Neurocysticercosis: Infection of the brain, spinal cord, or perimeningeal structures with the larval forms of the genus TAENIA (primarily T. solium in humans). Lesions formed by the organism are referred to as cysticerci. The infection may be subacute or chronic, and the severity of symptoms depends on the severity of the host immune response and the location and number of lesions. SEIZURES represent the most common clinical manifestation although focal neurologic deficits may occur. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1998, Ch27, pp46-50)Taenia solium: Species of tapeworm in the genus TAENIA, that infects swine. It is acquired by humans through the ingestion of cured or undercooked pork.Epilepsy: A disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of paroxysmal brain dysfunction due to a sudden, disorderly, and excessive neuronal discharge. Epilepsy classification systems are generally based upon: (1) clinical features of the seizure episodes (e.g., motor seizure), (2) etiology (e.g., post-traumatic), (3) anatomic site of seizure origin (e.g., frontal lobe seizure), (4) tendency to spread to other structures in the brain, and (5) temporal patterns (e.g., nocturnal epilepsy). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p313)Taenia: A genus of large tapeworms.Cysticercus: The larval form of various tapeworms of the genus Taenia.Cysticercosis: Infection with CYSTICERCUS, the larval form of the various tapeworms of the genus Taenia (usually T. solium in man). In humans they penetrate the intestinal wall and invade subcutaneous tissue, brain, eye, muscle, heart, liver, lung, and peritoneum. Brain involvement results in NEUROCYSTICERCOSIS.Mesocestoides: A genus of tapeworm, containing several species, found as adults in birds and mammals. The larvae or cysticercoid stage develop in invertebrates. Human infection has been reported and is probably acquired from eating inadequately cooked meat of animals infected with the second larval stage known as the tetrahythridium.Albendazole: A benzimidazole broad-spectrum anthelmintic structurally related to MEBENDAZOLE that is effective against many diseases. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p38)Antibodies, Helminth: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to HELMINTH ANTIGENS.Anticestodal Agents: Agents used to treat tapeworm infestations in man or animals.Antigens, Helminth: Any part or derivative of a helminth that elicits an immune reaction. The most commonly seen helminth antigens are those of the schistosomes.Taeniasis: Infection with tapeworms of the genus Taenia.Epilepsy, Generalized: Recurrent conditions characterized by epileptic seizures which arise diffusely and simultaneously from both hemispheres of the brain. Classification is generally based upon motor manifestations of the seizure (e.g., convulsive, nonconvulsive, akinetic, atonic, etc.) or etiology (e.g., idiopathic, cryptogenic, and symptomatic). (From Mayo Clin Proc, 1996 Apr;71(4):405-14)Anthelmintics: Agents destructive to parasitic worms. They are used therapeutically in the treatment of HELMINTHIASIS in man and animal.Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe: A localization-related (focal) form of epilepsy characterized by recurrent seizures that arise from foci within the temporal lobe, most commonly from its mesial aspect. A wide variety of psychic phenomena may be associated, including illusions, hallucinations, dyscognitive states, and affective experiences. The majority of complex partial seizures (see EPILEPSY, COMPLEX PARTIAL) originate from the temporal lobes. Temporal lobe seizures may be classified by etiology as cryptogenic, familial, or symptomatic (i.e., related to an identified disease process or lesion). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p321)Brain Diseases: Pathologic conditions affecting the BRAIN, which is composed of the intracranial components of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. This includes (but is not limited to) the CEREBRAL CORTEX; intracranial white matter; BASAL GANGLIA; THALAMUS; HYPOTHALAMUS; BRAIN STEM; and CEREBELLUM.Taenia saginata: Species of tapeworm in the genus TAENIA, that infects cattle. It is acquired by humans through the ingestion of raw or insufficiently cooked beef.Seizures: Clinical or subclinical disturbances of cortical function due to a sudden, abnormal, excessive, and disorganized discharge of brain cells. Clinical manifestations include abnormal motor, sensory and psychic phenomena. Recurrent seizures are usually referred to as EPILEPSY or "seizure disorder."Anticonvulsants: Drugs used to prevent SEIZURES or reduce their severity.Cestode Infections: Infections with true tapeworms of the helminth subclass CESTODA.Subarachnoid Space: The space between the arachnoid membrane and PIA MATER, filled with CEREBROSPINAL FLUID. It contains large blood vessels that supply the BRAIN and SPINAL CORD.Praziquantel: An anthelmintic used in most schistosome and many cestode infestations.Antiplatyhelmintic Agents: Agents used to treat cestode, trematode, or other flatworm infestations in man or animals.Epilepsies, Myoclonic: A clinically diverse group of epilepsy syndromes characterized either by myoclonic seizures or by myoclonus in association with other seizure types. Myoclonic epilepsy syndromes are divided into three subtypes based on etiology: familial, cryptogenic, and symptomatic (i.e., occurring secondary to known disease processes such as infections, hypoxic-ischemic injuries, trauma, etc.).Immunologic Tests: Immunologic techniques involved in diagnosis.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Food Parasitology: The presence of parasites in food and food products. For the presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food, FOOD MICROBIOLOGY is available.Epilepsy, Reflex: A subtype of epilepsy characterized by seizures that are consistently provoked by a certain specific stimulus. Auditory, visual, and somatosensory stimuli as well as the acts of writing, reading, eating, and decision making are examples of events or activities that may induce seizure activity in affected individuals. (From Neurol Clin 1994 Feb;12(1):57-8)Tuberculoma, Intracranial: A well-circumscribed mass composed of tuberculous granulation tissue that may occur in the cerebral hemispheres, cerebellum, brain stem, or perimeningeal spaces. Multiple lesions are quite common. Management of intracranial manifestations vary with lesion site. Intracranial tuberculomas may be associated with SEIZURES, focal neurologic deficits, and INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION. Spinal cord tuberculomas may be associated with localized or radicular pain, weakness, sensory loss, and incontinence. Tuberculomas may arise as OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS, but also occur in immunocompetent individuals.Spinal Cord Diseases: Pathologic conditions which feature SPINAL CORD damage or dysfunction, including disorders involving the meninges and perimeningeal spaces surrounding the spinal cord. Traumatic injuries, vascular diseases, infections, and inflammatory/autoimmune processes may affect the spinal cord.Myoclonic Epilepsy, Juvenile: A disorder characterized by the onset of myoclonus in adolescence, a marked increase in the incidence of absence seizures (see EPILEPSY, ABSENCE), and generalized major motor seizures (see EPILEPSY, TONIC-CLONIC). The myoclonic episodes tend to occur shortly after awakening. Seizures tend to be aggravated by sleep deprivation and alcohol consumption. Hereditary and sporadic forms have been identified. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p323)Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Epilepsy, Tonic-Clonic: A generalized seizure disorder characterized by recurrent major motor seizures. The initial brief tonic phase is marked by trunk flexion followed by diffuse extension of the trunk and extremities. The clonic phase features rhythmic flexor contractions of the trunk and limbs, pupillary dilation, elevations of blood pressure and pulse, urinary incontinence, and tongue biting. This is followed by a profound state of depressed consciousness (post-ictal state) which gradually improves over minutes to hours. The disorder may be cryptogenic, familial, or symptomatic (caused by an identified disease process). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p329)Antiparasitic Agents: Drugs used to treat or prevent parasitic infections.Brain Stem Infarctions: Infarctions that occur in the BRAIN STEM which is comprised of the MIDBRAIN; PONS; and MEDULLA OBLONGATA. There are several named syndromes characterized by their distinctive clinical manifestations and specific sites of ischemic injury.Epilepsy, Complex Partial: A disorder characterized by recurrent partial seizures marked by impairment of cognition. During the seizure the individual may experience a wide variety of psychic phenomenon including formed hallucinations, illusions, deja vu, intense emotional feelings, confusion, and spatial disorientation. Focal motor activity, sensory alterations and AUTOMATISM may also occur. Complex partial seizures often originate from foci in one or both temporal lobes. The etiology may be idiopathic (cryptogenic partial complex epilepsy) or occur as a secondary manifestation of a focal cortical lesion (symptomatic partial complex epilepsy). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp317-8)Sclerosis: A pathological process consisting of hardening or fibrosis of an anatomical structure, often a vessel or a nerve.PeruBrain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Epilepsy, Frontal Lobe: A localization-related (focal) form of epilepsy characterized by seizures which arise in the FRONTAL LOBE. A variety of clinical syndromes exist depending on the exact location of the seizure focus. Frontal lobe seizures may be idiopathic (cryptogenic) or caused by an identifiable disease process such as traumatic injuries, neoplasms, or other macroscopic or microscopic lesions of the frontal lobes (symptomatic frontal lobe seizures). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp318-9)Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Arachnoiditis: Acute or chronic inflammation of the arachnoid membrane of the meninges most often involving the spinal cord or base of the brain. This term generally refers to a persistent inflammatory process characterized by thickening of the ARACHNOID membrane and dural adhesions. Associated conditions include prior surgery, infections, trauma, SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE, and chemical irritation. Clinical features vary with the site of inflammation, but include cranial neuropathies, radiculopathies, and myelopathies. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1997, Ch48, p25)Fourth Ventricle: An irregularly shaped cavity in the RHOMBENCEPHALON, located between the MEDULLA OBLONGATA; the PONS; and the isthmus in front, and the CEREBELLUM behind. It is continuous with the central canal of the cord below and with the CEREBRAL AQUEDUCT above, and through its lateral and median apertures it communicates with the SUBARACHNOID SPACE.Hydrocephalus: Excessive accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid within the cranium which may be associated with dilation of cerebral ventricles, INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; HEADACHE; lethargy; URINARY INCONTINENCE; and ATAXIA.Trichlorfon: An organochlorophosphate cholinesterase inhibitor that is used as an insecticide for the control of flies and roaches. It is also used in anthelmintic compositions for animals. (From Merck, 11th ed)Epilepsy, Rolandic: An autosomal dominant inherited partial epilepsy syndrome with onset between age 3 and 13 years. Seizures are characterized by PARESTHESIA and tonic or clonic activity of the lower face associated with drooling and dysarthria. In most cases, affected children are neurologically and developmentally normal. (From Epilepsia 1998 39;Suppl 4:S32-S41)Niclosamide: An antihelmintic that is active against most tapeworms. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p48)Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Neurosurgery: A surgical specialty concerned with the treatment of diseases and disorders of the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral and sympathetic nervous system.Neurology: A medical specialty concerned with the study of the structures, functions, and diseases of the nervous system.Carbamazepine: An anticonvulsant used to control grand mal and psychomotor or focal seizures. Its mode of action is not fully understood, but some of its actions resemble those of PHENYTOIN; although there is little chemical resemblance between the two compounds, their three-dimensional structure is similar.
Neurocysticercosis[edit]. The diagnosis of neurocysticercosis is mainly clinical, based on a compatible presentation of ... Commission on Tropical Diseases of the International League Against Epilepsy". Epilepsia. 35 (1): 89-93. 1994. doi:10.1111/j. ... September 3, 1992). "Neurocysticercosis in an Orthodox Jewish Community in New York City". New England Journal of Medicine. 327 ... In neurocysticercosis praziquantel is widely used.[43] Albendazole appears to be more effective and a safe drug for ...
Bruschi, Fabrizio (2011). "Was Julius Caesar's epilepsy due to neurocysticercosis?". Trends in Parasitology. Cell Press. 27 (9 ... The claim of epilepsy is countered among some medical historians by a claim of hypoglycemia, which can cause epileptoid ... Gomez J, Kotler J, Long J (1995). "Was Julius Caesar's epilepsy due to a brain tumor?". The Journal of the Florida Medical ... 225-226, citing doubters of epilepsy: F. Kanngiesser, "Notes on the Pathology of the Julian Dynasty," Glasgow Medical Journal ...
This disease is the leading cause of acquired epilepsy. Cysticercus was discovered in the late 17th century CE as a parasitic ... Del Brutto, Oscar H.; Sotelo, Julio; Román, Gustavo C. (1998). Neurocysticercosis : A Clinical Handbook. Lisse [Netherlands]: ... Such brain infection can lead to a serious medical condition called neurocysticercosis. ... Development of an experimental model of porcine neurocysticercosis". PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. 9 (8): e0003980. doi: ...
It is not fatal, although cysticercosis can cause epilepsy and neurocysticercosis can be fatal. Infection by T. solium is ... A specific form of cysticercosis called neurocysticercosis is said to be the most common infection of the central nervous ... which is the major cause of neurocysticercosis, T. asiatica may also cause cysticercosis. Taeniasis is contracted after eating ...
"Was Julius Caesar's epilepsy due to neurocysticercosis?". Trends in Parasitology. Cell Press. 27 (9): 373-374. doi:10.1016/j.pt ... "German Epilepsy Museum. Retrieved 28 August 2008.. *^ Hodder, Harbour Fraser (September 2003). "Epilepsy and Empire, Caveat ... Gomez J, Kotler J, Long J (1995). "Was Julius Caesar's epilepsy due to a brain tumor?". The Journal of the Florida Medical ... The claim of epilepsy is countered among some medical historians by a claim of hypoglycemia, which can cause epileptoid ...
The most severe form is neurocysticercosis, which affects the brain and is a major cause of epilepsy. Human infection is ... September 3, 1992). "Neurocysticercosis in an Orthodox Jewish Community in New York City". New England Journal of Medicine. 327 ... In many cases, cysticercosis in the brain can lead to epilepsy, seizures, lesions in the brain, blindness, tumor-like growths, ... If they localize in the brain, serious neurocysticercosis follows. Intestinal infection of T. solium is called taeniasis which ...
"Migraine and Epilepsy: Epidemiologic connections" - Epilepsy.com Barre, M; Hamelin, S; Minotti, L; Kahane, P; Vercueil, L (2008 ... "Migraine-like Visual Hallucinations as the Presenting Manifestations of Focal Seizures in Neurocysticercosis". Journal of Neuro ... "Epilepsy and migraine". Epilepsy & Behavior. 4: 13. doi:10.1016/j.yebeh.2003.07.003. Toldo, Irene; Perissinotto, Egle; ... Differential diagnosis of migraine and epilepsy" - Epilepsy.com Sances, Grazia; Guaschino, Elena; Perucca, Piero; Allena, Marta ...
Commission on Tropical Diseases of the International League Against Epilepsy (1994). "Relationship Between Epilepsy and ... Neurocysticercosis, which arises when larvae of the pork tapeworm Taenia solium penetrate the central nervous system, is the ... However, neurocysticercosis resulting from penetration of T. solium larvae into the central nervous system is the major cause ... of acquired epilepsy worldwide. In 2000, about 39 million people were infected with trematodes (flukes) that naturally ...
Infection with the pork tapeworm, which can cause neurocysticercosis, is the cause of up to half of epilepsy cases in areas of ... Classification of seizures and epilepsy syndromes". The Epilepsies: The diagnosis and management of the epilepsies in adults ... Epilepsy results in economic costs in Europe of around 15.5 billion Euros in 2004. In India, epilepsy is estimated to result in ... Gliosis, neuronal loss, and atrophy of specific areas of the brain are linked to epilepsy but it is unclear if epilepsy causes ...
Commission on Tropical Diseases of the International League Against Epilepsy (1994). "Relationship Between Epilepsy and ... Neurocysticercosis, which arises when larvae of the pork tapeworm Taenia solium penetrate the central nervous system, is the ... Magnetic resonance image of a patient with neurocysticercosis demonstrating multiple cysticerci within the brain ... neurocysticercosis resulting from penetration of T. solium larvae into the central nervous system is the major cause of ...
... late infantile Neuroblastoma Neurocutaneous melanosis Neurocysticercosis Neuroectodermal endocrine syndrome Neuroectodermal ... syndrome Noonan syndrome Norman-Roberts lissencephaly syndrome Normokalemic periodic paralysis Norrie disease Northern epilepsy ...
Some forms of drug-resistant epilepsy. *Some forms of movement disorders (advanced Parkinson's disease, chorea) - this involves ... Ventricular endoscopy is used in the treatment of intraventricular bleeds, hydrocephalus, colloid cyst and neurocysticercosis. ... Wilder Penfield - known as one of the founding fathers of modern neurosurgery, and pioneer of epilepsy neurosurgery ... stereotactic neurosurgery, functional neurosurgery, and epilepsy surgery (the latter includes partial or total corpus ...
On long-term followup, most of his patients did not demonstrate total epilepsy remission and language problems continued. Out ... Neurocysticercosis, and Demyelinating Disease. Central Nervous System vasculitis may be associated with this condition as well ... Pearl PL, Carrazana EJ, Holmes GL (November 2001). "The Landau-Kleffner Syndrome". Epilepsy Curr. 1 (2): 39-45. doi:10.1046/j. ... neurocysticercosis, and demyelinating disease. Central Nervous System vasculitis may be associated with this condition as well ...
... epilepsy, complex partial MeSH C10.228.140.490.360.270 --- epilepsy, frontal lobe MeSH C10.228.140.490.360.272 --- epilepsy, ... neurocysticercosis MeSH C10.228.228.205.250.600 --- neuroschistosomiasis MeSH C10.228.228.205.300 --- central nervous system ... epilepsy MeSH C10.228.140.490.250 --- epilepsies, myoclonic MeSH C10.228.140.490.250.300 --- myoclonic epilepsy, juvenile MeSH ... epilepsy, rolandic MeSH C10.228.140.490.360.290 --- epilepsy, temporal lobe MeSH C10.228.140.490.370 --- epilepsy, benign ...
Ventricular endoscopy is used in the treatment of intraventricular bleeds, hydrocephalus, colloid cyst and neurocysticercosis. ... and epilepsy surgery (the latter includes partial or total corpus callosotomy - severing part or all of the corpus callosum to ... and pioneer of epilepsy neurosurgery Joseph Ransohoff - known for his pioneering use of medical imaging and catheterization in ... and intracellular hemorrhages Some forms of drug-resistant epilepsy Some forms of movement disorders (advanced Parkinson's ...
focal neurological disease, such as stroke, brain tumors,[37] multiple sclerosis,[36] and some forms of epilepsy ... parasitic diseases, such as neurocysticercosis. Psychoactive drugsEdit. Main article: Substance-induced psychosis ...
The following is a list of mental disorders as defined by the DSM and ICD. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is the American Psychiatric Association's standard reference for psychiatry which includes over 450 different definitions of mental disorders.[1] The International Classification of Diseases (ICD) published by the World Health Organization (WHO) is the international standard system for classifying all medical diseases.[2] It also includes a section on mental and behavioral disorders. The diagnostic criteria and information in the DSM and ICD are revised and updated with each new version. This list contains conditions which are currently recognised as mental disorders as defined by these two systems. There is disagreement in various fields of mental health care, including the field of psychiatry, over the definitions and criteria used to delineate mental disorders. Of concern to some professionals is whether certain mental disorders should be classified as ...
Neurocysticercosis is estimated to be the cause of 50 percent of acquired epilepsy cases in developing countries and is the ... Neurocysticercosis is caused by the pork tapeworm Taenia solium. Humans can get infected with the parasite by ingesting the ... To diagnose neurocysticercosis, brain imaging must be used to view the location of the cysts as well as determine which type ... Neurocysticercosis is a parasitic disease in the central nervous system that causes cysts containing parasitic larvae of the ...
... in patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and to determine their relationship to the epileptogenic zone (EZ). ... Surgical treatment for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy in the presence of massive calcified neurocysticercosis.. *Lauro Wichert- ... The epilepsies: Complex challenges needing complex solutions. *Julián Tejada. , Kauê M. Costa. , Poliana Bertti. , Norberto ... Implementation and Test of B.R.A.S.I.L: An Epilepsy Computer-Aided Diagnosis Toolkit. *Lucas Ferrari de Oliveira. , Paulo ...
Neurocysticercosis is a leading cause of adult-onset seizures worldwide, and it is estimated to cause 30% of all epilepsy cases ... The symptoms of neurocysticercosis may include headaches, confusion, seizures, and vision changes. Cysticercosis is typically ... neurocysticercosis), skeletal muscle, eyes, and skin. Many individuals with cysticercosis never experience any symptoms at all ...
Special Article - Epilepsy and Seizure Disorders. Epilepsy and Intracranial Vascular Malformations, a Possible Missing Link!. ... Immunological and Endocrine Profile of Two Patients with Severe Subarachnoid Neurocysticercosis, Resistant to the Cysticidal ... Special Article - Epilepsy and Seizure Disorders. Angelman Syndrome: Clinical Aspects. Authors: Campos JG, Moya C, Guevara- ... Low Serum Levels of Antiepileptic Drugs in Patients with Epilepsy-Bad Compliance or Something Else?. Authors: Rasheva M, ...
... a neglected parasitic infection that is a significant cause of acquired epilepsy worldwide--is on the rise in the United States ... Cite this: Neurocysticercosis: Leading Cause of Acquired Epilepsy Worldwide - Medscape - Aug 01, 2016. ... Approximately 50 million people worldwide have neurocysticercosis, and it is the leading cause of acquired epilepsy in many ... Management of Neurocysticercosis. Management of patients with neurocysticercosis is a complex, evolving field, and must be ...
... or no abnormality in neurocysticercosis epilepsy. Examination of CSF in neurocysticercosis usually yields mild abnormalities ... 1990) Neurocysticercosis as the main cause of late-onset epilepsy in Mexico. Arch Intern Med 150:325-327. ... Neurocysticercosis is a major cause of acquired epilepsy in Latin American countries. The economic burden of both are not well ... For both neurocysticercosis and epilepsy, there is a dilemma about whether limited public resources would better be spent on ...
... with epilepsy. RESULTS: CT scans indicated that 61.1% of the patients had neurocysticercosis-associated epilepsy, the ... OBJECTIVE: To survey the prevalence of neurocysticercosis in patients treated for epilepsy in Lusikisiki, E Cape. DESIGN: This ... Neurocysticercosis in persons with epilepsy in Medellin, Colombia. Epilepsia 1998; 39(12): 1334-1339. [ Links ]. ... Neurocysticercosis. Semin Neurol 2005; 25 (3): 243-251. [ Links ]. 6. Sotelo J, Del Brutto OH. Review of neurocysticercosis. ...
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research aims to publish findings of doctors at grass root level and post graduate students, so that all unique medical experiences are recorded in literature.
Selected scientific articles published in journals and books about epilepsy. ... The impact of neurocysticercosis in California: a review of hospitalized cases. PLOS Negl Trop Dis 2012;6(1). doi: 10.1371/ ... Managing Epilepsy Well: Emerging e-Tools for epilepsy self-management. Epilepsy Behav. 2013;29:133-140. doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh. ... People with epilepsy are diagnosed most often with unspecified epilepsy, followed by focal epilepsy, generalized convulsive ...
Diagnosis and Management of Neurocysticercosis. Neurocysticercosis is a leading preventable cause of epilepsy worldwide. This ... International League Against Epilepsy: A Practical Clinical Definition of EpilepsyExternal. This 2014 report provides the ... Diagnose and Treat Epilepsy. 2017 Revised Classification of SeizuresExternal. The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) ... Guidelines for Epilepsy CentersExternal. The National Association of Epilepsy Centers (NAEC) is a nonprofit association that ...
San Diego School of Medicine have discovered that convulsive seizures in a form of severe epilepsy are generated. ... Neurocysticercosis. Neurocysticercosis or Cysticercosis of brain is the most common cause of epilepsy and the most common ... Recognizing and Treating Epilepsy Is Difficult In Elderly. It is more difficult to recognize and treat epilepsy in old than in ... Epilepsy Febrile Fits / Febrile Convulsions Neurocysticercosis Reye s Syndrome Convulsions Pediatric Pyloric Stenosis ...
Ginkgo may increase the risk of seizures in people with epilepsy and could reduce the effectiveness of anti-seizure drugs, a ... Neurocysticercosis. Neurocysticercosis or Cysticercosis of brain is the most common cause of epilepsy and the most common ... Epilepsy Neurocysticercosis Saint Johns Wort High Blood Pressure and Herbs Acai Berry - Does It Really Work? Home Grown Herbs ... Reasons Behind Stubborn Epilepsy. Researchers seem to have found why a form of epilepsy does not respond to drug treatment. ...
Epilepsy and neurocysticercosis in an Andean community. Int J Epidemiol. 1999;28:799-803. [PubMed] ... Neurocysticercosis is responsible for increased rates of seizures and epilepsy in endemic regions. The most common form of the ... Epilepsy due to neurocysticercosis: analysis of 203 patients. Neurology. 1992;42:389-392. [PubMed] ... Medina MT, Rosas E, Rubio-Donnadieu F, Sotelo J. Neurocysticercosis as the main cause of late-onset epilepsy in Mexico. Arch ...
Neurocysticercosis and epilepsy in developing countries. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2000 Feb. 68(2):137-43. [Medline]. ... Neurocysticercosis and epilepsy. Singh G, Prabhakar S, eds. Taenia Solium Cysticercosis. Oxon, UK: CABI Publishing; 2002. 211- ... Neuroimaging in neurocysticercosis. CT scans showing different phases of neurocysticercosis. Top left: CT scan showing many ... Neuroimaging in neurocysticercosis. Natural history of neurocysticercosis. Top left: This CT scan shows a large occipital ...
Of these children, three were asymptomatic and four presented epilepsy. Among seronegative children (n = 2,805), seven ... is one of the leading causes of epilepsy worldwide. The majority of cases in Europe are diagnosed in immigrants. Currently in ... Epilepsy and neurocysticercosis in Latin America: a systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2013;7(10):e2480. ... Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is one of the leading causes of epilepsy worldwide. The majority of cases in Europe are diagnosed in ...
Keywords : ELISA; Neurocysticercosis; Cysticercus cellulosae; Taenia solium; Epilepsy. · abstract in Portuguese · text in ... Neurocysticercosis is the most common parasitic disease in developing countries. Epilepsy is the most common clinical ... INTRODUCTION: Neurocysticercosis is an infection of the human central nervous system caused by the metacestode larvae of Taenia ... CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that ELISA contributes to the diagnosis of neurocysticercosis if the result is negative or if ...
Epilepsy surgery in context of neurocysticercosis.. Singh G, Chowdhary AK., Ann Indian Acad Neurol 17(suppl 1), 2014 PMID: ... The relationship between neurocysticercosis and epilepsy: an endless debate.. Carpio A, Romo ML., Arq Neuropsiquiatr 72(5), ... Neurocysticercosis and epilepsy in developing countries.. Pal DK, Carpio A, Sander JW., J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatr. 68(2 ... Cognitive performance of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and incidental calcified neurocysticercosis. Terra- ...
Neurocysticercosis, for example, is the most common cause of epilepsy in the developing world; the parasite causes small ...
Neurocysticercosis, caused by infection with larval Taenia solium, is a major cause of epilepsy worldwide. Larval degeneration ... Neurocysticercosis and epilepsy in developing countries. J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatry. 68:137.-143. ... Commission on Tropical Diseases of the International League Against Epilepsy. 1994. Relationship between epilepsy and tropical ... Epilepsy is the most common manifestation; in disease endemic regions, 25% of epilepsy may be due to NCC (9, 10, 11, 12). The ...
Epilepsy surgery in context of neurocysticercosis. Ann Indian Acad Neurol 17 (Suppl 1): S65-S68.. [Google Scholar] ... Cognitive and surgical outcome in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis plus neurocysticercosis: ... Neurocysticercosis. Neurohospitalist 4: 205-212.. [Google Scholar] * Ong S, Talan DA, Moran GJ, Mower W, Newdow M, Tsang VC, ... Therapy of neurocysticercosis. Childs Nerv Syst 3: 208-211.. [Google Scholar] * Cardenas G, Carrillo-Mezo R, Jung H, Sciutto E ...
Neurocysticercosis represents an important cause of seizures in children in endemic countries, such as Latin America, Asia and ... in a child with an onset of epilepsy especially if he had long-term stay in endemic regions, or he emigrated from an endemic ... The diagnosis was neurocysticercosis. This case accentuates the need to consider neurocysticercosis in a child presenting with ... Carpio A: Neurocysticercosis: an update. Lancet Infect Dis. 2002, 2 (12): 751-762. 10.1016/S1473-3099(02)00454-1.CrossRefPubMed ...
4. Neurocysticercosis 137. 5. Cerebrovascular Diseases 171. 6. Epilepsies 195. 7. Headache 209 ...
Neurocysticercosis. Epilepsy. Brain Diseases. Central Nervous System Diseases. Nervous System Diseases. Neurologic ... Neurocysticercosis: a major cause of neurological disease worldwide. Clin Infect Dis. 1997 Feb;24(2):101-13; quiz 114-5. Review ... Edema associated with foci in idiopathic epilepsy is highly unusual so that this observation suggests that the mechanism(s) ... Clinicoradiological and pathological correlations in patients with solitary cysticercus granuloma and epilepsy: focus on ...
Neurocysticercosis was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging, serology, histology, and genetic analysis. Neurocysticercosis ... If complete removal of the cystic structures cannot be proven in cases with surgically treated neurocysticercosis, ... We communicate a case of a middle-aged Brazilian patient with an unusual presentation of fourth ventricular neurocysticercosis ... Epilepsy and neurocysticercosis in rural Tanzania-an imaging study. Epilepsia 50: 987-993.[Crossref]. [Google Scholar] ...
Del Brutto OH, Santibañez R, Noboa CA, et al. Epilepsy due to neurocysticercosis: analysis of 203 patients. Neurology 1992;42: ... It is well known that neurocysticercosis (NCC), the commonest parasitic brain disease,1,2 causes epilepsy, focal neurological ... Corona T, Lugo R, Medina R, et al. Single-day praziquantel therapy for neurocysticercosis. N Engl J Med 1996;334:125. ... Del Brutto OH, Rajshekhar V, White AC Jr, et al. Proposed diagnostic criteria for neurocysticercosis. Neurology 2001;57:177-83. ...
  • Typical and atypical perfusion patterns in periictal SPECT of patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy. (semanticscholar.org)
  • PURPOSE To characterize perfusion patterns of periictal single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) in patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and to determine their relationship to the epileptogenic zone (EZ). (semanticscholar.org)
  • In onchocerciasis endemic areas, a distinctive form of epilepsy has been described as nodding syndrome, affecting children and causing nodding seizures, mental retardation and debilitating physical development. (bmj.com)
  • The number of hospitalizations and associated charges for neurocysticercosis far exceeds those for malaria and are greater than for all of the other neglected tropical diseases combined. (cdc.gov)
  • Inpatient Sample for 2003 through 2012 and found an estimated 18,584 hospitalizations for neurocysticercosis and associated hospital charges totaling more than $908 million U.S. dollars. (cdc.gov)
  • In this study, we found that there are about 1800 hospitalizations for neurocysticercosis in the Unites States each year, resulting in about $90 million dollars in hospital charges. (cdc.gov)
  • Only 24% (45/188) of patients with active epilepsy were taking antiepileptic drugs, all at sub-therapeutic doses. (edu.pe)
  • Possible pharmacoresistant epilepsy should be considered early in the disease, when there is a lack of response to the first antiepileptic drug, since only 14% of those will respond to a second drug, and only 2% to a third drug if the second fails too. (smw.ch)
  • A system and method for applying electrical stimulation or drug infusion to nervous tissue of a patient to treat epilepsy, movement disorders, and other indications uses at least one implantable system control unit (SCU) (110), including an implantable signal/pulse generator (IPG) and one or more electrodes. (google.com)
  • There are many different ways to treat epilepsy including medications, surgery to treat the epilepsy or to treat underlying conditions, implanted devices, and diet . (medicinenet.com)
  • My special interest lies with poverty-related diseases of the infectious as well as non-infectious nature, zoonotic diseases (especially those that affect the central nervous system e.g. neurocysticercosis) with the ensuing One-Health concept, global palliative care as well as migrant medicine. (uio.no)
  • This can cause severe problems, particularly in the central nervous system (neurocysticercosis) where they can cause epileptic seizures. (theconversation.com)
  • The scientists hope that their findings - based on a mouse model of severe epilepsy - may someday pave the way for improved treatments of childhood epilepsy, which affects more than two percent of children worldwide. (medindia.net)
  • Clobazam in refractory childhood epilepsy. (aiims.edu)
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