A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the anatomy, physiology, and pathology of the kidney.
Stipends or grants-in-aid granted by foundations or institutions to individuals for study.
The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.
Pathological processes of the KIDNEY or its component tissues.
A nursing specialty involving the care of patients with or at risk for KIDNEY DISEASES.
Procedures which temporarily or permanently remedy insufficient cleansing of body fluids by the kidneys.
Therapy for the insufficient cleansing of the BLOOD by the kidneys based on dialysis and including hemodialysis, PERITONEAL DIALYSIS, and HEMODIAFILTRATION.
The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.
Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.
Lists of persons or organizations, systematically arranged, usually in alphabetic or classed order, giving address, affiliations, etc., for individuals, and giving address, officers, functions, and similar data for organizations. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.
Conditions in which the KIDNEYS perform below the normal level for more than three months. Chronic kidney insufficiency is classified by five stages according to the decline in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE and the degree of kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA). The most severe form is the end-stage renal disease (CHRONIC KIDNEY FAILURE). (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002)
Hospital units in which care is provided the hemodialysis patient. This includes hemodialysis centers in hospitals.
Refusal of the health professional to initiate or continue treatment of a patient or group of patients. The refusal can be based on any reason. The concept is differentiated from PATIENT REFUSAL OF TREATMENT see TREATMENT REFUSAL which originates with the patient and not the health professional.
A surgical specialty concerned with the study, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases of the urinary tract in both sexes, and the genital tract in the male. Common urological problems include urinary obstruction, URINARY INCONTINENCE, infections, and UROGENITAL NEOPLASMS.
Abrupt reduction in kidney function. Acute kidney injury encompasses the entire spectrum of the syndrome including acute kidney failure; ACUTE KIDNEY TUBULAR NECROSIS; and other less severe conditions.
Compilations of data on hospital activities and programs; excludes patient medical records.
Neoplasms composed of connective tissue, including elastic, mucous, reticular, osseous, and cartilaginous tissue. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in connective tissue.
Physicians who hold degrees from medical schools in countries other than the ones in which they practice.
The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.
Dialysis fluid being introduced into and removed from the peritoneal cavity as either a continuous or an intermittent procedure.
The volume of water filtered out of plasma through glomerular capillary walls into Bowman's capsules per unit of time. It is considered to be equivalent to INULIN clearance.
The presence of proteins in the urine, an indicator of KIDNEY DISEASES.
Organized services in a hospital which provide medical care on an outpatient basis.
The recognition of professional or technical competence through registration, certification, licensure, admission to association membership, the award of a diploma or degree, etc.
The minimum acceptable patient care, based on statutes, court decisions, policies, or professional guidelines.
Selection of a type of occupation or profession.
Creatinine is a waste product that's generated from muscle metabolism, typically filtered through the kidneys and released in urine, with increased levels in blood indicating impaired kidney function.
A condition characterized by severe PROTEINURIA, greater than 3.5 g/day in an average adult. The substantial loss of protein in the urine results in complications such as HYPOPROTEINEMIA; generalized EDEMA; HYPERTENSION; and HYPERLIPIDEMIAS. Diseases associated with nephrotic syndrome generally cause chronic kidney dysfunction.
Major administrative divisions of the hospital.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Decalcification of bone or abnormal bone development due to chronic KIDNEY DISEASES, in which 1,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D3 synthesis by the kidneys is impaired, leading to reduced negative feedback on PARATHYROID HORMONE. The resulting SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM eventually leads to bone disorders.
Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.
Stones in the KIDNEY, usually formed in the urine-collecting area of the kidney (KIDNEY PELVIS). Their sizes vary and most contains CALCIUM OXALATE.
Hereditary diseases that are characterized by the progressive expansion of a large number of tightly packed CYSTS within the KIDNEYS. They include diseases with autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance.

Prevalence, predictors, and consequences of late nephrology referral at a tertiary care center. (1/380)

Despite improvements in dialysis care, mortality of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remains high. One factor that has thus far received little attention, but might contribute to morbidity and mortality, is the timing of referral to the nephrologist. This study examines the hypothesis that late referral of patients to the nephrologist might lead to suboptimal pre-ESRD care. Clinical and laboratory data were obtained from the patient records and electronic databases of New England Medical Center, its affiliated dialysis unit (Dialysis Clinics, Inc., Boston), and the office records of the outpatient nephrology clinic. Early (ER) and late (LR) referral were defined by the time of first nephrology encounter greater than or less than 4 mo, respectively, before initiation of dialysis. Multivariate models were built to explore factors associated with LR, and whether LR is associated with hypoalbuminemia or late initiation of dialysis. Of the 135 patients, 30 (22%) were referred late. There were no differences in age, gender, race, and cause of ESRD between ER and LR patients. However, there were significant differences in insurance coverage between these two groups. In the multivariate analysis, patients covered by health maintenance organizations were more likely to be referred late (odds ratio = 4.5) than patients covered by Medicare. Compared to ER, LR patients were more likely to have hypoalbuminemia (56% versus 80%), hematocrit <28% (33% versus 55%), and predicted GFR <5 ml/min per 1.73 m2 (17% versus 40%) at the start of dialysis, and less likely to have received erythropoietin (40% versus 17%) or have a functioning permanent vascular access for the first hemodialysis (40% versus 4%). It is concluded that late referral to the nephrologist is common in the United States and is associated with poor pre-ESRD care. Pre-ESRD care of patients treated by nephrologists was also less than ideal. The patient-, physician-, and system-related factors behind this observation are unclear. Meanwhile, pre-ESRD educational efforts need to target patients, generalists, and nephrologists.  (+info)

Evidence-based nephrology. (2/380)

Systematic reviews and meta-analyses are the best approaches available for summarizing the available evidence concerning the efficacy of therapies. Although the renal field has been slow to use these techniques, they are being used increasingly. In March 1997, the Cochrane Renal Group was formed, and this group aims to produce and maintain up to date systematic reviews of the evidence on the effectiveness of therapies used to treat patients with renal diseases. This group is part of the Cochrane Collaboration which is an international structure grouping collaborators together, with the aim of preparing, maintaining and disseminating systematic reviews of the effects of health care in all areas of medicine.  (+info)

Evidence-based medicine and its horizons: a useful tool for nephrologists? (3/380)

Though the concept of 'evidence-based medicine' (EBM) nowadays has become very popular and even fashionable, its practice is far from being an established reality. There are many reasons why, despite its potential, EBM finds obstacles in expressing its full potential as a tool to better inform health care decisions. Broadly speaking, these obstacles fall into three categories: (i) inadequacy of available information with respect the complexities of health care delivery; (ii) poor quality of clinical research; and (iii) insufficient and inappropriate efforts to promote the uptake of effective interventions in clinical practice. In the first part of the paper, we will discuss: (i) what evidence-based medicine is; (ii) why systematic reviews are the fundamental tool of EBM and what is really special about them; (iii) what are the tools for the practice of EBM; (iv) what its limitations are; and (v) what are the hindrances to its implementation. In the second part, a brief assessment of the state of the art of systematic reviews in nephrology will be presented, with special reference to the activities of the recently launched Cochrane Collaborative Review Group in Renal Diseases.  (+info)

Attitudes of Canadian nephrologists toward dialysis modality selection. (4/380)

OBJECTIVE: To determine the opinions and attitudes of Canadian nephrologists about dialysis modality decisions and optimal dialysis system design. PARTICIPANTS: Members of the Canadian Society of Nephrology. INTERVENTION: A mailed survey questionnaire. RESULTS: A 66% response rate was obtained. Decisions about modality are reported to be based most strongly on patient preference (4.4 on a scale from 1 to 5), followed by quality of life (4.06), morbidity (3.97), mortality (3.85), and rehabilitation (3.69), while neither facility (1.78) nor physician (1.62) reimbursement are important. When asked about the current relative utilization of each modality, nephrologists felt that hospital-based hemodialysis (HD) is slightly overutilized (2.53), continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) is about right (3.00), while cycler peritoneal dialysis (PD) (3.53), community-based full (3.83) and self-care HD (3.91), and home HD (4.02) are underutilized. A hypothetical question about optimal distribution to maximize survival revealed that a type of HD should constitute 62.8% of the mix, with more emphasis on cycler PD (14.9%), community-based full care HD (13.8%), self-care HD (14.5%), and home HD (9.0%) than is current practice. However, when the goal was to maximize cost effectiveness, HD fell slightly to 57.8%. CONCLUSIONS: These survey results suggest that the current national average 66%/34% HD/PD ratio is reasonable. However, there appears to be a consensus that Canada could evolve to a more cost-effective, community-based dialysis system without compromising patient outcomes.  (+info)

Community nephrology: audit of screening for renal insufficiency in a high risk population. (5/380)

BACKGROUND: The rate of acceptance onto dialysis programmes has doubled in the past 10 years and is steadily increasing. Early detection and treatment of renal failure slows the rate of progression. Is it feasible to screen for patients who are at increased risk of developing renal failure? We have audited primary care records of patients aged 50-75 years who have either hypertension or diabetes, and are therefore considered to be at high risk of developing renal insufficiency. Our aim was to see whether patients had had their blood pressure measured and urine tested for protein within 12 months, and plasma creatinine measured within 24 months. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of case notes and computer records in 12 general practices from inner and greater London. A total of 16,855 patients were aged 50-75 years. From this age group, 2693 (15.5%) patients were identified as being either hypertensive or diabetic, or both. RESULTS: Of the 2561 records audited, 1359 (53.1%) contained a plasma creatinine measured within 24 months, and 11% of these (150) had a value > 125 micromol/l. This equates to a prevalence of renal insufficiency of > 110,000 patients per million in this group. Forty two patients (28%) had been referred to a nephrologist. Of records audited, 73% contained a blood pressure measurement and 29% contained a test for proteinuria within 12 months. CONCLUSIONS: There is a high prevalence of chronic renal insufficiency in hypertensive and diabetic patients. It is feasible to detect renal insufficiency at a primary care level, but an effective system will require computerized databases that code for age, ethnicity, measurement of blood pressure and renal function, as well as diagnoses.  (+info)

Latin American nephrology: scientific production and impact of the publications. (6/380)

BACKGROUND: During the last two decades, there has been a significant change in the origin and impact of the world's biomedical scientific production, particularly in countries in which the investment in research accounts for an important portion of the gross national product (GNP). However, in less developed countries, budget restrictions and the lack of policies toward research may determine a limited growth of the scientific production. METHODS: We examined the number and impact of peer-reviewed publications from Latin America included in the Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) and MEDLINE databases. In addition, we analyzed the number of abstracts submitted to the congresses of the International Society of Nephrology (ISN), American Society of Nephrology (ASN), and Latin American Society of Nephrology and Hypertension (SLANH). RESULTS: The number of peer-reviewed publications in nephrology from authors in Latin America during the last 20 years represented less than 1% of the world's total. Only 13 out of the 22 Latin American countries accounted for these publications. The citation impact (3.52) was below the world average (7.82). However, this index showed a tendency towards growth in the five most productive countries. Likewise, the number of abstracts submitted to international meetings of nephrology by authors in Latin American countries has shown a steady growth in the recent years, but remains proportionately low compared with the rest of the world. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that although efforts toward improving the quantity and quality of research in Latin America have been made, the final results are less than other regions in the world. Possible factors responsible for the low performance include a failure in academic motivation and lack of pressure for publication, as well as limited research funding. Therefore, important efforts from local and international nephrological communities are needed to boost research in Latin America.  (+info)

Edmund Randerath (1899-1961): experimental proof for the glomerular origin of proteinuria. (7/380)

A century ago, Edmund Randerath (1899-1961), who was one of the pioneers in nephrology that provided indirect experimental proof for the glomerular origin of proteinuria, was born. In the first decades of this century, the concept prevailed that "nephrosis" was a process of primary tubular cell degeneration. In contrast to prevailing opinion, he interpreted these changes to be the result of the uptake and storage of serum proteins after they had been filtered in the glomerulus. Edmund Randerath proved the glomerular origin of proteinuria by astute experiments in amphibia. In the salamander, an intraperitoneal injection of albumin provoked the supposedly "degenerative" changes of tubular epithelial cells in only those nephrons that drained the coelomic cavity and were devoid of glomeruli, but not in those nephrons that were closed and attached to glomeruli. This observation provided incontrovertible evidence that the presence of serum proteins in tubular fluid was a prerequisite for the development of the tubular epithelial cell changes typically seen in nephrotic patients.  (+info)

Level of renal function at the initiation of dialysis in the U.S. end-stage renal disease population. (8/380)

Level of renal function at the initiation of dialysis in the U.S. end-stage renal disease population. BACKGROUND: More than 285,000 individuals in the United States suffer from end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and are treated predominantly by dialysis. Despite the high cost and poor outcomes of dialysis treatment for ESRD, there are few data about the level of renal function at the onset of ESRD and no established medical criteria for the initiation of dialysis. METHODS: We report the level of serum creatinine and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in 90,897 patients who began dialysis in the U. S. between April 1995 through September 1997. Data were obtained from the U.S. Renal Data System. GFR was predicted by an equation developed from the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study. RESULTS: The mean (SD) serum creatinine was 8.5 (3.8) mg/dl. The mean (SD) predicted GFR was 7.1 (3.1) ml/min/1.73 m2, with a range from 1 to 42 ml/min/1.73 m2. The proportion of patients with predicted GFR of > 10, 5 to 10, and <5 ml/min/1.73 m2 was 14, 63, and 23%, respectively. The mean predicted GFR was significantly lower among younger patients, women, African Americans, patients with a higher body weight, patients with ESRD because of diseases other than diabetes, uninsured patients, patients who were employed, homemakers or students, and patients selecting hemodialysis. CONCLUSIONS: There is wide variation in renal function at the initiation of dialysis in the U.S. ESRD population, and a substantial fraction of patients start dialysis at very low levels of predicted GFR. Further analyses are needed to examine the factors associated with late initiation of dialysis and its impact on the cost and outcomes of ESRD.  (+info)

Nephrology is a branch of medicine that deals with the study and treatment of kidney diseases. A nephrologist is a medical specialist who specializes in the diagnosis, management, and treatment of various kidney-related disorders such as chronic kidney disease (CKD), acute renal failure, glomerulonephritis, hypertension, kidney stones, electrolyte imbalances, and inherited kidney diseases. They also provide care for patients who require dialysis or transplantation due to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Nephrologists work closely with other healthcare professionals including primary care physicians, surgeons, radiologists, and pathologists to develop individualized treatment plans for their patients.

Fellowships and scholarships in the medical context are awards given to individuals to support their education, training, or research in a specific medical field. Here are the definitions for each:

1. Fellowship: A fellowship is a competitive award given to a highly qualified individual, usually a physician or researcher, to pursue advanced training, education, or research in a specialized area of medicine. Fellowships can last from one to several years and often involve working in an academic medical center or research institution. They may include a stipend, tuition support, and other benefits.
2. Scholarship: A scholarship is a financial award given to an individual to support their education, typically for undergraduate or graduate studies. In the medical context, scholarships are often granted to students who demonstrate academic excellence, leadership potential, and a commitment to a career in medicine. Scholarships can cover tuition, fees, books, and living expenses and may be awarded by universities, professional organizations, or other entities.

Both fellowships and scholarships can provide valuable opportunities for individuals to advance their knowledge, skills, and careers in the medical field. They are often highly competitive, with selection based on a variety of factors including academic achievement, research experience, leadership potential, and personal qualities.

Chronic kidney failure, also known as chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 5 or end-stage renal disease (ESRD), is a permanent loss of kidney function that occurs gradually over a period of months to years. It is defined as a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of less than 15 ml/min, which means the kidneys are filtering waste and excess fluids at less than 15% of their normal capacity.

CKD can be caused by various underlying conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, glomerulonephritis, polycystic kidney disease, and recurrent kidney infections. Over time, the damage to the kidneys can lead to a buildup of waste products and fluids in the body, which can cause a range of symptoms including fatigue, weakness, shortness of breath, nausea, vomiting, and confusion.

Treatment for chronic kidney failure typically involves managing the underlying condition, making lifestyle changes such as following a healthy diet, and receiving supportive care such as dialysis or a kidney transplant to replace lost kidney function.

Kidney disease, also known as nephropathy or renal disease, refers to any functional or structural damage to the kidneys that impairs their ability to filter blood, regulate electrolytes, produce hormones, and maintain fluid balance. This damage can result from a wide range of causes, including diabetes, hypertension, glomerulonephritis, polycystic kidney disease, lupus, infections, drugs, toxins, and congenital or inherited disorders.

Depending on the severity and progression of the kidney damage, kidney diseases can be classified into two main categories: acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). AKI is a sudden and often reversible loss of kidney function that occurs over hours to days, while CKD is a progressive and irreversible decline in kidney function that develops over months or years.

Symptoms of kidney diseases may include edema, proteinuria, hematuria, hypertension, electrolyte imbalances, metabolic acidosis, anemia, and decreased urine output. Treatment options depend on the underlying cause and severity of the disease and may include medications, dietary modifications, dialysis, or kidney transplantation.

Nephrology nursing is a specialized area of nursing practice that focuses on the care of patients with kidney diseases or disorders, including those who require dialysis or have undergone kidney transplantation. Nephrology nurses work in various settings such as hospitals, clinics, dialysis centers, and transplant units to provide comprehensive care for their patients. They are responsible for assessing, planning, implementing, and evaluating the nursing care plan for patients with kidney-related conditions.

Nephrology nurses must have a deep understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the kidneys, as well as knowledge of various kidney diseases such as chronic kidney disease (CKD), acute kidney injury (AKI), glomerulonephritis, and polycystic kidney disease. They must also be familiar with different dialysis modalities, including hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT).

In addition to their clinical skills, nephrology nurses must possess excellent communication and interpersonal skills to work effectively with patients, families, and other healthcare professionals. They must be able to provide emotional support to patients and families dealing with the challenges of kidney disease and its treatment. Nephrology nurses may also be involved in patient education, case management, research, and advocacy efforts related to kidney health.

Renal replacement therapy (RRT) is a medical treatment that takes over the normal function of the kidneys when they fail. The main objectives of RRT are to remove waste products and excess fluid, correct electrolyte imbalances, and maintain acid-base balance in the body. There are several types of RRT, including hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and kidney transplantation.

Hemodialysis involves circulating the patient's blood through an external filter called a dialyzer, which removes waste products and excess fluid. The cleaned blood is then returned to the patient's body. Hemodialysis can be performed in a hospital or dialysis center, or at home with appropriate training.

Peritoneal dialysis involves instilling a special solution called dialysate into the patient's abdominal cavity, where it remains for a period of time to allow waste products and excess fluid to move from the bloodstream into the dialysate through a membrane in the peritoneum. The used dialysate is then drained out of the body and replaced with fresh dialysate. Peritoneal dialysis can be performed continuously or intermittently, and it can also be done at home.

Kidney transplantation involves surgically implanting a healthy kidney from a donor into the patient's body to replace the failed kidneys. This is usually the most effective form of RRT, but it requires major surgery and long-term immunosuppressive therapy to prevent rejection of the transplanted organ.

Overall, RRT is a life-sustaining treatment for patients with end-stage kidney disease, and it can significantly improve their quality of life and longevity.

Renal dialysis is a medical procedure that is used to artificially remove waste products, toxins, and excess fluids from the blood when the kidneys are no longer able to perform these functions effectively. This process is also known as hemodialysis.

During renal dialysis, the patient's blood is circulated through a special machine called a dialyzer or an artificial kidney, which contains a semi-permeable membrane that filters out waste products and excess fluids from the blood. The cleaned blood is then returned to the patient's body.

Renal dialysis is typically recommended for patients with advanced kidney disease or kidney failure, such as those with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). It is a life-sustaining treatment that helps to maintain the balance of fluids and electrolytes in the body, prevent the buildup of waste products and toxins, and control blood pressure.

There are two main types of renal dialysis: hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. Hemodialysis is the most common type and involves using a dialyzer to filter the blood outside the body. Peritoneal dialysis, on the other hand, involves placing a catheter in the abdomen and using the lining of the abdomen (peritoneum) as a natural filter to remove waste products and excess fluids from the body.

Overall, renal dialysis is an essential treatment option for patients with kidney failure, helping them to maintain their quality of life and prolong their survival.

**Referral:**
A referral in the medical context is the process where a healthcare professional (such as a general practitioner or primary care physician) sends or refers a patient to another healthcare professional who has specialized knowledge and skills to address the patient's specific health condition or concern. This could be a specialist, a consultant, or a facility that provides specialized care. The referral may involve transferring the patient's care entirely to the other professional or may simply be for a consultation and advice.

**Consultation:**
A consultation in healthcare is a process where a healthcare professional seeks the opinion or advice of another professional regarding a patient's medical condition. This can be done in various ways, such as face-to-face meetings, phone calls, or written correspondence. The consulting professional provides their expert opinion to assist in the diagnosis, treatment plan, or management of the patient's condition. The ultimate decision and responsibility for the patient's care typically remain with the referring or primary healthcare provider.

Medical societies are professional organizations composed of physicians, surgeons, and other healthcare professionals who share a common purpose of promoting medical research, education, and patient care. These societies can focus on specific medical specialties, such as the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) for cancer specialists or the American College of Surgeons (ACS) for surgeons. They may also address broader issues related to healthcare policy, advocacy, and ethics. Medical societies often provide resources for continuing medical education, publish scientific journals, establish clinical practice guidelines, and offer networking opportunities for members.

A medical directory is a collection of information about healthcare professionals, organizations, and facilities, arranged in a systematic and searchable manner. Medical directories can be found in both print and digital formats and serve as a valuable resource for patients, doctors, researchers, and other healthcare providers.

The information contained in medical directories may include the names and contact details of physicians, specialists, and other healthcare professionals, along with their qualifications, areas of expertise, and professional affiliations. Medical directories may also provide information about hospitals, clinics, research institutions, and other healthcare organizations, including their services, accreditation status, and quality indicators.

Medical directories can be used for a variety of purposes, such as finding a specialist in a particular field, locating a nearby hospital or clinic, verifying the credentials of a healthcare provider, or conducting research on healthcare trends and outcomes. Some medical directories may also include patient reviews and ratings, which can help consumers make informed decisions about their care.

Examples of medical directories include the American Medical Association (AMA) Physician Masterfile, the National Provider Identifier (NPI) Registry, and the Healthcare Bluebook.

Medical education, graduate refers to the post-baccalaureate programs of study leading to a doctoral degree in medicine (MD) or osteopathic medicine (DO). These programs typically include rigorous coursework in the basic medical sciences, clinical training, and research experiences. The goal of medical education at this level is to prepare students to become competent, caring physicians who are able to provide high-quality medical care to patients, conduct research to advance medical knowledge, and contribute to the improvement of health care systems.

Graduate medical education (GME) typically includes residency programs, which are postgraduate training programs that provide specialized clinical training in a particular field of medicine. Residency programs typically last three to seven years, depending on the specialty, and provide hands-on experience in diagnosing and treating patients under the supervision of experienced physicians.

Medical education at the graduate level is designed to build upon the foundational knowledge and skills acquired during undergraduate medical education (UME) and to prepare students for licensure and certification as practicing physicians. Graduates of GME programs are eligible to take licensing exams and apply for certification in their chosen specialty through professional organizations such as the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS).

Chronic Renal Insufficiency (CRI) is a medical condition characterized by a gradual and progressive loss of kidney function over a period of months or years. It is also known as Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). The main function of the kidneys is to filter waste products and excess fluids from the blood, which are then excreted in the urine. When the kidneys become insufficient, these waste products and fluids accumulate in the body, leading to various complications.

CRI is defined as a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of less than 60 ml/min/1.73m2 for three months or more, regardless of cause. GFR is a measure of kidney function that estimates how well the kidneys are filtering waste products from the blood. The condition is classified into five stages based on the severity of the disease and the GFR value.

Stage 1: GFR greater than or equal to 90 ml/min/1.73m2
Stage 2: GFR between 60-89 ml/min/1.73m2
Stage 3: GFR between 30-59 ml/min/1.73m2
Stage 4: GFR between 15-29 ml/min/1.73m2
Stage 5: GFR less than 15 ml/min/1.73m2 or dialysis

CRI can be caused by various underlying conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, glomerulonephritis, polycystic kidney disease, and other genetic or acquired disorders. Symptoms of CRI may include fatigue, weakness, loss of appetite, swelling in the legs and ankles, shortness of breath, and changes in urination patterns. Treatment for CRI focuses on slowing down the progression of the disease, managing symptoms, and preventing complications. This may involve lifestyle modifications, medication, dialysis, or kidney transplantation.

Hemodialysis units in a hospital setting are specialized departments or facilities that provide hemodialysis treatment to patients with kidney failure. Hemodialysis is a process of purifying the blood of waste products and excess fluids using a machine (hemodialysis machine) and a semi-permeable membrane (dialyzer). The procedure typically involves accessing the patient's bloodstream through a surgically created vascular access, such as a fistula or graft, and passing the blood through the dialyzer to remove waste products and excess fluids.

Hospital hemodialysis units are staffed by trained healthcare professionals, including nephrologists (kidney specialists), nurses, technicians, and support personnel. These units provide inpatient and outpatient services for patients who require hemodialysis due to acute or chronic kidney failure, as well as those who need dialysis while hospitalized for other medical conditions.

Hospital hemodialysis units may offer various types of hemodialysis treatments, including conventional hemodialysis, high-flux hemodialysis, hemofiltration, and hemodiafiltration. They also provide education and support to patients and their families regarding dialysis treatment options, lifestyle modifications, and long-term management of kidney disease.

"Refusal to treat" is a medical-legal term that refers to the situation where a healthcare professional or institution declines to provide medical care or treatment to a patient. The refusal can be based on various reasons such as:

1. Lack of training or expertise to handle the patient's medical condition.
2. The belief that the treatment requested by the patient is medically inappropriate or unnecessary.
3. Personal or professional disagreements with the patient's choices or lifestyle.
4. Concerns about the safety of the healthcare provider or other patients.
5. Inability to pay for the treatment or lack of insurance coverage.

However, it is important to note that refusing to treat a patient is a serious decision that should only be made after careful consideration and consultation with other healthcare professionals. Healthcare providers have an ethical duty to provide emergency medical care to anyone in need, regardless of their ability to pay or any personal differences. In addition, they must comply with applicable laws and regulations regarding refusal to treat, which may vary depending on the jurisdiction.

Urology is a surgical specialty that deals with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and conditions related to the male and female urinary tract system and the male reproductive organs. This includes the kidneys, ureters, bladder, prostate gland, and testicles. Urologists are medical doctors who have completed specialized training in this field, and they may perform various surgical procedures such as cystoscopy, lithotripsy, and radical prostatectomy to treat conditions like kidney stones, urinary tract infections, bladder cancer, enlarged prostate, and infertility.

Acute kidney injury (AKI), also known as acute renal failure, is a rapid loss of kidney function that occurs over a few hours or days. It is defined as an increase in the serum creatinine level by 0.3 mg/dL within 48 hours or an increase in the creatinine level to more than 1.5 times baseline, which is known or presumed to have occurred within the prior 7 days, or a urine volume of less than 0.5 mL/kg per hour for six hours.

AKI can be caused by a variety of conditions, including decreased blood flow to the kidneys, obstruction of the urinary tract, exposure to toxic substances, and certain medications. Symptoms of AKI may include decreased urine output, fluid retention, electrolyte imbalances, and metabolic acidosis. Treatment typically involves addressing the underlying cause of the injury and providing supportive care, such as dialysis, to help maintain kidney function until the injury resolves.

Hospital records are a type of medical record that is created and maintained by healthcare professionals during a patient's hospitalization. These records typically include detailed information about the patient's medical history, physical examination findings, laboratory and diagnostic test results, treatment plans, progress notes, medications, and other relevant data. The purpose of hospital records is to provide a comprehensive documentation of the patient's care while in the hospital, which can be used for clinical decision-making, communication among healthcare providers, quality improvement, research, and legal purposes. Hospital records are considered confidential and protected health information under federal and state laws, such as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).

Neoplasms of connective tissue are abnormal growths or tumors that develop from the cells that form the body's supportive framework, including bones, cartilage, tendons, ligaments, and other connective tissues. These neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous), and they can cause various symptoms depending on their location and size.

There are several types of connective tissue neoplasms, including:

1. Fibroma: A benign tumor that arises from fibrous connective tissue.
2. Fibrosarcoma: A malignant tumor that develops from fibrous connective tissue.
3. Lipoma: A benign tumor that arises from fat cells.
4. Liposarcoma: A malignant tumor that develops from fat cells.
5. Chondroma: A benign tumor that arises from cartilage.
6. Chondrosarcoma: A malignant tumor that develops from cartilage.
7. Osteoma: A benign tumor that arises from bone.
8. Osteosarcoma: A malignant tumor that develops from bone.
9. Giant cell tumors: Benign or malignant tumors that contain many giant cells, which are large, multinucleated cells.
10. Synovial sarcoma: A malignant tumor that arises from the synovial tissue that lines joints and tendons.

Connective tissue neoplasms can cause various symptoms depending on their location and size. For example, a benign lipoma may cause a painless lump under the skin, while a malignant osteosarcoma may cause bone pain, swelling, and fractures. Treatment options for connective tissue neoplasms include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

"Foreign Medical Graduates" (FMGs) are physicians who have graduated from a medical school outside of the country where they are seeking to practice medicine. These doctors may be required to pass certain examinations and complete additional training in order to meet the licensing requirements of the new country. The specific requirements for FMGs can vary depending on the country and jurisdiction.

Kidney transplantation is a surgical procedure where a healthy kidney from a deceased or living donor is implanted into a patient with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) or permanent kidney failure. The new kidney takes over the functions of filtering waste and excess fluids from the blood, producing urine, and maintaining the body's electrolyte balance.

The transplanted kidney is typically placed in the lower abdomen, with its blood vessels connected to the recipient's iliac artery and vein. The ureter of the new kidney is then attached to the recipient's bladder to ensure proper urine flow. Following the surgery, the patient will require lifelong immunosuppressive therapy to prevent rejection of the transplanted organ by their immune system.

Peritoneal dialysis is a type of renal replacement therapy used to treat patients with severe kidney dysfunction or end-stage renal disease. It is a process that utilizes the peritoneum, a membranous sac lining the abdominal cavity, as a natural semipermeable membrane for filtering waste products, excess fluids, and electrolytes from the bloodstream.

In peritoneal dialysis, a sterile dialysate solution is infused into the peritoneal cavity via a permanently implanted catheter. The dialysate contains various substances such as glucose or other osmotic agents, electrolytes, and buffer solutions that facilitate the diffusion of waste products and fluids from the blood vessels surrounding the peritoneum into the dialysate.

There are two primary types of peritoneal dialysis: continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and automated peritoneal dialysis (APD). CAPD is performed manually, several times a day, while APD is carried out using a cycler machine overnight.

Peritoneal dialysis offers certain advantages over hemodialysis, such as better preservation of residual renal function, fewer dietary restrictions, and greater flexibility in scheduling treatments. However, it also has potential complications, including peritonitis (inflammation of the peritoneum), catheter-related infections, fluid imbalances, and membrane failure over time.

Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a test used to check how well the kidneys are working. Specifically, it estimates how much blood passes through the glomeruli each minute. The glomeruli are the tiny fibers in the kidneys that filter waste from the blood. A lower GFR number means that the kidneys aren't working properly and may indicate kidney disease.

The GFR is typically calculated using a formula that takes into account the patient's serum creatinine level, age, sex, and race. The most commonly used formula is the CKD-EPI (Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration) equation. A normal GFR is usually above 90 mL/min/1.73m2, but this can vary depending on the individual's age and other factors.

Proteinuria is a medical term that refers to the presence of excess proteins, particularly albumin, in the urine. Under normal circumstances, only small amounts of proteins should be found in the urine because the majority of proteins are too large to pass through the glomeruli, which are the filtering units of the kidneys.

However, when the glomeruli become damaged or diseased, they may allow larger molecules such as proteins to leak into the urine. Persistent proteinuria is often a sign of kidney disease and can indicate damage to the glomeruli. It is usually detected through a routine urinalysis and may be confirmed with further testing.

The severity of proteinuria can vary, and it can be a symptom of various underlying conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, glomerulonephritis, and other kidney diseases. Treatment for proteinuria depends on the underlying cause and may include medications to control blood pressure, manage diabetes, or reduce protein loss in the urine.

An outpatient clinic in a hospital setting is a department or facility where patients receive medical care without being admitted to the hospital. These clinics are typically designed to provide specialized services for specific medical conditions or populations. They may be staffed by physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals who work on a part-time or full-time basis.

Outpatient clinics offer a range of services, including diagnostic tests, consultations, treatments, and follow-up care. Patients can visit the clinic for routine checkups, management of chronic conditions, rehabilitation, and other medical needs. The specific services offered at an outpatient clinic will depend on the hospital and the clinic's specialty.

Outpatient clinics are often more convenient and cost-effective than inpatient care because they allow patients to receive medical treatment while continuing to live at home. They also help reduce the burden on hospitals by freeing up beds for patients who require more intensive or emergency care. Overall, outpatient clinics play an essential role in providing accessible and high-quality healthcare services to patients in their communities.

Credentialing is a process used in the healthcare industry to verify and assess the qualifications, training, licensure, and background of healthcare practitioners, such as doctors, nurses, and allied health professionals. The purpose of credentialing is to ensure that healthcare providers meet the necessary standards and requirements to provide safe and competent patient care within a specific healthcare organization or facility.

The credentialing process typically includes primary source verification of the following:

1. Education: Verification of the healthcare provider's completion of an accredited educational program leading to their degree or diploma.
2. Training: Confirmation of any required internships, residencies, fellowships, or other clinical training experiences.
3. Licensure: Validation of current, active, and unrestricted licensure or registration to practice in the healthcare provider's state or jurisdiction.
4. Certification: Verification of any relevant board certifications or specialty credentials held by the healthcare provider.
5. Work history: A review of the healthcare provider's professional work experience, including any gaps in employment or practice.
6. Malpractice and disciplinary history: Investigation of any malpractice claims, lawsuits, or disciplinary actions taken against the healthcare provider by a licensing board, professional organization, or court.
7. References: Solicitation and evaluation of professional references from colleagues and supervisors who can attest to the healthcare provider's clinical skills, character, and ability to provide quality patient care.
8. Clinical privileges: Granting specific clinical privileges based on the healthcare provider's qualifications, training, and experience, allowing them to perform certain procedures or treatments within the organization.
9. Background check: A criminal background check to ensure the healthcare provider has no disqualifying convictions or pending legal issues.
10. Immunization status: Verification of the healthcare provider's immunization status to protect patients and staff from infectious diseases.

Credentialing is usually performed by a dedicated committee within a healthcare organization, often called the Medical Staff Office or Credentials Committee. The process must be repeated periodically (usually every three years) to maintain the healthcare provider's privileges and ensure their continued compliance with the organization's standards and requirements.

The "Standard of Care" is a legal term that refers to the level and type of medical care that a reasonably prudent physician with similar training and expertise would provide under similar circumstances. It serves as a benchmark for determining whether a healthcare provider has been negligent in their duties. In other words, if a healthcare professional fails to meet the standard of care and their patient is harmed as a result, they may be held liable for medical malpractice.

It's important to note that the standard of care can vary depending on factors such as the patient's age, medical condition, and geographic location. Additionally, the standard of care is not static and evolves over time as new medical research and technologies become available. Healthcare professionals are expected to stay current with advances in their field and provide care that reflects the most up-to-date standards.

A career choice refers to the decision or selection of a job or profession that an individual makes, typically based on their interests, skills, values, and personal goals. It involves considering various factors such as education and training requirements, job outlook, salary potential, and work-life balance. A well-informed career choice can lead to long-term job satisfaction, success, and fulfillment. It is essential to note that career choices can change over time due to various reasons, including personal growth, industry trends, or changes in life circumstances.

Creatinine is a waste product that's produced by your muscles and removed from your body by your kidneys. Creatinine is a breakdown product of creatine, a compound found in meat and fish, as well as in the muscles of vertebrates, including humans.

In healthy individuals, the kidneys filter out most of the creatinine and eliminate it through urine. However, when the kidneys are not functioning properly, creatinine levels in the blood can rise. Therefore, measuring the amount of creatinine in the blood or urine is a common way to test how well the kidneys are working. High creatinine levels in the blood may indicate kidney damage or kidney disease.

Nephrotic syndrome is a group of symptoms that indicate kidney damage, specifically damage to the glomeruli—the tiny blood vessel clusters in the kidneys that filter waste and excess fluids from the blood. The main features of nephrotic syndrome are:

1. Proteinuria (excess protein in urine): Large amounts of a protein called albumin leak into the urine due to damaged glomeruli, which can't properly filter proteins. This leads to low levels of albumin in the blood, causing fluid buildup and swelling.
2. Hypoalbuminemia (low blood albumin levels): As albumin leaks into the urine, the concentration of albumin in the blood decreases, leading to hypoalbuminemia. This can cause edema (swelling), particularly in the legs, ankles, and feet.
3. Edema (fluid retention and swelling): With low levels of albumin in the blood, fluids move into the surrounding tissues, causing swelling or puffiness. The swelling is most noticeable around the eyes, face, hands, feet, and abdomen.
4. Hyperlipidemia (high lipid/cholesterol levels): The kidneys play a role in regulating lipid metabolism. Damage to the glomeruli can lead to increased lipid production and high cholesterol levels in the blood.

Nephrotic syndrome can result from various underlying kidney diseases, such as minimal change disease, membranous nephropathy, or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Treatment depends on the underlying cause and may include medications to control inflammation, manage high blood pressure, and reduce proteinuria. In some cases, dietary modifications and lifestyle changes are also recommended.

There seems to be a misunderstanding in your question. "Hospital Departments" is not a medical term or diagnosis, but rather an organizational structure used by hospitals to divide their services and facilities into different units based on medical specialties or patient populations. Examples of hospital departments include internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, emergency medicine, radiology, and pathology. Each department typically has its own staff, equipment, and facilities to provide specialized care for specific types of patients or medical conditions.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

Renal osteodystrophy is a bone disease that occurs in individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is characterized by abnormalities in the bones' structure and mineral composition due to disturbances in the metabolism of calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D. These metabolic disturbances result from the kidneys' decreased ability to maintain balance in the levels of these minerals and hormones.

Renal osteodystrophy can manifest as several bone disorders, including:

1. Osteitis fibrosa cystica: Increased bone turnover due to excessive parathyroid hormone (PTH) production, leading to high levels of alkaline phosphatase and increased resorption of bones.
2. Adynamic bone disease: Decreased bone turnover due to reduced PTH levels, resulting in low bone formation rates and increased fracture risk.
3. Mixed uremic osteodystrophy: A combination of high and low bone turnover, with varying degrees of mineralization defects.
4. Osteomalacia: Defective mineralization of bones due to vitamin D deficiency or resistance, leading to soft and weak bones.

Symptoms of renal osteodystrophy may include bone pain, muscle weakness, fractures, deformities, and growth retardation in children. Diagnosis typically involves laboratory tests, imaging studies, and sometimes bone biopsies. Treatment focuses on correcting the metabolic imbalances through dietary modifications, medications (such as phosphate binders, vitamin D analogs, and calcimimetics), and addressing any secondary hyperparathyroidism if present.

A kidney, in medical terms, is one of two bean-shaped organs located in the lower back region of the body. They are essential for maintaining homeostasis within the body by performing several crucial functions such as:

1. Regulation of water and electrolyte balance: Kidneys help regulate the amount of water and various electrolytes like sodium, potassium, and calcium in the bloodstream to maintain a stable internal environment.

2. Excretion of waste products: They filter waste products from the blood, including urea (a byproduct of protein metabolism), creatinine (a breakdown product of muscle tissue), and other harmful substances that result from normal cellular functions or external sources like medications and toxins.

3. Endocrine function: Kidneys produce several hormones with important roles in the body, such as erythropoietin (stimulates red blood cell production), renin (regulates blood pressure), and calcitriol (activated form of vitamin D that helps regulate calcium homeostasis).

4. pH balance regulation: Kidneys maintain the proper acid-base balance in the body by excreting either hydrogen ions or bicarbonate ions, depending on whether the blood is too acidic or too alkaline.

5. Blood pressure control: The kidneys play a significant role in regulating blood pressure through the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), which constricts blood vessels and promotes sodium and water retention to increase blood volume and, consequently, blood pressure.

Anatomically, each kidney is approximately 10-12 cm long, 5-7 cm wide, and 3 cm thick, with a weight of about 120-170 grams. They are surrounded by a protective layer of fat and connected to the urinary system through the renal pelvis, ureters, bladder, and urethra.

Kidney calculi, also known as kidney stones, are hard deposits made of minerals and salts that form inside your kidneys. They can range in size from a grain of sand to a golf ball. When they're small enough, they can be passed through your urine without causing too much discomfort. However, larger stones may block the flow of urine, causing severe pain and potentially leading to serious complications such as urinary tract infections or kidney damage if left untreated.

The formation of kidney calculi is often associated with factors like dehydration, high levels of certain minerals in your urine, family history, obesity, and certain medical conditions such as gout or inflammatory bowel disease. Symptoms of kidney stones typically include severe pain in the back, side, lower abdomen, or groin; nausea and vomiting; fever and chills if an infection is present; and blood in the urine. Treatment options depend on the size and location of the stone but may include medications to help pass the stone, shock wave lithotripsy to break up the stone, or surgical removal of the stone in severe cases.

Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) is a genetic disorder characterized by the growth of multiple cysts in the kidneys. These cysts are fluid-filled sacs that can vary in size and can multiply, leading to enlarged kidneys. The increased size and number of cysts can result in reduced kidney function, high blood pressure, and eventually kidney failure.

There are two main types of PKD: Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) and Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease (ARPKD). ADPKD is the most common form, affecting approximately 1 in every 500 people. It typically develops in adulthood. On the other hand, ARPKD is a rarer form, affecting about 1 in every 20,000 children, and it often presents in infancy or early childhood.

In addition to kidney problems, PKD can also affect other organs, such as the liver and the heart. It's important to note that while there is no cure for PKD, various treatments can help manage symptoms and slow down the progression of the disease.

... onco-nephrology), structural kidney diseases (uro-nephrology), procedural nephrology or other non-nephrology areas as described ... course in either nephrology or paediatric nephrology. Nephrology training in Australia and New Zealand typically includes ... The American Nephrology Nurses' Association (ANNA), founded in 1969, promotes excellence in and appreciation of nephrology ... "Nephrology Specialty Description". American Medical Association. "Nephrology". American College of Physicians. "Dialysis". nhs. ...
... and Urology journal Geriatric Nephrology "ASN-ASP Junior Development Grant in Geriatric Nephrology". ... A book about geriatric nephrology was published in 1986 by Bernard Davis, M. Michelis. The American Society of Nephrology has a ... Geriatric nephrology is the branch of internal medicine and geriatric medicine that deals with diseases of the kidney. It is a ... Geriatric nephrology at Mount Sinai Hospital (All articles with unsourced statements, Articles with unsourced statements from ...
Nephrology". PubMed. United States National Library of Medicine. Retrieved 2022-08-05. "Nature Reviews Nephrology". Web of ... "Nature Reviews Nephrology". Scopus. Retrieved 2022-08-05. "Journals Ranked by Impact: Urology & Nephrology". 2021 Journal ... Nature Reviews Nephrology is a monthly peer-reviewed review journal published by Nature Portfolio. It was established as Nature ... "Displaying Record for Publication: Nature Reviews Nephrology". CASSI. Chemical Abstracts Service. Retrieved 2022-08-05. "About ...
The Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation is a monthly peer-reviewed medical journal. It is published by Oxford University Press ... The journal's current editor-in-chief is Denis Fouque (Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre-Bénite, France). "Nephrology ... Nephrology journals, Academic journals established in 1981, Organ transplantation journals, All stub articles, Surgery journal ...
Nephrology "American Society of Nephrology". jasn.asnjournals.org. "American Society of Nephrology". cjasn.asnjournals.org. " ... "American Society of Nephrology - About ASN - Sharon M. Moe, MD, FASN". www.asn-online.org. "American Society of Nephrology - ... "American Society of Nephrology - About ASN - Raymond C. Harris, MD, FASN". www.asn-online.org. "American Society of Nephrology ... "American Society of Nephrology - KSAP - Home". www.asn-online.org. "American Society of Nephrology - Kidney Week - Home". www. ...
Nephrology Committee of the Polish Academy of Science chaired by Professor Tadeusz Orłowski and Nephrology Section of the ... Polish Nephrology and Dialysis Therapy - established in 1997, edited by Przegląd Lekarski publisher, publishes original papers ... Nephrology Forum - issued since 2008, edited by Via Medica publisher, publishes mostly reviews, recommendations and guidelines ... The last conference of the Nephrology Section of the Polish Society of Internal Medicine was thereby the First Funding Congress ...
The Indian Journal of Nephrology is a peer-reviewed open-access medical journal published on behalf of the Indian Society of ... The journal publishes articles on the subject of nephrology. The journal is indexed in Abstracts on Hygiene and Communicable ... Nephrology journals, Open access journals, Quarterly journals, English-language journals, Medknow Publications academic ...
The International Society of Nephrology (ISN) is an organization concerned with kidney health. The ISN has over 9,000 ... In addition, the ISN closely collaborates with over 100 national and regional nephrology societies around the world, ...
"International Pediatric Nephrology Association (IPNA)". www.theisn.org. Brussels, Belgium: International Society of Nephrology ... Chesney RW (July 2005). "The future of pediatric nephrology". Pediatric Nephrology. 20 (7): 867-71. doi:10.1007/s00467-005-1902 ... Cochat P, Salusky IB (2014). "IPNA: Global Pediatric Nephrology, Introduction and Overview". Pediatric Nephrology. pp. 1-7. doi ... July 2016). "The global pediatric nephrology workforce: a survey of the International Pediatric Nephrology Association". BMC ...
The International Journal of Nephrology and Renovascular Disease is an open-access peer-reviewed medical journal focusing on ... Nephrology journals, Academic journals established in 2008, All stub articles, Medical journal stubs). ...
The Journal of the American Society of Nephrology is a peer-reviewed medical journal covering nephrology. It was established in ... Nephrology". 2020 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science (Science ed.). Clarivate Analytics. 2020. Official website v t e ( ... Nephrology journals, Academic journals published by learned and professional societies of the United States, Academic journals ... ranking it first in the field of nephrology. The journal is abstracted and indexed in the following databases: CINAHL Current ...
The Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology is a monthly peer-reviewed medical journal covering nephrology. It ... Nephrology". 2021 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science (Science ed.). Clarivate Analytics. 2021. Official website v t e ( ... Nephrology". The journal is abstracted and indexed in the following databases: CINAHL Current Contents/Clinical Medicine ... Nephrology journals, Academic journals published by learned and professional societies of the United States, Academic journals ...
Nephrology. 17 (4): 346-51. doi:10.1111/j.1440-1797.2012.01573.x. PMID 22295894. S2CID 24163790. Tan S, Li R, Ding K, Lobie PE ...
Nephrology Urology Lote CJ (2012). Principles of Renal Physiology (5th ed.). Springer. Pocock G, Richards CD (2006). Human ... Nephrology. 15 (1): 27-44. doi:10.1038/s41581-018-0078-3. PMID 30455427. S2CID 53872296. (Articles with short description, ... Jameson JL, Loscalzo J (2010). Harrison's Nephrology and Acid-Base Disorders. McGraw-Hill Professional. p. 3. ISBN 978-0-07- ...
Nephrology. 15 (9): 546-558. doi:10.1038/s41581-019-0167-y. PMID 31239546. S2CID 195354083. Wang M, Zheng Q, Shen Q, Guo S ( ...
Nephrology. 6 (5): 274-85. doi:10.1038/nrneph.2010.33. PMID 20308999. S2CID 205512465. Jain A, Buist NR, Kennaway NG, Powell BR ...
Nephrology; and Neurology & Neurosurgery. Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital, is ranked #6 nationally for Neonatal Care by ...
Nephrology. 18 (9): 605-614. doi:10.1111/nep.12134. PMID 23869492. S2CID 31791094. Greendyke RM, Bernhardt AJ, Tasbas HE, ...
Nephrology. 14 (11): 678-687. doi:10.1038/s41581-018-0051-1. PMID 30120380. S2CID 52033674. Torres JA, Kruger SL, Broderick C, ... Nephrology. 10 (9): 485-486. doi:10.1038/nrneph.2014.132. PMID 25092148. S2CID 22042874. Kumar V, Abbas AK, Aster JC (2015). ... Nephrology. 6 (4): 197-206. doi:10.1038/nrneph.2010.18. PMC 4050432. PMID 20177400. Rozenfeld MN, Ansari SA, Shaibani A, ... Nephrology. 16 (1): 1. doi:10.1038/s41581-019-0226-4. PMID 31654043. S2CID 204886698. Nowak KL, Hopp K (April 2020). "Metabolic ...
Nephrology. 11 (1): 46-61. doi:10.1038/nrneph.2014.215. PMID 25421826. S2CID 19814440. Habib, G.S. Systemic effects of intra- ... Nephrology: nephrotic syndrome, idiopathic type or secondary to lupus nephritis. Neurology: multiple sclerosis. Ophthalmology: ...
Nephrology. 7 (11): 669-674. doi:10.1038/nrneph.2011.138. PMID 21947122. S2CID 13425677. "Gitelman Syndrome". NORD (National ... April 2011). "Spectrum of mutations in Gitelman syndrome". Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. 22 (4): 693-703. doi: ... January 2013). "Renal phosphate handling in Gitelman syndrome--the results of a case-control study". Pediatric Nephrology. 28 ( ... BMC Nephrology. 18 (1): 38. doi:10.1186/s12882-017-0455-3. PMC 5270235. PMID 28125972. Cruz DN, Shaer AJ, Bia MJ, Lifton RP, ...
Nephrology. 7 (9): 499-508. doi:10.1038/nrneph.2011.88. PMID 21727925. S2CID 11627241. Kishimoto TK, Viswanathan K, Ganguly T, ... Alwall was appointed to a newly created Chair of Nephrology at the University of Lund in 1957. Subsequently, he collaborated ... Talk given to the Nordic Nephrology Days Symposium, Lund, 1997, as archived on HDCN. Media related to Hemodialysis at Wikimedia ... 1944". Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. 8 (12): 1959-65. doi:10.1681/ASN.V8121959. PMID 9402100. McKellar S ( ...
Nephrology. 15 (6): 346-366. doi:10.1038/s41581-019-0129-4. PMC 6590709. PMID 30858582. N-acetyllactosamine+synthase at the U.S ...
Nephrology. 16 (7): 619-25. doi:10.1111/j.1440-1797.2011.01479.x. PMID 21609363. S2CID 22894817. Mastrangelo M, Cesario S ( ...
March 2009). "New equations to estimate GFR in children with CKD". Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. 20 (3): 629- ... Nephrology. 13 (8): 684-688. doi:10.1111/j.1440-1797.2008.01045.x. ISSN 1320-5358. PMID 19154321. S2CID 45943783. Fontsere, N ... Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. 6 (8): 1813-4. doi:10.2215/cjn.06040611. PMID 21784836. Murray, A. W.; ... Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. 19 (5): 844-46. doi:10.1681/ASN.2008010110. PMID 18385419. Eckardt KU, Berns JS ...
November 2017). "Health Care Costs Associated with AKI". Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. 12 (11): 1733- ... Nephrology. 15 (4): 419-28. doi:10.1111/j.1440-1797.2010.01317.x. PMID 20609093. S2CID 24061863. Flo TH, Smith KD, Sato S, ... Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. 18 (2): 407-13. doi:10.1681/ASN.2006080882. PMID 17229907. Berger T, Togawa A, ... Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. 3 (3): 665-73. doi:10.2215/CJN.04010907. PMC 2386703. PMID 18337554. ...
Nephrology; Neurology and Neurosurgery; Pulmonology; and Urology. High performing specialty programs were: Cardiology and Heart ...
Nephrology. 20 (4): 273-8. doi:10.1111/nep.12381. PMID 25524550. S2CID 11292241. Mega JL, Stitziel NO, Smith JG, Chasman DI, ...
Nephrology. 2 (8): 424-431. doi:10.1038/ncpneph0228. PMID 16932477. S2CID 20184856. Bell, David S. (May 2000). "Orthostatic ...
... onco-nephrology), structural kidney diseases (uro-nephrology), procedural nephrology or other non-nephrology areas as described ... course in either nephrology or paediatric nephrology. Nephrology training in Australia and New Zealand typically includes ... The American Nephrology Nurses Association (ANNA), founded in 1969, promotes excellence in and appreciation of nephrology ... "Nephrology Specialty Description". American Medical Association. "Nephrology". American College of Physicians. "Dialysis". nhs. ...
Welcome to Medscape Nephrology, where you can peruse the latest medical news, commentary from clinician experts, major ... Nephrology. Allergy & Immunology Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Dermatology Diabetes & Endocrinology Emergency ... Featured Nephrology News & Perspectives * Not So Fast on Dental Screenings in Primary Care, USPSTF Says ... Nephrology Neurology Ob/Gyn & Womens Health Oncology Ophthalmology Orthopedics Pathology & Lab Medicine Pediatrics Plastic ...
Meet the Nephrology team at Massachusetts General Hospital. The team consists of doctors, researchers, and other faculty. ...
The Pediatric Nephrology & Hypertension Program offers comprehensive evaluation and management of all disorders of the kidneys ... Pediatric Nephrology & Hypertension Program. The Pediatric Nephrology & Hypertension Program offers comprehensive evaluation ... MGfC Pediatric Nephrology & Hypertension Program Yawkey Center for Outpatient Care 32 Fruit Street, Suite 6C Boston, MA 02114 ... Specialty Programs Within Nephrology. While our specialists see patients with all forms of kidney disease, our division offers ...
Nature Reviews Nephrology (Nat Rev Nephrol) ISSN 1759-507X (online) ISSN 1759-5061 (print) ...
Visiting investigators invited to present primarily Nephrology research, because their work is judged by the Nephrology faculty ... The non-Nephrology research conferences given by Stanford colleagues cover the same disciplines, but the research is not ... The range of Nephrology research topics is broad and includes physiology, pathophysiology, vascular, cell and molecular biology ... Fellows and faculty of the Nephrology division. *Stanford faculty and fellows who are working in non-nephrological but research ...
... is a book containing the following 29 chapters: Acid and Base Disorders, Anatomy, Calcium Disorders, Cardiovascular ... Urology - Nephrology Pages Calcium Nephrolithiasis Cysteine Calculi Nephrolithiasis Nephrolithiasis Risk Factors Struvite ... The Nephrology Book is composed of 182 topic pages which are organized into 29 Chapters. ...
The Center for Acute Care Nephrology offers comprehensive therapy options when treating acute kidney injury needs. Armed with ... The Center for Acute Care Nephrology can be reached via phone or email. Contact Us ...
... You may be trying to access this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts ... Thought you might appreciate this item(s) I saw in Indian Journal of Nephrology.. ...
Overview of the Division of Nephrology in the Department of Internal Medicine at UT Southwestern. ... Donald Seldin, a foundational figure in the history of this institution and in the field of nephrology itself. A nephron ... Parkland Hospital is one the nations leading safety net institutions, and nephrology is one of its busiest services, where we ... In the Division of Nephrology, we are deeply committed to deliver unsurpassed care to our patients, promote kidney awareness in ...
Nephrology articles covering symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and follow-up. Peer reviewed and up-to-date ...
p>The Boston Childrens Division of Nephrology cares for infants, children, and adolescents with congenital and acquired kidney ... Why choose the Division of Nephrology at Boston Childrens Hospital?. We are honored to be recognized as one of the top center ... Boston Childrens Nephrology Division has one of the largest and longest-established research programs centered in a pediatric ... We are one of the largest pediatric nephrology services in the United States, caring for children from all over the world. ...
With over 80+ members of the Nephrology, CKD, Urology, and Hematology community are involved in the program - the networking ...
BU Nephrology has a long history of ground breaking basic, translational, and clinical research. The research training program ...
... available care providers and other information for Nephrology Associates of Northern Illinois in Oak Park, IL. ... Nephrology Associates of Northern Illinois - Oak Park Make an Appointment Schedule Online (708) 524-4576 Call 7085244576 ...
Nephrology Nursing. Renal nurses provide care for patients who are experiencing, or are at risk of kidney disease. This ...
Our expert team to include Division Chiefs and General Nephrology Faculty. ... Chief, Division of Nephrology. Factor Chair. Advanced Research Training. Program Director. Specialty: General Nephrology, ... Chief, Division of Nephrology. Factor Chair. Advanced Research Training. Program Director. Specialty: General Nephrology, ... Clinical Chief of Nephrology. Director, CORE Kidney Program. Director, Nephrology Clinical Research Program. Director, Genetics ...
Kidney Disease and Nephrology When your all-important kidneys suffer from diabetes complications or other factors, you need ... The Sutter Health network includes nearly 150 nephrology experts (doctors who study kidney function and treat renal disease), ...
Search by city to compare Nephrology Specialists in Illinois, read ratings and more on Sharecare. ... See All Nephrology in null, Illinois Find Nephrology Specialists in Illinois. * * Alton ...
Nature Reviews Nephrology (Nat Rev Nephrol) ISSN 1759-507X (online) ISSN 1759-5061 (print) ... Nature Reviews Nephrology volume 19, pages 1-2 (2023)Cite this article ... Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL, USA ...
Remote - MD, VA, DE, PA & NY ...
Nephrology who sees patients at Duke Regional Hospital. ...
Nephrology Grand Rounds, Katz Family Division of Nephrology and Hypertensionat the Miller School of Medicine (University of ... Assistant Professor of Medicine (Nephrology); Course Director, Noon Conference Series, Internal Medicine: Nephrology. ... Her research training in Nephrology has been under the mentorship of Dr. Stefan Somlo, C.N.H Long Professor of Medicine ( ... Besse joined Yale School of Medicine faculty in the Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Nephrology in 2018. ...
The University of North Carolina (UNC) Division of Nephrology and the UNC Kidney Center offer a postdoctoral fellowship, the ... This fellowship in glomerular disease is open to physicians having completed a general nephrology fellowship.. The fellowship ... Advanced training in clinical nephrology focused on the management of patients with glomerular diseases and systemic vasculitis ...
2004-2023 Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. All rights reserved. 7041 Koll Center Parkway, Suite 160, Pleasanton, CA 94566, USA ...
Associate Professor of Medicine. Nephrology Lead, UNC Multidisciplinary Vasculitis and Connective Tissue Disease Clinic ...
NYMC > Departments > Academic Departments > School of Medicine > Medicine > Divisions > Nephrology Nephrology. Michael Klein, M ... The Division of Nephrology at Westchester Medical Center has 10 full-time clinical faculty members. Additional allied ... The renal team provides the entire scope of advanced critical care nephrology, including continuous and intermittent dialysis ... The renal team provides primary nephrology and consulting services for transplantation, which also include kidney-heart and ...
View article titled, The History of Nephrology in the Talmudic Corpus Open the PDF for The History of Nephrology in the ... Nephrology Sonia Youhanna, Lise Bankir, Paul Jungers, David Porteous, Ozren Polasek, Murielle Bochud, Caroline Hayward, Olivier ... Nephrology Julien Coussement, Christine Danguy, Karim Zouaoui-Boudjeltia, Pierre Defrance, Lise Bankir, Patrick Biston, Michael ... Renal diseases Diagnosis Urine Urea Animal models Autopsy Origins of Nephrology The Modern Era Am J Nephrol 1999;19:336 339 ...
The Nephrology Nursing Perspectives podcast will provide interviews and discussions between members of the American Nephrology ... In honor of ANNAs 50th anniversary, the Nephrology Nursing Journal began an oral history of ANNA, nephrology nursing, and the ... NNJ Extra is brought to you by the Nephrology Nursing Journal, the official journal of the American Nephrology Nurses ... This podcast will focus on nephrology nurses issues, health policy, and nephrology nursing as a specialty nursing profession ...
About ISNs World Congress of Nephrology. ISNs biennial World Congresses of Nephrology (WCN) are premiere educational events ... Past World Congresses of Nephrology. Since the Society foundation in 1960, 22 World Congresses of Nephrology have successfully ... The main objectives of the World Congresses of Nephrology are to:. *Advance the education of physicians and other professionals ... The most recent ISN World Congress of Nephrology was hosted by the South African Renal Society (SARS) in partnership with the ...
  • ASN welcomes Connie Rhee, MD, MSc, as the new Editor-in-Chief of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN). (asn-online.org)
  • Dr. Dada is an active member of The National Kidney Foundation, American Society of Nephrology and Renal Physicians Association. (utmbhealth.com)
  • Dr. Murphy was the President-Elect of the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) and was named in June as the recipient of the ASN's Trailblazer Award, a lifetime achievement award for her work on advocacy, mentorship and breaking barriers in nephrology and medicine. (asn-online.org)
  • Frankfurt: ANU), a late stage clinical pharmaceutical company focused on developing innovative therapies to treat progressive kidney disease, is pleased to announce the presentation of a peer-reviewed abstract to be presented November 4, 2022 at the American Society of Nephrology ("ASN") Annual Conference - Kidney Week. (menafn.com)
  • The latest Nephrology Self-Assessment Program (nephSAP) issue, Volume 22: Issue 2 (Aug 2023): End-Stage Kidney Disease, is now avail. (asn-online.org)
  • Nephrology (Carlton);28(11): 620-628, 2023 Nov. (bvsalud.org)
  • Nephrology concerns the diagnosis and treatment of kidney diseases, including electrolyte disturbances and hypertension, and the care of those requiring renal replacement therapy, including dialysis and renal transplant patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • The full-service Pediatric Nephrology & Hypertension Program at Mass General for Children (MGfC) emphasizes personalized, prompt and friendly consultation and care for both inpatients and outpatients. (massgeneral.org)
  • The Division of Cardiology and Nephrology (DCN) regulates and reviews Investigational New Drug (IND) applications and marketing applications for drug and biologic products for the treatment of cardiovascular and kidney conditions and diseases, such as: acute coronary syndrome, heart failure, hypertension, peripheral arterial disease, pulmonary hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, chronic kidney diseases, acute kidney injury, and glomerular diseases. (fda.gov)
  • The Division of Nephrology and Hypertension is committed to basic as well as clinical research. (usc.edu)
  • Nephrology (from Greek nephros "kidney", combined with the suffix -logy, "the study of") is a specialty of adult internal medicine and pediatric medicine that concerns the study of the kidneys, specifically normal kidney function (renal physiology) and kidney disease (renal pathophysiology), the preservation of kidney health, and the treatment of kidney disease, from diet and medication to renal replacement therapy (dialysis and kidney transplantation). (wikipedia.org)
  • Nephrologists may further sub-specialise in dialysis, kidney transplantation, home therapies (home dialysis), cancer-related kidney diseases (onco-nephrology), structural kidney diseases (uro-nephrology), procedural nephrology or other non-nephrology areas as described above. (wikipedia.org)
  • The renal team provides the entire scope of advanced critical care nephrology, including continuous and intermittent dialysis support for heart transplants, heart assist devices, trauma and burn patients, liver and kidney transplants and oncology patients. (nymc.edu)
  • This podcast will focus on nephrology nurses' issues, health policy, and nephrology nursing as a specialty nursing profession in the areas of conservative management, peritoneal dialysis, hemodialysis, continuous kidney replacement therapies, acute kidney injury, transplantation, vendors, and government and regulatory agencies. (annanurse.org)
  • Nephrologists may provide care to people without kidney problems and may work in general/internal medicine, transplant medicine, immunosuppression management, intensive care medicine, clinical pharmacology, perioperative medicine, or pediatric nephrology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Besse received her bachelors degree in Biomedical Engineering from Brown University in 2003, pre-doctoral training in genetics at the Joslin Diabetes Center at the Harvard Medical School, her M.D. from the University of Connecticut School of Medicine in 2009, and clinical training in Internal Medicine/Nephrology at the Yale School of Medicine. (yale.edu)
  • Dr. Besse joined Yale School of Medicine faculty in the Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Nephrology in 2018. (yale.edu)
  • We are one of the largest pediatric nephrology services in the United States, caring for children from all over the world. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Boston Children's Nephrology Division has one of the largest and longest-established research programs centered in a pediatric nephrology program. (childrenshospital.org)
  • The Sutter Health network includes nearly 150 nephrology experts (doctors who study kidney function and treat renal disease), including pediatric nephrologists and kidney transplant specialists, dedicate themselves to the highest level of research-backed care. (sutterhealth.org)
  • Dr. Alexandra Bicki is a pediatric nephrology fellow at the University of California, San Francisco. (kidneyfund.org)
  • She completed her residency and chief residency in pediatrics at the University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School and is currently a pediatric nephrology fellow at the University of California, San Francisco. (kidneyfund.org)
  • While the focus is on nephrology, these interviews provide a time capsule of what nursing was like as a profession from the 1960s to the present and how a specialty organization can influence the lives of patients and nurses. (annanurse.org)
  • In the Division of Nephrology, we are deeply committed to deliver unsurpassed care to our patients, promote kidney awareness in our communities, train the next generation of leaders in the field, and conduct cutting edge research that can transform our field. (utsouthwestern.edu)
  • 0.75 contact hours are available for free for the podcast episode, "Caring for Nephrology Patients and Staff During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Experiences of the Northwest Kidney Centers. (annanurse.org)
  • In honor of ANNA's 50th anniversary, the Nephrology Nursing Journal began an oral history of ANNA, nephrology nursing, and the care of patients with kidney disease, interviewing past presidents of ANNA and other nephrology nurse leaders. (annanurse.org)
  • The Clinical Scientist in Nephrology program strives to improve the quality of care provided to kidney patients and promotes clinical research in nephrology. (kidneyfund.org)
  • For over 30 years, the American Kidney Fund Clinical Scientist in Nephrology (CSN) fellowship program has funded researchers whose work is designed to improve diagnosis, treatment and outcomes for patients living with chronic kidney disease and has promoted clinical research in nephrology. (kidneyfund.org)
  • This award is provided annually to an organization/facility/department/unit that demonstrates that it values certification as a way to promote patient safety and improve the quality of care provided to nephrology patients. (nncc-exam.org)
  • Therefore, the present work aims in reporting the experience of the psychological service provided to patients in a nephrology unit at a public hospital in Rio Grande do Sul. (bvsalud.org)
  • On our South Campus stands a bronze depiction of UT Southwestern's first nephrologist, Dr. Donald Seldin , a foundational figure in the history of this institution and in the field of nephrology itself. (utsouthwestern.edu)
  • The Nephrology Self-Assessment Program (nephSAP®) provides a learning vehicle for physicians, scientists, advanced practitioners, nurses, pharmacists, and other health professionals working and training in the field of nephrology to renew and refresh their clinical knowledge, diagnostic, and therapeutic skills. (asn-online.org)
  • Thought you might appreciate this item(s) I saw in Indian Journal of Nephrology. (lww.com)
  • Finally, many Australian and New Zealand nephrologists participate in career-long professional and personal development through bodies such as the Australian and New Zealand Society of Nephrology and the Transplant Society of Australia and New Zealand. (wikipedia.org)
  • This fellowship in glomerular disease is open to physicians having completed a general nephrology fellowship. (unc.edu)
  • NNCC supports nephrology certification, education and research by providing scholarships, grants and awards. (nncc-exam.org)
  • Nephrology training in Australia and New Zealand typically includes completion of a medical degree (Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery: 4-6 years), internship (1 year), Basic Physician Training (3 years minimum), successful completion of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians written and clinical examinations, and Advanced Physician Training in Nephrology (3 years). (wikipedia.org)
  • BU Nephrology has a long history of ground breaking basic, translational, and clinical research. (bu.edu)
  • The Division of Nephrology at Westchester Medical Center has 10 full-time clinical faculty members. (nymc.edu)
  • The 2024-2025 Clinical Scientist in Nephrology (CSN) Fellowship Application is now available. (kidneyfund.org)
  • The Clinical Scientist in Nephrology program has trained some of nephrology's brightest scholars who have gone on to become leaders in the field and mentors to new generations of scientists studying kidney disease. (kidneyfund.org)
  • A Clinical Scientist in Nephrology fellowship may be granted yearly, with a maximum duration of two years for each fellowship. (kidneyfund.org)
  • I've Chosen Shimonov after retirement of my prior Nephrology Doctor left Rogosin and seem to be becoming accustomed to this new provider who seems eager to profoundly assist with my questions, medical history, symptomatic difficult trial periods, and summarized overall tracking of past labs, reports, diagnostics, special examinations, medications, and the future prospects of innovative clinical treatments possibly improving outcomes! (vitals.com)
  • In 1997, Dr. Murphy was recruited to the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai as Director of Transplant Nephrology and-just six years later-was named the division Chief of Nephrology, becoming one of the youngest division Chiefs in the United States. (asn-online.org)
  • Boston Children's Hospital's specialists in the Division of Nephrology care for infants, children, and adolescents with congenital and acquired kidney disease . (childrenshospital.org)
  • Her extraordinary resume, however, does not fully represent or encapsulate the deep and lasting impression, she made on her colleagues, friends, and mentees throughout the Mount Sinai Health System, greater medical community in New York and globally in the nephrology community. (asn-online.org)
  • Her research training in Nephrology has been under the mentorship of Dr. Stefan Somlo, C.N.H Long Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) and Professor of Genetics. (yale.edu)
  • In the Division of Nephrology, we believe that diversity, equity, and inclusion strengthen our ability to pursue our missions. (utsouthwestern.edu)
  • Why choose the Division of Nephrology at Boston Children's Hospital? (childrenshospital.org)
  • The University of North Carolina (UNC) Division of Nephrology and the UNC Kidney Center offer a postdoctoral fellowship, the UNC Glomerulonephritis (GN) fellowship, focused on glomerular diseases and vasculitis. (unc.edu)
  • During your two years of fellowship, the faculty and staff of this division will guide you to acquire comprehensive knowledge and skills in nephrology that will make you fully prepared for your nephrology boards and as an outstanding practicing nephrologist or investigator. (downstate.edu)
  • With over 80+ members of the Nephrology, CKD, Urology, and Hematology community are involved in the program - the networking and development opportunities do not stop! (uab.edu)
  • Results of search for 'su:{Nephrology. (who.int)
  • They currently practice at Nephrology Associates of Northern Illinois and Indiana and are affiliated with UChicago Medicine AdventHealth Hinsdale, Rush Oak Park Hospital, UChicago Medicine AdventHealth La Grange, Macneal Hospital and West Suburban Medical Center. (sharecare.com)
  • Optional third year is available for ACGME accredited Nephrology Critical Care line, or non ACGME accredited fellowship training in Interventional nephrology or Renal transplant, or ESRD administration. (downstate.edu)
  • Visiting investigators invited to present primarily Nephrology research, because their work is judged by the Nephrology faculty to be of outstanding quality and interest. (stanford.edu)
  • Design a research project with a faculty or mentor, aiming to have an abstract for any of the annual nephrology meetings. (downstate.edu)
  • Whereas according to some opinions, "renal" and "nephro" should be replaced with "kidney" in scientific writings such as "kidney medicine" (instead of nephrology) or "kidney replacement therapy", other experts have advocated preserving the use of renal and nephro as appropriate including in "nephrology" and "renal replacement therapy", respectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • India To become a nephrologist in India, one has to complete an MBBS (5 and 1/2 years) degree, followed by an MD/DNB (3 years) either in medicine or paediatrics, followed by a DM/DNB (3 years) course in either nephrology or paediatric nephrology. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the United Kingdom, nephrology (often called renal medicine) is a subspecialty of general medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Nivetha Subramanian is a nephrology fellow at Stanford Medicine. (kidneyfund.org)
  • A visionary leader and stalwart champion for the Department of Medicine and Nephrology, Dr. Murphy never stopped planning to make the things better, stronger, and more inclusive. (asn-online.org)
  • NNJ Extra provides expanded content, such as interviews and roundtable discussions related to articles published in the journal and issues in nephrology nursing. (annanurse.org)
  • These recordings shine light on the specialty's rich history, the challenges the nephrology nursing practice has faced, and the advances made over the last 50 years. (annanurse.org)
  • Additional episodes were released during Nephrology Nurses Week in September 2019 and during the ANNA Nephrology Nursing Practice, Management, & Leadership Conference in San Diego, CA, in October 2019. (annanurse.org)
  • The unbeknownst perplexities has stifled & forced nephrology researchers to breakdown various distinct cases analogous yet extraordinary ones begging for deeper molecular cellular studies of their epicenter Origen if factually having DNA legitimacy? (vitals.com)
  • The Nephrology Nursing Perspectives podcast will provide interviews and discussions between members of the American Nephrology Nurses Association and the nephrology community. (annanurse.org)
  • NNJ Extra is brought to you by the Nephrology Nursing Journal , the official journal of the American Nephrology Nurses Association. (annanurse.org)
  • NNCC grants given annually through the American Nephrology Nurses' Association (ANNA). (nncc-exam.org)
  • NNCC grant given annually through the American Nephrology Nurses Association (ANNA). (nncc-exam.org)
  • NNCC established this grant to be given annually through the American Nephrology Nurses Association (ANNA). (nncc-exam.org)
  • recognition on the NNCC website and at the NNCC exhibit at professional nephrology events. (nncc-exam.org)
  • The award consists of a wall plaque, a $500 gift card, a press release and recognition on the NNCC website and at the NNCC exhibit at professional nephrology events. (nncc-exam.org)
  • The range of Nephrology research topics is broad and includes physiology, pathophysiology, vascular, cell and molecular biology, transplantation and immunobiology, molecular genetics and health policy and outcomes research. (stanford.edu)
  • A physician who has undertaken additional training and become certified in nephrology is called a nephrologist. (wikipedia.org)
  • The non-Nephrology research conferences given by Stanford colleagues cover the same disciplines, but the research is not related directly to the kidney or kidney diseases. (stanford.edu)
  • In December, 2015, the NCCA granted accreditation to the Nephrology Nursing Certification Commission's CCHT certification examination program for demonstrating compliance with the NCCA Standards for the Accreditation of Certification Programs . (nncc-exam.org)
  • Completion of a post-graduate degree (usually a PhD) in a nephrology research interest (3-4 years) is optional but increasingly common. (wikipedia.org)
  • A weekly research conference exposes fellows to current renal and Nephrology research. (stanford.edu)
  • To promote nursing research, particularly in the area of nephrology. (nncc-exam.org)
  • The Center for Acute Care Nephrology offers comprehensive therapy options when treating acute kidney injury needs. (cincinnatichildrens.org)
  • The Center for Acute Care Nephrology can be reached via phone or email. (cincinnatichildrens.org)
  • The most recent ISN World Congress of Nephrology was hosted by the South African Renal Society (SARS) in partnership with the African Association of Nephrology (AFRAN) and the Renal Care Society of South Africa (RCSSA). (isn-online.org)
  • The term "nephrology" was first used in about 1960, according to the French "néphrologie" proposed by Pr. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the Society' foundation in 1960, 22 World Congresses of Nephrology have successfully been hosted around the world. (isn-online.org)