NewsPoverty Areas: City, urban, rural, or suburban areas which are characterized by severe economic deprivation and by accompanying physical and social decay.Newspapers: Publications printed and distributed daily, weekly, or at some other regular and usually short interval, containing news, articles of opinion (as editorials and letters), features, advertising, and announcements of current interest. (Webster's 3d ed)Mass Media: Instruments or technological means of communication that reach large numbers of people with a common message: press, radio, television, etc.Truth Disclosure: Truthful revelation of information, specifically when the information disclosed is likely to be psychologically painful ("bad news") to the recipient (e.g., revelation to a patient or a patient's family of the patient's DIAGNOSIS or PROGNOSIS) or embarrassing to the teller (e.g., revelation of medical errors).Journalism, Medical: The collection, writing, and editing of current interest material on topics related to biomedicine for presentation through the mass media, including newspapers, magazines, radio, or television, usually for a public audience such as health care consumers.Television: The transmission and reproduction of transient images of fixed or moving objects. An electronic system of transmitting such images together with sound over a wire or through space by apparatus that converts light and sound into electrical waves and reconverts them into visible light rays and audible sound. (From Webster, 3rd ed)Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Journalism: The collection, preparation, and distribution of news and related commentary and feature materials through such media as pamphlets, newsletters, newspapers, magazines, radio, motion pictures, television, and books. While originally applied to the reportage of current events in printed form, specifically newspapers, with the advent of radio and television the use of the term has broadened to include all printed and electronic communication dealing with current affairs.United StatesIncome: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Public Opinion: The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.Social Conditions: The state of society as it exists or in flux. While it usually refers to society as a whole in a specified geographical or political region, it is applicable also to restricted strata of a society.Family Characteristics: Size and composition of the family.Communications Media: The means of interchanging or transmitting and receiving information. Historically the media were written: books, journals, newspapers, and other publications; in the modern age the media include, in addition, radio, television, computers, and information networks.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Child Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the child.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Censuses: Enumerations of populations usually recording identities of all persons in every place of residence with age or date of birth, sex, occupation, national origin, language, marital status, income, relation to head of household, information on the dwelling place, education, literacy, health-related data (e.g., permanent disability), etc. The census or "numbering of the people" is mentioned several times in the Old Testament. Among the Romans, censuses were intimately connected with the enumeration of troops before and after battle and probably a military necessity. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed; Garrison, An Introduction to the History of Medicine, 4th ed, p66, p119)Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Phospholipases A2, Cytosolic: A subcategory of phospholipases A2 that occur in the CYTOSOL.Radio: The transmission and reception of electric impulses or signals by means of electric waves without a connecting wire, or the use of these waves for the wireless transmission of electric impulses into which sound is converted. (From Webster's 3d)Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Vulnerable Populations: Groups of persons whose range of options is severely limited, who are frequently subjected to COERCION in their DECISION MAKING, or who may be compromised in their ability to give INFORMED CONSENT.Public Assistance: Financial assistance to impoverished persons for the essentials of living through federal, state or local government programs.Food Supply: The production and movement of food items from point of origin to use or consumption.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Health Communication: The transfer of information from experts in the medical and public health fields to patients and the public. The study and use of communication strategies to inform and influence individual and community decisions that enhance health.Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Social Welfare: Organized institutions which provide services to ameliorate conditions of need or social pathology in the community.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Information Dissemination: The circulation or wide dispersal of information.Economics: The science of utilization, distribution, and consumption of services and materials.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Education: Acquisition of knowledge as a result of instruction in a formal course of study.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Neglected Diseases: Diseases that are underfunded and have low name recognition but are major burdens in less developed countries. The World Health Organization has designated six tropical infectious diseases as being neglected in industrialized countries that are endemic in many developing countries (HELMINTHIASIS; LEPROSY; LYMPHATIC FILARIASIS; ONCHOCERCIASIS; SCHISTOSOMIASIS; and TRACHOMA).Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Public Relations: Relations of an individual, association, organization, hospital, or corporation with the publics which it must take into consideration in carrying out its functions. Publics may include consumers, patients, pressure groups, departments, etc.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Financing, Personal: Payment by individuals or their family for health care services which are not covered by a third-party payer, either insurance or medical assistance.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.United Nations: An international organization whose members include most of the sovereign nations of the world with headquarters in New York City. The primary objectives of the organization are to maintain peace and security and to achieve international cooperation in solving international economic, social, cultural, or humanitarian problems.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Catastrophic Illness: An acute or prolonged illness usually considered to be life-threatening or with the threat of serious residual disability. Treatment may be radical and is frequently costly.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Small-Area Analysis: A method of analyzing the variation in utilization of health care in small geographic or demographic areas. It often studies, for example, the usage rates for a given service or procedure in several small areas, documenting the variation among the areas. By comparing high- and low-use areas, the analysis attempts to determine whether there is a pattern to such use and to identify variables that are associated with and contribute to the variation.Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Role Playing: The adopting or performing the role of another significant individual in order to gain insight into the behavior of that person.Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.Information Science: The field of knowledge, theory, and technology dealing with the collection of facts and figures, and the processes and methods involved in their manipulation, storage, dissemination, publication, and retrieval. It includes the fields of COMMUNICATION; PUBLISHING; LIBRARY SCIENCE; and informatics.Hispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Financial Management: The obtaining and management of funds for institutional needs and responsibility for fiscal affairs.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Continental Population Groups: Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Homicide: The killing of one person by another.Advertising as Topic: The act or practice of calling public attention to a product, service, need, etc., especially by paid announcements in newspapers, magazines, on radio, or on television. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)CaliforniaPartnership Practice, Dental: A voluntary contract between two or more dentists who may or may not share responsibility for the care of patients, with proportional sharing of profits and losses.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Parental Notification: Reporting to parents or guardians about care to be provided to a minor (MINORS).Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Housing: Living facilities for humans.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Sociology: A social science dealing with group relationships, patterns of collective behavior, and social organization.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.MissouriPersuasive Communication: A mode of communication concerned with inducing or urging the adoption of certain beliefs, theories, or lines of action by others.Medically Uninsured: Individuals or groups with no or inadequate health insurance coverage. Those falling into this category usually comprise three primary groups: the medically indigent (MEDICAL INDIGENCY); those whose clinical condition makes them medically uninsurable; and the working uninsured.Noma: A severe gangrenous process occurring predominantly in debilitated and malnourished children, especially in underdeveloped countries. It typically begins as a small vesicle or ulcer on the gingiva that rapidly becomes necrotic and spreads to produce extensive destruction of the buccal and labial mucosa and tissues of the face, which may result in severe disfigurement and even death. Various bacteria have been implicated in the etiology. (Dorland, 27th ed)Tobacco Industry: The aggregate business enterprise of agriculture, manufacture, and distribution related to tobacco and tobacco-derived products.Africa South of the Sahara: All of Africa except Northern Africa (AFRICA, NORTHERN).Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Sociology, Medical: The study of the social determinants and social effects of health and disease, and of the social structure of medical institutions or professions.Ownership: The legal relation between an entity (individual, group, corporation, or-profit, secular, government) and an object. The object may be corporeal, such as equipment, or completely a creature of law, such as a patent; it may be movable, such as an animal, or immovable, such as a building.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Consumer Advocacy: The promotion and support of consumers' rights and interests.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Medical Tourism: Travel to another country for the purpose of medical treatment.Cultural Deprivation: The absence of certain expected and acceptable cultural phenomena in the environment which results in the failure of the individual to communicate and respond in the most appropriate manner within the context of society. Language acquisition and language use are commonly used in assessing this concept.Catholicism: The Christian faith, practice, or system of the Catholic Church, specifically the Roman Catholic, the Christian church that is characterized by a hierarchic structure of bishops and priests in which doctrinal and disciplinary authority are dependent upon apostolic succession, with the pope as head of the episcopal college. (From Webster, 3d ed; American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed)Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Rural Nursing: A branch of nursing requiring generalist training with specialty knowledge in crisis assessment and management in all subdisciplines of nursing. Rural nursing practices often include geographical and social distance concepts in delivery of health care.Consumer Health Information: Information intended for potential users of medical and healthcare services. There is an emphasis on self-care and preventive approaches as well as information for community-wide dissemination and use.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).ChicagoStress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Human Development: Continuous sequential changes which occur in the physiological and psychological functions during the life-time of an individual.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Humanism: An ethical system which emphasizes human values and the personal worth of each individual, as well as concern for the dignity and freedom of humankind.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Terminally Ill: Persons with an incurable or irreversible illness at the end stage that will result in death within a short time. (From O'Leary et al., Lexikon: Dictionary of Health Care Terms, Organizations, and Acronyms for the Era of Reform, 1994, p780)IndiaSocial Problems: Situations affecting a significant number of people, that are believed to be sources of difficulty or threaten the stability of the community, and that require programs of amelioration.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Cities: A large or important municipality of a country, usually a major metropolitan center.Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Unemployment: The state of not being engaged in a gainful occupation.North CarolinaKenya: A republic in eastern Africa, south of ETHIOPIA, west of SOMALIA with TANZANIA to its south, and coastline on the Indian Ocean. Its capital is Nairobi.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Community Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Allostasis: Biological adaptation, such as the rise of EPINEPHRINE in response to exercise, stress or perceived danger, followed by a fall of epinephrine during RELAXATION. Allostasis is the achievement of stability by turning on and turning off the allostatic systems including the IMMUNE SYSTEM; the AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM and NEUROENDOCRINE SYSTEMS.African Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Africa.Malnutrition: An imbalanced nutritional status resulted from insufficient intake of nutrients to meet normal physiological requirement.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Healthy People Programs: Healthy People Programs are a set of health objectives to be used by governments, communities, professional organizations, and others to help develop programs to improve health. It builds on initiatives pursued over the past two decades beginning with the 1979 Surgeon General's Report, Healthy People, Healthy People 2000: National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives, and Healthy People 2010. These established national health objectives and served as the basis for the development of state and community plans. These are administered by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP). Similar programs are conducted by other national governments.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)BangladeshInvestments: Use for articles on the investing of funds for income or profit.Environment Design: The structuring of the environment to permit or promote specific patterns of behavior.Tropical Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with diseases, mainly of parasitic origin, common in tropical and subtropical regions.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Maternal Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the mother.Single Parent: A natural, adoptive, or substitute parent of a dependent child, who lives with only one parent. The single parent may live with or visit the child. The concept includes the never-married, as well as the divorced and widowed.South Africa: A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Hunger: The desire for FOOD generated by a sensation arising from the lack of food in the STOMACH.Quebec: A province of eastern Canada. Its capital is Quebec. The region belonged to France from 1627 to 1763 when it was lost to the British. The name is from the Algonquian quilibek meaning the place where waters narrow, referring to the gradually narrowing channel of the St. Lawrence or to the narrows of the river at Cape Diamond. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p993 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p440)Rhode IslandEmigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.Latin America: The geographic area of Latin America in general and when the specific country or countries are not indicated. It usually includes Central America, South America, Mexico, and the islands of the Caribbean.Grief: Normal, appropriate sorrowful response to an immediate cause. It is self-limiting and gradually subsides within a reasonable time.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.TennesseeHealth Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Professional-Family Relations: The interactions between the professional person and the family.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Terrorism: The use or threatened use of force or violence against persons or property in violation of criminal laws for purposes of intimidation, coercion, or ransom, in support of political or social objectives.Urban Renewal: The planned upgrading of a deteriorating urban area, involving rebuilding, renovation, or restoration. It frequently refers to programs of major demolition and rebuilding of blighted areas.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.GeorgiaChild, Orphaned: Child who has lost both parents through death or desertion.Child Mortality: Number of deaths of children between one year of age to 12 years of age in a given population.Infant Mortality: Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Disabled Children: Children with mental or physical disabilities that interfere with usual activities of daily living and that may require accommodation or intervention.Sanitation: The development and establishment of environmental conditions favorable to the health of the public.Caribbean Region: The area that lies between continental North and South America and comprises the Caribbean Sea, the West Indies, and the adjacent mainland regions of southern Mexico, Central America, Colombia, and Venezuela.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Medical Oncology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of neoplasms.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Violence: Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.Child Nutrition Disorders: Disorders caused by nutritional imbalance, either overnutrition or undernutrition, occurring in children ages 2 to 12 years.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Zimbabwe: A republic in southern Africa, east of ZAMBIA and BOTSWANA and west of MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Harare. It was formerly called Rhodesia and Southern Rhodesia.Costa RicaCharities: Social welfare organizations with programs designed to assist individuals in need.Information Services: Organized services to provide information on any questions an individual might have using databases and other sources. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)FloridaPrejudice: A preconceived judgment made without factual basis.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.MexicoCrime: A violation of the criminal law, i.e., a breach of the conduct code specifically sanctioned by the state, which through its administrative agencies prosecutes offenders and imposes and administers punishments. The concept includes unacceptable actions whether prosecuted or going unpunished.Child Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological maturing of an individual from birth up to but not including ADOLESCENCE.Causality: The relating of causes to the effects they produce. Causes are termed necessary when they must always precede an effect and sufficient when they initiate or produce an effect. Any of several factors may be associated with the potential disease causation or outcome, including predisposing factors, enabling factors, precipitating factors, reinforcing factors, and risk factors.Food Assistance: Food or financial assistance for food given to those in need.Human Rights: The rights of the individual to cultural, social, economic, and educational opportunities as provided by society, e.g., right to work, right to education, and right to social security.Emigrants and Immigrants: People who leave their place of residence in one country and settle in a different country.Parenting: Performing the role of a parent by care-giving, nurturance, and protection of the child by a natural or substitute parent. The parent supports the child by exercising authority and through consistent, empathic, appropriate behavior in response to the child's needs. PARENTING differs from CHILD REARING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the children and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.Minority Groups: A subgroup having special characteristics within a larger group, often bound together by special ties which distinguish it from the larger group.Urbanization: The process whereby a society changes from a rural to an urban way of life. It refers also to the gradual increase in the proportion of people living in urban areas.Medicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.AfricaTaxes: Governmental levies on property, inheritance, gifts, etc.Fees and Charges: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for health care services.Planning Techniques: Procedures, strategies, and theories of planning.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)BrazilCapital Expenditures: Those funds disbursed for facilities and equipment, particularly those related to the delivery of health care.NicaraguaEconomic Recession: Significant decline in economic activity spread across the economy, lasting more than a few months, normally visible in real gross domestic product, real income, employment, industrial production, and wholesale-retail sales. (National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, www.nber.org/cycles.html, accessed 4/23/2009)Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.
  • The lunch will take place ahead of The United Nation's annual International Anti-Poverty Day on October 17 and International Anti-Poverty Week 16 - 22 October and. (scoop.co.nz)
  • Anti-Poverty day aims to raise awareness of the causes of poverty and the solutions. (scoop.co.nz)
  • FILE - In this Feb. 21, 2019, file photo, former Vice President Al Gore, left, founder of the Climate Reality Project, and the Rev. William Barber II, president of the Repairers of the Breach, visit Lowndes County resident Charlie Mae Holcombe to talk about the failing wastewater sanitation system at her home in Hayneville, Ala. An anti-poverty coalition led by Barber is scheduled to hold a virtual march Saturday. (go.com)
  • It also attests to the success of the Chinese model of development on the high plateau and offers the world an exemplary case," said Wang, who is also the director of an anti-poverty research center. (xinhuanet.com)
  • The director of a Victoria-based anti-poverty group said Thursday the need to fight poverty is immediate and they will be among many watching to ensure the government's plan includes targets and timelines. (cbc.ca)
  • The goal is to help lawmakers to better gauge the effectiveness of anti-poverty programs, although it does not replace the Census Bureau's official poverty formula. (foxnews.com)
  • Anti-poverty groups also support bills that reduce fines and fees in the criminal-justice system and one that would prevent debt collectors from using bank levies to wipe out people's last dollar. (publicnewsservice.org)
  • The poverty reduction is consistent with high growth rates of recent years, including 9% GDP growth in 2007. (scoop.co.nz)
  • Despite sustained high economic growth, poverty reduction had been slow over previous years after peaking at 54.8% in 2001. (scoop.co.nz)
  • Economists say this will lead to further correlation between economic successes and poverty reduction. (scoop.co.nz)
  • By Departments, poverty reduction was larger in those that have developed modern farming facilities and non-traditional export factories. (scoop.co.nz)
  • Shane Simpson, the minister of social development and poverty reduction, (centre), is joined by UNBC chair Dawn Hemingway, (left), and Parliamentary Secretary and co-chair Mable Elmore in November at a news conference in Victoria on the NDP's advisory forum on poverty reduction. (cbc.ca)
  • British Columbia's promised plan to fight poverty is taking longer to introduce than originally forecast, says the minister in charge of poverty reduction. (cbc.ca)
  • The NDP made poverty reduction one of its key election promises last spring after years of labelling the former B.C. Liberal government as insensitive for rejecting plans to reduce one of the highest child-poverty rates in Canada. (cbc.ca)
  • Members of the public are invited to attend the "A Call to Action: Poverty Reduction in Kalamazoo County" seminar and learn about the problems associated with poverty in the community and how they can aid in reducing the disproportionate number of residents who live at or below the poverty level. (wmich.edu)
  • Feb. 4- Income security, Barbara Young, a past director of the Kalamazoo County Community Action Agency, vice president of the Kalamazoo County Poverty-Reduction Initiative and a consultant for WMU's new University-Community Empowerment Center. (wmich.edu)
  • The administration of President Luis Guillermo Solís launched a targeted poverty-reduction plan on Thursday, aimed at pulling at least 54,600 families out of extreme poverty. (ticotimes.net)
  • Mr. Geoffrey K. Ocansey, National Programme Officer of Ghana National Education Campaign Coalition, speaking on the theme: "Make Noise for MDGs" said education had been identified as the best tool for fighting poverty and recording other benefits like reduction in cases of infant and maternal mortality, increasing economic gains and empowering people. (ghanabusinessnews.com)
  • Povertyenvironment.net is a knowledge hub dedicated to compiling and sharing information on good practices and lessons gained from the beneficial relationship between environmental engagement and poverty reduction globally. (povertyenvironment.net)
  • According to Jaime Saavedra, World Bank Poverty Manager for Latin America, Mexico has made considerable strides in poverty reduction since the late 1990s, with performance above the Latin American average. (wikipedia.org)
  • 9 October 2012 A new three-year project in Uganda will help the recently formed Uganda Poverty and Conservation Learning Group promote evidence-based policies that both reduce poverty and conserve wildlife. (iied.org)
  • 1 June 2011 United Nations officials today called for boosting support for sustainable agriculture, including smallholder farmers, as a way to drive green growth and reduce poverty. (un.org)
  • The Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL) is a global research center working to reduce poverty by ensuring that policy is informed by scientific evidence. (povertyactionlab.org)
  • KALAMAZOO-Western Michigan University will offer a free five-week seminar in January and February that is designed to help reduce poverty in Kalamazoo County. (wmich.edu)
  • 5.4 billion in to reduce poverty in the provinces by improving the income of poor people living in rural areas and helping to ensure that they have enough food to eat, even in times of hardship. (dailynews.lk)
  • The feat was accomplished after Tibet lifted the remaining 150,000 people out of poverty and took 19 counties off the poverty list in 2019, said Qizhala in his government work report delivered at the third session of the 11th People's Congress of Tibet Autonomous Region. (xinhuanet.com)
  • The figures have been released today by the charity Save the Children, which is now turning its attention to poverty-stricken Britain for the first time ever, blaming the Government's austerity measures. (itv.com)
  • Brazil has launched a welfare scheme to lift millions out of extreme poverty by 2014, which President Dilma Rousseff calls her government's key priority. (bbc.co.uk)
  • However, observers suggest that continued strong growth and foreign and domestic investment (encouraged by high commodity prices), coupled with the government's focus on social policies and infrastructure, will lead to the kind of dent in poverty that occurred in Chile in the last decade and a half. (scoop.co.nz)
  • In the IFS report on child poverty, the organisation acknowledged that, in the long term, the government's introduction of Universal Credit to replace the current benefits system will have an impact on reducing child poverty. (channel4.com)
  • A member of King's society is one of 27 on the New Democrat government's poverty strategy advisory panel established last year. (cbc.ca)
  • The revised poverty rate of 16.1 percent also is higher than the record 46.2 million, or 15 percent, that the government's official estimate reported in September. (foxnews.com)
  • Treasury yesterday confirmed that it had likely overstated how many children would be lifted out of poverty as a result of the government's Families Package. (radionz.co.nz)
  • Treasury has revealed it made a "deeply regrettable mistake" by likely overstating how many children would be lifted out of poverty as a result of the government's Families Package. (radionz.co.nz)
  • Evelyn Brodkin, associate professor at the University of Chicago's School of Social Service Administration, leads a discussion on the politics, practices, and possibilities of the government's involvement and impact on poverty and inequality. (uchicago.edu)
  • Experts mulling over 2010 data out of the US Census Bureau report that while much of America has been plagued with a poverty epidemic, one of every five counties in the country has seen significant increases in the percentage of their school-age poor over the last few years. (rt.com)
  • Going over just the largest 100 school districts in America, 96 percent saw a growth in children stricken with poverty between 2007 and 2010. (rt.com)
  • Global pandemics, by their very nature, exploit the fissures of society and America has fissures in terms of poverty and systemic racism. (go.com)
  • Even before the recession hit, middle class incomes had been stagnant and the number of people living in poverty in America was unacceptably high, and today's numbers make it clear that our work is just beginning," Mr. Obama said in a statement. (cbsnews.com)
  • Edelman, author of So Rich, So Poor: Why It's So Hard to End Poverty in America , also highlighted the problem of low-wage jobs affecting poverty when he spoke to Bill Moyers in June . (commondreams.org)
  • Calling his program 'No Poor Person Left Behind,' Bush announced that, beginning in June, poverty in America will be outsourced. (thespoof.com)
  • Founder and executive director of the Poverty Alleviation and Empowerment Foundation (PAEF), Pauline Gregory Lewis has been working to assist children whose schooling is being affected by financial challenges in the St Catherine area for the past five years. (jamaica-gleaner.com)
  • It should also brainstorm about sectors where jobs could be generated in the age of digitisation and automatisation and distribute successful case studies from member states that have successfully integrated economic, social and environmental policies that have helped in poverty alleviation. (hindustantimes.com)
  • The World Bank estimates that the proportion of the world population living in extreme poverty will drop to 9.6 per cent this year. (newyorker.com)
  • On Sunday, the World Bank announced that this year, for the first time on record, the percentage of the earth's population that is living in extreme poverty is likely to fall below ten per cent. (newyorker.com)
  • This year, according to the bank's new projections, the proportion living in extreme poverty will be 9.6 per cent. (newyorker.com)
  • There are 1.4 billion people in the world living in extreme poverty. (abdn.ac.uk)
  • Dr Hilary Homans, Director of the Centre for International Sustainable Development, said: "There are now 1.4 billion people in the world living in extreme poverty and we hope the lecture will help to connect students and the wider community to this pivotal issue. (abdn.ac.uk)
  • Of this number, 767 million were found to be living in extreme poverty. (hindustantimes.com)
  • BEIJING, Nov. 21 (Xinhua) -- China will increase financial input and policy support to eradicate abject poverty. (xinhuanet.com)
  • Eradicating abject poverty, which persists in places including Tibet Autonomous Region and parts of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region as well as the provinces of Sichuan, Yunnan and Gansu, is crucial for the success of the country's poverty elimination campaign, according to a guideline issued by the general offices of the Communist Party of China Central Committee and the State Council Tuesday. (xinhuanet.com)
  • Many of the people who live in those slums, however, do not even count as being poor thanks to a new definition that has moved India's poverty line to 32 rupees - or 60 US cents - per day. (rt.com)
  • Putting 32 rupees as the benchmark to decide the poverty line is wrong because one cannot do anything with that amount," he says. (rt.com)
  • Many people above the poverty line are also vulnerable. (rt.com)
  • How is that not close to the poverty line? (rt.com)
  • For now, Ram Niwas says, the debate over the poverty line is meaningless in his life. (rt.com)
  • Many are not claiming the benefits they are entitled to, leaving 84,000 under the Department of Work and Pensions defined poverty line and 200,000 reporting cutbacks on food, heat and social activity spending. (bbc.com)
  • Given all the unemployment we saw, it's the government safety net that's keeping people above the poverty line," said Douglas Besharov, a University of Maryland public policy professor and former scholar at the conservative American Enterprise Institute. (cbsnews.com)
  • Although he insists that a relative income measure will be retained, he has previously referred to it as being a "poverty plus a pound" benchmark, in which earning £1 above the 60 per cent line means a family is no longer in poverty. (channel4.com)
  • If we side-line income poverty it will backfire and we will see an increase in problems like debt, family breakdown, poor health and addiction. (channel4.com)
  • About 1.3 billion people have been lifted above the poverty line. (newyorker.com)
  • If the poverty line is raised to $2 a day, Asia has about 1.9 billion poor people," or more than three-quarters of the world total, it said. (aljazeera.com)
  • An unexpected bill or other crisis can hurtle families living near the poverty line into chaos, said Cheryl Grice, chief executive officer of Pathway Inc. The group helps provide heat and other services to residents in northwest Ohio's Lucas County. (cantonrep.com)
  • A miscalculation in Treasury's child poverty figures is an "extremely rare" error in one line of code among thousands, says the deputy secretary. (radionz.co.nz)
  • Pope Francis spoke out about inequality, the environment, sustainable development and the elimination of poverty during his visit to the United Nations' agricultural development agency in Rome Thursday. (catholicnewsagency.com)
  • Modeled after Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s last organizing effort, the new campaign seeks to bring the issue of poverty to the American consciousness amid anxiety, uncertainty and growing inequality. (go.com)
  • But Peter Edelman, director of the Georgetown Center on Poverty, Inequality and Public Policy, tells the AP, "The issues aren't just with public benefits. (commondreams.org)
  • The Census Bureau states that "the number of people in poverty in 2010 (46.2 million) is the largest number in the 52 years for which poverty estimates have been published. (commondreams.org)
  • Surveying the pain of the first full year of the recession, a new U.S. Census Bureau report shows that household income has dropped, millions more are in poverty - and for the eighth year in a row, fewer Americans are covered by private health insurance. (mercurynews.com)
  • According to new research from the U.S. Census Bureau , nearly 70,000 fewer children are living in poverty in Ohio since 2015. (publicnewsservice.org)
  • Despite the continuing economic recovery, child poverty in Connecticut was no less of a problem last year than it had been a year earlier, according to data released Thursday by the U.S. Census Bureau. (theday.com)
  • The ranks of the working-age poor climbed to the highest level since the 1960s as the recession threw millions of people out of work last year, leaving one in seven Americans in poverty. (cbsnews.com)
  • For a copy of the article "Pathways to Resilience: Maternal Nurturance as a Buffer Against the Effects of Childhood Poverty on Metabolic Syndrome at Midlife" and access to other Psychological Science research findings, please contact Lucy Hyde at 202-293-9300 or [email protected] . (eurekalert.org)
  • Even more strikingly, a growing body of research shows that childhood poverty causes lasting changes in the brain - from its overall structure down to the level of gene expression. (abc.net.au)
  • Use these social-bookmarking links to share Childhood poverty may leave its mark . (abc.net.au)
  • As the Parliamentary term comes to a close, our members are taking this opportunity to highlight the fact that, even in Parliament there are workers earning poverty wages who struggle to feed their families and pay their bills," said Jill Ovens. (scoop.co.nz)
  • Falling incomes poverty warning Jump to media player Falling incomes will mean the biggest drop for middle-income families since the 1970s - and will push 600,000 more children into poverty, says a report from the Institute for Fiscal Studies. (bbc.com)
  • Falling incomes will mean the biggest drop for middle-income families since the 1970s - and will push 600,000 more children into poverty, says a report from the Institute for Fiscal Studies. (bbc.com)
  • Under the act, relative poverty is defined as 60 per cent of mid-way national incomes. (channel4.com)
  • The latest statistics were calculated using a new method of measuring fuel poverty, which highlights families facing both high energy bills and low incomes. (ageuk.org.uk)
  • Jessica Fraser, executive director of the Indiana Institute for Working Families, says incomes have grown in the state, but poverty numbers haven't changed much, which means most of the growth in the last decade was at the top. (publicnewsservice.org)
  • Utahns should be grateful for their associations with Yunus, who in particular has forged a bond with local surgeon Scott Leckman, the board chairman for Results, a group that advocates for solutions to poverty. (deseretnews.com)
  • The Mass Poor People's Assembly & Moral March on Washington aims to build upon the nation's principles to pursue solutions to poverty - something advocates say is getting especially severe in rural areas. (go.com)
  • The University of Aberdeen's Centre for International Sustainable Development will host a public lecture to mark World Poverty Day tomorrow (Wednesday October 19). (abdn.ac.uk)
  • NEW DELHI: The Centre has taken a stand that begging can only be decriminalised in cases where a person has been compelled to beg due to poverty. (indiatimes.com)
  • Chinese President Xi Jinping (C back) gives a speech while presiding over a symposium on poverty relief in Taiyuan, capital of north China's Shanxi Province, June 23, 2017. (xinhuanet.com)
  • There's a lot of heat on the topic of global poverty, but fundamentally a lot of agreement, too. (worldhunger.org)
  • LHASA, Jan. 7 (Xinhua) -- China's Tibet Autonomous Region has basically eradicated absolute poverty, chairman of the regional government announced Tuesday. (xinhuanet.com)
  • Absolute poverty has been basically eradicated (in Tibet)," said Qizhala. (xinhuanet.com)
  • It is of great significance in the development of the Tibetan people to basically eliminate absolute poverty, given the adverse natural conditions on the plateau and the region's underdeveloped social conditions," said Wang Zhuo, a public administration expert with Sichuan University. (xinhuanet.com)
  • The IFS predicts that the number of children in relative child poverty will rise by 400,000 from 2010/11 to 2015/16, and that absolute poverty will rise by 500,000. (channel4.com)
  • The first Millennium Development Goal is to cut absolute poverty in half by 2015. (results.org)
  • The figure from the Institute for Fiscal Studies was selected as the winning statistic because it highlights the growth of in-work poverty and the need to address the country's welfare challenges, the RSS said. (research-live.com)
  • Zed, who is president of Universal Society of Hinduism, in a statement in Nevada (USA) today, urged other world entertainment celebrities to follow Rahman in contributing to poverty eradication from the planet. (thaindian.com)
  • President of the 74th Session of the UN General Assembly Tijjani Muhammad-Bande will formally launch the 'Alliance for Poverty Eradication' on June 30, which he said will serve as a forum for Member States to raise awareness about the danger that poverty poses to world peace, human rights and sustainable development. (hindustantimes.com)
  • India has become a founding member of an Alliance for Poverty Eradication at the UN, launched by the President of the General Assembly, aimed at focussing on efforts to boost global economy in the aftermath of the Covid-19 pandemic. (hindustantimes.com)
  • He will also galvanise Member States, the international community and other stakeholders to support actions geared towards poverty eradication. (hindustantimes.com)
  • He stressed that the Alliance for Poverty Eradication should contribute to the policy discourse that seeks to analyse poverty from the perspective of multiple deprivations. (hindustantimes.com)
  • The alliance should also use the United Nations development system to enable it to bring together its special expertise and policy portfolios to focus on integrated system-wide action for poverty eradication," Naidu said. (hindustantimes.com)
  • RIO RANCHO, N.M. -- Clergy and religious leaders are preparing to hold a virtual march Saturday to highlight the plight of Americans struggling with poverty - people like Madelyn "Maddie" Brace and her boyfriend, Luciano Benavidez. (go.com)
  • He said that the stimulus package he signed into law last year and other government programs kept "millions of Americans" out of poverty. (cbsnews.com)
  • The U.S. criminal justice system has kept millions of Americans in an endless cycle of poverty and incarceration, creating barriers for former inmates as well as their families, communities and national economy, according to a new report published Tuesday. (commondreams.org)
  • As millions of Americans continue to struggle in a sluggish economy, a growing portion of the country says that poverty is caused by circumstances beyond individual control, according to a new NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll. (nbcnews.com)
  • Several teams presented evidence that poverty, disadvantage and stressful life events are strongly associated with cognitive problems in middle age and dementia later in life among African-Americans. (npr.org)
  • Mr Buys says it used to be very difficult to get the government to address the issue of white poverty. (bbc.co.uk)
  • A number of churches and religious groups are involved in the campaign - recently the Vicar of Dibley, comic Dawn French, led hundreds of women clergy to Number 10 to sing hymns and take their poverty message to the heart of government. (bbc.co.uk)
  • The Indian government has announced a drop in the number of poor people in the country by massaging the criteria used to measure poverty. (rt.com)
  • That puts it at the highest since the 1960s, when the government launched a war on poverty that expanded the federal role in social welfare programs from education to health care. (cbsnews.com)
  • In 2009, the poverty level stood at $21,954 for a family of four, based on an official government calculation that includes only cash income before tax deductions. (cbsnews.com)
  • The work and pensions secretary announces that the government is to change the way it measures poverty amid new figures revealing that targets to halve child poverty by 2010 have been missed. (channel4.com)
  • The consultation is being launched as new figures reveal that the former government failed to reach the targets enshrined in the Child Poverty Act of 2010. (channel4.com)
  • Although the minister has said that income measures of poverty would remain, Labour fears that by making other indicators more significant, the government will attempt to insist that it is on track to meet the target as newer factors gain importance. (channel4.com)
  • Accumulatively, Tibet has lifted 628,000 people out of poverty, and delisted 74 county-level regions from the poverty list, according to data from the regional government. (xinhuanet.com)
  • He said more Nigerians would be lifted out of poverty if the is government re-elected for another term. (vanguardngr.com)
  • If the government pushing back to the fall means that the legislation is ultimately much more concrete and actionable, then we would actually say that's a good thing,' said Doug King, the executive director of the Together Against Poverty Society. (cbc.ca)
  • Simpson said he has attended several public meetings where people express concerns about poverty and suggest where the government should focus its attention. (cbc.ca)
  • The Hispanic poverty level rose after the government took into account safety-net programs such as food stamps and housing, which have lower participation among immigrants and non-English speakers. (foxnews.com)
  • Devised a year ago, this measure provides a fuller picture of poverty that the government believes can be used to assess safety-net programs by factoring in living expenses and taxpayer-provided benefits that the official formula leaves out. (foxnews.com)
  • The government has confirmed details about a families income package that it expects will lift about 88,000 New Zealand children out of poverty. (radionz.co.nz)
  • Yet despite the recent shift in attitudes about the causes of poverty away from an individual responsibility narrative, the Pew poll shows very little change in opinion about spending on government programs traditionally associated with poverty. (nbcnews.com)
  • And similarly, a 2013 NBC/Wall Street Journal poll showed two decades after President Clinton promised to "end welfare as we know it," more respondents chose "too much government welfare that prevents initiative" as the leading cause of poverty than any other factor. (nbcnews.com)
  • The government plans to launch a new lotto style 'National Hottery' to provide the warmth of hope to those members of the electorate struggling to combat the rising problem of 'fuel poverty', according to a leaked report. (thespoof.com)
  • The constant government corruption is another factor to which poverty is frequently attributed. (wikipedia.org)
  • The project aims to build on current programmes, which are credited with raising 20 million Brazilians out of poverty over the past decade. (bbc.co.uk)
  • Iain Duncan Smith has launched a consultation which aims to include factors such as worklessness, welfare dependency, addiction, education and family breakdown as ways of measuring poverty as well as the more traditional income measures. (channel4.com)
  • A concept note on the formation of the alliance with the UN said that it aims to provide a forum at which participants would deliberate on measures that need to be instituted so as to get the world economy working in the aftermath of the Covid-19 pandemic, canvass support for efforts that have proved effective in alleviating and ultimately eradicating poverty within and across the world's regions. (hindustantimes.com)
  • A new collaboration between the Ombudsman's Office, Veritas University and the University of Costa Rica aims to personalize the plight of poverty faced by many Costa Ricans. (ticotimes.net)
  • The Coalition still has no clear roadmap for how they will continue the child poverty reductions they inherited. (channel4.com)
  • Ica (southern coast), Madre de Dios (southern jungle, benefitting from a large road project and high gold prices) and Lima led with 36.7%, 28.3%, and 22.7% poverty reductions, respectively. (scoop.co.nz)
  • There is a real feeling it is make-or-break time to tackle poverty, said a spokesman, so many celebrities feel if they can use their influence to change things then so much the better. (bbc.co.uk)
  • 21 March 2013 Researchers will meet at London Zoo on 26-27 March to join the dots between large land deals, conservation, land rights and efforts to tackle poverty in poor communities worldwide. (iied.org)
  • Yunus is one of the genuine heroes of our age - a man who continues to seek for solutions to the world's most vexing problems, and who transcends charity by teaching people how to permanently rise above poverty. (deseretnews.com)
  • Some of the world's least-developed countries (LDCs) will seek to devise a common strategy in Bangladesh in a WTO-sponsored meeting looking to reduce their poverty levels. (aljazeera.com)
  • A charity that provides free breakfasts to primary schools tells Channel 4 News it has seen a four-fold rise in its waiting list in the last four months, amid fears child poverty is on the rise. (channel4.com)
  • Washington DC -- President Bush stunned the nation's capital today by personally announcing at a specially-called news conference the first step in what he characterized as a broad-based effort to both reduce the burgeoning federal deficit and jump-start the nation's constipated economy. (thespoof.com)
  • but to adopt trade as a principal tool for fighting poverty," Commerce Minister, Amir Khasru Mahmud Chowdhury, told reporters. (aljazeera.com)
  • But new data also suggests those living in poverty should get by on the equivalent of two dollars per month for their health and education, sparking outrage across India. (rt.com)
  • 5 October 2012 As thousands of delegates gather in India for the 11th Conference of Parties to the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) next week, a new initiative will be unveiled to help countries meet some of their obligations under the legally-binding treaty whilst also reducing poverty. (iied.org)
  • India has joined the alliance as a founding member and stressed that ending poverty is not just about monetary compensation but guaranteeing access of the poor to quality education, healthcare, clean water, sanitation, decent housing and social security. (hindustantimes.com)
  • He pointed out that India is implementing a comprehensive development strategy based on a digital foundation to end poverty in all its forms, through accelerated economic growth and broader social safety nets. (hindustantimes.com)
  • In an interview with the Otago Daily Times she was keen to emphasise her political views were formed by the content of the poverty register - not the other way around - and no political leaning had coloured the reports. (odt.co.nz)