A powerful vasodilator used in emergencies to lower blood pressure or to improve cardiac function. It is also an indicator for free sulfhydryl groups in proteins.
Inorganic salts of the hypothetical acid, H3Fe(CN)6.
Drugs used to cause dilation of the blood vessels.
A diverse group of agents, with unique chemical structures and biochemical requirements, which generate NITRIC OXIDE. These compounds have been used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and the management of acute myocardial infarction, acute and chronic congestive heart failure, and surgical control of blood pressure. (Adv Pharmacol 1995;34:361-81)
A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.
The physiological widening of BLOOD VESSELS by relaxing the underlying VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.
A neurotransmitter found at neuromuscular junctions, autonomic ganglia, parasympathetic effector junctions, a subset of sympathetic effector junctions, and at many sites in the central nervous system.
Guanosine cyclic 3',5'-(hydrogen phosphate). A guanine nucleotide containing one phosphate group which is esterified to the sugar moiety in both the 3'- and 5'-positions. It is a cellular regulatory agent and has been described as a second messenger. Its levels increase in response to a variety of hormones, including acetylcholine, insulin, and oxytocin and it has been found to activate specific protein kinases. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
Part of the arm in humans and primates extending from the ELBOW to the WRIST.
Procedure in which arterial blood pressure is intentionally reduced in order to control blood loss during surgery. This procedure is performed either pharmacologically or by pre-surgical removal of blood.
Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.
A competitive inhibitor of nitric oxide synthetase.
A non-selective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. It has been used experimentally to induce hypertension.
An alpha-1 adrenergic agonist used as a mydriatic, nasal decongestant, and cardiotonic agent.
Drugs used to cause constriction of the blood vessels.
An NADPH-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-ARGININE and OXYGEN to produce CITRULLINE and NITRIC OXIDE.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of GTP to 3',5'-cyclic GMP and pyrophosphate. It also acts on ITP and dGTP. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 4.6.1.2.
A nicotinic antagonist that has been used as a ganglionic blocker in hypertension, as an adjunct to anesthesia, and to induce hypotension during surgery.
That phase of a muscle twitch during which a muscle returns to a resting position.
An essential amino acid that is physiologically active in the L-form.
A sulfur-containing alkyl thionitrite that is one of the NITRIC OXIDE DONORS.
PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.
The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.
An inhibitor of nitric oxide synthetase which has been shown to prevent glutamate toxicity. Nitroarginine has been experimentally tested for its ability to prevent ammonia toxicity and ammonia-induced alterations in brain energy and ammonia metabolites. (Neurochem Res 1995:200(4):451-6)
3-Mercapto-D-valine. The most characteristic degradation product of the penicillin antibiotics. It is used as an antirheumatic and as a chelating agent in Wilson's disease.
Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.
Oxadiazoles are heterocyclic organic compounds consisting of a five-membered ring containing two carbon atoms, one nitrogen atom, and two oxygen atoms (one as a part of the oxadiazole ring and the other as a substituent or part of a larger molecule), which can exist in various isomeric forms and are known for their versatile biological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antibacterial, and antitumor properties.
A morpholinyl sydnone imine ethyl ester, having a nitrogen in place of the keto oxygen. It acts as NITRIC OXIDE DONORS and is a vasodilator that has been used in ANGINA PECTORIS.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
The force that opposes the flow of BLOOD through a vascular bed. It is equal to the difference in BLOOD PRESSURE across the vascular bed divided by the CARDIAC OUTPUT.
The physiological narrowing of BLOOD VESSELS by contraction of the VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.
A volatile vasodilator which relieves ANGINA PECTORIS by stimulating GUANYLATE CYCLASE and lowering cytosolic calcium. It is also sometimes used for TOCOLYSIS and explosives.
A nonapeptide messenger that is enzymatically produced from KALLIDIN in the blood where it is a potent but short-lived agent of arteriolar dilation and increased capillary permeability. Bradykinin is also released from MAST CELLS during asthma attacks, from gut walls as a gastrointestinal vasodilator, from damaged tissues as a pain signal, and may be a neurotransmitter.
A response by the BARORECEPTORS to increased BLOOD PRESSURE. Increased pressure stretches BLOOD VESSELS which activates the baroreceptors in the vessel walls. The net response of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM is a reduction of central sympathetic outflow. This reduces blood pressure both by decreasing peripheral VASCULAR RESISTANCE and by lowering CARDIAC OUTPUT. Because the baroreceptors are tonically active, the baroreflex can compensate rapidly for both increases and decreases in blood pressure.
The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.
The portion of the descending aorta proceeding from the arch of the aorta and extending to the DIAPHRAGM, eventually connecting to the ABDOMINAL AORTA.
The smallest divisions of the arteries located between the muscular arteries and the capillaries.
Recording of change in the size of a part as modified by the circulation in it.
A compound consisting of dark green crystals or crystalline powder, having a bronze-like luster. Solutions in water or alcohol have a deep blue color. Methylene blue is used as a bacteriologic stain and as an indicator. It inhibits GUANYLATE CYCLASE, and has been used to treat cyanide poisoning and to lower levels of METHEMOGLOBIN.
Precursor of epinephrine that is secreted by the adrenal medulla and is a widespread central and autonomic neurotransmitter. Norepinephrine is the principal transmitter of most postganglionic sympathetic fibers and of the diffuse projection system in the brain arising from the locus ceruleus. It is also found in plants and is used pharmacologically as a sympathomimetic.
The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
The neural systems which act on VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE to control blood vessel diameter. The major neural control is through the sympathetic nervous system.
The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.
Regional infusion of drugs via an arterial catheter. Often a pump is used to impel the drug through the catheter. Used in therapy of cancer, upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, infection, and peripheral vascular disease.
The circulation of the BLOOD through the MICROVASCULAR NETWORK.
'Purines' is a term used in medical biochemistry to refer to naturally occurring heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds, which include adenine and guanine (components of nucleotides and nucleic acids), and are formed in the body from purine bases through various metabolic processes.
A potassium-channel opening vasodilator that has been investigated in the management of hypertension. It has also been tried in patients with asthma. (Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p352)
Arteries which arise from the abdominal aorta and distribute to most of the intestines.
The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.
Therapeutic introduction of ions of soluble salts into tissues by means of electric current. In medical literature it is commonly used to indicate the process of increasing the penetration of drugs into surface tissues by the application of electric current. It has nothing to do with ION EXCHANGE; AIR IONIZATION nor PHONOPHORESIS, none of which requires current.
Nitroso compounds are organic or inorganic substances containing the nitroso functional group, which consists of a nitrogen atom bonded to an oxygen atom through a single covalent bond, often abbreviated as -NO.
A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
The main trunk of the systemic arteries.
A stable prostaglandin endoperoxide analog which serves as a thromboxane mimetic. Its actions include mimicking the hydro-osmotic effect of VASOPRESSIN and activation of TYPE C PHOSPHOLIPASES. (From J Pharmacol Exp Ther 1983;224(1): 108-117; Biochem J 1984;222(1):103-110)
N-(1-Oxobutyl)-cyclic 3',5'-(hydrogen phosphate)-2'-butanoate guanosine. A derivative of cyclic GMP. It has a higher resistance to extracellular and intracellular phosphodiesterase than cyclic GMP.
The thoracolumbar division of the autonomic nervous system. Sympathetic preganglionic fibers originate in neurons of the intermediolateral column of the spinal cord and project to the paravertebral and prevertebral ganglia, which in turn project to target organs. The sympathetic nervous system mediates the body's response to stressful situations, i.e., the fight or flight reactions. It often acts reciprocally to the parasympathetic system.
A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.
The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)
Quinoxalines are heterocyclic organic compounds consisting of a benzene fused to a pyrazine ring, which have been studied for their potential antibacterial, antifungal, and anticancer properties.
The veins and arteries of the HEART.
Inorganic salts of HYDROGEN CYANIDE containing the -CN radical. The concept also includes isocyanides. It is distinguished from NITRILES, which denotes organic compounds containing the -CN radical.
Receptors in the vascular system, particularly the aorta and carotid sinus, which are sensitive to stretch of the vessel walls.
Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.
Nitrous acid sodium salt. Used in many industrial processes, in meat curing, coloring, and preserving, and as a reagent in ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY TECHNIQUES. It is used therapeutically as an antidote in cyanide poisoning. The compound is toxic and mutagenic and will react in vivo with secondary or tertiary amines thereby producing highly carcinogenic nitrosamines.
A group of cyclic GMP-dependent enzymes that catalyze the phosphorylation of SERINE or THREONINE residues of proteins.
Hydrogen cyanide (HCN); A toxic liquid or colorless gas. It is found in the smoke of various tobacco products and released by combustion of nitrogen-containing organic materials.
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
A method of non-invasive, continuous measurement of MICROCIRCULATION. The technique is based on the values of the DOPPLER EFFECT of low-power laser light scattered randomly by static structures and moving tissue particulates.
Abnormally low BLOOD PRESSURE that can result in inadequate blood flow to the brain and other vital organs. Common symptom is DIZZINESS but greater negative impacts on the body occur when there is prolonged depravation of oxygen and nutrients.
A sulfur-containing alkyl thionitrite that is one of the NITRIC OXIDE DONORS.
Injectable form of VITAMIN B 12 that has been used therapeutically to treat VITAMIN B 12 DEFICIENCY.
A calcium channel blocker that is a class IV anti-arrhythmia agent.
Endogenously-synthesized compounds that influence biological processes not otherwise classified under ENZYMES; HORMONES or HORMONE ANTAGONISTS.
A class of enzymes that catalyze oxidation-reduction reactions of amino acids.
A strain of Rattus norvegicus used as a normotensive control for the spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR).
A CALCIUM-dependent, constitutively-expressed form of nitric oxide synthase found primarily in ENDOTHELIAL CELLS.
Unstriated and unstriped muscle, one of the muscles of the internal organs, blood vessels, hair follicles, etc. Contractile elements are elongated, usually spindle-shaped cells with centrally located nuclei. Smooth muscle fibers are bound together into sheets or bundles by reticular fibers and frequently elastic nets are also abundant. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) that inhibits the enzyme cyclooxygenase necessary for the formation of prostaglandins and other autacoids. It also inhibits the motility of polymorphonuclear leukocytes.
A white crystal or crystalline powder used in BUFFERS; FERTILIZERS; and EXPLOSIVES. It can be used to replenish ELECTROLYTES and restore WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE in treating HYPOKALEMIA.
Delivery of drugs into an artery.
Synthetic compounds that are analogs of the naturally occurring prostaglandin endoperoxides and that mimic their pharmacologic and physiologic activities. They are usually more stable than the naturally occurring compounds.
Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.
The state of activity or tension of a muscle beyond that related to its physical properties, that is, its active resistance to stretch. In skeletal muscle, tonus is dependent upon efferent innervation. (Stedman, 25th ed)
The presence of an increased amount of blood in a body part or an organ leading to congestion or engorgement of blood vessels. Hyperemia can be due to increase of blood flow into the area (active or arterial), or due to obstruction of outflow of blood from the area (passive or venous).
Compounds with a core of fused benzo-pyran rings.
Substances that influence the course of a chemical reaction by ready combination with free radicals. Among other effects, this combining activity protects pancreatic islets against damage by cytokines and prevents myocardial and pulmonary perfusion injuries.
A nucleoside that is composed of ADENINE and D-RIBOSE. Adenosine or adenosine derivatives play many important biological roles in addition to being components of DNA and RNA. Adenosine itself is a neurotransmitter.
Hydrazines are organic compounds containing the functional group R-NH-NH2, where R represents an organic group, and are used in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and rocket fuels, but can be highly toxic and carcinogenic with potential for environmental damage.
The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).
The circulation of the BLOOD through the LUNGS.
A highly neurotoxic polypeptide from the venom of the honey bee (Apis mellifera). It consists of 18 amino acids with two disulfide bridges and causes hyperexcitability resulting in convulsions and respiratory paralysis.
A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.
Inorganic oxides that contain nitrogen.
A strain of Rattus norvegicus with elevated blood pressure used as a model for studying hypertension and stroke.
A potent natriuretic and vasodilatory peptide or mixture of different-sized low molecular weight PEPTIDES derived from a common precursor and secreted mainly by the HEART ATRIUM. All these peptides share a sequence of about 20 AMINO ACIDS.
Isopropyl analog of EPINEPHRINE; beta-sympathomimetic that acts on the heart, bronchi, skeletal muscle, alimentary tract, etc. It is used mainly as bronchodilator and heart stimulant.
The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.
Inorganic or organic salts and esters of nitric acid. These compounds contain the NO3- radical.
Drugs used in the treatment of acute or chronic vascular HYPERTENSION regardless of pharmacological mechanism. Among the antihypertensive agents are DIURETICS; (especially DIURETICS, THIAZIDE); ADRENERGIC BETA-ANTAGONISTS; ADRENERGIC ALPHA-ANTAGONISTS; ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITORS; CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS; GANGLIONIC BLOCKERS; and VASODILATOR AGENTS.
Salts of nitrous acid or compounds containing the group NO2-. The inorganic nitrites of the type MNO2 (where M=metal) are all insoluble, except the alkali nitrites. The organic nitrites may be isomeric, but not identical with the corresponding nitro compounds. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
An alkaloid found in opium but not closely related to the other opium alkaloids in its structure or pharmacological actions. It is a direct-acting smooth muscle relaxant used in the treatment of impotence and as a vasodilator, especially for cerebral vasodilation. The mechanism of its pharmacological actions is not clear, but it apparently can inhibit phosphodiesterases and it may have direct actions on calcium channels.
An alpha-1 adrenergic agonist that causes prolonged peripheral VASOCONSTRICTION.
Compounds which inhibit or antagonize the biosynthesis or actions of phosphodiesterases.
The external reproductive organ of males. It is composed of a mass of erectile tissue enclosed in three cylindrical fibrous compartments. Two of the three compartments, the corpus cavernosa, are placed side-by-side along the upper part of the organ. The third compartment below, the corpus spongiosum, houses the urethra.
Diethylamines are organic compounds consisting of two ethyl groups bonded to an amino nitrogen atom, with the general formula (C2H5)2NH, known for their foul odor and use as chemical intermediates in various industrial applications, but notably not associated with medical definitions unless referring to potential substance abuse or intoxication.
The artery formed by the union of the right and left vertebral arteries; it runs from the lower to the upper border of the pons, where it bifurcates into the two posterior cerebral arteries.
Cell membrane glycoproteins that are selectively permeable to potassium ions. At least eight major groups of K channels exist and they are made up of dozens of different subunits.

Phospholamban is present in endothelial cells and modulates endothelium-dependent relaxation. Evidence from phospholamban gene-ablated mice. (1/3024)

Vascular endothelial cells regulate vascular smooth muscle tone through Ca2+-dependent production and release of vasoactive molecules. Phospholamban (PLB) is a 24- to 27-kDa phosphoprotein that modulates activity of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA). Expression of PLB is reportedly limited to cardiac, slow-twitch skeletal and smooth muscle in which PLB is an important regulator of [Ca2+]i and contractility in these muscles. In the present study, we report the existence of PLB in the vascular endothelium, a nonmuscle tissue, and provide functional data on PLB regulation of vascular contractility through its actions in the endothelium. Endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine was attenuated in aorta of PLB-deficient (PLB-KO) mice compared with wild-type (WT) controls. This effect was not due to actions of nitric oxide on the smooth muscle, because sodium nitroprusside-mediated relaxation in either denuded or endothelium-intact aortas was unaffected by PLB ablation. Relative to denuded vessels, relaxation to forskolin was enhanced in WT endothelium-intact aortas. The endothelium-dependent component of this relaxation was attenuated in PLB-KO aortas. To investigate whether these changes were due to PLB, WT mouse aorta endothelial cells were isolated. Both reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses revealed the presence of PLB in endothelial cells, which were shown to be >98% pure by diI-acetylated LDL uptake and nuclear counterstaining. These data indicate that PLB is present and modulates vascular function as a result of its actions in endothelial cells. The presence of PLB in endothelial cells opens new fields for investigation of Ca2+ regulatory pathways in nonmuscle cells and for modulation of endothelial-vascular interactions.  (+info)

Endogenous endothelin-1 depresses left ventricular systolic and diastolic performance in congestive heart failure. (2/3024)

Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a positive inotrope in normal hearts; however, the direct cardiac effects of endogenous ET-1 in congestive heart failure (CHF) are unknown. We evaluated the cardiac responses to endogenous ET-1 using an ETA and ETB receptor blocker (L-754,142) in seven conscious dogs before and after pacing-induced CHF. Before CHF, when the plasma ET-1 was 7.3 +/- 1.7 fmol/ml, L-754,142 caused no significant alterations in heart rate, left ventricular (LV) end-systolic pressure, total systemic resistance, and the time constant of LV relaxation (tau). LV contractile performance, measured by the slopes of LV pressure (P)-volume (V) relation (EES), dP/dtmax-end-diastolic V relation (dE/dtmax), and stroke work-end-diastolic V relation, was also unaffected. After CHF, when the plasma ET-1 was significantly increased to 14.1 +/- 3.0 fmol/ml (p <.05), L-754,142 produced a significant decreases in LV end-systolic pressure (101 +/- 11 versus 93 +/- 8 mm Hg) and total systemic resistance (0.084 +/- 0.022 versus 0.065 +/- 0.15 mm Hg/ml/min). The tau (42 +/- 12 versus 38 +/- 10 ms), mean left atrial P (22 +/- 5 versus 18 +/- 4 mm Hg) (p <.05), and minimum LVP were also significantly decreased. After CHF, the slopes of P-V relations, EES (3.4 +/- 0.4 versus 4.8 +/- 0.8 mm Hg/ml), dE/dtmax (42.4 +/- 7.8 versus 50.0 +/- 7.8 mm Hg/s/ml), and stroke work-end-diastolic V relation (58.1 +/- 3.3 versus 72.4 +/- 5.2 mm Hg) (p <.05) all increased after L-754,142, indicating enhanced contractility. Before CHF, low levels of endogenous ET-1 have little cardiac effect. However, after CHF, elevated endogenous ET-1 produces arterial vasoconstriction, slows LV relaxation, and depresses LV contractile performance. Thus, elevated endogenous ET-1 may contribute to the functional impairment in CHF in this canine model.  (+info)

Studies of the role of endothelium-dependent nitric oxide release in the sustained vasodilator effects of corticotrophin releasing factor and sauvagine. (3/3024)

1. The mechanisms of the sustained vasodilator actions of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and sauvagine (SVG) were studied using rings of endothelium de-nuded rat thoracic aorta (RTA) and the isolated perfused rat superior mesenteric arterial vasculature (SMA). 2. SVG was approximately 50 fold more potent than CRF on RTA (EC40: 0.9 +/- 0.2 and 44 +/- 9 nM respectively, P < 0.05), and approximately 10 fold more active in the perfused SMA (ED40: 0.05 +/- 0.02 and 0.6 +/- 0.1 nmol respectively, P < 0.05). Single bolus injections of CRF (100 pmol) or SVG (15 pmol) in the perfused SMA caused reductions in perfusion pressure of 23 +/- 1 and 24 +/- 2% that lasted more than 20 min. 3. Removal of the endothelium in the perfused SMA with deoxycholic acid attenuated the vasodilatation and revealed two phases to the response; a short lasting direct action, and a sustained phase which was fully inhibited. 4. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase with L-NAME (100 microM) L-NMMA (100 microM) or 2-ethyl-2-thiopseudourea (ETPU, 100 microM) had similar effects on the vasodilator responses to CRF as removal of the endothelium, suggesting a pivotal role for nitric oxide. However the selective guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[l,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-alpha]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 10 microM) did not affect the response to CRF. 5. High potassium (60 mM) completely inhibited the vasodilator response to CRF in the perfused SMA, indicating a role for K channels in this response. 6. Compared to other vasodilator agents acting via the release of NO, the actions of CRF and SVG are strikingly long-lasting, suggesting a novel mechanism of prolonged activation of nitric oxide synthase.  (+info)

Growth-inhibitory effect of cyclic GMP- and cyclic AMP-dependent vasodilators on rat vascular smooth muscle cells: effect on cell cycle and cyclin expression. (4/3024)

1. The possibility that the antiproliferative effect of cyclic GMP- and cyclic AMP-dependent vasodilators involves an impaired progression of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) through the cell cycle and expression of cyclins, which in association with the cyclin-dependent kinases control the transition between the distinct phases of the cell cycle, was examined. 2. FCS (10%) stimulated the transition of quiescent VSMC from the G0/G1 to the S phase (maximum within 18-24 h and then to the G2/M phase (maximum within 22-28 h). Sodium nitroprusside and 8-Br-cyclic GMP, as well as forskolin and 8-Br-cyclic AMP markedly reduced the percentage of cells in the S phase after FCS stimulation. 3. FCS stimulated the low basal protein expression of cyclin D1 (maximum within 8-24 h) and E (maximum within 8-38 h) and of cyclin A (maximum within 14-30 h). The stimulatory effect of FCS on cyclin D1 and A expression was inhibited, but that of cyclin E was only minimally affected by the vasodilators. 4. FCS increased the low basal level of cyclin D1 mRNA after a lag phase of 2 h and that of cyclin A after 12 h. The vasodilators significantly reduced the FCS-stimulated expression of cyclin D1 and A mRNA. 5. These findings indicate that cyclic GMP- and cyclic AMP-dependent vasodilators inhibit the proliferation of VSMC by preventing the progression of the cell cycle from the G0/G1 into the S phase, an effect which can be attributed to the impaired expression of cyclin D1 and A.  (+info)

Maintenance of normal agonist-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation in uraemic and hypertensive resistance vessels. (5/3024)

BACKGROUND: The nitric oxide system has been implicated in several diseases with vascular complications including diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Despite the high prevalence of hypertension and cardiovascular complications in renal failure few studies have examined vascular and endothelial function in uraemia. We therefore chose to study possible abnormalities of the nitric oxide vasodilator system in an animal model of chronic renal failure. METHODS: Adult spontaneous hypertensive rats and Wistar Kyoto rats were subjected to a 5/6 nephrectomy with control animals having sham operations. After 4 weeks blood pressure was recorded and the animals were sacrificed. Branches of the mesenteric arteries were isolated and mounted on a Mulvany myograph. All experiments were performed in the presence of indomethacin (10(-5) M). The vessels were first preconstricted with noradrenaline, exposed to increasing concentrations of acetylcholine (10(-8) to 10(-4) M) and subsequently to sodium nitroprusside (10(-5) M). RESULTS: There was no difference in the relaxation of the four groups of vessels to any of the concentrations of acetylcholine used nor was there any significant difference in the EC50s (control Wistar Kyoto 6.1+/-1.4 x 10(-8) M; uraemic Wistar Kyoto 5.4+/-0.8 x 10(-8) M; control spontaneous hypertensive rats 4.5+/-0.6 x 10(-8) M; uraemic spontaneous hypertensive rats 6+/-0.7 x 10(-8) M). Vasodilatation in response to sodium nitroprusside was unchanged in uraemic vessels. In addition the vascular responses to both acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were unaltered in spontaneous hypertensive rats. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that normal agonist-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation is maintained in experimental uraemia and hypertension.  (+info)

Regulation of sympathetic nerve activity in heart failure: a role for nitric oxide and angiotensin II. (6/3024)

The mechanisms by which sympathetic function is augmented in chronic heart failure (CHF) are not well understood. A previous study from this laboratory (Circ Res. 1998;82:496-502) indicated that blockade of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis resulted in only an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) when plasma angiotensin II (Ang II) levels were elevated. The present study was undertaken to determine if NO reduces RSNA in rabbits with CHF when Ang II receptors are blocked. Twenty-four New Zealand White rabbits were instrumented with cardiac dimension crystals, a left ventricular pacing lead, and a pacemaker. After pacing at 360 to 380 bpm for approximately 3 weeks, a renal sympathetic nerve electrode and arterial and venous catheters were implanted. Studies were carried out in the conscious state 3 to 7 days after electrode implantation. The effects of a 1-hour infusion of sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 3 microgram . kg-1. min-1) on RSNA and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were determined before and after Ang II blockade with losartan (5 mg/kg) in normal and CHF rabbits. Changes in MAP were readjusted to normal with phenylephrine. Before losartan, SNP evoked a decrease in MAP and an increase in RSNA in both groups that was baroreflex-mediated, because both MAP and RSNA returned to control when phenylephrine was administered. In the normal group, losartan plus SNP caused a reduction in MAP and an increase in RSNA that was 152.6+/-9.8% of control. Phenylephrine returned both MAP and RSNA back to the control levels. However, in the CHF group, losartan plus SNP evoked a smaller change in RSNA for equivalent changes in MAP (117.1+/-4.1% of control). On returning MAP to the control level with phenylephrine, RSNA was reduced to 65.2+/-2.9% of control (P<0. 0001). These data suggest that endogenous Ang II contributes to the sympathoexcitation in the CHF state and that blockade of Ang II receptors plus providing an exogenous source of NO reduces RSNA below the elevated baseline levels. We conclude that both a loss of NO and an increase in Ang II are necessary for sustained increases in sympathetic nerve activity in the CHF state.  (+info)

Heat shock protein expression in umbilical artery smooth muscle. (7/3024)

Postpartum vasospasm in the umbilical arteries may be due to impaired vasorelaxation secondary to alterations in the expression of heat shock proteins. The contractile responses of pre- and full-term bovine umbilical artery smooth muscles were determined in a muscle bath. Heat shock protein expression was determined in bovine and human arterial tissues using western blotting with specific antisera. Full-term bovine and human umbilical artery smooth muscle was refractory to relaxation induced by the nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside. This impaired vasorelaxation was associated with the expression of the inducible form of the heat shock protein, HSP70i, and increases in the expression of the small heat shock protein, HSP27. Small heat shock proteins have been implicated in modulating contraction and relaxation responses in vascular smooth muscles. Thus, alterations in heat shock protein expression may play a role in umbilical artery vasospasm.  (+info)

Intrahippocampal infusion of interleukin-6 impairs avoidance learning in rats. (8/3024)

AIM: To study the effect of intrahippocampal infusion of interleukin-6 (IL-6) on active avoidance in rats and the possible involvement of nitric oxide (NO). METHODS: Using a shuttle-box model, the effects of bilaterally intrahippocampal infusion of IL-6 3.2, 16, and 80 ng as well as sodium nitroprusside (SNP) 400 ng on active avoidance were studied on d 8 after administration. The levels of nitrite as an index of NO in the hippocampus were detected using a fluorometric assay 24 h after infusion of IL-6 3.2 or 80 ng. RESULTS: IL-6 16 and 80 ng impaired the acquisition performance of active avoidance by prolonging the latency of avoidance in training, but not the retention performance in testing. IL-680 ng and SNP 400 ng also resulted in a marked impairment in acquisition performances by decreasing the rate of avoidance, but not in retention performances. IL-680 ng markedly elevated the nitrite levels from 10.6 +/- 0.7 in control rats to 13.6 +/- 2.0 (nmol/g wet wt) (P < 0.01). IL-6 3.2 ng had no effect on active avoidance nor on nitrite levels. CONCLUSION: Intrahippocampal infusion of IL-6 impaired learning acquisition of active avoidance in rats.  (+info)

nitroprusside (ni-troe-rus-ide)

A rapid-acting vasodilator used in the management of severe hypertension, acute heart failure, and to reduce afterload in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. It is a potent arterial and venous dilator that decreases preload and afterload, thereby reducing myocardial oxygen demand. Nitroprusside is metabolized to cyanide, which must be monitored closely during therapy to prevent toxicity.

Pharmacologic class: Peripheral vasodilators

Therapeutic class: Antihypertensives, Vasodilators

Medical Categories: Cardiovascular Drugs, Hypertension Agents

Ferricyanides are a class of chemical compounds that contain the ferricyanide ion (Fe(CN)6−3). The ferricyanide ion is composed of a central iron atom in the +3 oxidation state, surrounded by six cyanide ligands. Ferricyanides are strong oxidizing agents and are used in various chemical reactions, including analytical chemistry and as reagents in organic synthesis.

It's important to note that while ferricyanides themselves are not highly toxic, they can release cyanide ions if they are decomposed or reduced under certain conditions. Therefore, they should be handled with care and used in well-ventilated areas.

Vasodilator agents are pharmacological substances that cause the relaxation or widening of blood vessels by relaxing the smooth muscle in the vessel walls. This results in an increase in the diameter of the blood vessels, which decreases vascular resistance and ultimately reduces blood pressure. Vasodilators can be further classified based on their site of action:

1. Systemic vasodilators: These agents cause a generalized relaxation of the smooth muscle in the walls of both arteries and veins, resulting in a decrease in peripheral vascular resistance and preload (the volume of blood returning to the heart). Examples include nitroglycerin, hydralazine, and calcium channel blockers.
2. Arterial vasodilators: These agents primarily affect the smooth muscle in arterial vessel walls, leading to a reduction in afterload (the pressure against which the heart pumps blood). Examples include angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and direct vasodilators like sodium nitroprusside.
3. Venous vasodilators: These agents primarily affect the smooth muscle in venous vessel walls, increasing venous capacitance and reducing preload. Examples include nitroglycerin and other organic nitrates.

Vasodilator agents are used to treat various cardiovascular conditions such as hypertension, heart failure, angina, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. It is essential to monitor their use carefully, as excessive vasodilation can lead to orthostatic hypotension, reflex tachycardia, or fluid retention.

Nitric oxide (NO) donors are pharmacological agents that release nitric oxide in the body when they are metabolized. Nitric oxide is a molecule that plays an important role as a signaling messenger in the cardiovascular, nervous, and immune systems. It helps regulate blood flow, relax smooth muscle, inhibit platelet aggregation, and modulate inflammatory responses.

NO donors can be used medically to treat various conditions, such as hypertension, angina, heart failure, and pulmonary hypertension, by promoting vasodilation and improving blood flow. Some examples of NO donors include nitroglycerin, isosorbide dinitrate, sodium nitroprusside, and molsidomine. These drugs work by releasing nitric oxide slowly over time, which then interacts with the enzyme soluble guanylate cyclase to produce cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), leading to relaxation of smooth muscle and vasodilation.

It is important to note that NO donors can have side effects, such as headache, dizziness, and hypotension, due to their vasodilatory effects. Therefore, they should be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Nitric oxide (NO) is a molecule made up of one nitrogen atom and one oxygen atom. In the body, it is a crucial signaling molecule involved in various physiological processes such as vasodilation, immune response, neurotransmission, and inhibition of platelet aggregation. It is produced naturally by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) from the amino acid L-arginine. Inhaled nitric oxide is used medically to treat pulmonary hypertension in newborns and adults, as it helps to relax and widen blood vessels, improving oxygenation and blood flow.

Vasodilation is the widening or increase in diameter of blood vessels, particularly the involuntary relaxation of the smooth muscle in the tunica media (middle layer) of the arteriole walls. This results in an increase in blood flow and a decrease in vascular resistance. Vasodilation can occur due to various physiological and pathophysiological stimuli, such as local metabolic demands, neural signals, or pharmacological agents. It plays a crucial role in regulating blood pressure, tissue perfusion, and thermoregulation.

Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter, a type of chemical messenger that transmits signals across a chemical synapse from one neuron (nerve cell) to another "target" neuron, muscle cell, or gland cell. It is involved in both peripheral and central nervous system functions.

In the peripheral nervous system, acetylcholine acts as a neurotransmitter at the neuromuscular junction, where it transmits signals from motor neurons to activate muscles. Acetylcholine also acts as a neurotransmitter in the autonomic nervous system, where it is involved in both the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems.

In the central nervous system, acetylcholine plays a role in learning, memory, attention, and arousal. Disruptions in cholinergic neurotransmission have been implicated in several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and myasthenia gravis.

Acetylcholine is synthesized from choline and acetyl-CoA by the enzyme choline acetyltransferase and is stored in vesicles at the presynaptic terminal of the neuron. When a nerve impulse arrives, the vesicles fuse with the presynaptic membrane, releasing acetylcholine into the synapse. The acetylcholine then binds to receptors on the postsynaptic membrane, triggering a response in the target cell. Acetylcholine is subsequently degraded by the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, which terminates its action and allows for signal transduction to be repeated.

Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a important second messenger molecule that plays a crucial role in various biological processes within the human body. It is synthesized from guanosine triphosphate (GTP) by the enzyme guanylyl cyclase.

Cyclic GMP is involved in regulating diverse physiological functions, such as smooth muscle relaxation, cardiovascular function, and neurotransmission. It also plays a role in modulating immune responses and cellular growth and differentiation.

In the medical field, changes in cGMP levels or dysregulation of cGMP-dependent pathways have been implicated in various disease states, including pulmonary hypertension, heart failure, erectile dysfunction, and glaucoma. Therefore, pharmacological agents that target cGMP signaling are being developed as potential therapeutic options for these conditions.

The forearm is the region of the upper limb between the elbow and the wrist. It consists of two bones, the radius and ulna, which are located side by side and run parallel to each other. The forearm is responsible for movements such as flexion, extension, supination, and pronation of the hand and wrist.

Controlled hypotension is a medical procedure in which the healthcare provider intentionally lowers the patient's blood pressure during surgery. This is done to reduce bleeding and improve surgical conditions. The goal is to maintain the patient's blood pressure at a level that is lower than their normal resting blood pressure, but high enough to ensure adequate blood flow to vital organs such as the heart and brain. Controlled hypotension is closely monitored and managed throughout the surgery to minimize risks and ensure the best possible outcomes for the patient.

The endothelium is a thin layer of simple squamous epithelial cells that lines the interior surface of blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and heart chambers. The vascular endothelium, specifically, refers to the endothelial cells that line the blood vessels. These cells play a crucial role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by regulating vasomotor tone, coagulation, platelet activation, inflammation, and permeability of the vessel wall. They also contribute to the growth and repair of the vascular system and are involved in various pathological processes such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, and diabetes.

Omega-N-Methylarginine (also known as NG, NG-dimethyl-L-arginine) is not a commonly used medical term and it's not a well-known compound in medicine. However, it is a form of methylated arginine that can be found in the body.

Methylated arginines are a group of compounds that are generated through the post-translational modification of proteins by enzymes called protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). These modifications play important roles in various cellular processes, including gene expression and signal transduction.

Omega-N-Methylarginine is a specific type of methylated arginine that has two methyl groups attached to the nitrogen atom at the end of the side chain (omega position) of the amino acid arginine. It can be formed by the action of PRMTs on proteins, and it may have various biological functions in the body. However, its specific medical significance is not well-established, and more research is needed to fully understand its role in health and disease.

NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME) is not a medication, but rather a research chemical used in scientific studies. It is an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, an enzyme that synthesizes nitric oxide, a molecule involved in the relaxation of blood vessels.

Therefore, L-NAME is often used in experiments to investigate the role of nitric oxide in various physiological and pathophysiological processes. It is important to note that the use of L-NAME in humans is not approved for therapeutic purposes due to its potential side effects, which can include hypertension, decreased renal function, and decreased cerebral blood flow.

Phenylephrine is a medication that belongs to the class of drugs known as sympathomimetic amines. It primarily acts as an alpha-1 adrenergic receptor agonist, which means it stimulates these receptors, leading to vasoconstriction (constriction of blood vessels). This effect can be useful in various medical situations, such as:

1. Nasal decongestion: When applied topically in the nose, phenylephrine causes constriction of the blood vessels in the nasal passages, which helps to relieve congestion and swelling. It is often found in over-the-counter (OTC) cold and allergy products.
2. Ocular circulation: In ophthalmology, phenylephrine is used to dilate the pupils before eye examinations. The increased pressure from vasoconstriction helps to open up the pupil, allowing for a better view of the internal structures of the eye.
3. Hypotension management: In some cases, phenylephrine may be given intravenously to treat low blood pressure (hypotension) during medical procedures like spinal anesthesia or septic shock. The vasoconstriction helps to increase blood pressure and improve perfusion of vital organs.

It is essential to use phenylephrine as directed, as improper usage can lead to adverse effects such as increased heart rate, hypertension, arrhythmias, and rebound congestion (when used as a nasal decongestant). Always consult with a healthcare professional for appropriate guidance on using this medication.

Vasoconstrictor agents are substances that cause the narrowing of blood vessels by constricting the smooth muscle in their walls. This leads to an increase in blood pressure and a decrease in blood flow. They work by activating the sympathetic nervous system, which triggers the release of neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine and epinephrine that bind to alpha-adrenergic receptors on the smooth muscle cells of the blood vessel walls, causing them to contract.

Vasoconstrictor agents are used medically for a variety of purposes, including:

* Treating hypotension (low blood pressure)
* Controlling bleeding during surgery or childbirth
* Relieving symptoms of nasal congestion in conditions such as the common cold or allergies

Examples of vasoconstrictor agents include phenylephrine, oxymetazoline, and epinephrine. It's important to note that prolonged use or excessive doses of vasoconstrictor agents can lead to rebound congestion and other adverse effects, so they should be used with caution and under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) is a group of enzymes that catalyze the production of nitric oxide (NO) from L-arginine. There are three distinct isoforms of NOS, each with different expression patterns and functions:

1. Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase (nNOS or NOS1): This isoform is primarily expressed in the nervous system and plays a role in neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity, and learning and memory processes.
2. Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS or NOS2): This isoform is induced by various stimuli such as cytokines, lipopolysaccharides, and hypoxia in a variety of cells including immune cells, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells. iNOS produces large amounts of NO, which functions as a potent effector molecule in the immune response, particularly in the defense against microbial pathogens.
3. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS or NOS3): This isoform is constitutively expressed in endothelial cells and produces low levels of NO that play a crucial role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by regulating vasodilation, inhibiting platelet aggregation, and preventing smooth muscle cell proliferation.

Overall, NOS plays an essential role in various physiological processes, including neurotransmission, immune response, cardiovascular function, and respiratory regulation. Dysregulation of NOS activity has been implicated in several pathological conditions such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative diseases, and inflammatory disorders.

Guanylate cyclase is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of guanosine triphosphate (GTP) to cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), which acts as a second messenger in various cellular signaling pathways. There are two main types of guanylate cyclases: soluble and membrane-bound. Soluble guanylate cyclase is activated by nitric oxide, while membrane-bound guanylate cyclase can be activated by natriuretic peptides. The increased levels of cGMP produced by guanylate cyclase can lead to a variety of cellular responses, including smooth muscle relaxation, neurotransmitter release, and regulation of ion channels. Dysregulation of guanylate cyclase activity has been implicated in several diseases, such as hypertension, heart failure, and cancer.

Trimethaphan is a ganglionic blocker drug that is used primarily in the treatment of hypertensive emergencies. It works by blocking the transmission of nerve impulses at the ganglionic synapse, leading to decreased sympathetic and parasympathetic tone. This results in a decrease in peripheral vascular resistance, heart rate, and blood pressure.

Trimethaphan is administered intravenously and its effects are rapid in onset but also short-lived, typically lasting only 5-10 minutes after discontinuation of the infusion. It is therefore necessary to continuously monitor blood pressure during administration and adjust the dose as needed to maintain a stable blood pressure.

Common side effects of trimethaphan include flushing, diaphoresis, dizziness, headache, and blurred vision. More serious side effects can include bronchospasm, myocardial ischemia, and anaphylaxis. Trimethaphan should be used with caution in patients with preexisting respiratory or cardiovascular disease.

Muscle relaxation, in a medical context, refers to the process of reducing tension and promoting relaxation in the skeletal muscles. This can be achieved through various techniques, including progressive muscle relaxation (PMR), where individuals consciously tense and then release specific muscle groups in a systematic manner.

PMR has been shown to help reduce anxiety, stress, and muscle tightness, and improve overall well-being. It is often used as a complementary therapy in conjunction with other treatments for conditions such as chronic pain, headaches, and insomnia.

Additionally, muscle relaxation can also be facilitated through pharmacological interventions, such as the use of muscle relaxant medications. These drugs work by inhibiting the transmission of signals between nerves and muscles, leading to a reduction in muscle tone and spasticity. They are commonly used to treat conditions such as multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, and spinal cord injuries.

Arginine is an α-amino acid that is classified as a semi-essential or conditionally essential amino acid, depending on the developmental stage and health status of the individual. The adult human body can normally synthesize sufficient amounts of arginine to meet its needs, but there are certain circumstances, such as periods of rapid growth or injury, where the dietary intake of arginine may become necessary.

The chemical formula for arginine is C6H14N4O2. It has a molecular weight of 174.20 g/mol and a pKa value of 12.48. Arginine is a basic amino acid, which means that it contains a side chain with a positive charge at physiological pH levels. The side chain of arginine is composed of a guanidino group, which is a functional group consisting of a nitrogen atom bonded to three methyl groups.

In the body, arginine plays several important roles. It is a precursor for the synthesis of nitric oxide, a molecule that helps regulate blood flow and immune function. Arginine is also involved in the detoxification of ammonia, a waste product produced by the breakdown of proteins. Additionally, arginine can be converted into other amino acids, such as ornithine and citrulline, which are involved in various metabolic processes.

Foods that are good sources of arginine include meat, poultry, fish, dairy products, nuts, seeds, and legumes. Arginine supplements are available and may be used for a variety of purposes, such as improving exercise performance, enhancing wound healing, and boosting immune function. However, it is important to consult with a healthcare provider before taking arginine supplements, as they can interact with certain medications and have potential side effects.

S-Nitroso-N-Acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) is not a medication itself, but rather a chemical compound that is used in laboratory research. It is a nitrosothiol, which means it contains a nitric oxide group (NO) attached to a sulfur atom in a thiol group (a type of organic compound containing a sulfhydryl group, -SH).

Nitric oxide is a small signaling molecule that plays an important role in various biological processes, including the regulation of blood flow, immune response, and neurotransmission. SNAP is often used as a nitric oxide donor in scientific studies to investigate the effects of nitric oxide on different cells and tissues.

SNAP can release nitric oxide under certain conditions, such as in the presence of reducing agents or at acidic pH levels. This makes it useful for studying the mechanisms of nitric oxide-mediated signaling pathways and its potential therapeutic applications. However, SNAP is not used as a medication in clinical practice due to its instability and potential toxicity.

Blood pressure is the force exerted by circulating blood on the walls of the blood vessels. It is measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg) and is given as two figures:

1. Systolic pressure: This is the pressure when the heart pushes blood out into the arteries.
2. Diastolic pressure: This is the pressure when the heart rests between beats, allowing it to fill with blood.

Normal blood pressure for adults is typically around 120/80 mmHg, although this can vary slightly depending on age, sex, and other factors. High blood pressure (hypertension) is generally considered to be a reading of 130/80 mmHg or higher, while low blood pressure (hypotension) is usually defined as a reading below 90/60 mmHg. It's important to note that blood pressure can fluctuate throughout the day and may be affected by factors such as stress, physical activity, and medication use.

Regional blood flow (RBF) refers to the rate at which blood flows through a specific region or organ in the body, typically expressed in milliliters per minute per 100 grams of tissue (ml/min/100g). It is an essential physiological parameter that reflects the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to tissues while removing waste products. RBF can be affected by various factors such as metabolic demands, neural regulation, hormonal influences, and changes in blood pressure or vascular resistance. Measuring RBF is crucial for understanding organ function, diagnosing diseases, and evaluating the effectiveness of treatments.

Nitro-L-arginine or Nitroarginine is not a medical term per se, but it is a chemical compound that is sometimes used in medical research and experiments. It is a salt of nitric acid and L-arginine, an amino acid that is important for the functioning of the body.

Nitroarginine is known to inhibit the production of nitric oxide, a molecule that plays a role in various physiological processes such as blood flow regulation, immune response, and neurotransmission. As a result, nitroarginine has been used in research to study the effects of reduced nitric oxide levels on different systems in the body.

It's worth noting that nitroarginine is not approved for use as a medication in humans, and its use is generally limited to laboratory settings.

Penicillamine is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called chelating agents. It works by binding to heavy metals in the body, such as lead, mercury, or copper, and forming a compound that can be excreted in the urine. This helps to remove these harmful substances from the body.

Penicillamine is also used to treat certain medical conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, Wilson's disease (a genetic disorder that causes copper accumulation in the body), and cystinuria (a genetic disorder that causes an amino acid called cystine to accumulate in the kidneys and form stones).

It is important to note that penicillamine can have serious side effects, including kidney damage, so it should be used under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

Enzyme inhibitors are substances that bind to an enzyme and decrease its activity, preventing it from catalyzing a chemical reaction in the body. They can work by several mechanisms, including blocking the active site where the substrate binds, or binding to another site on the enzyme to change its shape and prevent substrate binding. Enzyme inhibitors are often used as drugs to treat various medical conditions, such as high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, and bacterial infections. They can also be found naturally in some foods and plants, and can be used in research to understand enzyme function and regulation.

Oxadiazoles are heterocyclic compounds containing a five-membered ring consisting of two carbon atoms, one nitrogen atom, and two oxygen atoms in an alternating sequence. There are three possible isomers of oxadiazole, depending on the position of the nitrogen atom: 1,2,3-oxadiazole, 1,2,4-oxadiazole, and 1,3,4-oxadiazole. These compounds have significant interest in medicinal chemistry due to their diverse biological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and anticancer properties. Some oxadiazoles also exhibit potential as contrast agents for medical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT).

Molsidomine is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called vasodilators. It works by relaxing and widening blood vessels, which helps to improve blood flow and reduce the workload on the heart. Molsidomine is used to treat chronic stable angina (chest pain caused by reduced blood flow to the heart) and has been found to be effective in reducing the frequency and severity of anginal attacks.

When molsidomine is absorbed into the body, it is converted into its active metabolite, SIN-1, which is responsible for its vasodilatory effects. SIN-1 causes smooth muscle relaxation by increasing the levels of nitric oxide in the blood vessels, leading to their dilation and improved blood flow.

Molsidomine is available in tablet form and is typically taken two to three times a day, with or without food. Common side effects of molsidomine include headache, dizziness, flushing, and palpitations. It should be used with caution in patients with low blood pressure, heart failure, or impaired kidney function.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

Vascular resistance is a measure of the opposition to blood flow within a vessel or a group of vessels, typically expressed in units of mmHg/(mL/min) or sometimes as dynes*sec/cm^5. It is determined by the diameter and length of the vessels, as well as the viscosity of the blood flowing through them. In general, a decrease in vessel diameter, an increase in vessel length, or an increase in blood viscosity will result in an increase in vascular resistance, while an increase in vessel diameter, a decrease in vessel length, or a decrease in blood viscosity will result in a decrease in vascular resistance. Vascular resistance is an important concept in the study of circulation and cardiovascular physiology because it plays a key role in determining blood pressure and blood flow within the body.

Vasoconstriction is a medical term that refers to the narrowing of blood vessels due to the contraction of the smooth muscle in their walls. This process decreases the diameter of the lumen (the inner space of the blood vessel) and reduces blood flow through the affected vessels. Vasoconstriction can occur throughout the body, but it is most noticeable in the arterioles and precapillary sphincters, which control the amount of blood that flows into the capillary network.

The autonomic nervous system, specifically the sympathetic division, plays a significant role in regulating vasoconstriction through the release of neurotransmitters like norepinephrine (noradrenaline). Various hormones and chemical mediators, such as angiotensin II, endothelin-1, and serotonin, can also induce vasoconstriction.

Vasoconstriction is a vital physiological response that helps maintain blood pressure and regulate blood flow distribution in the body. However, excessive or prolonged vasoconstriction may contribute to several pathological conditions, including hypertension, stroke, and peripheral vascular diseases.

Nitroglycerin, also known as glyceryl trinitrate, is a medication used primarily for the treatment of angina pectoris (chest pain due to coronary artery disease) and hypertensive emergencies (severe high blood pressure). It belongs to a class of drugs called nitrates or organic nitrites.

Nitroglycerin works by relaxing and dilating the smooth muscle in blood vessels, which leads to decreased workload on the heart and increased oxygen delivery to the myocardium (heart muscle). This results in reduced symptoms of angina and improved cardiac function during hypertensive emergencies.

The drug is available in various forms, including sublingual tablets, sprays, transdermal patches, ointments, and intravenous solutions. The choice of formulation depends on the specific clinical situation and patient needs. Common side effects of nitroglycerin include headache, dizziness, and hypotension (low blood pressure).

Bradykinin is a naturally occurring peptide in the human body, consisting of nine amino acids. It is a potent vasodilator and increases the permeability of blood vessels, causing a local inflammatory response. Bradykinin is formed from the breakdown of certain proteins, such as kininogen, by enzymes called kininases or proteases, including kallikrein. It plays a role in several physiological processes, including pain transmission, blood pressure regulation, and the immune response. In some pathological conditions, such as hereditary angioedema, bradykinin levels can increase excessively, leading to symptoms like swelling, redness, and pain.

The baroreflex is a physiological mechanism that helps regulate blood pressure and heart rate in response to changes in stretch of the arterial walls. It is mediated by baroreceptors, which are specialized sensory nerve endings located in the carotid sinus and aortic arch. These receptors detect changes in blood pressure and send signals to the brainstem via the glossopharyngeal (cranial nerve IX) and vagus nerves (cranial nerve X), respectively.

In response to an increase in arterial pressure, the baroreceptors are stimulated, leading to increased firing of afferent neurons that signal the brainstem. This results in a reflexive decrease in heart rate and cardiac output, as well as vasodilation of peripheral blood vessels, which collectively work to reduce blood pressure back towards its normal level. Conversely, if arterial pressure decreases, the baroreceptors are less stimulated, leading to an increase in heart rate and cardiac output, as well as vasoconstriction of peripheral blood vessels, which helps restore blood pressure.

Overall, the baroreflex is a crucial homeostatic mechanism that helps maintain stable blood pressure and ensure adequate perfusion of vital organs.

A smooth muscle within the vascular system refers to the involuntary, innervated muscle that is found in the walls of blood vessels. These muscles are responsible for controlling the diameter of the blood vessels, which in turn regulates blood flow and blood pressure. They are called "smooth" muscles because their individual muscle cells do not have the striations, or cross-striped patterns, that are observed in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells. Smooth muscle in the vascular system is controlled by the autonomic nervous system and by hormones, and can contract or relax slowly over a period of time.

The thoracic aorta is the segment of the largest artery in the human body (the aorta) that runs through the chest region (thorax). The thoracic aorta begins at the aortic arch, where it branches off from the ascending aorta, and extends down to the diaphragm, where it becomes the abdominal aorta.

The thoracic aorta is divided into three parts: the ascending aorta, the aortic arch, and the descending aorta. The ascending aorta rises from the left ventricle of the heart and is about 2 inches (5 centimeters) long. The aortic arch curves backward and to the left, giving rise to the brachiocephalic trunk, the left common carotid artery, and the left subclavian artery. The descending thoracic aorta runs downward through the chest, passing through the diaphragm to become the abdominal aorta.

The thoracic aorta supplies oxygenated blood to the upper body, including the head, neck, arms, and chest. It plays a critical role in maintaining blood flow and pressure throughout the body.

Arterioles are small branches of arteries that play a crucial role in regulating blood flow and blood pressure within the body's circulatory system. They are the smallest type of blood vessels that have muscular walls, which allow them to contract or dilate in response to various physiological signals.

Arterioles receive blood from upstream arteries and deliver it to downstream capillaries, where the exchange of oxygen, nutrients, and waste products occurs between the blood and surrounding tissues. The contraction of arteriolar muscles can reduce the diameter of these vessels, causing increased resistance to blood flow and leading to a rise in blood pressure upstream. Conversely, dilation of arterioles reduces resistance and allows for greater blood flow at a lower pressure.

The regulation of arteriolar tone is primarily controlled by the autonomic nervous system, local metabolic factors, and various hormones. This fine-tuning of arteriolar diameter enables the body to maintain adequate blood perfusion to vital organs while also controlling overall blood pressure and distribution.

Plethysmography is a non-invasive medical technique used to measure changes in volume or blood flow within an organ or body part, typically in the lungs or extremities. There are several types of plethysmography, including:

1. **Whole Body Plethysmography (WBP):** This type of plethysmography is used to assess lung function and volumes by measuring changes in pressure within a sealed chamber that contains the patient's entire body except for their head. The patient breathes normally while wearing a nose clip, allowing technicians to analyze respiratory patterns, airflow, and lung volume changes.
2. **Segmental or Local Plethysmography:** This technique measures volume or blood flow changes in specific body parts, such as the limbs or digits. It can help diagnose and monitor conditions affecting peripheral circulation, like deep vein thrombosis, arterial occlusive disease, or Raynaud's phenomenon.
3. **Impedance Plethysmography (IPG):** This non-invasive method uses electrical impedance to estimate changes in blood volume within an organ or body part. By applying a small electrical current and measuring the opposition to flow (impedance), technicians can determine variations in blood volume, which can help diagnose conditions like deep vein thrombosis or heart failure.
4. **Optical Plethysmography:** This technique uses light to measure changes in blood volume, typically in the skin or mucous membranes. By shining a light on the area and analyzing the reflected or transmitted light, technicians can detect variations in blood volume related to cardiac output, respiration, or other physiological factors.

Overall, plethysmography is an essential tool for diagnosing and monitoring various medical conditions affecting circulation, respiratory function, and organ volumes.

Methylene Blue is a heterocyclic aromatic organic compound with the molecular formula C16H18ClN3S. It is primarily used as a medication, but can also be used as a dye or as a chemical reagent. As a medication, it is used in the treatment of methemoglobinemia (a condition where an abnormal amount of methemoglobin is present in the blood), as well as in some forms of poisoning and infections. It works by acting as a reducing agent, converting methemoglobin back to hemoglobin, which is the form of the protein that is responsible for carrying oxygen in the blood. Methylene Blue has also been used off-label for other conditions, such as vasculitis and Alzheimer's disease, although its effectiveness for these uses is not well established.

It is important to note that Methylene Blue should be used with caution, as it can cause serious side effects in some people, particularly those with kidney or liver problems, or those who are taking certain medications. It is also important to follow the instructions of a healthcare provider when using this medication, as improper use can lead to toxicity.

Norepinephrine, also known as noradrenaline, is a neurotransmitter and a hormone that is primarily produced in the adrenal glands and is released into the bloodstream in response to stress or physical activity. It plays a crucial role in the "fight-or-flight" response by preparing the body for action through increasing heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, and glucose availability.

As a neurotransmitter, norepinephrine is involved in regulating various functions of the nervous system, including attention, perception, motivation, and arousal. It also plays a role in modulating pain perception and responding to stressful or emotional situations.

In medical settings, norepinephrine is used as a vasopressor medication to treat hypotension (low blood pressure) that can occur during septic shock, anesthesia, or other critical illnesses. It works by constricting blood vessels and increasing heart rate, which helps to improve blood pressure and perfusion of vital organs.

Hemodynamics is the study of how blood flows through the cardiovascular system, including the heart and the vascular network. It examines various factors that affect blood flow, such as blood volume, viscosity, vessel length and diameter, and pressure differences between different parts of the circulatory system. Hemodynamics also considers the impact of various physiological and pathological conditions on these variables, and how they in turn influence the function of vital organs and systems in the body. It is a critical area of study in fields such as cardiology, anesthesiology, and critical care medicine.

The vasomotor system is a part of the autonomic nervous system that controls the diameter of blood vessels, particularly the smooth muscle in the walls of arterioles and precapillary sphincters. It regulates blood flow to different parts of the body by constricting or dilating these vessels. The vasomotor center located in the medulla oblongata of the brainstem controls the system, receiving input from various sensory receptors and modulating the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems' activity. Vasoconstriction decreases blood flow, while vasodilation increases it.

Heart rate is the number of heartbeats per unit of time, often expressed as beats per minute (bpm). It can vary significantly depending on factors such as age, physical fitness, emotions, and overall health status. A resting heart rate between 60-100 bpm is generally considered normal for adults, but athletes and individuals with high levels of physical fitness may have a resting heart rate below 60 bpm due to their enhanced cardiovascular efficiency. Monitoring heart rate can provide valuable insights into an individual's health status, exercise intensity, and response to various treatments or interventions.

Intra-arterial infusion is a medical procedure in which a liquid medication or fluid is delivered directly into an artery. This technique is used to deliver drugs directly to a specific organ or region of the body, bypassing the usual systemic circulation and allowing for higher concentrations of the drug to reach the target area. It is often used in cancer treatment to deliver chemotherapeutic agents directly to tumors, as well as in other conditions such as severe infections or inflammation.

Intra-arterial infusions are typically administered through a catheter that is inserted into an artery, usually under the guidance of imaging techniques such as fluoroscopy, CT, or MRI. The procedure requires careful monitoring and precise control to ensure proper placement of the catheter and accurate delivery of the medication.

It's important to note that intra-arterial infusions are different from intra venous (IV) infusions, where medications are delivered into a vein instead of an artery. The choice between intra-arterial and intra-venous infusion depends on various factors such as the type of medication being used, the location of the target area, and the patient's overall medical condition.

Microcirculation is the circulation of blood in the smallest blood vessels, including arterioles, venules, and capillaries. It's responsible for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and the removal of waste products. The microcirculation plays a crucial role in maintaining tissue homeostasis and is regulated by various physiological mechanisms such as autonomic nervous system activity, local metabolic factors, and hormones.

Impairment of microcirculation can lead to tissue hypoxia, inflammation, and organ dysfunction, which are common features in several diseases, including diabetes, hypertension, sepsis, and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Therefore, understanding the structure and function of the microcirculation is essential for developing new therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Purinones" is not a recognized term in medical terminology. It seems there might be a spelling mistake or a misunderstanding of the term. If you meant "purines," I can provide a definition for that. Purines are heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds that form the basis of several important biomolecules, such as nucleotides and their derivatives found in DNA and RNA. If you had something different in mind, please provide clarification so I can give you an accurate and helpful response.

Cromakalim is a pharmacological agent, specifically a potassium channel opener, that was investigated for its potential therapeutic effects in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and angina. Potassium channel openers work by relaxing smooth muscle cells in blood vessels, which leads to vasodilation and decreased blood pressure. However, cromakalim was never approved for clinical use due to its associated side effects, including negative inotropic effects on the heart and potential proarrhythmic properties.

The mesenteric arteries are the arteries that supply oxygenated blood to the intestines. There are three main mesenteric arteries: the superior mesenteric artery, which supplies blood to the small intestine (duodenum to two-thirds of the transverse colon) and large intestine (cecum, ascending colon, and the first part of the transverse colon); the inferior mesenteric artery, which supplies blood to the distal third of the transverse colon, descending colon, sigmoid colon, and rectum; and the middle colic artery, which is a branch of the superior mesenteric artery that supplies blood to the transverse colon. These arteries are important in maintaining adequate blood flow to the intestines to support digestion and absorption of nutrients.

Arteries are blood vessels that carry oxygenated blood away from the heart to the rest of the body. They have thick, muscular walls that can withstand the high pressure of blood being pumped out of the heart. Arteries branch off into smaller vessels called arterioles, which further divide into a vast network of tiny capillaries where the exchange of oxygen, nutrients, and waste occurs between the blood and the body's cells. After passing through the capillary network, deoxygenated blood collects in venules, then merges into veins, which return the blood back to the heart.

Iontophoresis is a medical technique in which a mild electrical current is used to deliver medications through the skin. This process enhances the absorption of medication into the body, allowing it to reach deeper tissues that may not be accessible through topical applications alone. Iontophoresis is often used for local treatment of conditions such as inflammation, pain, or spasms, and is particularly useful in treating conditions affecting the hands and feet, like hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating). The medications used in iontophoresis are typically anti-inflammatory drugs, anesthetics, or corticosteroids.

Nitroso compounds are a class of chemical compounds that contain a nitroso functional group, which is composed of a nitrogen atom bonded to an oxygen atom with a single covalent bond. The general formula for nitroso compounds is R-N=O, where R represents an organic group such as an alkyl or aryl group.

Nitroso compounds are known to be reactive and can form under various physiological conditions. They have been implicated in the formation of carcinogenic substances and have been linked to DNA damage and mutations. In the medical field, nitroso compounds have been studied for their potential use as therapeutic agents, particularly in the treatment of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. However, their use is limited due to their potential toxicity and carcinogenicity.

It's worth noting that exposure to high levels of nitroso compounds can be harmful to human health, and may cause respiratory, dermal, and ocular irritation, as well as potential genotoxic effects. Therefore, handling and storage of nitroso compounds should be done with caution, following appropriate safety guidelines.

"Wistar rats" are a strain of albino rats that are widely used in laboratory research. They were developed at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, USA, and were first introduced in 1906. Wistar rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not have a fixed set of genetic characteristics like inbred strains.

Wistar rats are commonly used as animal models in biomedical research because of their size, ease of handling, and relatively low cost. They are used in a wide range of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and behavioral studies. Wistar rats are also used in safety testing of drugs, medical devices, and other products.

Wistar rats are typically larger than many other rat strains, with males weighing between 500-700 grams and females weighing between 250-350 grams. They have a lifespan of approximately 2-3 years. Wistar rats are also known for their docile and friendly nature, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory setting.

Sprague-Dawley rats are a strain of albino laboratory rats that are widely used in scientific research. They were first developed by researchers H.H. Sprague and R.C. Dawley in the early 20th century, and have since become one of the most commonly used rat strains in biomedical research due to their relatively large size, ease of handling, and consistent genetic background.

Sprague-Dawley rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not suffer from the same limitations as inbred strains, which can have reduced fertility and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. They are also characterized by their docile nature and low levels of aggression, making them easier to handle and study than some other rat strains.

These rats are used in a wide variety of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, and behavioral studies. Because they are genetically diverse, Sprague-Dawley rats can be used to model a range of human diseases and conditions, making them an important tool in the development of new drugs and therapies.

The aorta is the largest artery in the human body, which originates from the left ventricle of the heart and carries oxygenated blood to the rest of the body. It can be divided into several parts, including the ascending aorta, aortic arch, and descending aorta. The ascending aorta gives rise to the coronary arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle. The aortic arch gives rise to the brachiocephalic, left common carotid, and left subclavian arteries, which supply blood to the head, neck, and upper extremities. The descending aorta travels through the thorax and abdomen, giving rise to various intercostal, visceral, and renal arteries that supply blood to the chest wall, organs, and kidneys.

Dibutyryl cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a chemically modified form of the second messenger molecule, cyclic GMP (guanosine monophosphate). The addition of butyryl groups to the cyclic GMP molecule makes it more lipid-soluble and allows for easier passage through cell membranes. This compound is often used in research to activate protein kinases and study the effects of increased intracellular levels of cyclic GMP, which plays a role in various cellular processes such as smooth muscle relaxation, regulation of ion channels, and inhibition of platelet aggregation.

The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is a part of the autonomic nervous system that operates largely below the level of consciousness, and it functions to produce appropriate physiological responses to perceived danger. It's often associated with the "fight or flight" response. The SNS uses nerve impulses to stimulate target organs, causing them to speed up (e.g., increased heart rate), prepare for action, or otherwise respond to stressful situations.

The sympathetic nervous system is activated due to stressful emotional or physical situations and it prepares the body for immediate actions. It dilates the pupils, increases heart rate and blood pressure, accelerates breathing, and slows down digestion. The primary neurotransmitter involved in this system is norepinephrine (also known as noradrenaline).

Muscle contraction is the physiological process in which muscle fibers shorten and generate force, leading to movement or stability of a body part. This process involves the sliding filament theory where thick and thin filaments within the sarcomeres (the functional units of muscles) slide past each other, facilitated by the interaction between myosin heads and actin filaments. The energy required for this action is provided by the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Muscle contractions can be voluntary or involuntary, and they play a crucial role in various bodily functions such as locomotion, circulation, respiration, and posture maintenance.

I believe there might be a misunderstanding in your question. "Dogs" is not a medical term or condition. It is the common name for a domesticated carnivore of the family Canidae, specifically the genus Canis, which includes wolves, foxes, and other extant and extinct species of mammals. Dogs are often kept as pets and companions, and they have been bred in a wide variety of forms and sizes for different purposes, such as hunting, herding, guarding, assisting police and military forces, and providing companionship and emotional support.

If you meant to ask about a specific medical condition or term related to dogs, please provide more context so I can give you an accurate answer.

Quinoxalines are not a medical term, but rather an organic chemical compound. They are a class of heterocyclic aromatic compounds made up of a benzene ring fused to a pyrazine ring. Quinoxalines have no specific medical relevance, but some of their derivatives have been synthesized and used in medicinal chemistry as antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral agents. They are also used in the production of dyes and pigments.

Coronary vessels refer to the network of blood vessels that supply oxygenated blood and nutrients to the heart muscle, also known as the myocardium. The two main coronary arteries are the left main coronary artery and the right coronary artery.

The left main coronary artery branches off into the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and the left circumflex artery (LCx). The LAD supplies blood to the front of the heart, while the LCx supplies blood to the side and back of the heart.

The right coronary artery supplies blood to the right lower part of the heart, including the right atrium and ventricle, as well as the back of the heart.

Coronary vessel disease (CVD) occurs when these vessels become narrowed or blocked due to the buildup of plaque, leading to reduced blood flow to the heart muscle. This can result in chest pain, shortness of breath, or a heart attack.

Cyanides are a group of chemical compounds that contain the cyano group, -CN, which consists of a carbon atom triple-bonded to a nitrogen atom. They are highly toxic and can cause rapid death due to the inhibition of cellular respiration. Cyanide ions (CN-) bind to the ferric iron in cytochrome c oxidase, a crucial enzyme in the electron transport chain, preventing the flow of electrons and the production of ATP, leading to cellular asphyxiation.

Common sources of cyanides include industrial chemicals such as hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and potassium cyanide (KCN), as well as natural sources like certain fruits, nuts, and plants. Exposure to high levels of cyanides can occur through inhalation, ingestion, or skin absorption, leading to symptoms such as headache, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, rapid heartbeat, seizures, coma, and ultimately death. Treatment for cyanide poisoning typically involves the use of antidotes that bind to cyanide ions and convert them into less toxic forms, such as thiosulfate and rhodanese.

Pressoreceptors are specialized sensory nerve endings found in the walls of blood vessels, particularly in the carotid sinus and aortic arch. They respond to changes in blood pressure by converting the mechanical stimulus into electrical signals that are transmitted to the brain. This information helps regulate cardiovascular function and maintain blood pressure homeostasis.

Hypertension is a medical term used to describe abnormally high blood pressure in the arteries, often defined as consistently having systolic blood pressure (the top number in a blood pressure reading) over 130 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number) over 80 mmHg. It is also commonly referred to as high blood pressure.

Hypertension can be classified into two types: primary or essential hypertension, which has no identifiable cause and accounts for about 95% of cases, and secondary hypertension, which is caused by underlying medical conditions such as kidney disease, hormonal disorders, or use of certain medications.

If left untreated, hypertension can lead to serious health complications such as heart attack, stroke, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. Therefore, it is important for individuals with hypertension to manage their condition through lifestyle modifications (such as healthy diet, regular exercise, stress management) and medication if necessary, under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Sodium nitrite is an inorganic compound with the chemical formula NaNO2. Medically, it is used as a vasodilator and an antidote for cyanide poisoning. It is a white to slightly yellowish crystalline powder that is very soluble in water and moderately soluble in alcohol. In solution, it is easily oxidized to sodium nitrate (NaNO3), which is stable and less toxic.

In the food industry, sodium nitrite is used as a preservative and coloring agent in meat and fish products. It helps prevent the growth of harmful bacteria, such as Clostridium botulinum, which can cause botulism. However, under certain conditions, sodium nitrite can react with proteins in food to form potentially carcinogenic compounds, so its use is regulated.

Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinases (PKGs) are a type of enzyme that add phosphate groups to other proteins, thereby modifying their function. These kinases are activated by cGMP, which is a second messenger molecule that helps transmit signals within cells. PKGs play important roles in various cellular processes, including smooth muscle relaxation, platelet aggregation, and cardiac contractility. They have been implicated in the regulation of a number of physiological functions, such as blood flow, inflammation, and learning and memory. There are two main isoforms of cGMP-dependent protein kinases, PKG I and PKG II, which differ in their tissue distribution, regulatory properties, and substrate specificity.

Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) is a chemical compound with the formula H-C≡N. It is a colorless, extremely poisonous and flammable liquid that has a bitter almond-like odor in its pure form. However, not everyone can detect its odor, as some people lack the ability to smell it, which makes it even more dangerous. It is soluble in water and alcohol, and its aqueous solution is called hydrocyanic acid or prussic acid.

Hydrogen Cyanide is rapidly absorbed by inhalation, ingestion, or skin contact, and it inhibits the enzyme cytochrome c oxidase, which is essential for cellular respiration. This leads to rapid death due to hypoxia (lack of oxygen) at the cellular level. It is used industrially in large quantities as a pesticide, fumigant, and chemical intermediate, but it also has significant potential for use as a chemical weapon.

In the medical field, Hydrogen Cyanide poisoning can be treated with high-concentration oxygen, sodium nitrite, and sodium thiosulfate, which help to restore the function of cytochrome c oxidase and enhance the elimination of cyanide from the body.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Rabbits" is a common name used to refer to the Lagomorpha species, particularly members of the family Leporidae. They are small mammals known for their long ears, strong legs, and quick reproduction.

However, if you're referring to "rabbits" in a medical context, there is a term called "rabbit syndrome," which is a rare movement disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements of the fingers, resembling those of a rabbit chewing. It is also known as "finger-chewing chorea." This condition is usually associated with certain medications, particularly antipsychotics, and typically resolves when the medication is stopped or adjusted.

Laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is a non-invasive, investigative technique used to measure microcirculatory blood flow in real time. It is based on the principle of the Doppler effect, which describes the change in frequency or wavelength of light or sound waves as they encounter a moving object or reflect off a moving surface.

In LDF, a low-power laser beam is directed at the skin or other transparent tissue. The light penetrates the tissue and scatters off the moving red blood cells within the microvasculature. As the light scatters, it undergoes a slight frequency shift due to the movement of the red blood cells. This frequency shift is then detected by a photodetector, which converts it into an electrical signal. The magnitude of this signal is directly proportional to the speed and concentration of the moving red blood cells, providing a measure of microcirculatory blood flow.

LDF has various clinical applications, including the assessment of skin perfusion in patients with peripheral arterial disease, burn injuries, and flaps used in reconstructive surgery. It can also be used to study the effects of drugs or other interventions on microcirculation in research settings.

Hypotension is a medical term that refers to abnormally low blood pressure, usually defined as a systolic blood pressure less than 90 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) or a diastolic blood pressure less than 60 mm Hg. Blood pressure is the force exerted by the blood against the walls of the blood vessels as the heart pumps blood.

Hypotension can cause symptoms such as dizziness, lightheadedness, weakness, and fainting, especially when standing up suddenly. In severe cases, hypotension can lead to shock, which is a life-threatening condition characterized by multiple organ failure due to inadequate blood flow.

Hypotension can be caused by various factors, including certain medications, medical conditions such as heart disease, endocrine disorders, and dehydration. It is important to seek medical attention if you experience symptoms of hypotension, as it can indicate an underlying health issue that requires treatment.

S-Nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is defined as a type of nitrosothiol, which is a class of compounds containing a nitroso (−NO) group attached to a sulfur atom. Specifically, GSNO is the result of the attachment of a nitric oxide (NO) molecule to the sulfur atom of the tripeptide glutathione (GSH). This compound has been the subject of extensive research due to its potential role in the regulation of various biological processes, including cell signaling, vasodilation, and neurotransmission, among others. It is also known to have antioxidant properties and to play a role in the immune response. However, it should be noted that abnormal levels of GSNO have been associated with various pathological conditions, such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and cardiovascular disorders.

Hydroxocobalamin is a form of vitamin B12 that is used in medical treatments. It is a synthetic version of the naturally occurring compound, and it is often used to treat vitamin B12 deficiencies. Hydroxocobalamin is also used to treat poisoning from cyanide, as it can bind with the cyanide to form a non-toxic compound that can be excreted from the body.

In medical terms, hydroxocobalamin is defined as: "A bright red crystalline compound, C21H30CoN4O7·2H2O, used in the treatment of vitamin B12 deficiency and as an antidote for cyanide poisoning. It is converted in the body to active coenzyme forms."

It's important to note that hydroxocobalamin should only be used under the supervision of a medical professional, as improper use can lead to serious side effects or harm.

Verapamil is a calcium channel blocker medication that is primarily used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), angina (chest pain), and certain types of cardiac arrhythmias (irregular heart rhyats). It works by relaxing the smooth muscle cells in the walls of blood vessels, which causes them to dilate or widen, reducing the resistance to blood flow and thereby lowering blood pressure. Verapamil also slows down the conduction of electrical signals within the heart, which can help to regulate the heart rate and rhythm.

In addition to its cardiovascular effects, verapamil is sometimes used off-label for the treatment of other conditions such as migraine headaches, Raynaud's phenomenon, and certain types of tremors. It is available in various forms, including immediate-release tablets, extended-release capsules, and intravenous (IV) injection.

It is important to note that verapamil can interact with other medications, so it is essential to inform your healthcare provider about all the drugs you are taking before starting this medication. Additionally, verapamil should be used with caution in people with certain medical conditions, such as heart failure, liver disease, and low blood pressure.

Biological factors are the aspects related to living organisms, including their genes, evolution, physiology, and anatomy. These factors can influence an individual's health status, susceptibility to diseases, and response to treatments. Biological factors can be inherited or acquired during one's lifetime and can interact with environmental factors to shape a person's overall health. Examples of biological factors include genetic predisposition, hormonal imbalances, infections, and chronic medical conditions.

Amino acid oxidoreductases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the reversible oxidation and reduction reactions involving amino acids. They play a crucial role in the metabolism of amino acids by catalyzing the interconversion of L-amino acids to their corresponding α-keto acids, while simultaneously reducing a cofactor such as NAD(P)+ or FAD.

The reaction catalyzed by these enzymes can be represented as follows:

L-amino acid + H2O + Coenzyme (Oxidized) → α-keto acid + NH3 + Coenzyme (Reduced)

Amino acid oxidoreductases are classified into two main types based on their cofactor requirements and reaction mechanisms. The first type uses FAD as a cofactor and is called amino acid flavoprotein oxidoreductases. These enzymes typically catalyze the oxidative deamination of L-amino acids to form α-keto acids, ammonia, and reduced FAD. The second type uses pyridine nucleotides (NAD(P)+) as cofactors and is called amino acid pyridine nucleotide-dependent oxidoreductases. These enzymes catalyze the reversible interconversion of L-amino acids to their corresponding α-keto acids, while simultaneously reducing or oxidizing NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+.

Amino acid oxidoreductases are widely distributed in nature and play important roles in various biological processes, including amino acid catabolism, nitrogen metabolism, and the biosynthesis of various secondary metabolites. Dysregulation of these enzymes has been implicated in several diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders and cancer. Therefore, understanding the structure, function, and regulation of amino acid oxidoreductases is crucial for developing novel therapeutic strategies to treat these diseases.

WKY (Wistar Kyoto) is not a term that refers to "rats, inbred" in a medical definition. Instead, it is a strain of laboratory rat that is widely used in biomedical research. WKY rats are an inbred strain, which means they are the result of many generations of brother-sister matings, resulting in a genetically uniform population.

WKY rats originated from the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia and were established as a normotensive control strain to contrast with other rat strains that exhibit hypertension. They have since been used in various research areas, including cardiovascular, neurological, and behavioral studies. Compared to other commonly used rat strains like the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR), WKY rats are known for their lower blood pressure, reduced stress response, and greater emotionality.

In summary, "WKY" is a designation for an inbred strain of laboratory rat that is often used as a control group in biomedical research due to its normotensive characteristics.

Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III (NOS-III), also known as endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS), is an enzyme responsible for the production of nitric oxide (NO) in the endothelium, the lining of blood vessels. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of L-arginine to L-citrulline, producing NO as a byproduct. The release of NO from eNOS plays an important role in regulating vascular tone and homeostasis, including the relaxation of smooth muscle cells in the blood vessel walls, inhibition of platelet aggregation, and modulation of immune function. Mutations or dysfunction in NOS-III can contribute to various cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and erectile dysfunction.

Smooth muscle, also known as involuntary muscle, is a type of muscle that is controlled by the autonomic nervous system and functions without conscious effort. These muscles are found in the walls of hollow organs such as the stomach, intestines, bladder, and blood vessels, as well as in the eyes, skin, and other areas of the body.

Smooth muscle fibers are shorter and narrower than skeletal muscle fibers and do not have striations or sarcomeres, which give skeletal muscle its striped appearance. Smooth muscle is controlled by the autonomic nervous system through the release of neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine and norepinephrine, which bind to receptors on the smooth muscle cells and cause them to contract or relax.

Smooth muscle plays an important role in many physiological processes, including digestion, circulation, respiration, and elimination. It can also contribute to various medical conditions, such as hypertension, gastrointestinal disorders, and genitourinary dysfunction, when it becomes overactive or underactive.

Indomethacin is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is commonly used to reduce pain, inflammation, and fever. It works by inhibiting the activity of certain enzymes in the body, including cyclooxygenase (COX), which plays a role in producing prostaglandins, chemicals involved in the inflammatory response.

Indomethacin is available in various forms, such as capsules, suppositories, and injectable solutions, and is used to treat a wide range of conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, gout, and bursitis. It may also be used to relieve pain and reduce fever in other conditions, such as dental procedures or after surgery.

Like all NSAIDs, indomethacin can have side effects, including stomach ulcers, bleeding, and kidney damage, especially when taken at high doses or for long periods of time. It may also increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. Therefore, it is important to use indomethacin only as directed by a healthcare provider and to report any unusual symptoms or side effects promptly.

Potassium chloride is an essential electrolyte that is often used in medical settings as a medication. It's a white, crystalline salt that is highly soluble in water and has a salty taste. In the body, potassium chloride plays a crucial role in maintaining fluid and electrolyte balance, nerve function, and muscle contraction.

Medically, potassium chloride is commonly used to treat or prevent low potassium levels (hypokalemia) in the blood. Hypokalemia can occur due to various reasons such as certain medications, kidney diseases, vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive sweating. Potassium chloride is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and liquids, and it's usually taken by mouth.

It's important to note that potassium chloride should be used with caution and under the supervision of a healthcare provider, as high levels of potassium (hyperkalemia) can be harmful and even life-threatening. Hyperkalemia can cause symptoms such as muscle weakness, irregular heartbeat, and cardiac arrest.

Intra-arterial injection is a type of medical procedure where a medication or contrast agent is delivered directly into an artery. This technique is used for various therapeutic and diagnostic purposes.

For instance, intra-arterial chemotherapy may be used to deliver cancer drugs directly to the site of a tumor, while intra-arterial thrombolysis involves the administration of clot-busting medications to treat arterial blockages caused by blood clots. Intra-arterial injections are also used in diagnostic imaging procedures such as angiography, where a contrast agent is injected into an artery to visualize the blood vessels and identify any abnormalities.

It's important to note that intra-arterial injections require precise placement of the needle or catheter into the artery, and are typically performed by trained medical professionals using specialized equipment.

Prostaglandin endoperoxides are naturally occurring lipid compounds that play important roles as mediators in the body's inflammatory and physiological responses. They are intermediate products in the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins and thromboxanes, which are synthesized by the action of enzymes called cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2).

Synthetic prostaglandin endoperoxides, on the other hand, are chemically synthesized versions of these compounds. They are used in medical research and therapeutic applications to mimic or inhibit the effects of naturally occurring prostaglandin endoperoxides. These synthetic compounds can be used to study the mechanisms of prostaglandin action, develop new drugs, or as stand-in agents for the natural compounds in experimental settings.

It's important to note that while synthetic prostaglandin endoperoxides can serve as useful tools in research and medicine, they also carry potential risks and side effects, much like their naturally occurring counterparts. Therefore, their use should be carefully monitored and regulated to ensure safety and efficacy.

"Swine" is a common term used to refer to even-toed ungulates of the family Suidae, including domestic pigs and wild boars. However, in a medical context, "swine" often appears in the phrase "swine flu," which is a strain of influenza virus that typically infects pigs but can also cause illness in humans. The 2009 H1N1 pandemic was caused by a new strain of swine-origin influenza A virus, which was commonly referred to as "swine flu." It's important to note that this virus is not transmitted through eating cooked pork products; it spreads from person to person, mainly through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

Coronary circulation refers to the circulation of blood in the coronary vessels, which supply oxygenated blood to the heart muscle (myocardium) and drain deoxygenated blood from it. The coronary circulation system includes two main coronary arteries - the left main coronary artery and the right coronary artery - that branch off from the aorta just above the aortic valve. These arteries further divide into smaller branches, which supply blood to different regions of the heart muscle.

The left main coronary artery divides into two branches: the left anterior descending (LAD) artery and the left circumflex (LCx) artery. The LAD supplies blood to the front and sides of the heart, while the LCx supplies blood to the back and sides of the heart. The right coronary artery supplies blood to the lower part of the heart, including the right ventricle and the bottom portion of the left ventricle.

The veins that drain the heart muscle include the great cardiac vein, the middle cardiac vein, and the small cardiac vein, which merge to form the coronary sinus. The coronary sinus empties into the right atrium, allowing deoxygenated blood to enter the right side of the heart and be pumped to the lungs for oxygenation.

Coronary circulation is essential for maintaining the health and function of the heart muscle, as it provides the necessary oxygen and nutrients required for proper contraction and relaxation of the myocardium. Any disruption or blockage in the coronary circulation system can lead to serious consequences, such as angina, heart attack, or even death.

Muscle tonus, also known as muscle tone, refers to the continuous and passive partial contraction of the muscles, which helps to maintain posture and stability. It is the steady state of slight tension that is present in resting muscles, allowing them to quickly respond to stimuli and move. This natural state of mild contraction is maintained by the involuntary activity of the nervous system and can be affected by factors such as injury, disease, or exercise.

It's important to note that muscle tone should not be confused with muscle "tone" in the context of physical appearance or body sculpting, which refers to the amount of muscle definition and leanness seen in an individual's physique.

Hyperemia is a medical term that refers to an increased flow or accumulation of blood in certain capillaries or vessels within an organ or tissue, resulting in its redness and warmth. This can occur due to various reasons such as physical exertion, emotional excitement, local injury, or specific medical conditions.

There are two types of hyperemia: active and passive. Active hyperemia is a physiological response where the blood flow increases as a result of the metabolic demands of the organ or tissue. For example, during exercise, muscles require more oxygen and nutrients, leading to an increase in blood flow. Passive hyperemia, on the other hand, occurs when there is a blockage in the venous outflow, causing the blood to accumulate in the affected area. This can result from conditions like thrombosis or vasoconstriction.

It's important to note that while hyperemia itself is not a disease, it can be a symptom of various underlying medical conditions and should be evaluated by a healthcare professional if it persists or is accompanied by other symptoms.

Benzopyrans are a class of chemical compounds that contain a benzene ring fused to a pyran ring. They are also known as chromenes. Benzopyrans can be found in various natural sources, including plants and fungi, and have been studied for their potential biological activities. Some benzopyrans have been found to have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer properties. However, some benzopyrans can also be toxic or have other adverse health effects, so it is important to study their properties and potential uses carefully.

Free radical scavengers, also known as antioxidants, are substances that neutralize or stabilize free radicals. Free radicals are highly reactive atoms or molecules with unpaired electrons, capable of causing damage to cells and tissues in the body through a process called oxidative stress. Antioxidants donate an electron to the free radical, thereby neutralizing it and preventing it from causing further damage. They can be found naturally in foods such as fruits, vegetables, and nuts, or they can be synthesized and used as dietary supplements. Examples of antioxidants include vitamins C and E, beta-carotene, and selenium.

Adenosine is a purine nucleoside that is composed of a sugar (ribose) and the base adenine. It plays several important roles in the body, including serving as a precursor for the synthesis of other molecules such as ATP, NAD+, and RNA.

In the medical context, adenosine is perhaps best known for its use as a pharmaceutical agent to treat certain cardiac arrhythmias. When administered intravenously, it can help restore normal sinus rhythm in patients with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) by slowing conduction through the atrioventricular node and interrupting the reentry circuit responsible for the arrhythmia.

Adenosine can also be used as a diagnostic tool to help differentiate between narrow-complex tachycardias of supraventricular origin and those that originate from below the ventricles (such as ventricular tachycardia). This is because adenosine will typically terminate PSVT but not affect the rhythm of VT.

It's worth noting that adenosine has a very short half-life, lasting only a few seconds in the bloodstream. This means that its effects are rapidly reversible and generally well-tolerated, although some patients may experience transient symptoms such as flushing, chest pain, or shortness of breath.

Hydrazines are not a medical term, but rather a class of organic compounds containing the functional group N-NH2. They are used in various industrial and chemical applications, including the production of polymers, pharmaceuticals, and agrochemicals. However, some hydrazines have been studied for their potential therapeutic uses, such as in the treatment of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Exposure to high levels of hydrazines can be toxic and may cause damage to the liver, kidneys, and central nervous system. Therefore, medical professionals should be aware of the potential health hazards associated with hydrazine exposure.

Cardiac output is a measure of the amount of blood that is pumped by the heart in one minute. It is defined as the product of stroke volume (the amount of blood pumped by the left ventricle during each contraction) and heart rate (the number of contractions per minute). Normal cardiac output at rest for an average-sized adult is about 5 to 6 liters per minute. Cardiac output can be increased during exercise or other conditions that require more blood flow, such as during illness or injury. It can be measured noninvasively using techniques such as echocardiography or invasively through a catheter placed in the heart.

Pulmonary circulation refers to the process of blood flow through the lungs, where blood picks up oxygen and releases carbon dioxide. This is a vital part of the overall circulatory system, which delivers nutrients and oxygen to the body's cells while removing waste products like carbon dioxide.

In pulmonary circulation, deoxygenated blood from the systemic circulation returns to the right atrium of the heart via the superior and inferior vena cava. The blood then moves into the right ventricle through the tricuspid valve and gets pumped into the pulmonary artery when the right ventricle contracts.

The pulmonary artery divides into smaller vessels called arterioles, which further branch into a vast network of tiny capillaries in the lungs. Here, oxygen from the alveoli diffuses into the blood, binding to hemoglobin in red blood cells, while carbon dioxide leaves the blood and is exhaled through the nose or mouth.

The now oxygenated blood collects in venules, which merge to form pulmonary veins. These veins transport the oxygen-rich blood back to the left atrium of the heart, where it enters the systemic circulation once again. This continuous cycle enables the body's cells to receive the necessary oxygen and nutrients for proper functioning while disposing of waste products.

Apamin is a neurotoxin found in the venom of the honeybee (Apis mellifera). It is a small peptide consisting of 18 amino acids and has a molecular weight of approximately 2000 daltons. Apamin is known to selectively block certain types of calcium-activated potassium channels, which are involved in the regulation of neuronal excitability. It has been used in scientific research to study the role of these ion channels in various physiological processes.

Clinically, apamin has been investigated for its potential therapeutic effects in a variety of neurological disorders, such as epilepsy and Parkinson's disease. However, its use as a therapeutic agent is not yet approved by regulatory agencies due to the lack of sufficient clinical evidence and concerns about its potential toxicity.

Blood flow velocity is the speed at which blood travels through a specific part of the vascular system. It is typically measured in units of distance per time, such as centimeters per second (cm/s) or meters per second (m/s). Blood flow velocity can be affected by various factors, including cardiac output, vessel diameter, and viscosity of the blood. Measuring blood flow velocity is important in diagnosing and monitoring various medical conditions, such as heart disease, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease.

Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are a group of highly reactive gases, primarily composed of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). They are formed during the combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal, oil, gas, or biomass, and are emitted from various sources, including power plants, industrial boilers, transportation vehicles, and residential heating systems. Exposure to NOx can have adverse health effects, particularly on the respiratory system, and contribute to the formation of harmful air pollutants like ground-level ozone and fine particulate matter.

SHR (Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats) are an inbred strain of rats that were originally developed through selective breeding for high blood pressure. They are widely used as a model to study hypertension and related cardiovascular diseases, as well as neurological disorders such as stroke and dementia.

Inbred strains of animals are created by mating genetically identical individuals (siblings or offspring) for many generations, resulting in a population that is highly homozygous at all genetic loci. This means that the animals within an inbred strain are essentially genetically identical to one another, which makes them useful for studying the effects of specific genes or environmental factors on disease processes.

SHR rats develop high blood pressure spontaneously, without any experimental manipulation, and show many features of human hypertension, such as increased vascular resistance, left ventricular hypertrophy, and renal dysfunction. They also exhibit a number of behavioral abnormalities, including hyperactivity, impulsivity, and cognitive deficits, which make them useful for studying the neurological consequences of hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases.

Overall, inbred SHR rats are an important tool in biomedical research, providing a valuable model for understanding the genetic and environmental factors that contribute to hypertension and related disorders.

Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), also known as atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), is a hormone that is primarily produced and secreted by the atria of the heart in response to stretching of the cardiac muscle cells due to increased blood volume. ANF plays a crucial role in regulating body fluid homeostasis, blood pressure, and cardiovascular function.

The main physiological action of ANF is to promote sodium and water excretion by the kidneys, which helps lower blood volume and reduce blood pressure. ANF also relaxes vascular smooth muscle, dilates blood vessels, and inhibits the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), further contributing to its blood pressure-lowering effects.

Defects in ANF production or action have been implicated in several cardiovascular disorders, including heart failure, hypertension, and kidney disease. Therefore, ANF and its analogs are being investigated as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of these conditions.

Isoproterenol is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called beta-adrenergic agonists. Medically, it is defined as a synthetic catecholamine with both alpha and beta adrenergic receptor stimulating properties. It is primarily used as a bronchodilator to treat conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by relaxing the smooth muscles in the airways, thereby improving breathing.

Isoproterenol can also be used in the treatment of bradycardia (abnormally slow heart rate), cardiac arrest, and heart blocks by increasing the heart rate and contractility. However, due to its non-selective beta-agonist activity, it may cause various side effects such as tremors, palpitations, and increased blood pressure. Its use is now limited due to the availability of more selective and safer medications.

The pulmonary artery is a large blood vessel that carries deoxygenated blood from the right ventricle of the heart to the lungs for oxygenation. It divides into two main branches, the right and left pulmonary arteries, which further divide into smaller vessels called arterioles, and then into a vast network of capillaries in the lungs where gas exchange occurs. The thin walls of these capillaries allow oxygen to diffuse into the blood and carbon dioxide to diffuse out, making the blood oxygen-rich before it is pumped back to the left side of the heart through the pulmonary veins. This process is crucial for maintaining proper oxygenation of the body's tissues and organs.

Nitrates are chemical compounds that consist of a nitrogen atom bonded to three oxygen atoms (NO3-). In the context of medical science, nitrates are often discussed in relation to their use as medications or their presence in food and water.

As medications, nitrates are commonly used to treat angina (chest pain) caused by coronary artery disease. Nitrates work by relaxing and widening blood vessels, which improves blood flow and reduces the workload on the heart. Some examples of nitrate medications include nitroglycerin, isosorbide dinitrate, and isosorbide mononitrate.

In food and water, nitrates are naturally occurring compounds that can be found in a variety of vegetables, such as spinach, beets, and lettuce. They can also be present in fertilizers and industrial waste, which can contaminate groundwater and surface water sources. While nitrates themselves are not harmful, they can be converted into potentially harmful compounds called nitrites under certain conditions, particularly in the digestive system of young children or in the presence of bacteria such as those found in unpasteurized foods. Excessive levels of nitrites can react with hemoglobin in the blood to form methemoglobin, which cannot transport oxygen effectively and can lead to a condition called methemoglobinemia.

Antihypertensive agents are a class of medications used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension). They work by reducing the force and rate of heart contractions, dilating blood vessels, or altering neurohormonal activation to lower blood pressure. Examples include diuretics, beta blockers, ACE inhibitors, ARBs, calcium channel blockers, and direct vasodilators. These medications may be used alone or in combination to achieve optimal blood pressure control.

In a medical context, nitrites are typically referred to as organic compounds that contain a functional group with the formula R-N=O, where R represents an alkyl or aryl group. They are commonly used in medicine as vasodilators, which means they widen and relax blood vessels, improving blood flow and lowering blood pressure.

One example of a nitrite used medically is amyl nitrite, which was previously used to treat angina pectoris, a type of chest pain caused by reduced blood flow to the heart muscle. However, its use has largely been replaced by other medications due to safety concerns and the availability of more effective treatments.

It's worth noting that inorganic nitrites, such as sodium nitrite, are also used in medicine for various purposes, including as a preservative in food and as a medication to treat cyanide poisoning. However, these compounds have different chemical properties and uses than organic nitrites.

Papaverine is defined as a smooth muscle relaxant and a non-narcotic alkaloid derived from the opium poppy. It works by blocking the phosphodiesterase enzyme, leading to an increase in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels within the cells, which in turn results in muscle relaxation.

It is used medically for its vasodilatory effects to treat conditions such as cerebral or peripheral vascular spasms and occlusive diseases, Raynaud's phenomenon, and priapism. Papaverine can also be used as an anti-arrhythmic agent in the management of certain types of cardiac arrhythmias.

It is important to note that papaverine has a narrow therapeutic index, and its use should be closely monitored due to the potential for adverse effects such as hypotension, reflex tachycardia, and gastrointestinal disturbances.

Methoxamine is a synthetic, selective α1-adrenergic receptor agonist used in scientific research and for therapeutic purposes. It has the ability to stimulate the α1 adrenergic receptors, leading to vasoconstriction (constriction of blood vessels), increased blood pressure, and reduced blood flow to the skin and extremities.

In a medical context, methoxamine is primarily used as an experimental drug or in research settings due to its specific pharmacological properties. It may be employed to investigate the role of α1-adrenergic receptors in various physiological processes or to temporarily counteract the hypotensive (low blood pressure) effects of certain medications, such as vasodilators or anesthetics.

It is important to note that methoxamine is not commonly used in routine clinical practice due to its strong vasoconstrictive properties and potential adverse effects on organ function if misused or improperly dosed.

Phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDE inhibitors) are a class of drugs that work by blocking the action of phosphodiesterase enzymes, which are responsible for breaking down cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), two crucial intracellular signaling molecules.

By inhibiting these enzymes, PDE inhibitors increase the concentration of cAMP and cGMP in the cells, leading to a variety of effects depending on the specific type of PDE enzyme that is inhibited. These drugs have been used in the treatment of various medical conditions such as erectile dysfunction, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and heart failure.

Examples of PDE inhibitors include sildenafil (Viagra), tadalafil (Cialis), vardenafil (Levitra) for erectile dysfunction, and iloprost, treprostinil, and sildenafil for pulmonary arterial hypertension. It's important to note that different PDE inhibitors have varying levels of selectivity for specific PDE isoforms, which can result in different therapeutic effects and side effect profiles.

The penis is a part of the male reproductive and urinary systems. It has three parts: the root, the body, and the glans. The root attaches to the pelvic bone and the body makes up the majority of the free-hanging portion. The glans is the cone-shaped end that protects the urethra, the tube inside the penis that carries urine from the bladder and semen from the testicles.

The penis has a dual function - it acts as a conduit for both urine and semen. During sexual arousal, the penis becomes erect when blood fills two chambers inside its shaft. This process is facilitated by the relaxation of the smooth muscles in the arterial walls and the trappping of blood in the corpora cavernosa. The stiffness of the penis enables sexual intercourse. After ejaculation, or when the sexual arousal passes, the muscles contract and the blood flows out of the penis back into the body, causing it to become flaccid again.

The foreskin, a layer of skin that covers the glans, is sometimes removed in a procedure called circumcision. Circumcision is often performed for religious or cultural reasons, or as a matter of family custom. In some countries, it's also done for medical reasons, such as to treat conditions like phimosis (an inability to retract the foreskin) or balanitis (inflammation of the glans).

It's important to note that any changes in appearance, size, or function of the penis should be evaluated by a healthcare professional, as they could indicate an underlying medical condition.

Diethylamines are organic compounds that consist of a nitrogen atom bonded to two ethyl groups and one hydrogen atom. The chemical formula for diethylamine is (C2H5)2NH, and it is a colorless liquid with an unpleasant fishy odor. It is used as a building block in the synthesis of various pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and other organic compounds. Diethylamines can also be found as byproducts in some industrial processes and are produced naturally by certain plants and animals.

Diethylamines can have stimulant effects on the central nervous system and can cause symptoms such as excitement, restlessness, and confusion. In high concentrations or with prolonged exposure, diethylamines can be toxic and may cause respiratory, cardiovascular, and neurological problems. Therefore, it is important to handle diethylamines with care and use appropriate safety measures when working with them.

The basilar artery is a major blood vessel that supplies oxygenated blood to the brainstem and cerebellum. It is formed by the union of two vertebral arteries at the lower part of the brainstem, near the junction of the medulla oblongata and pons.

The basilar artery runs upward through the center of the brainstem and divides into two posterior cerebral arteries at the upper part of the brainstem, near the midbrain. The basilar artery gives off several branches that supply blood to various parts of the brainstem, including the pons, medulla oblongata, and midbrain, as well as to the cerebellum.

The basilar artery is an important part of the circle of Willis, a network of arteries at the base of the brain that ensures continuous blood flow to the brain even if one of the arteries becomes blocked or narrowed.

Potassium channels are membrane proteins that play a crucial role in regulating the electrical excitability of cells, including cardiac, neuronal, and muscle cells. These channels facilitate the selective passage of potassium ions (K+) across the cell membrane, maintaining the resting membrane potential and shaping action potentials. They are composed of four or six subunits that assemble to form a central pore through which potassium ions move down their electrochemical gradient. Potassium channels can be modulated by various factors such as voltage, ligands, mechanical stimuli, or temperature, allowing cells to fine-tune their electrical properties and respond to different physiological demands. Dysfunction of potassium channels has been implicated in several diseases, including cardiac arrhythmias, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative disorders.

"Nitroprusside Rmb, Nitroprusside Sxp, Nitroprusside Tlb (Southern XP IP Pty Ltd)". Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA). 5 ... Sodium nitroprusside is used in a separate urinalysis test known as the cyanide nitroprusside test or Brand's test. In this ... The nitroprusside reaction is used for the identification of ketones in urine testing. Sodium nitroprusside was found to give a ... Sodium nitroprusside is light sensitive, so it needs to be shielded from light to prevent degradation. Sodium nitroprusside is ...
"Sodium Nitroprusside". The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. Archived from the original on 21 December 2016. ... The vasodilator most commonly used is nitroprusside. Individuals with chronic MR can be treated with vasodilators as well to ...
Sodium nitroprusside. Enhanced hypotensive effect. Thyroid hormones. Effects on the heart of lofepramine may be exacerbated. ...
"Sodium Nitroprusside". The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. Archived from the original on 21 December 2016. ... the medication sodium nitroprusside, and certain seeds such as those of apples and apricots. Liquid forms of cyanide can be ... intravenous infusion of nitroprusside for hypertensive crisis; or the inhalation of hydrogen cyanide gas. The last typically ...
The nitroprusside anion, [Fe(CN)5NO]2−, a mixed nitrosyl cyano complex, has pharmaceutical applications as a slow release agent ... "Sodium Nitroprusside". www.drugs.com. The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. Retrieved 21 October 2022. Hayton, T. ... The anion in Roussin's red salt, [Fe2S2(NO)4]2−. The anion in Roussin's black salt, [Fe4S3(NO)7]−. The nitroprusside anion, [Fe ... H2O Nitric acid is used in some preparations of nitroprusside from ferrocyanide: HNO3 + [Fe(CN)6]4- → [Fe(CN)5(NO)]2- + OH− + ...
Molsidomine and nitroprusside already contain nitrogen in the right oxidation state (+2) and liberate NO without the aid of ... Nitroprusside is used intravenously for the treatment of hypertensive crises, heart failure, and lowering of blood pressure ... Sodium nitroprusside: Monograph. Tanaka, Y.; Tang, G.; Takizawa, K.; Otsuka, K.; Eghbali, M.; Song, M.; Nishimaru, K.; ... Nitroprusside, given intravenously, acts immediately, and after stopping the infusion blood pressure returns to its previous ...
The reagent is typically provided in two parts: A mixture of 2% sodium nitroprusside and 2% acetaldehyde in water (solution A) ... Leeuwenkamp, O. R.; van Bennekom, W. P.; van der Mark, E. J.; Bult, A. (1984). "Nitroprusside, antihypertensive drug and ... which subsequently reacts with sodium nitroprusside to the imine. Finally, the iminium salt is hydrolysed to the bright blue ...
Bernshtein, V N; Belikov, V G (1961). "Sodium Nitroprusside and Its Use in Analysis". Russian Chemical Reviews. 30 (4): 227. ...
"Elevated carboxyhemoglobin associated with sodium nitroprusside treatment". Intensive Care Medicine. 31 (9): 1235-1238. doi: ...
It has been associated with nitroprusside. Coronary arteriovenous fistula between coronary artery and another cardiac chamber, ...
Cottrell, JE; Casthely, PA; Brodie, JD; Patel, K; Klein, A; Turndorf, H (1979). "Prevention of Nitroprusside-induced Cyanide ... Cottrell, JE; Patel, KP; Ransohoff, JR; Turndorf, H (1978). "Intracranial Pressure Changes Induced by Sodium Nitroprusside in ... Cottrell, JE; Patel, KP; Casthely, PA; Marlin, A; Turndorf, H (1981). "Cerebrospinal fluid cyanide after nitroprusside infusion ...
Sulfides also turn solutions of red sodium nitroprusside purple. Sulfites produce SO2 gas, which smells of burning sulfur, when ...
Sodium nitroprusside is a drug used as a vasodilator. It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines. ...
Arteriolar vasodilator Cadralazine Dihydralazine Endralazine Sodium nitroprusside "Hydralazine Hydrochloride". The American ...
Those based on sodium nitroprusside and the ruthenium sulfoxide compounds. The ruthenium sulfoxide complexes were created and ...
... s include: hydralazine minoxidil nitroprusside Messerli, F (September 2001). "Vasodilatory edema: a ...
It is produced when nitroprusside is broken down into its constituents. It inhibits cells from properly utilizing oxygen by ...
Nitroprusside - an arteriolar and venous dilator, given as an intravenous infusion. Nitroprusside acts within seconds and has a ... This may be done with labetalol or sodium nitroprusside given by injection into a vein. In those who are pregnant, magnesium ... However, the potential for cyanide toxicity limits the prolonged use of nitroprusside, particularly in patients with chronic ... July 1994). "A comparison of intravenous nicardipine and sodium nitroprusside in the immediate treatment of severe hypertension ...
The most specific test is the cyanide-nitroprusside test Ultrasound/CT scan to reveal if a stone is present. Genetic analysis ... The stones may be identified by a positive nitroprusside cyanide test. The crystals are usually hexagonal, translucent, white. ...
This is done using dipsticks coated in nitroprusside or similar reagents. Nitroprusside changes from pink to purple in the ...
Nitroprusside or phenylephrine may be used in those with decompensated heart failure depending on the blood pressure. Aortic ... In those with high blood pressure nitroprusside may be carefully used. Phenylephrine may be used in those with very low blood ...
Among the many 3-dimensional structures Coppens characterized is the nitroprusside ion. Coppens was a corresponding member of ...
Among his earlier works was a treatise on nitroprussides (1868). In 1880 he published a study on the correlation between the ...
Sodium nitroprusside was previously the first-line choice due to its rapid onset, although now it is less commonly used due to ... Sodium nitroprusside is also contraindicated in patients with myocardial infarction, due to coronary steal. It is again ... Hydralazine and Sodium nitroprusside are systemic vasodilators, thereby reducing afterload, however can be found to have reflex ... sodium nitroprusside, esmolol, nifedipine, minoxidil, isradipine, clonidine, and chlorpromazine. These medications work through ...
Sodium nitroprusside, a metabolite of which is thiocyanate, is however still used for the treatment of a hypertensive emergency ... Rhodanese catalyzes the reaction of sodium nitroprusside with thiosulfate to form the metabolite thiocyanate. Thiocyanate is ...
The reaction of ketones with sodium nitroprusside in an alkaline medium turns the test pad purple. Ketonuria occurs in ... Test strips use sodium nitroprusside to detect acetoacetate, and those with a glycine additive can detect acetone; however, ...
... red crystals of sodium nitroprusside can be selectively crystallized. Upon treatment with chlorine gas, potassium ferrocyanide ...
The test used in the urine test strips is based on the reaction of sodium nitroprusside (nitroferricyanide). In this reaction ... H2O Sodium nitroprusside + Acetoacetic acid + Alkali medium → Pink-magenta complex + Water The test does not measure beta- ... the acetoacetic acid in an alkali medium reacts with the sodium nitroprusside producing a magenta coloured complex: Na2[Fe(CN) ...
... nitroprusside, and electrical stimulation". Neurourology and Urodynamics. 14 (2): 153-68. doi:10.1002/nau.1930140208. PMID ...
With nitroprusside-alkaline ferricyanide reagent a yellow colour is produced, indicating it is not a guanidine derivative. ...
"Nitroprusside Rmb, Nitroprusside Sxp, Nitroprusside Tlb (Southern XP IP Pty Ltd)". Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA). 5 ... Sodium nitroprusside is used in a separate urinalysis test known as the cyanide nitroprusside test or Brands test. In this ... The nitroprusside reaction is used for the identification of ketones in urine testing. Sodium nitroprusside was found to give a ... Sodium nitroprusside is light sensitive, so it needs to be shielded from light to prevent degradation. Sodium nitroprusside is ...
... nitroprusside sodium), frequency-based adverse effects, comprehensive interactions, contraindications, pregnancy & lactation ... nitroprusside sodium (Rx). Brand and Other Names:Nipride RTU, Nitropress, more...Sodium Nitroprusside ... encoded search term (nitroprusside sodium (Nipride RTU%2C Nitropress)) and nitroprusside sodium (Nipride RTU, Nitropress) What ... Use caution when administering nitroprusside to patients with hepatic insufficiency. When sodium nitroprusside (or any other ...
Sodium nitroprusside. In a severe hypertensive emergency, when the above-mentioned medications have failed to lower BP, sodium ... Therefore, sodium nitroprusside should be reserved for use in postpartum care or for administration just before the delivery of ... Nitroprusside results in the release of nitric oxide, which in turn causes significant vasodilation. Preload and afterload are ... What is the role of sodium nitroprusside in the treatment of preeclampsia? ...
Sodium nitroprusside. In a severe hypertensive emergency, when the above-mentioned medications have failed to lower BP, sodium ... Therefore, sodium nitroprusside should be reserved for use in postpartum care or for administration just before the delivery of ... Nitroprusside results in the release of nitric oxide, which in turn causes significant vasodilation. Preload and afterload are ... What is the role of sodium nitroprusside in the treatment of preeclampsia? ...
... nitroprusside sodium), frequency-based adverse effects, comprehensive interactions, contraindications, pregnancy & lactation ... nitroprusside sodium (Rx). Brand and Other Names:Nipride RTU, Nitropress, more...Sodium Nitroprusside ... encoded search term (nitroprusside sodium (Nipride RTU%2C Nitropress)) and nitroprusside sodium (Nipride RTU, Nitropress) What ... Use caution when administering nitroprusside to patients with hepatic insufficiency. When sodium nitroprusside (or any other ...
Nitroprusside. For more information on this medication choose from the list of selections below. ... Product Information: NITROPRESS(R) injection, sodium nitroprusside injection. Hospira,Inc, Lake Forest, IL, 2004. ...
The signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia listed in Table 3 can be roughly correlated with the percentage of total hemoglobin in the oxidized form (see "Clinical Assessment-Laboratory Tests"). Unfortunately, because methemoglobin (MetHb) is generally expressed as a percent of total hemoglobin, levels may not correspond with symptoms in some patients. For example, a patient with a MetHb level of 20% and total hemoglobin of 15 grams per deciliter (g/dL) still has 12 g/dL of functioning hemoglobin, whereas a patient with a MetHb level of 20% and total hemoglobin of 8 g/dL has only 6.4 g/dL of functioning hemoglobin. Anemia, acidosis, respiratory compromise, cardiovascular disease, sepsis or the presence of other abnormal hemoglobin species (i.e. carboxyhemoglobin, sulfhemoglobin, sickle hemoglobin (HbS) may make patients more symptomatic than expected for a given MetHb level [Wright et al. 1999; Ash-Bernal et al. 2004; Skold et al. 2011].. Due to the large excess capacity of the blood to carry ...
Background: The aim of this study was to compare the endothelial damage in saphenous veins created with sodium nitroprusside ... USE OF SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE AND PAPAVERINE SOLUTION IN PREPARATION OF SAPHENOUS VEIN ... USE OF SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE AND PAPAVERINE SOLUTION IN PREPARATION OF SAPHENOUS VEIN ... Conclusions: Our results show that supplementation of sodium nitroprusside to the preservation solution preserves the ...
This study was aimed to evaluate the molecular mechanisms of NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced insults to human ... This study was aimed to evaluate the molecular mechanisms of NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced insults to human ... This study was aimed to evaluate the molecular mechanisms of NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced insults to human ... This study was aimed to evaluate the molecular mechanisms of NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced insults to human ...
Sulfides also turn solutions of red sodium nitroprusside purple. Sulfites produce SO2 gas, which smells of burning sulfur, when ...
B. Nitroprusside Explanation. Nitroprusside is a drug that may cause intra coronary steal away from ischemic areas. Intra ... Nitroprusside is a vasodilator that acts by relaxing smooth muscles in blood vessels, including those in the coronary arteries ...
nitric oxide, nitroglycerin, nitroprusside, nitrous oxide. Local anesthetics. articaine, benzocaine, bupivacaine, lidocaine, ...
The sodium nitroprusside group showed statistically significant improvement on the total BPRS-18 score from the second hour of ... Lastly, sodium nitroprusside as a glutamate-nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate network modulator may emerge as a safe ... Intravenous sodium nitroprusside. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial involved 20 patients who were randomly ... Rapid improvement of acute schizophrenia symptoms after intravenous sodium nitroprusside: a randomized, double-blind, placebo- ...
nitroprusside. *Andre sildenafil produkter (Revatio). Denne medisinen kan også innvirke på følgende medikamenter:. *Visse ...
Vasodilator drugs, such as nitroglycerine or nitroprusside, may be administered. In some forms of heart failure, the use of ...
Following return to baseline, the NO-donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 0.1 mg/kg) elicited mechanical hypersensitivity in ...
Sodium nitroprusside prevents the detrimental effects of glucose on the neurovascular unit and behaviour in zebrafish. Disease ... Sodium nitroprusside prevents the detrimental effects of glucose on the neurovascular unit and behaviour in zebrafish. Disease ...
Lee DH, Pfeifer GP: Mutagenesis induced by the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside in mouse cells. Mutagenesis. 2007, 22: ...
They use nitroprusside to lower blood pressure and treat critical hypertension and congestive heart failure, as well as to keep ... When nitroprusside wholesale acquisition costs increased from $28 to $881 for 50 milligrams from 2012 to 2015, utilization ... These tactics saved the organization nearly $8.1 million over two years on nitroprusside costs as well as about $582,000 on ... Cleveland Clinic is one of the most prolific users of the heart drugs nitroprusside and isoproterenol, so when their respective ...
Sodium nitroprusside augments human lung fibroblast collagen gel contraction independently of NO-cGMP pathway. ...
Drugs tested included isoproterenol, salbutamol, papaverine, sodium-nitroprusside, and adenosine. Tissue responses to ... nitroprusside. The sensitivity of denuded lung trachealis compared to intact trachealis to adenosine was increased ...
Ursodeoxycholic acid suppresses mitochondria-dependent programmed cell death induced by sodium nitroprusside in SH-SY5Y cells. ...
Other names: Ketone bodies (blood), serum ketones, beta-hydroxybutyric acid, acetoacetate, nitroprusside test ...
Dopamine, hydralazine, isosorbide dinitrate, methyldopa, sodium nitroprusside.. Other. Acetazolamide, adrenaline (epinephrine ...
"Nitroprusside, an injectable drug used to lower drug pressure, increased 268 percent over two years," he said. "Isoproterenol, ...
HARRIS S, RINDER C, RINDER H, TRACEY J, SMITH B, HINES R. Nitroprusside Inhibition of Platelet Function Is Transient and ... Harris S, Rinder C, Rinder H, Tracey J, Smith B, Hines R. Nitroprusside Inhibition of Platelet Function Is Transient and ... HARRIS S, RINDER C, RINDER H, TRACEY J, SMITH B, HINES R. Nitroprusside Inhibition of Platelet Function Is Transient and ... Harris S, Rinder C, Rinder H, Tracey J, Smith B, Hines R. Nitroprusside Inhibition of Platelet Function Is Transient and ...
Severe hypertension may be treated according to local protocols, although nitro prusside may be the best choice for treating ... Severe hypertension may be treated according to local protocols, although nitro prusside may be the best choice for treating ... although nitro prusside may be the best choice for treating methyl mercaptan-induced hypertension. ...
Nitroprusside (10?10-10?4 M) was utilized to assess endothelium-independent rest (20). Tempol (1 mM), a superoxide scavenger, ...
... high concentrations of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) inhibit the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs, while its low concentration ... high concentrations of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) inhibit the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs, while its low concentration ...
  • Sodium nitroprusside (SNP), sold under the brand name Nitropress among others, is a medication used to lower blood pressure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sodium nitroprusside was discovered as early as 1850 and found to be useful in medicine in 1928. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sodium nitroprusside is light sensitive, so it needs to be shielded from light to prevent degradation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sodium nitroprusside is intravenously infused in cases of acute hypertensive crises. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients with conditions associated with a higher cyanide/thiocyanate ratio (e.g. congenital (Leber's) optic atrophy, tobacco amblyopia) should only be treated with sodium nitroprusside with great caution. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some evidence suggests sodium nitroprusside use in critically ill children may be safe, even without monitoring of cyanide level. (wikipedia.org)
  • Treatment of sodium nitroprusside overdose includes the following: Discontinuing sodium nitroprusside administration Buffering the cyanide by using sodium nitrite to convert haemoglobin to methaemoglobin as much as the patient can safely tolerate Infusing sodium thiosulfate to convert the cyanide to thiocyanate. (wikipedia.org)
  • lofexidine, nitroprusside sodium. (medscape.com)
  • Product Information: NITROPRESS(R) injection, sodium nitroprusside injection. (rxwiki.com)
  • The aim of this study was to compare the endothelial damage in saphenous veins created with sodium nitroprusside and papaverine. (dergisi.org)
  • Saphenous vein grafts were distended in the heparinized lactated Ringer's solution containing papaverine at pressure not exceeding 80 mmHg in Group 3 (Papaverine group), and distended at same pressure in the heparinized lactated Ringer's solution containing sodium nitroprusside in Group 4 (Sodium Nitroprusside group). (dergisi.org)
  • Score in sodium nitroprusside group was found to be significantly better than the others. (dergisi.org)
  • Our results show that supplementation of sodium nitroprusside to the preservation solution preserves the endothelium. (dergisi.org)
  • This study was aimed to evaluate the molecular mechanisms of NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced insults to human chondrocytes. (tmu.edu.tw)
  • Sodium nitroprusside prevents the detrimental effects of glucose on the neurovascular unit and behaviour in zebrafish. (nottingham.ac.uk)
  • Epithelium removal had no effect on the sensitivity of tracheal strips to papaverine or salbutamol, but significantly enhanced sensitivity to isoproterenol and sodium- nitroprusside. (cdc.gov)
  • According to previous reports, high concentrations of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) inhibit the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs, while its low concentration promotes this process. (magiran.com)
  • The Urine Reagent Strip (Ketone) Rapid Test is based on the reaction of acetoacetic acid with sodium nitroprusside in a strongly basic medium. (rapidtest.com)
  • Cleveland Clinic found three therapeutic alternatives for specific indications including IV nitroglycerin taking the place of nitroprusside for hypertension following cardiac surgery, adding clevidipine as an alternative to nitroprusside for aortic dissection, and using dobutamine instead of isoproterenol for the intraoperative testing of myectomy patients. (modernhealthcare.com)
  • Cleveland Clinic is one of the most prolific users of the heart drugs nitroprusside and isoproterenol, so when their respective prices surged 30-fold and 70-fold over a three-year span, it caught the provider's attention. (modernhealthcare.com)
  • There were no therapeutic alternatives to nitroprusside for acute heart failure and none to isoproterenol for electrophysiology testing, thus those critical uses were retained. (modernhealthcare.com)
  • The organization ended the routine ordering of nitroprusside for the treatment of hypertension following cardiac surgery, removed the high-concentration option for nitroprusside in the electronic medication order, and reduced the typical dispensing quantity of isoproterenol. (modernhealthcare.com)
  • These tactics saved the organization nearly $8.1 million over two years on nitroprusside costs as well as about $582,000 on isoproterenol. (modernhealthcare.com)
  • They use nitroprusside to lower blood pressure and treat critical hypertension and congestive heart failure, as well as to keep blood pressure low during surgery. (modernhealthcare.com)
  • An introduction of generic competitors has since decreased the price of nitroprusside. (modernhealthcare.com)
  • Nitroprusside produces vasodilation and increases the inotropic activity of the heart. (medscape.com)
  • When nitroprusside wholesale acquisition costs increased from $28 to $881 for 50 milligrams from 2012 to 2015, utilization across 47 hospitals studied decreased 53%, Cleveland Clinic researchers found in a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. (modernhealthcare.com)
  • Nitroprusside, an injectable drug used to lower drug pressure, increased 268 percent over two years," he said. (ijpr.org)
  • Sodium nitroprusside injection is not suitable for direct injection. (nih.gov)
  • Sodium nitroprusside should be used only when available equipment and personnel allow blood pressure to be continuously monitored. (nih.gov)
  • If blood pressure has not been adequately controlled after 10 minutes of infusion at the maximum rate, administration of sodium nitroprusside should be terminated immediately. (nih.gov)
  • Sodium nitroprusside, USP is a reddish brown crystals or powder soluble in water. (nih.gov)
  • In an aqueous solution infused intravenously, sodium nitroprusside is a rapid-acting vasodilator, active on both arteries and veins. (nih.gov)
  • Sodium nitroprusside solution is rapidly degraded by trace contaminants, often with resulting color changes. (nih.gov)
  • 50 mg Single Dose Vial - Each 2 mL vial contains the equivalent of 50 mg sodium nitroprusside dihydrate in sterile water for injection. (nih.gov)
  • The principal pharmacological action of sodium nitroprusside is relaxation of vascular smooth muscle and consequent dilatation of peripheral arteries and veins. (nih.gov)
  • Sodium nitroprusside is more active on veins than on arteries, but this selectivity is much less marked than that of nitroglycerin. (nih.gov)
  • In association with the decrease in blood pressure, sodium nitroprusside administered intravenously to hypertensive and normotensive patients produces slight increases in heart rate and a variable effect on cardiac output. (nih.gov)
  • In normotensive subjects, acute reduction of mean arterial pressure to 60 to 75 mm Hg by infusion of sodium nitroprusside caused a significant increase in renin activity. (nih.gov)
  • In the same study, ten renovascular-hypertensive patients given sodium nitroprusside had significant increases in renin release from the involved kidney at mean arterial pressures of 90 to 137 mm Hg. (nih.gov)
  • The hypotensive effect of sodium nitroprusside is seen within a minute or two after the start of an adequate infusion, and it dissipates almost as rapidly after an infusion is discontinued. (nih.gov)
  • Infused sodium nitroprusside is rapidly distributed to a volume that is approximately coextensive with the extracellular space. (nih.gov)
  • Safe use of sodium nitroprusside injection must be guided by knowledge of the further metabolism of these products. (nih.gov)
  • Effects of sodium nitroprusside on left ventricular diastolic pressure-volume relations. (jci.org)
  • The effect of sodium nitroprusside on the relationship between left ventricular pressure and volume during diastole was studied in 11 patients with congestive heart failure. (jci.org)
  • Serial left ventricular cineangiograms performed 15 min apart in six additional subjects who did not receive sodium nitroprusside showed no shift in the diastolic pressure-volume relation, indicating that the shift seen with nitroprusside was not due to the angiographic procedure itself. (jci.org)
  • Sodium nitroprusside is a nitrovasodilator that is used intravenously for therapy of severe hypertension, hypertensive emergencies and heart failure. (nih.gov)
  • Sodium nitroprusside (nye" troe prus' ide) is a nonselective vasodilator that acts through release of nitric oxide to cause relaxation of smooth muscle cells of arterioles and venules. (nih.gov)
  • Sodium nitroprusside is available in solution for injection in 2 or 5 mL vials of 50 mg generically and under the brand name of Nitropress. (nih.gov)
  • Sodium nitroprusside is metabolized in peripheral tissue to a cyanide radical which is converted to thiocyanate in the liver. (nih.gov)
  • Eschenhagen T. Sodium nitroprusside. (nih.gov)
  • Sodium nitroprusside-induced cyanide intoxication and prevention with sodium thiosulfate prophylaxis. (nih.gov)
  • Monitoring cyanide and thiocyanate concentrations during infusion of sodium nitroprusside in children. (nih.gov)
  • In the study presented here we investigated effects of adrenergic agonists or related postreceptor-active agents on stimulation of pineal cyclic GMP accumulation by the NO generator sodium nitroprusside (NP). (nih.gov)
  • There were no differences in acetylcholine (Ach)-, or sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-stimulated vasodilation between groups. (usda.gov)
  • Epithelium removal had no effect on the sensitivity of tracheal strips to papaverine or salbutamol, but significantly enhanced sensitivity to isoproterenol and sodium- nitroprusside. (cdc.gov)
  • However, a good indication of whether or not the methamphetamine moiety is present can be obtained with the sodium nitroprusside/ sodium carbonate test for secondary amines. (erowid.org)
  • Despite routine use of nitroprusside to treat congestive heart failure and hypertension and isoproterenol to treat heart block and bradycardia, the results also suggest a shift in prescribing patterns to two other intravenous heart drugs with somewhat similar effects but more stable pricing. (medscape.com)
  • Nitroprusside is used predominantly to treat hypertensive emergencies, such as to lower blood pressure during acute aortic dissection or to improve cardiac output in severe congestive heart failure. (nih.gov)
  • CLEVELAND, OH - In the wake of staggering price increases, the number of patients receiving the heart drugs nitroprusside ( Nitropress , Valeant Pharmaceuticals) and isoproterenol ( Isuprel , Valeant Pharmaceuticals) has fallen dramatically by 53% and 35%, respectively, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine [ 1 ] . (medscape.com)
  • The brand name version of nitroprusside, Nitropress, was originally approved in 1981 to treat cardiovascular patients. (calbrokermag.com)
  • Left ventricular diastolic pressure-volume curves were constructed in each patient from data obtained before and during nitroprusside infusion. (jci.org)
  • In 9 of 11 patients there was a substantial downward displacement of the diastolic pressure-volume curve during nitroprusside infusion, with left ventricular pressure being lower for any given volume with nitroprusside. (jci.org)
  • A possible explanation for the altered diastolic pressure-volume relationships with nitroprusside might be a direct relaxant effect of nitroprusside on ventricular muscle, similar to its known relaxant effect on vascular smooth muscle. (jci.org)
  • Hver lateral pharmacopoeia varied gather that interacts by uncounted element rhombisk tablet indeholder 100mg af Sildenafil, en aktiv ingrediens Sildenafil modish it spurn exist antecedently massed increase laud base achieve this. (biology4all.com)
  • Drugs that were around for decades - almost a century, sometimes - caught us off guard," said Scott Knoer, chief pharmacy officer of the Cleveland Clinic, referring to price hikes for drugs such as nitroprusside, which increased 672 percent per unit from 2013 to 2015, according to the report. (calbrokermag.com)
  • Clinical pharmacokinetics of nitroprusside, cyanide, thiosulphate and thiocyanate. (nih.gov)
  • Nitroprusside is unstable and must be administered intravenously with careful monitoring. (nih.gov)
  • Cyanide is another toxic metabolite of nitroprusside that may enter breastmilk. (nih.gov)
  • Serum aminotransferase elevations during nitroprusside therapy are uncommon and are more likely attributable to hepatic ischemia due to hypotension, heart failure or anoxia. (nih.gov)
  • Potentiates antiaggregatory effect of Na nitroprusside. (mims.com)
  • Nitroprusside cost hospitals almost $95 million in 2015 up from $48.3 million the year before, according to the report. (calbrokermag.com)
  • Alternatively, nitroprusside may affect the diastolic pressure-volume curve by affecting viscous properties or by altering one or more of the extrinsic constraints acting upon the left ventricle. (jci.org)
  • Breastmilk levels of nitroprusside sodium have not been measured after exogenous administration. (nih.gov)
  • Review of hepatotoxicity of hypertensive agents does not discuss nitroprusside). (nih.gov)
  • Nitroprusside was infused to lower mean arterial pressure approximately 20-30 mm Hg. (jci.org)