Vestibulocochlear Nerve: The 8th cranial nerve. The vestibulocochlear nerve has a cochlear part (COCHLEAR NERVE) which is concerned with hearing and a vestibular part (VESTIBULAR NERVE) which mediates the sense of balance and head position. The fibers of the cochlear nerve originate from neurons of the SPIRAL GANGLION and project to the cochlear nuclei (COCHLEAR NUCLEUS). The fibers of the vestibular nerve arise from neurons of Scarpa's ganglion and project to the VESTIBULAR NUCLEI.Vestibulocochlear Nerve Diseases: Pathological processes of the VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE, including the branches of COCHLEAR NERVE and VESTIBULAR NERVE. Common examples are VESTIBULAR NEURITIS, cochlear neuritis, and ACOUSTIC NEUROMA. Clinical signs are varying degree of HEARING LOSS; VERTIGO; and TINNITUS.Facial Nerve: The 7th cranial nerve. The facial nerve has two parts, the larger motor root which may be called the facial nerve proper, and the smaller intermediate or sensory root. Together they provide efferent innervation to the muscles of facial expression and to the lacrimal and SALIVARY GLANDS, and convey afferent information for TASTE from the anterior two-thirds of the TONGUE and for TOUCH from the EXTERNAL EAR.Vestibulocochlear Nerve Injuries: Traumatic injuries to the VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE.Facial Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the facial nerve or nuclei. Pontine disorders may affect the facial nuclei or nerve fascicle. The nerve may be involved intracranially, along its course through the petrous portion of the temporal bone, or along its extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include facial muscle weakness, loss of taste from the anterior tongue, hyperacusis, and decreased lacrimation.Vestibular Nerve: The vestibular part of the 8th cranial nerve (VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE). The vestibular nerve fibers arise from neurons of Scarpa's ganglion and project peripherally to vestibular hair cells and centrally to the VESTIBULAR NUCLEI of the BRAIN STEM. These fibers mediate the sense of balance and head position.Ear, Inner: The essential part of the hearing organ consists of two labyrinthine compartments: the bony labyrinthine and the membranous labyrinth. The bony labyrinth is a complex of three interconnecting cavities or spaces (COCHLEA; VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH; and SEMICIRCULAR CANALS) in the TEMPORAL BONE. Within the bony labyrinth lies the membranous labyrinth which is a complex of sacs and tubules (COCHLEAR DUCT; SACCULE AND UTRICLE; and SEMICIRCULAR DUCTS) forming a continuous space enclosed by EPITHELIUM and connective tissue. These spaces are filled with LABYRINTHINE FLUIDS of various compositions.Subarachnoid Space: The space between the arachnoid membrane and PIA MATER, filled with CEREBROSPINAL FLUID. It contains large blood vessels that supply the BRAIN and SPINAL CORD.Labyrinth Diseases: Pathological processes of the inner ear (LABYRINTH) which contains the essential apparatus of hearing (COCHLEA) and balance (SEMICIRCULAR CANALS).Nerve Compression Syndromes: Mechanical compression of nerves or nerve roots from internal or external causes. These may result in a conduction block to nerve impulses (due to MYELIN SHEATH dysfunction) or axonal loss. The nerve and nerve sheath injuries may be caused by ISCHEMIA; INFLAMMATION; or a direct mechanical effect.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Sciatic Nerve: A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.Peripheral Nerves: The nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord, including the autonomic, cranial, and spinal nerves. Peripheral nerves contain non-neuronal cells and connective tissue as well as axons. The connective tissue layers include, from the outside to the inside, the epineurium, the perineurium, and the endoneurium.Optic Nerve: The 2nd cranial nerve which conveys visual information from the RETINA to the brain. The nerve carries the axons of the RETINAL GANGLION CELLS which sort at the OPTIC CHIASM and continue via the OPTIC TRACTS to the brain. The largest projection is to the lateral geniculate nuclei; other targets include the SUPERIOR COLLICULI and the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEI. Though known as the second cranial nerve, it is considered part of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Nerve Fibers: Slender processes of NEURONS, including the AXONS and their glial envelopes (MYELIN SHEATH). Nerve fibers conduct nerve impulses to and from the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Nerve Regeneration: Renewal or physiological repair of damaged nerve tissue.Dental Technicians: Individuals responsible for fabrication of dental appliances.District of Columbia: A federal area located between Maryland and Virginia on the Potomac river; it is coextensive with Washington, D.C., which is the capital of the United States.Minicomputers: Small computers that lack the speed, memory capacity, and instructional capability of the full-size computer but usually retain its programmable flexibility. They are larger, faster, and more flexible, powerful, and expensive than microcomputers.Ganglia, Parasympathetic: Ganglia of the parasympathetic nervous system, including the ciliary, pterygopalatine, submandibular, and otic ganglia in the cranial region and intrinsic (terminal) ganglia associated with target organs in the thorax and abdomen.Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Audiology: The study of hearing and hearing impairment.ArchivesVertigo: An illusion of movement, either of the external world revolving around the individual or of the individual revolving in space. Vertigo may be associated with disorders of the inner ear (EAR, INNER); VESTIBULAR NERVE; BRAINSTEM; or CEREBRAL CORTEX. Lesions in the TEMPORAL LOBE and PARIETAL LOBE may be associated with FOCAL SEIZURES that may feature vertigo as an ictal manifestation. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp300-1)Cranial Nerves: Twelve pairs of nerves that carry general afferent, visceral afferent, special afferent, somatic efferent, and autonomic efferent fibers.Cranial Nerve Diseases: Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.Cochlear Nerve: The cochlear part of the 8th cranial nerve (VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE). The cochlear nerve fibers originate from neurons of the SPIRAL GANGLION and project peripherally to cochlear hair cells and centrally to the cochlear nuclei (COCHLEAR NUCLEUS) of the BRAIN STEM. They mediate the sense of hearing.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Axons: Nerve fibers that are capable of rapidly conducting impulses away from the neuron cell body.Cochlear Nucleus: The brain stem nucleus that receives the central input from the cochlear nerve. The cochlear nucleus is located lateral and dorsolateral to the inferior cerebellar peduncles and is functionally divided into dorsal and ventral parts. It is tonotopically organized, performs the first stage of central auditory processing, and projects (directly or indirectly) to higher auditory areas including the superior olivary nuclei, the medial geniculi, the inferior colliculi, and the auditory cortex.Neurofibromatosis 1: An autosomal dominant inherited disorder (with a high frequency of spontaneous mutations) that features developmental changes in the nervous system, muscles, bones, and skin, most notably in tissue derived from the embryonic NEURAL CREST. Multiple hyperpigmented skin lesions and subcutaneous tumors are the hallmark of this disease. Peripheral and central nervous system neoplasms occur frequently, especially OPTIC NERVE GLIOMA and NEUROFIBROSARCOMA. NF1 is caused by mutations which inactivate the NF1 gene (GENES, NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1) on chromosome 17q. The incidence of learning disabilities is also elevated in this condition. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1014-18) There is overlap of clinical features with NOONAN SYNDROME in a syndrome called neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome. Both the PTPN11 and NF1 gene products are involved in the SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION pathway of Ras (RAS PROTEINS).Neurofibromatosis 2: An autosomal dominant disorder characterized by a high incidence of bilateral acoustic neuromas as well as schwannomas (NEURILEMMOMA) of other cranial and peripheral nerves, and other benign intracranial tumors including meningiomas, ependymomas, spinal neurofibromas, and gliomas. The disease has been linked to mutations of the NF2 gene (GENES, NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 2) on chromosome 22 (22q12) and usually presents clinically in the first or second decade of life.Positron-Emission Tomography: An imaging technique using compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides (such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18) to measure cell metabolism. It has been useful in study of soft tissues such as CANCER; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; and brain. SINGLE-PHOTON EMISSION-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY is closely related to positron emission tomography, but uses isotopes with longer half-lives and resolution is lower.Neuroma, Acoustic: A benign SCHWANNOMA of the eighth cranial nerve (VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE), mostly arising from the vestibular branch (VESTIBULAR NERVE) during the fifth or sixth decade of life. Clinical manifestations include HEARING LOSS; HEADACHE; VERTIGO; TINNITUS; and FACIAL PAIN. Bilateral acoustic neuromas are associated with NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 2. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p673)Genes, Neurofibromatosis 1: Tumor suppressor genes located on the long arm of human chromosome 17 in the region 17q11.2. Mutation of these genes is thought to cause NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1, Watson syndrome, and LEOPARD syndrome.Fluorodeoxyglucose F18: The compound is given by intravenous injection to do POSITRON-EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY for the assessment of cerebral and myocardial glucose metabolism in various physiological or pathological states including stroke and myocardial ischemia. It is also employed for the detection of malignant tumors including those of the brain, liver, and thyroid gland. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1162)Tympanic Membrane Perforation: A temporary or persistent opening in the eardrum (TYMPANIC MEMBRANE). Clinical signs depend on the size, location, and associated pathological condition.Blast Injuries: Injuries resulting when a person is struck by particles impelled with violent force from an explosion. Blast causes pulmonary concussion and hemorrhage, laceration of other thoracic and abdominal viscera, ruptured ear drums, and minor effects in the central nervous system. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Ear, Middle: The space and structures directly internal to the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE and external to the inner ear (LABYRINTH). Its major components include the AUDITORY OSSICLES and the EUSTACHIAN TUBE that connects the cavity of middle ear (tympanic cavity) to the upper part of the throat.Ear: The hearing and equilibrium system of the body. It consists of three parts: the EXTERNAL EAR, the MIDDLE EAR, and the INNER EAR. Sound waves are transmitted through this organ where vibration is transduced to nerve signals that pass through the ACOUSTIC NERVE to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. The inner ear also contains the vestibular organ that maintains equilibrium by transducing signals to the VESTIBULAR NERVE.Lacerations: Torn, ragged, mangled wounds.Ear Protective Devices: Personal devices for protection of the ears from loud or high intensity noise, water, or cold. These include earmuffs and earplugs.Tinnitus: A nonspecific symptom of hearing disorder characterized by the sensation of buzzing, ringing, clicking, pulsations, and other noises in the ear. Objective tinnitus refers to noises generated from within the ear or adjacent structures that can be heard by other individuals. The term subjective tinnitus is used when the sound is audible only to the affected individual. Tinnitus may occur as a manifestation of COCHLEAR DISEASES; VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; and other conditions.Digoxigenin: 3 beta,12 beta,14-Trihydroxy-5 beta-card-20(22)-enolide. A cardenolide which is the aglycon of digoxin. Can be obtained by hydrolysis of digoxin or from Digitalis orientalis L. and Digitalis lanata Ehrh.Hypothalamic Hormones: Peptide hormones produced by NEURONS of various regions in the HYPOTHALAMUS. They are released into the pituitary portal circulation to stimulate or inhibit PITUITARY GLAND functions. VASOPRESSIN and OXYTOCIN, though produced in the hypothalamus, are not included here for they are transported down the AXONS to the POSTERIOR LOBE OF PITUITARY before being released into the portal circulation.Pituitary Hormones: Hormones secreted by the PITUITARY GLAND including those from the anterior lobe (adenohypophysis), the posterior lobe (neurohypophysis), and the ill-defined intermediate lobe. Structurally, they include small peptides, proteins, and glycoproteins. They are under the regulation of neural signals (NEUROTRANSMITTERS) or neuroendocrine signals (HYPOTHALAMIC HORMONES) from the hypothalamus as well as feedback from their targets such as ADRENAL CORTEX HORMONES; ANDROGENS; ESTROGENS.Colorimetry: Any technique by which an unknown color is evaluated in terms of standard colors. The technique may be visual, photoelectric, or indirect by means of spectrophotometry. It is used in chemistry and physics. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Melanins: Insoluble polymers of TYROSINE derivatives found in and causing darkness in skin (SKIN PIGMENTATION), hair, and feathers providing protection against SUNBURN induced by SUNLIGHT. CAROTENES contribute yellow and red coloration.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Receptors, Pituitary Hormone: Cell surface proteins that bind pituitary hormones with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Since many pituitary hormones are also released by neurons as neurotransmitters, these receptors are also found in the nervous system.Vestibule, Labyrinth: An oval, bony chamber of the inner ear, part of the bony labyrinth. It is continuous with bony COCHLEA anteriorly, and SEMICIRCULAR CANALS posteriorly. The vestibule contains two communicating sacs (utricle and saccule) of the balancing apparatus. The oval window on its lateral wall is occupied by the base of the STAPES of the MIDDLE EAR.Vestibular Nuclei: The four cellular masses in the floor of the fourth ventricle giving rise to a widely dispersed special sensory system. Included is the superior, medial, inferior, and LATERAL VESTIBULAR NUCLEUS. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Semicircular Canals: Three long canals (anterior, posterior, and lateral) of the bony labyrinth. They are set at right angles to each other and are situated posterosuperior to the vestibule of the bony labyrinth (VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH). The semicircular canals have five openings into the vestibule with one shared by the anterior and the posterior canals. Within the canals are the SEMICIRCULAR DUCTS.Fourth Ventricle: An irregularly shaped cavity in the RHOMBENCEPHALON, located between the MEDULLA OBLONGATA; the PONS; and the isthmus in front, and the CEREBELLUM behind. It is continuous with the central canal of the cord below and with the CEREBRAL AQUEDUCT above, and through its lateral and median apertures it communicates with the SUBARACHNOID SPACE.
... which in turn joins the vestibular nerve to form the vestibulocochlear nerve, or cranial nerve number VIII. The region of the ... Its hair cells transform the fluid waves into nerve signals. The journey of countless nerves begins with this first step; from ... Vestibulocochlear Nerve Middlebrooks, J.C. (2009). "Auditory System: Central Pathways". In Squire. Encyclopedia of Neuroscience ... There are far fewer inner hair cells in the cochlea than afferent nerve fibers - many auditory nerve fibers innervate each hair ...
The great auricular nerve, auricular nerve, auriculotemporal nerve, and lesser and greater occipital nerves of the cervical ... and are transmitted to the vestibulocochlear nerve in the inner ear. This nerve transmits information to the temporal lobe of ... Parts of the otic vesicle in turn form the vestibulocochlear nerve. These form bipolar neurons which supply sensation to parts ... This causes depolarisation, which is passed as a signal to the brain along the vestibulocochlear nerve. Dynamic balance also ...
It also contains two cranial nerves - the vestibulocochlear nerve and the facial nerve; the cerebellar flocculus and the ... Arachnoid cyst Facial nerve tumour Lipoma Meningioma Schwannoma of other cranial nerves (e.g. CN V >VII>IX,X,XI) Metastasis ... cranial nerves, and associated vessels. The cerebellopontine angle is also the site of a set of neurological disorders known as ...
The cranial nerves containing SSA fibers are the optic nerve (II) and the vestibulocochlear nerve (VIII). The term "SSA" also ... Special somatic afferent fibers (SSA) are the afferent nerve fibers that carry information from the special senses of vision, ...
It transmits the facial (VII) and vestibulocochlear (VIII) cranial nerves into a canal in the petrous temporal bone. Lies ... nerves. Lies at the anterolateral margins of the f. magnum and transmits the hypoglossal (XII) nerve. Also visible in the ... It transmits the medulla, the ascending portions of the spinal accessory nerve (XI), and the vertebral arteries. Lies in the ...
... and cranial nerve VII (controls facial expression and taste). Cranial nerve VIII, along with these two nerves, also passes ... portion of the vestibulocochlear nerve (cranial nerve VIII). ARs are slow-growing local, benign and non-invasive. Progression ... is a benign primary intracranial tumor of the myelin-forming cells of the vestibulocochlear nerve (8th cranial nerve). A type ... The tumor may develop within the auditory canal, where the vestibulocochlear nerve which supplies the inner ear penetrates the ...
... all mixed-cranial nerves. The vestibulocochlear nerve, has the bipolar neuron type in both the spiral ganglion as well as ... The peripheral branch travels through the distal dorsal root into the spinal nerve all the way until skin, joint, and muscle. ... Pseudounipolar neurons are also found in the sensory ganglia of cranial nerves V, VII, IX and X, ...
Persons with cochlear deficits fail otoacoustic emissions testing, while persons with 8th cranial nerve (vestibulocochlear ... hearing loss resulting from degeneration of the cochlea or associated structures of the inner ear or auditory nerves. The ... The electrodes of the implant are designed to stimulate the array of nerve fibers that previously responded to different ... which then send information to the brain via the auditory nerve. The cochlea is tonotopically mapped in a spiral fashion, with ...
This tonotopy then projects through the vestibulocochlear nerve and associated midbrain structures to the primary auditory ... Nerves that transmit information from different regions of the basilar membrane therefore encode frequency tonotopically. ...
It is thought to result from the virus spreading from the facial nerve to the vestibulocochlear nerve. Symptoms include hearing ... Due to the close relationship of blood vessels to nerves, the virus can spread to involve the blood vessels and compromise the ... The trigeminal nerve is the most commonly involved nerve, of which the ophthalmic division is the most commonly involved branch ... Once chickenpox has resolved, the virus may remain inactive in nerve cells. When it reactivates, it travels from the nerve body ...
Most common of these is a vestibular schwannoma, a tumor of the vestibulocochlear nerve that may lead to tinnitus and hearing ... Outside the cranial nerves, schwannomas may present on the flexor surfaces of the limbs. Rare occurrences of these tumors in ... The tumor cells always stay on the outside of the nerve, but the tumor itself may either push the nerve aside and/or up against ... A schwannoma is a usually-benign nerve sheath tumor composed of Schwann cells, which normally produce the insulating myelin ...
... and vestibulocochlear nerves (CN VIII). Obstruction of the AICA can cause paresis, paralysis, and loss of sensation in the face ... Underneath the gray matter of the cortex lies white matter, made up largely of myelinated nerve fibers running to and from the ... The cerebellum receives nearly 200 million input fibers; in contrast, the optic nerve is composed of a mere one million fibers ... This organizational uniformity makes the nerve circuitry relatively easy to study. To envision this "perpendicular array", one ...
... type II, in which bilateral acoustic neuromas (tumors of the vestibulocochlear nerve or cranial nerve 8 (CN ... In some cases of NF2, the damage to nearby vital structures, such as other cranial nerves and the brain stem, can be life- ... In NF1 symptoms include light brown spots on the skin, freckles in the armpit and groin, small bumps within nerves, and ... In NF1 the tumors are neurofibromas (tumors of the peripheral nerves), while in NF2 and schwannomatosis tumors of Schwann cells ...
... oculomotor nerve (III), trochlear nerve (IV), trigeminal nerve (V), abducens nerve (VI), facial nerve (VII), vestibulocochlear ... Cranial nerve mnemonics. References[edit]. *^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y Vilensky, Joel; Robertson, ... the pons has the nuclei of the trigeminal nerve (V), abducens nerve (VI), facial nerve (VII) and vestibulocochlear nerve (VIII ... The oculomotor nerve (III), trochlear nerve (IV), abducens nerve (VI) and the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve (V1) ...
... which is most likely due to damage to the vestibulocochlear nerve (cranial nerve VIII) and not the cochlea itself. Some people ... and cranial nerve VIII. Iron deposition is also present in cranial nerves I & II, but this damage less frequently presents ... symptoms when compared to cranial nerve VIII, which can be explained by cranial nerve VIII's notable segment of glial cells, ...
... trigeminal nerve - polymodal pathways, olfactory nerve, optic nerve and vestibulocochlear nerve - monomodal pathways). These ... transmitted through spinoreticular pathways and cranial nerves ( ... "Sympathetic-nerve activity during sleep in normal subjects". ... adjacent to the facial nerve was identified as a sleep-promoting center on the basis of anatomical, electrophysiological and ...
Bilateral sensorineural hearing loss caused by complications with the vestibulocochlear nerves from onset of NM Subacute ... Tumor cell proliferation is observed around nerve roots as well as loss of myelinated nerve fibers and axonal swelling. In ... the afferent sensory root of the spinal nerve) than the ventral roots (the efferent motor root of a spinal nerve). With mild ... This same situation also appear with spinal arteries where leakage of tumor cells is into the nerve roots. More regarding the ...
... the nerves form a nerve net, but in most animals they are organized longitudinally into bundles. In simple animals, receptor ... vestibulocochlear and hypoglossal nerves. Great feats were made during the third century in both the digestive and reproductive ... The latter consists of sensory nerves that transmit information from sense organs and motor nerves that influence target organs ... Greek physicians were able to differentiate nerves from blood vessels and tendons and to realize that the nerves convey neural ...
In addition, the function of the vestibular system can be affected by tumors on the vestibulocochlear nerve, an infarct in the ... To nuclei of cranial nerves III, IV, and VI. Signals sent to these nerves cause the vestibulo-ocular reflex. They allow for the ...
... fibers of the vestibulocochlear nerve, the spinal and principal trigeminal nerve nuclei, which form the general somatic ... vestibulocochlear nuclei (vestibular nuclei and cochlear nuclei) (VIII) The functions of these four cranial nerves (V-VIII) ... A number of cranial nerve nuclei are present in the pons: mid-pons: the 'chief' or 'pontine' nucleus of the trigeminal nerve ... facial nerve nucleus (VII) lower down in the pons: ... the motor nucleus for the trigeminal nerve (V) lower down in ...
... nerve Pudendal nerve Inferior anal nerves Perineal nerves Posterior labial nerves Posterior scrotal nerves Dorsal nerve of ... Vestibulocochlear nerve Vestibular nerve Cochlear nerve Glossopharyngeal nerve Tympanic nerve Tympanic plexus Lesser petrosal ... nerve Vagus nerve Superior laryngeal nerve Recurrent laryngeal nerve Accessory nerve Hypoglossal nerve Spinal nerves Cervical ... nerve Lesser palatine nerves Superior alveolar nerves Zygomatic nerve Infra-orbital nerve Mandibular nerve Masseteric nerve ...
... and vestibulocochlear (8th) cranial nerve nuclei) and their associated fibre tracts, the tegmental pontine reticular nucleus, ... The pontine tegmentum contains nuclei of several cranial nerves and consequently has a role in several groups of sensory and ... Nearby important structures include the cranial nerve nuclei of the oculomotor (3rd) and trochlear (4th) nerve nuclei, which ... Some of the fibers from the cochlear nerve cross over in the pontine tegmentum, forming the trapezoid body, which is thought to ...
... or the vestibulocochlear nerve (cranial nerve VIII) or neural part. SNHL accounts for about 90% of hearing loss reported. SNHL ... Hypoplastic auditory nerves or abnormalities of the cochlea Normal progressive age-related loss of hearing acuity or ... may affect the initiation of the nerve impulse in the cochlear nerve or the transmission of the nerve impulse along the nerve ... The cerebellopontine angle is the exit site of both the facial nerve(CN7) and the vestibulocochlear nerve(CN8). Patients with ...
The olfactory nerve is the shortest of the twelve cranial nerves and, similar to the optic nerve, does not emanate from the ... The olfactory nerve is typically considered the first cranial nerve, or simply CN I, that contains sensory nerve fibers ... CN VIII - Vestibulocochlear. *CN IX - Glossopharyngeal. *CN X - Vagus. *CN XI - Accessory ... The olfactory nerves consist of a collection of many sensory nerve fibers that extend from the olfactory epithelium to the ...
The optic nerve has been classified as the second of twelve paired cranial nerves but is technically part of the central ... The optic nerve, also known as cranial nerve II, or simply as CN II, is a paired nerve that transmits visual information from ... Other optic nerve problems are less common. Optic nerve hypoplasia is the underdevelopment of the optic nerve resulting in ... CN VIII - Vestibulocochlear. *CN IX - Glossopharyngeal. *CN X - Vagus. *CN XI - Accessory ...
The great auricular nerve, auricular nerve, auriculotemporal nerve, and lesser and greater occipital nerves of the cervical ... and are transmitted to the vestibulocochlear nerve in the inner ear. This nerve transmits information to the temporal lobe of ... Parts of the otic vesicle in turn form the vestibulocochlear nerve.[18] These form bipolar neurons which supply sensation to ... This causes depolarisation, which is passed as a signal to the brain along the vestibulocochlear nerve.[9] Dynamic balance also ...
Vestibulocochlear nerve, nerve in the human ear, serving the organs of equilibrium and of hearing. It consists of two ... anatomically and functionally distinct parts: the cochlear nerve, distributed to the hearing organ, and the vestibular nerve, ... prenatal development: Cranial nerves. The acoustic nerves (VIII) are pure sensory nerves, each with a ganglion that subdivides ... eighth cranial nerve. Vestibulocochlear nerve, also called Auditory Nerve, Acoustic Nerve, or Eighth Cranial Nerve, nerve in ...
The vestibulocochlear nerves, cranial nerve VIII, are the eighth pair of cranial nerves and are numbered with the Roman numeral ... They are sensory nerves that run from the brain stem between the base of the brain (pons) and the spinal cord in an area known ... The nerves in this region are sensitive to changes in the position of the head, and the impulses they initiate are passed into ... Each of these nerves has two parts: (1) the vestibular branch, which is located in ganglia near the vestibule and Continue ...
... sometimes referred to as the auditory nerve) is the eighth of twelve cranial nerves. This group includes all the nerves that ... The vestibulocochlear nerve (sometimes referred to as the auditory nerve) is the eighth of twelve cranial nerves. This group ... Vestibulocochlear nerve. Vestibulocochlear nerve. Medically reviewed by the Healthline Medical Network - Written by the ... The vestibulocochlear nerve is responsible for both hearing and balance and brings information from the inner ear to the brain ...
The vestibulocochlear nerve is the eighth cranial nerve. The 12 cranial nerves, the vestibulocochlear nerve included, emerge ... Vestibulocochlear+Nerve. The vestibulocochlear nerve (also known as the auditory or acoustic nerve) is the eighth of twelve ... The Cochlear nerve (n. ... The vestibular nerve is one of the two branches of the Vestibulocochlear nerve (the cochlear nerve ... The Cochlear nerve (n. ... The vestibular nerve is one of the two branches of the Vestibulocochlear nerve (the cochlear nerve ...
HHTM anterior-inferior cerebellar artery / auditory-vestibular (VIII) / cranial nerves / facial (V) / internal auditory meatus ... Uncategorized / vestibulocochlear nerve (VIII). This post is about how the auditory nerve (cranial nerve VIII, officially ... Category: vestibulocochlear nerve (VIII). The Ear is Hooked Up to the Brain. May 16, 2017. May 16, 2017. ... Homecranial nervesCategory vestibulocochlear nerve (VIII). ... called vestibulocochlear CNVIII) hooks up our inner ears to our ...
Vestibulocochlear nerve information including symptoms, causes, diseases, symptoms, treatments, and other medical and health ... Cochlear Nerve *Vestibular Nerve Source - MeSH 2007 Broader terms for Vestibulocochlear nerve. *Cranial Nerves Source - MeSH ... Nerve disorder *Nerve problem (9132 causes) *Nerve pain *Composite Vestibulocochlear nerve as an Organ. Vestibulocochlear nerve ... Vestibulocochlear nerve. Description of Vestibulocochlear nerve. Vestibulocochlear nerve: a composite sensory nerve supplying ...
Cranial nerve VIII; responsible for transmitting sound and equilibrium (balance) information from the inner ear to the brain. ► ... click here to learn more (press,cranial nerves)-link provided by:University of Pennsylvania, School of Veterinary Medicine ► ... vestibulocochlear nerve Cranial nerve VIII; responsible for transmitting sound and equilibrium (balance) information from the ...
Problems with the vestibulocochlear nerve may result in deafness, tinnitus (ringing or noise in the ears), dizziness, vertigo ... A nerve that is responsible for the sense of hearing and which is also pertinent to balance, to the body position sense. ... The vestibulocochlear nerve is the eighth cranial nerve. The 12 cranial nerves, the vestibulocochlear nerve included, emerge ... Vestibulocochlear nerve - Nerve: Vestibulocochlear nerve The course and connections of the facial nerve in the temporal bone … ...
The cranial nerves are a set of twelve nerves that originate in the brain. Each has a different function for sense or movement ... The vestibulocochlear nerve contains two components:. *The vestibular nerve helps the body sense changes in the position of the ... Nerve conduction velocity: Side effects and normal values. A nerve conduction velocity test measures how fast the nerves in the ... The trochlear nerve is also involved in eye movement.. The trochlear nerve, like the oculomotor nerve, originates in the ...
The 12 Cranial Nerves This article introduces the cranial nerves, their anatomy, names, functions and mnemonics to help you ... Vestibulocochlear Nerve This article describes the anatomy and pathway of the vestibulocochlear nerve, or cranial nerve 8. ... Nuclei, course and branches of the vestibulocochlear nerve.. This is a sample quiz. Upgrade to Kenhub Premium to get full ... Cranial Nerve Nuclei This is an article covering the anatomy and embryology of the cranial nerve nuclei in the brainstem. Learn ...
Information on the vestibulocochlear nerve by the AnatomyZone daily feed. Subscribe to learn interesting facts about the human ... Learn more about the anatomy of the cranial nerves in this tutorial. ... The structure indicated is the vestibulocochlear nerve (cranial nerve VIII).. The vestibulocochlear nerve consists of a ... Cochlear nerve. Bipolar sensory neurons in the organ of coorti pass impulses from the hair cells of the cochlear via the ...
Vestibulocochlear nerve (CN VIII or 8): Auditory receptors of the cochlear division are located in the organ of Corti and ... Other articles where Cochlear nerve is discussed: human nervous system: ... In nervous system disease: Cranial nerves. To examine the cochlear nerve, hearing tests are used to determine the patients ... part of vestibulocochlear nerve. * In vestibulocochlear nerve. …and functionally distinct parts: the cochlear nerve, ...
The vestibulocochlear nerve is the eighth cranial nerve and has two roles: innervation to the cochlea for hearing innervation ... Case 2: annotated CN VIII and others cranial nervesCase 2: annotated CN VIII and others cranial nerves ... In the IAM the nerve splits into four bundles: cochlear nerve, superior and inferior division of the vestibular nerve and nerve ... Vestibulocochlear nerve. Assoc Prof Craig Hacking ◉ ◈ and Assoc Prof Frank Gaillard ◉ ◈ et al. ...
The vestibulocochlear nerve is the eighth paired cranial nerve. It is comprised of two components - vestibular fibres and ... Patients may also exhibit signs related to the other cranial nerves, bleeding from the ears and nose, and cerebrospinal fluid ... the vestibulocochlear nerve splits, forming the vestibular nerve and the cochlear nerve. The vestibular nerve innervates the ... the vestibulocochlear nerve splits, forming the vestibular nerve and the cochlear nerve. The vestibular nerve innervates the ...
The vestibulocochlear nerve is the eighth paired cranial nerve. It is comprised of two components - vestibular fibres and ... Cranial Nerves*Summary. *Olfactory Nerve (CN I). *Optic Nerve (CN II). *Oculomotor Nerve (CN III) ...
... sometimes referred to as the auditory nerve) is the eighth of twelve cranial nerves. This group includes all the nerves that ... It is a paired set of nerves (one from ... The vestibulocochlear nerve (sometimes referred to as the ... The vestibulocochlear nerve is responsible for both hearing and balance and brings information from the inner ear to the brain ... Problems with the vestibulocochlear nerve can result in vertigo, vomiting, ringing in the ears, a false sense of motion, motion ...
What is ampullar nerve, inferior? Meaning of ampullar nerve, inferior medical term. What does ampullar nerve, inferior mean? ... Looking for online definition of ampullar nerve, inferior in the Medical Dictionary? ampullar nerve, inferior explanation free ... auditory nerve vestibulocochlear n.. auricular nerves, anterior origin, auriculotemporal nerve; distribution, skin of ... infratrochlear nerve See ophthalmic nerve.. lacrimal nerve See ophthalmic nerve.. long ciliary nerve One of a pair of nerves ...
cranial nerves mnemonic , cranial nerve 8 vestibulocochlear the vestibulocochlear nerve is .... #cranial #nerves #mnemonic # ... cranial nerves mnemonic , cranial nerve 8 vestibulocochlear the vestibulocochlear nerve is .... cranial nerves mnemonic , ... cranial nerves mnemonic , cranial nerve 8 vestibulocochlear the vestibulocochlear nerve is .... ...
Neurophysiologic Intraoperative Monitoring of the Vestibulocochlear Nerve. Simon, Mirela V. Simon, Mirela V. Less ... Neurophysiologic Intraoperative Monitoring of the Glossopharyngeal and Vagus Nerves. Singh, Rajdeep; Husain, Aatif M. ... Neurophysiologic Monitoring of the Spinal Accessory Nerve, Hypoglossal Nerve, and the Spinomedullary Region. Skinner, Stanley A ... Intraoperative Use of Somatosensory-Evoked Potential in Monitoring Nerve Roots. Tsai, Shang-Wen; Tsai, Ching-Lin; Wu, Po-Ting; ...
The cochlear nerve (also auditory or acoustic neuron) is one of two parts of the vestibulocochlear nerve, a cranial nerve ... This travels in parallel with the vestibular nerves through the internal auditory canal, through which it connects to the ... The other portion of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the vestibular nerve, which carries spatial orientation information to the ... In humans, there are on average 30,000 nerve fibers within the cochlear nerve.[1] The number of fibers varies significantly ...
Vestibulocochlear nerve - CN VIII. The vestibulocochlear or statoacoustic nerve enters the brainstem at the pontomedullary ... nerves. Others are named for their relationship to neighboring structures (trochlear nerve), appearance (trigeminal nerve), ... Hypoglossal nerve - CN XII. The nucleus of this nerve lies in the lower medulla, and the nerve itself leaves the cranial cavity ... Trigeminal nerve - CN V. The nucleus of the nerve stretches from the midbrain (ie, mesencephalic nerve) through the pons (ie, ...
Find out information about eighth cranial nerve. auditory nerve in man, the eighth pair of cranial nerves.The nerve copsists of ... two functional parts- the vestibular, which is the conductor of the impulses... Explanation of eighth cranial nerve ... Vestibulocochlear Nerve. in man, the eighth pair of cranial nerves.. The nerve copsists of two functional parts- the vestibular ... Related to eighth cranial nerve: acoustic nerve. vestibulocochlear nerve. [və¦stib·yə·lə′käk·lē·ər ‚nərv] (neuroscience) ...
84 Facial nerve 1005. Mohammadali M. Shoja and R. Shane Tubbs. 85 Vestibulocochlear nerve 1034. Mohammadali M. Shoja and R. ... 83 Cranial nerves N ]VI 989. Jenna R. Voirol Kelley A. Strothmann Anthony Zandian and Joel A. Vilensky ... 87 Vagus accessory and hypoglossal nerves 1041. Mohammadali M. Shoja Christoph J. Griessenauer Marios Loukas and R. Shane Tubbs ... 86 Glossopharyngeal nerve 1036. Mohammadali M. Shoja Marios Loukas and R. Shane Tubbs ...
... and auditory nerve. The eardrum separates this space from the ear canal. The area is pressurized. ... The vestibulocochlear nerve (sometimes referred to as the auditory nerve) is the eighth of twelve cranial nerves. This group ... Vestibulocochlear nerve. Medically reviewed by the Healthline Medical Network. ... Once in the fluid-filled inner ear, sounds are converted into nerve impulses and sent to the brain. ...
Nerve Sheath Neoplasms. Neoplasms, Nerve Tissue. Neoplasms by Histologic Type. Neoplasms. Neoplastic Syndromes, Hereditary. ... Neurofibromatosis type II (NF2) is associated with tumors of the nerves, brain, and spinal cord. Most people with NF2 develop ... vestibular schwannomas, or tumors on the hearing and balance nerves. As they grow, vestibular schwannomas can cause hearing ...
  • Which is the Auto-immune disorder involving demyelination of peripheral nerves. (armoredpenguin.com)
  • A set of 12 peripheral nerves emerging from the brain that innervate the structures of the head, neck, thorax and abdomen. (kenhub.com)
  • However, unlike peripheral nerves which are separated to achieve segmental innervation , cranial nerves are divided to serve one or a few specific functions in wider anatomical territories. (wikidoc.org)