: not a safe drug for treating nocturnal leg cramps.. ... Seasonal effects on the occurrence of nocturnal leg cramps: a prospective cohort study.. 2015 Scott R Garrison 외 4 명 Canadian ...
... with sleep-wake transition disorders second most common. 53% had nocturnal seizures. 16 patients were monitored by pulse ... Sleep problems in Dravet syndrome: a modifiable comorbidity. By Nicole Villas,2018-01-22T16:47:16-05:00January 22nd, 2018, ... 2017) 57 patients from Australia completed a sleep questionnaire, with 75% reporting problems. The most commonly reported ... problem was difficulty initiating and maintaining sleep, ...
... sleep-wake transitions, wake and sleep stability, occurrence and morphology of sleep spindles, and electrooculography measures ... REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD is a parasomnia characterized by a history of recurrent nocturnal dream enactment behavior and ... Neurophysiological basis of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder: informing future drug development ... Salivary melatonin concentrations had a nocturnal peak at approximately 4 am. The median nocturnal melatonin response at 4 am ...
... characterized by enhanced slow-wave sleep and REM sleep. Frequent sleep-wake transitions were identified in nocturnal sleep ... Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/complications. Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology. Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology. ... Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/complications. Pain/complications. Sleep Wake Disorders/complications. Sleep/physiology. ... Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/diagnosis. Sleep Stages/physiology. Sleep Wake Disorders/diagnosis. ...
Nocturnal leg cramps: A common complaint in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis. Matsumoto, M., Watanabe, K., Tsuji, T ... Journal of Spinal Disorders and Techniques. 22, 5, p. 372-375 4 p.. 研究成果: Article ...
Sleep, a normal, reversible, recurrent state of reduced responsiveness to external stimulation that is accompanied by complex ... sleep in newborns occurs at sleep onset as well as sleep-to-wake and active-to-quiet NREM sleep transitions. NREM sleep in the ... For example, sleep disorders such as sleep apnea are more common among older people, and even in healthy older people there is ... there is an increasing tendency toward the concentration of sleep in one long nocturnal period. The trend toward monophasic ...
Sleep deprivation and irregular sleep-wake schedules can also cause sleep paralysis. It is also seen in narcolepsy, a disorder ... Occur in association with sleep, specific stages of sleep or sleep-wake transitions. These can be disruptive to the patient and ... Nightmares are vivid nocturnal events that can cause feelings of fear, terror, and/or anxiety. Usually, the person having a ... REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). People with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder act out dramatic and/or violent ...
... breathing disorders in which respiratory effort is diminished or absent in an intermittent or cyclical fashion during sleep. In ... central sleep apnea is associated with obstructive sleep apnea syndromes or is caused by an underlying medical condition, re... ... The term central sleep apnea encompasses a heterogeneous group of sleep-related ... insomnia may actually put these patients at increased risk of central apneas because a greater number of sleep-wake transitions ...
... might know it as something called catathrenia or nocturnal groaning that typically occurs during our sleep-wake transitions.(1) ... New York City sleep specialist Dr. Steven Park has spent decades treating sleep disorders, including catathrenia. He explains ... "Catathrenia: Parasomnia or Uncommon Feature of Sleep Disordered Breathing?" Sleep. 2008 Jan 1; 31(1): 132-139. ... are prescribed to people who suffer from poor sleep due to a sleep breathing disorder. He needs to see his doctor for further ...
This is a very unusual manifestation of a non-REM parasomnia, a sleep disorder involving partial arousal during the transition ... Nocturnal Episodes of Pain and Screaming. A new case study in the journal Sleep (Mantoan et al., 2013) reports on the ... But what if waking up from sleep was the nightmare? Hypnopompic hallucinations are unusual sensory phenomena experienced just ... There was no history of sleep violence, sleep sex, sleep eating, or any other NREM parasomniac automatisms. The authors could ...
Nocturnal Awakening Symptom Checker: Possible causes include Bronchial Asthma. Check the full list of possible causes and ... Frequent sleep-wake transitions were identified in nocturnal sleep with all sleep stages switching to wakefulness, with more ... In contrast, primary headache disorders which often occur during nocturnal sleep or upon awakening, such as migraine, cluster ... Thus, the presence of a long sleep latency, frequent nocturnal awakenings, or prolonged periods of wakefulness during the sleep ...
Interest in and treatment of sleep disturbances in youth continues to increase, but research continues to lag. ... Pediatric sleep disorders represent highly common phenomena that often interfere with daily patient and family functioning. ... Events can take place during sleep-wake transitions, arousal, or REM sleep. The relationship of events to sleep stage and other ... Nocturnal sleep PSG shows REM sleep latency to be less than or equal to 15 minutes or a multiple sleep latency test shows a ...
  • How much the bedwetting limits social activities like sleep-overs and campouts The degree of the social ostracism by peers Anger, punishment, and rejection by caregivers The number of failed treatment attempts How long the child has been wetting Studies show that bedwetting children are more likely to have behavioral problems. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is important to note the behavioral and neurophysiologic similarities between dexmedetomidine-induced altered arousal and sleep occurs because activation of inhibitory inputs from the pre-optic area is an essential component of how non-REM sleep is initiated. (bioportfolio.com)
  • For example, the typical presence of certain electroencephalogram (EEG) patterns ( brain patterns of electrical activity) with behavioral sleep has led to the designation of such patterns as "signs" of sleep. (britannica.com)
  • In addition to the behavioral and physiological criteria already mentioned, subjective experience (in the case of the self ) and verbal reports of such experience (in the case of others) are used at the human level to define sleep. (britannica.com)
  • Such subjective evidence, however, can be at variance with both behavioral classifications and sleep electrophysiology, raising interesting questions about how to define the true measure of sleep. (britannica.com)
  • The consequences of untreated sleep problems may include significant emotional, behavioral, and cognitive dysfunction. (medscape.com)
  • On the other hand, disrupted and inadequate sleep alone can produce behavioral, affective, and cognitive dysfunction. (medscape.com)
  • Sleep has also been described as a behavioral state marked by characteristic immobile posture and diminished but readily reversible sensitivity to external stimuli. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • 3) behavioral phenomena occurring during sleep [sleepwalking, rapid eye movement (REM) behavioral disorder, periodic leg movements of sleep, etc. (wordpress.com)
  • Relating to or exhibiting approximately 24-hour periodicity, especially related to fluctuation of behavioral and physiological functions, including sleep waking. (1800cpap.com)
  • The Stanford Sleep Clinic's website suggests that adjusting light exposure (blackout curtains or eye shades), taking certain "alerting medications" and trying behavioral techniques may be helpful to sufferers of "Shift Work Sleep Disorder. (paloaltoonline.com)
  • Sleep is a natural, periodic and reversible behavioral state of perceptual disengagement from and unresponsiveness to the environment. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • The 24 hour day-night cycle associated with the daily fluctuation of behavioral and physiological functions, including sleep and waking. (clinicalsleep.com)
  • Cognitive and behavioural involvement is the rule, not the exception, among patients with disorders of the central nervous system (CNS). (bmj.com)
  • Patients who are sedated with dexmedetomidine are arousable and responsive in a manner that is very similar to that seen in people who are sleeping. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Several other sleep-related abnormalities have recently been identified in patients with RBD/Parkinson's disease who experience abnormalities in sleep electroencephalographic frequencies, sleep-wake transitions, wake and sleep stability, occurrence and morphology of sleep spindles, and electrooculography measures. (dovepress.com)
  • 2017) 57 patients from Australia completed a sleep questionnaire, with 75% reporting problems. (dravetfoundation.org)
  • RESULTS: Compared with the controls, the narcoleptic patients showed a 1.5-fold increase in total sleep time over 24 h, characterized by enhanced slow-wave sleep and REM sleep. (bireme.br)
  • RESULTS: Overall, few differences in sleep/wake patterns were found between mTBI patients and controls. (bireme.br)
  • Pain and increased sleep need (in terms of hours per day or napping frequency) were found to co-exist in as much as 29% of mTBI patients at one month postinjury. (bireme.br)
  • CONCLUSION: Pain could be associated with more pronounced sleep need in about one-third of mTBI patients during early recovery. (bireme.br)
  • Patients also report nonrestorative sleep, choking, and shortness of breath. (medscape.com)
  • Almost all PCD patients have otolaryngologic manifestations, characterized by recurrent ear and sinus infections, chronic inflammation at this level, sensorioneural and conductive hearing loss, and sleep-disordered breathing. (bvsalud.org)
  • During sleep, CPAP patients wear a face mask connected to a pump that forces air into the nasal passages at pressures high enough to overcome obstructions in the airway and stimulate normal breathing. (1800cpap.com)
  • The association between sleep disordered breathing (SDB) and cardiovascular morbidity in adults has become an important consideration in the management of patients with SDB. (ahajournals.org)
  • With increasing knowledge about sleep and its disorders and widespread use of diagnostic testing for sleep, more patients with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) are being identified. (psychiatrictimes.com)
  • Medical interns working extended shifts reported making more medical errors (including those that harm or kill patients), had a 60 percent increase in the odds of suffering an occupational injury, and have twice the odds of suffering motor-vehicle crashes on the drive home from work, a June 2011 article in the journal Science of Nature and Sleep states. (paloaltoonline.com)
  • At this point, you've had a brief overview of how we assess patients for sleep disorders and what types of sleep disorders exist. (coursera.org)
  • Patients with COPD may experience most pronounced hypoventilation and oxyhemoglobin desaturation during phasic REM sleep. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • In epilepsy, genetics is leading the way, but this is only the dawn of what will, thankfully, be a new era in our ability to treat and eventually cure patients with epilepsy and other brain network disorders. (cureepilepsy.org)
  • Recently, studies have been successful in developing reliable analytical methods that quantitatively represent the disease progression in patients with PD, VD, SAD, tremor, and sleep disturbance [ 9 - 11 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Patients taking sleeping pills for long periods of time, please do not try to leave it alone. (netbeans.org)
  • Further we hypothesized that arterial StHCO 3 - concentration (a surrogate for CA activity) was elevated in relation to the degree of disordered breathing in OSA patients. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The aim of this study was to investigate whether synchronization (in relaxed conditions with no stimuli) between different brain areas within the delta, theta, alpha (alpha1, alpha2), beta (beta1, beta2), and gamma bands is altered in patients with a neurological disorder in order to generate significant cortical enhancements. (ibecbarcelona.eu)
  • On the other hand, LP method significantly overestimated %Sync especially in the more severe patients, because it was unable to track the phase non-linearities that can be observed during sleep disordered breathing. (ibecbarcelona.eu)
  • Also known as hypersomnolence, these less common primary sleep disorders leave patients excessively sleepy during the daytime to the extent that they can no longer function normally. (blogspot.com)
  • Two-thirds of these patients wake up in the middle of the night, with more than half having trouble falling back to sleep after a middle-of-the-night awakening . (wikipedia.org)
  • A sleep disorder that is diagnosed with patients who feel sleepy and go to bed early in the evening and wake up very early in the morning. (clinicalsleep.com)
  • Both processes are disturbed in critically ill patients, potentially due to exposure to sleep-altering medications (e.g., propofol), the structure of the intensive care unit (ICU) environment (e.g., workflow), aggravation of a pre-existing sleep disorder, and/or effects of acute illness (e.g., sepsis). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Usually the patients who show up at the sleep center are teens who are brought in by their mothers because they can't get up and make it to their early morning classes. (cnn.com)
  • Most times, the help of a sleep physician is essential, and always, the patients themselves have to want to change their schedule. (cnn.com)
  • She sees patients at the Sleep Center and the Neuromuscular Clinic. (stanford.edu)
  • Treatments to improve sleep quality, sleep-related breathing disorders, and quality of life in patients who use opioids chronically are discussed. (stanford.edu)
  • The eligible women would be randomized and stratified by sleep problems to two arms: (Acupuncture Arm vs. Sham Acupuncture) with a goal of having 48 patients complete the study (we anticipate about 20% attrition rate). (stanford.edu)
  • Patients can resist the desire to sleep only temporarily but can be roused as readily as from normal sleep. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Patients may also experience sleep attacks-episodes of sleep that strike without warning. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The HR mice, i.e. those animals that have a genetic predisposition to hyper-activating their HPA axis in response to stressors, showed disturbed patterns in sleep architecture, similar to what is known from depressed patients. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Automobile accidents in patients with sleep disorders. (sleepdisorderhelp.com)
  • Initially described in 1917, the condition causes victims, generally young men in apparently OK health and no serious medical history, to die suddenly in their sleep, with deaths being the most frequent in the early morning hours. (toptenz.net)
  • The condition rose to prominence in the United States as significant numbers of refugees fleeing conflict in Southeast Asia came to the United States and gained notoriety by causing frequent, mysterious deaths through sudden nocturnal heart failure. (toptenz.net)
  • Deaths due to all causes are most frequent between 4:00 and 6:00 a.m., and this second section of the class highlights the relevance of sleep for preventive medicine. (coursera.org)
  • If we adopt a "bio-psycho-social" approach to illness generally, one which recognises the biological, psychological, and social aspects of our lives, we become less likely to neglect the treatable psychological origins of many physical complaints (from globus hystericus to full blown conversion disorder) and the treatable psychological consequences (such as depression and anxiety) of much physical disease. (bmj.com)
  • Nightmares are vivid nocturnal events that can cause feelings of fear, terror, and/or anxiety. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • In that study, EDS was associated with insufficient sleep, several sleep disorders, and general organic diseases in addition to psychiatric conditions (including anxiety and depressive disorders) and hypnotic and antidepressant use [ 1 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The Amitriptyline helps with sleep, Guanficine off label for night terrors, racing heart from anxiety. (drugs.com)
  • Instead of viewing anxiety as a sign of disorder or dysfunction, I see it as a normal, human response to this life that includes stress, fear, risk, and ultimately, death . (selfgrowth.com)
  • Reducing stress and anxiety triggers may reduce the likelihood of an exacerbation of the disorder. (ldsindex.org)
  • A rare and by default always fatal condition most frequently reported from Southeast Asia, Sudden Unexplained Nocturnal Death Syndrome (SUNDS) has disproportionately affected those of Southeast Asian backgrounds and led to intense scientific investigation. (toptenz.net)
  • As 41% BE were idiopathic, in 11% the disorder was postinfectious and others were associated to rheumatic disease, Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, IgG deficiency and Kartagener syndrome. (bvsalud.org)
  • or (4) circadian rhythm disorders associated with jet lag, shift work, and delayed sleep phase syndrome. (wordpress.com)
  • Others in this group are disorders of neurological mechanisms (e.g., irregular sleep-wake pattern and advanced sleep phase syndrome). (1800cpap.com)
  • The desire to optimize infant sleep duration and consolidation, however, must be balanced with safe infant sleep, a fact reinforced by the 3500 infants who tragically die of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) or other sleep-related deaths annually. (aappublications.org)
  • male gender (the classic patient with OSA is the male sex ,20:1 - male -female ratio) - obesity (particularly obesity of the upper body football player body habitus - stocky - certain endocrine disorders (hypothyroidism and acromegaly), - Prader-Willi syndrome (a congenital syndrome involving mental retardation, sexual infantilism, polyphagia with obesity, muscular hypotonia), - congenital craniophacial abnormalities (Pierre Robin syndrome). (pdfmedsearch.com)
  • The notion many of us bring to neurology-that only a minority of neurological disorders has a significant psychological or psychiatric dimension-is almost certainly wrong. (bmj.com)
  • We then pick out a number of neurological disorders which are particularly liable to give rise to "discipline confusion" by turning up in the psychiatry clinic, grouping these disorders in terms of the neuropsychiatric function which they most conspicuously disturb (for example, memory in the case of transient global amnesia). (bmj.com)
  • In the diagnosis and treatment of RBD, potentially serious neurological disorders must be ruled out. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • In experimental studies, sleep has also been defined in terms of physiological variables generally associated with recurring periods of inactivity identified behaviorally as sleep. (britannica.com)
  • Advances in the technology of animal experimentation have made it possible to extend the physiological approach from externally measurable manifestations of sleep such as the EEG to the underlying neural (nerve) mechanisms presumably responsible for such manifestations. (britannica.com)
  • Waking effects routinely observed in such studies have been of deteriorated physiological functioning, sometimes including actual tissue damage. (britannica.com)
  • This supports the view that sleep serves a vital physiological function. (britannica.com)
  • Physiological hypotheses have implicated genes associated with both the monoamine and circadian systems, related to stress-induced arousal responses and subsequent overactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis or, alternatively, mediated by increased activation of REM sleep mechanisms [ 10 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • It presents physiological and pathophysiological insights related to sleep medicine obtained by new technical developments. (frontiersin.org)
  • Light, through its non-imaging forming effects, plays a dominant role on a myriad of physiological functions, including the human sleep-wake cycle. (mdpi.com)
  • Although its function remains to be fully elucidated, sleep is a universal need of all higher life forms including humans, absence of which has serious physiological consequences. (nap.edu)
  • They are caused by a physiological activation in which the patient's brain exits from SWS and is caught in between a sleeping and waking state. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sleep is a dynamic process that affects both psychological and physiological functioning. (healio.com)
  • Internal clock (suprachiasmatic nucleus) that influences sleep-wake cycle and other physiological functions. (nsmcovington.com)
  • As the clinical discipline of sleep prospered, sleep neurobiology through the 1990s focused primarily on mammals and used systems physiological and pharmacological approaches. (jneurosci.org)
  • Periodic limb movement disorder consists of stereotyped extensions of the great toe and dorsiflexion of the foot recurring every 20-40 s during non-rapid eye movement sleep. (wordpress.com)
  • That result must be understood in the context of the limited duration of the studies and should not be interpreted as indicating that sleep loss is either safe or desirable. (britannica.com)
  • Risk factors for developing hallucinations include older age, longer duration of PD, history of sleep disorder, depression, and coexisting cognitive impairment [ 1 , 2 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Although the impact of duration of this disorder on the development of risk factors for cardiovascular disease is difficult to estimate, morbidity secondary to SDB seems to manifest gradually, often taking decades. (ahajournals.org)
  • The current study aimed to investigate the longitudinal associations between the quality of parent-child interactions in toddlerhood and sleep duration and quality at early school age. (medworm.com)
  • At 4 months, reported overnight sleep duration was similar between groups, but compared with room-sharers, early independent sleepers had better sleep consolidation (longest stretch: 46 more minutes, P = .02). (aappublications.org)
  • Short sleep duration during infancy has been associated with adverse outcomes for infants and families. (aappublications.org)
  • Conclusions: These data suggest that consumption of a tart cherry juice concentrate provides an increase in exogenous melatonin that is beneficial in improving sleep duration and quality in healthy men and women and might be of benefit in managing disturbed sleep. (researchgate.net)
  • The stability of the wake state, alertness, and how well the brain functions cognitively and emotionally all depend upon an adequate duration of quality sleep. (psychiatrictimes.com)
  • Although the duration of sleep needed for stable waking functions varies among individuals and across the life span, daily sleep in our species is an average duration of eight hours. (psychiatrictimes.com)
  • We tested the hypothesis that activity-adjusted morning blood pressure surge, blood pressure load, and diurnal and nocturnal blood pressure are significantly higher in children with sleep disordered breathing than in healthy controls and that these blood pressure parameters relate to left ventricular remodeling. (ahajournals.org)
  • Diurnal and nocturnal systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and mean arterial blood pressure predicted the changes in left ventricular relative wall thickness. (ahajournals.org)
  • Researchers have learned about the cyclical patterns of different types of sleep and their relationships to breathing, heart rate, brain waves, and other physical functions. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Similar to non-REM sleep, the investigators also found that dexmedetomidine decreased cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolism, but maintained cortico-cortical functional connectivity patterns. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Use of bright light to affect a change in sleep patterns. (1800cpap.com)
  • The chapter ends with a discussion about how sleep patterns change over an individual's life span. (nap.edu)
  • However, most often the problems reflect certain established patterns of interaction between the parent and the child at time of sleep transition. (mhmedical.com)
  • Altered patterns of sleep during an ICU stay take days to normalize and in certain cases may persist after transfer to the general floor/ward. (biomedcentral.com)
  • It is closely linked with the Sunrise - Sunset cycle and is associated with the waking and sleeping patterns of animals and the metabolism of the plants like opening of flowers, etc. (vishwafoundation.com)
  • The biological clockwork that regulates these rhythms is dynamic over the lifespan: rhythmic activities such as sleep/wake patterns change markedly as we age, and in many cases they become increasingly fragmented. (jci.org)
  • Results from this clinical trial of dexmedetomidine suggests that this drug may be used to induce and maintain a brain state that closely approximates non-REM II sleep state characterized by sleep spindles, and slow-delta oscillations. (bioportfolio.com)
  • A key strength of this proposal is that it is based upon compelling results obtained from our recently conducted Phase I/II proof-of-concept clinical study (NCT01485393) where the investigators established the safety, efficacy, dosing paradigm, and dose for successfully using dexmedetomidine to induce sleep, which is characterized by non-REM I-III and REM sleep states. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Diagnostic criteria for the disorder were adopted in the 2007 study of 50 case emphasized clinical features that distinguish TEA from transient global amnesia (TGA), with which TEA is often compared: A history of recurrent witnessed episodes of transient amnesia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sleep spindles are also known as "sigma waves" a term initially recommended (1961) but later discouraged by the International Fenderation of Societies for Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology (IFSECN), and redefined as a "group of rhythmic waves characterized by progressively increasing, then gradually decreasing amplitude"[ 1 ]. (intechopen.com)
  • The use of social media and nightly entertainment in young subjects may blur the clinical picture sometimes hinder a diagnosis of a real sleep disorder. (global-summit.com)
  • A general clinical background is sketched about sleep cycle, circadian rhythms, biological clock, aiming at building a structure for efficient diagnosing. (global-summit.com)
  • Which is a detailed flat form of Neuroimaging of Sleep and Sleep Disorders concerning imaging methods in sleep medicine highlights the evolving investigation possibilities from research and clinical aspects. (global-summit.com)
  • Masturbation during sleep was first reported as a clinical disorder in 1986. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is considered to be a prodromal feature of these neurodegenerative disorders (PD, dementia with Lewy bodies [DLB], mulitple system atrophy) and can predate the clinical manifestation by years to decades. (healio.com)
  • This 4-volume work--the largest reference work available on the subject--completely integrates basic and clinical aspects of sleep and sleep disorders. (credoreference.com)
  • Hypertension (both systemic and pulmonary), cardiac arrythmias, headaches, and depression are just a few of the clinical entities that have recently been associated with sleep-related The physician often focuses on the management of the secondary effects without A common example is the middle-aged male presenting with vague complaints Physical examination reveals only mild hypertension. (pdfmedsearch.com)
  • The founders of the field quickly recognized the clinical significance of sleep and the existence of sleep disorders. (jneurosci.org)
  • Significant alterations in several frequency bands of the EEG, which also seem to at least partly mimic clinical observations, suggest the SR mouse lines as a promising animal model for basic research of mechanisms underlying sleep impairments in MD. (biomedcentral.com)
  • J of Clinical Sleep Medicine, 5(1), 71-78. (sleepdisorderhelp.com)
  • Neurology has an especially close relationship with psychology and psychiatry, as all three disciplines focus on the functions and disorders of a single organ, the brain. (bmj.com)
  • Two portable light sources, comprising light emitting diodes (LEDs) of two different wavelengths, were compared to a standard light box in suppressing and phase shifting nocturnal salivary melatonin. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Background: Tart Montmorency cherries have been reported to contain high levels of phytochemicals including melatonin, a molecule critical in regulating the sleep-wake cycle in humans. (researchgate.net)
  • Purpose: The aim of our investigation was to ascertain whether ingestion of a tart cherry juice concentrate would increase the urinary melatonin levels in healthy adults and improve sleep quality. (researchgate.net)
  • The SCN directly regulates multiple neurotransmitter systems that either drive or modulate sleep, including the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and melatonin from the pineal gland [ 2 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We also use melatonin , but not as a sleep aid. (cnn.com)
  • For example, when a given child with recurrent depression has an exacerbation, sleep problems often increase simultaneously. (medscape.com)
  • Oral/sublingual will reduce sleep latency Hypothesis 2.2. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Therefore, the investigators hypothesize that oral dexmedetomidine will shorten sleep latency by inducing a non-REM II state that will allow indigenous sleep mechanisms to engage successful sleep state switching into non-REM III and REM sleep states, conferring the restorative benefits of sleep. (bioportfolio.com)