Pancreatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous: Neoplasms containing cyst-like formations or producing mucin or serum.Skin Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.Neoplasms, Multiple Primary: Two or more abnormal growths of tissue occurring simultaneously and presumed to be of separate origin. The neoplasms may be histologically the same or different, and may be found in the same or different sites.Kidney Neoplasms: Tumors or cancers of the KIDNEY.Neoplasms, Second Primary: Abnormal growths of tissue that follow a previous neoplasm but are not metastases of the latter. The second neoplasm may have the same or different histological type and can occur in the same or different organs as the previous neoplasm but in all cases arises from an independent oncogenic event. The development of the second neoplasm may or may not be related to the treatment for the previous neoplasm since genetic risk or predisposing factors may actually be the cause.Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous: An adenocarcinoma producing mucin in significant amounts. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Thyroid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the THYROID GLAND.Myeloproliferative Disorders: Conditions which cause proliferation of hemopoietically active tissue or of tissue which has embryonic hemopoietic potential. They all involve dysregulation of multipotent MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS, most often caused by a mutation in the JAK2 PROTEIN TYROSINE KINASE.DNA, Neoplasm: DNA present in neoplastic tissue.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Parotid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PAROTID GLAND.Cystadenoma: A benign neoplasm derived from glandular epithelium, in which cystic accumulations of retained secretions are formed. In some instances, considerable portions of the neoplasm, or even the entire mass, may be cystic. (Stedman, 25th ed)Neoplasms, Connective and Soft Tissue: Neoplasms developing from some structure of the connective and subcutaneous tissue. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in connective or soft tissue.Neoplasms, Plasma Cell: Neoplasms associated with a proliferation of a single clone of PLASMA CELLS and characterized by the secretion of PARAPROTEINS.Appendiceal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the APPENDIX.Liver Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.Cystadenoma, Mucinous: A multilocular tumor with mucin secreting epithelium. They are most often found in the ovary, but are also found in the pancreas, appendix, and rarely, retroperitoneal and in the urinary bladder. They are considered to have low-grade malignant potential.Ovarian Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.Endocrine Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ENDOCRINE GLANDS.Gastrointestinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, from the MOUTH to the ANAL CANAL.Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal: Carcinoma that arises from the PANCREATIC DUCTS. It accounts for the majority of cancers derived from the PANCREAS.Neoplasms, Experimental: Experimentally induced new abnormal growth of TISSUES in animals to provide models for studying human neoplasms.Neoplasms, Vascular Tissue: Neoplasms composed of vascular tissue. This concept does not refer to neoplasms located in blood vessels.Eye Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the EYE.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Nose Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the NOSE.Salivary Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SALIVARY GLANDS.Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced: Tumors, cancer or other neoplasms produced by exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation.Adenocarcinoma, Papillary: An adenocarcinoma containing finger-like processes of vascular connective tissue covered by neoplastic epithelium, projecting into cysts or the cavity of glands or follicles. It occurs most frequently in the ovary and thyroid gland. (Stedman, 25th ed)Carcinoma, Papillary: A malignant neoplasm characterized by the formation of numerous, irregular, finger-like projections of fibrous stroma that is covered with a surface layer of neoplastic epithelial cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)Testicular Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the TESTIS. Germ cell tumors (GERMINOMA) of the testis constitute 95% of all testicular neoplasms.Neoplasms, Muscle Tissue: Neoplasms composed of muscle tissue: skeletal, cardiac, or smooth. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in muscles.Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial: Neoplasms composed of glandular tissue, an aggregation of epithelial cells that elaborate secretions, and of any type of epithelium itself. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the various glands or in epithelial tissue.Cystadenocarcinoma, Mucinous: A malignant cystic or semisolid tumor most often occurring in the ovary. Rarely, one is solid. This tumor may develop from a mucinous cystadenoma, or it may be malignant at the onset. The cysts are lined with tall columnar epithelial cells; in others, the epithelium consists of many layers of cells that have lost normal structure entirely. In the more undifferentiated tumors, one may see sheets and nests of tumor cells that have very little resemblance to the parent structure. (Hughes, Obstetric-Gynecologic Terminology, 1972, p184)Adenoma: A benign epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Soft Tissue Neoplasms: Neoplasms of whatever cell type or origin, occurring in the extraskeletal connective tissue framework of the body including the organs of locomotion and their various component structures, such as nerves, blood vessels, lymphatics, etc.Hematologic Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.Neoplasm Proteins: Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.Uterine Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the UTERUS.Intestinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the INTESTINES.Neoplasms, Adnexal and Skin Appendage: Neoplasms composed of sebaceous or sweat gland tissue or tissue of other skin appendages. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the sebaceous or sweat glands or in the other skin appendages.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Vascular Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the vasculature system, such as ARTERIES and VEINS. They are differentiated from neoplasms of vascular tissue (NEOPLASMS, VASCULAR TISSUE), such as ANGIOFIBROMA or HEMANGIOMA.Sweat Gland NeoplasmsLymphoma: A general term for various neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissue.Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Palatal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PALATE, including those of the hard palate, soft palate and UVULA.Neoplasms, Complex and Mixed: Neoplasms composed of more than one type of neoplastic tissue.Antigens, Neoplasm: Proteins, glycoprotein, or lipoprotein moieties on surfaces of tumor cells that are usually identified by monoclonal antibodies. Many of these are of either embryonic or viral origin.Mandibular Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MANDIBLE.Cystadenocarcinoma: A malignant neoplasm derived from glandular epithelium, in which cystic accumulations of retained secretions are formed. The neoplastic cells manifest varying degrees of anaplasia and invasiveness, and local extension and metastases occur. Cystadenocarcinomas develop frequently in the ovaries, where pseudomucinous and serous types are recognized. (Stedman, 25th ed)Bile Duct Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the BILE DUCTS.Neoplasm Invasiveness: Ability of neoplasms to infiltrate and actively destroy surrounding tissue.Thymus Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the THYMUS GLAND.Splenic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SPLEEN.Heart Neoplasms: Tumors in any part of the heart. They include primary cardiac tumors and metastatic tumors to the heart. Their interference with normal cardiac functions can cause a wide variety of symptoms including HEART FAILURE; CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS; or EMBOLISM.Cystadenoma, Serous: A cystic tumor of the ovary, containing thin, clear, yellow serous fluid and varying amounts of solid tissue, with a malignant potential several times greater than that of mucinous cystadenoma (CYSTADENOMA, MUCINOUS). It can be unilocular, parvilocular, or multilocular. It is often bilateral and papillary. The cysts may vary greatly in size. (Dorland, 27th ed; from Hughes, Obstetric-Gynecologic Terminology, 1972)Colonic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON.Maxillary Neoplasms: Cancer or tumors of the MAXILLA or upper jaw.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Anal Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the anal gland.Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal: Neoplasms composed of primordial GERM CELLS of embryonic GONADS or of elements of the germ layers of the EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the gonads or present in an embryo or FETUS.Bone Marrow Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the bone marrow. They are differentiated from neoplasms composed of bone marrow cells, such as MULTIPLE MYELOMA. Most bone marrow neoplasms are metastatic.Neoplasms, Adipose Tissue: Neoplasms composed of fatty tissue or connective tissue made up of fat cells in a meshwork of areolar tissue. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in adipose tissue.Colorectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.Meningeal Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplastic processes that arise from or secondarily involve the meningeal coverings of the brain and spinal cord.Duodenal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the DUODENUM.Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms: Tumors or cancers of the ADRENAL CORTEX.Mouth Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MOUTH.Mediastinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MEDIASTINUM.Tongue Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the TONGUE.Ileal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer in the ILEUM region of the small intestine (INTESTINE, SMALL).Stomach Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.Urinary Bladder Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the URINARY BLADDER.Carcinoma, Acinar Cell: A malignant tumor arising from secreting cells of a racemose gland, particularly the salivary glands. Racemose (Latin racemosus, full of clusters) refers, as does acinar (Latin acinus, grape), to small saclike dilatations in various glands. Acinar cell carcinomas are usually well differentiated and account for about 13% of the cancers arising in the parotid gland. Lymph node metastasis occurs in about 16% of cases. Local recurrences and distant metastases many years after treatment are common. This tumor appears in all age groups and is most common in women. (Stedman, 25th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1240; from DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p575)Spinal Cord Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplasms which occur within the substance of the spinal cord (intramedullary neoplasms) or in the space between the dura and spinal cord (intradural extramedullary neoplasms). The majority of intramedullary spinal tumors are primary CNS neoplasms including ASTROCYTOMA; EPENDYMOMA; and LIPOMA. Intramedullary neoplasms are often associated with SYRINGOMYELIA. The most frequent histologic types of intradural-extramedullary tumors are MENINGIOMA and NEUROFIBROMA.Vaginal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the VAGINA.Adenoma, Oxyphilic: A usually benign glandular tumor composed of oxyphil cells, large cells with small irregular nuclei and dense acidophilic granules due to the presence of abundant MITOCHONDRIA. Oxyphil cells, also known as oncocytes, are found in oncocytomas of the kidney, salivary glands, and endocrine glands. In the thyroid gland, oxyphil cells are known as Hurthle cells and Askanazy cells.Neoplasm Recurrence, Local: The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.Nervous System Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplastic processes arising from or involving components of the central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous systems, cranial nerves, and meninges. Included in this category are primary and metastatic nervous system neoplasms.Janus Kinase 2: A Janus kinase subtype that is involved in signaling from GROWTH HORMONE RECEPTORS; PROLACTIN RECEPTORS; and a variety of CYTOKINE RECEPTORS such as ERYTHROPOIETIN RECEPTORS and INTERLEUKIN RECEPTORS. Dysregulation of Janus kinase 2 due to GENETIC TRANSLOCATIONS have been associated with a variety of MYELOPROLIFERATIVE DISORDERS.Neoplasm Metastasis: The transfer of a neoplasm from one organ or part of the body to another remote from the primary site.Muscle Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in muscle tissue or specific muscles. They are differentiated from NEOPLASMS, MUSCLE TISSUE which are neoplasms composed of skeletal, cardiac, or smooth muscle tissue, such as MYOSARCOMA or LEIOMYOMA.Liver Neoplasms, Experimental: Experimentally induced tumors of the LIVER.Hemangiosarcoma: A rare malignant neoplasm characterized by rapidly proliferating, extensively infiltrating, anaplastic cells derived from blood vessels and lining irregular blood-filled or lumpy spaces. (Stedman, 25th ed)Carcinoma: A malignant neoplasm made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate the surrounding tissues and give rise to metastases. It is a histological type of neoplasm but is often wrongly used as a synonym for "cancer." (From Dorland, 27th ed)Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Myelodysplastic-Myeloproliferative Diseases: Clonal myeloid disorders that possess both dysplastic and proliferative features but are not properly classified as either MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES or MYELOPROLIFERATIVE DISORDERS.Pancreatectomy: Surgical removal of the pancreas. (Dorland, 28th ed)Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms: Neoplasms which arise from peripheral nerve tissue. This includes NEUROFIBROMAS; SCHWANNOMAS; GRANULAR CELL TUMORS; and malignant peripheral NERVE SHEATH NEOPLASMS. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp1750-1)Cerebral Ventricle Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the brain ventricles, including the two lateral, the third, and the fourth ventricle. Ventricular tumors may be primary (e.g., CHOROID PLEXUS NEOPLASMS and GLIOMA, SUBEPENDYMAL), metastasize from distant organs, or occur as extensions of locally invasive tumors from adjacent brain structures.Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PARANASAL SINUSES.Pleural Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the thin serous membrane that envelopes the lungs and lines the thoracic cavity. Pleural neoplasms are exceedingly rare and are usually not diagnosed until they are advanced because in the early stages they produce no symptoms.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Common Bile Duct Neoplasms: Tumor or cancer of the COMMON BILE DUCT including the AMPULLA OF VATER and the SPHINCTER OF ODDI.Orbital Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the bony orbit and contents except the eyeball.Abdominal NeoplasmsCerebellar Neoplasms: Primary or metastatic neoplasms of the CEREBELLUM. Tumors in this location frequently present with ATAXIA or signs of INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION due to obstruction of the fourth ventricle. Common primary cerebellar tumors include fibrillary ASTROCYTOMA and cerebellar HEMANGIOBLASTOMA. The cerebellum is a relatively common site for tumor metastases from the lung, breast, and other distant organs. (From Okazaki & Scheithauer, Atlas of Neuropathology, 1988, p86 and p141)Lipoma: A benign tumor composed of fat cells (ADIPOCYTES). It can be surrounded by a thin layer of connective tissue (encapsulated), or diffuse without the capsule.Facial NeoplasmsRetrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Neoplasms by Site: A collective term for precoordinated organ/neoplasm headings locating neoplasms by organ, as BRAIN NEOPLASMS; DUODENAL NEOPLASMS; LIVER NEOPLASMS; etc.Bronchial Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the BRONCHI.Peritoneal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PERITONEUM.Histiocytic Disorders, Malignant: Distinctive neoplastic disorders of histiocytes. Included are malignant neoplasms of MACROPHAGES and DENDRITIC CELLS.Urogenital Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the UROGENITAL SYSTEM in either the male or the female.Spinal NeoplasmsSkull Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the bony part of the skull.Vulvar Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the VULVA.Neoplasms, Neuroepithelial: Neoplasms composed of neuroepithelial cells, which have the capacity to differentiate into NEURONS, oligodendrocytes, and ASTROCYTES. The majority of craniospinal tumors are of neuroepithelial origin. (From Dev Biol 1998 Aug 1;200(1):1-5)Ear Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of any part of the hearing and equilibrium system of the body (the EXTERNAL EAR, the MIDDLE EAR, and the INNER EAR).Lip Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LIP.Fibroma: A benign tumor of fibrous or fully developed connective tissue.Neoplasm Transplantation: Experimental transplantation of neoplasms in laboratory animals for research purposes.Adrenal Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ADRENAL GLANDS.Pelvic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the pelvic region.Gingival NeoplasmsGallbladder Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the gallbladder.Neoplasm Seeding: The local implantation of tumor cells by contamination of instruments and surgical equipment during and after surgical resection, resulting in local growth of the cells and tumor formation.Neoplasms, Fibroepithelial: Neoplasms composed of fibrous and epithelial tissue. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in fibrous tissue or epithelium.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Respiratory Tract NeoplasmsNeoplasms, Connective Tissue: Neoplasms composed of connective tissue, including elastic, mucous, reticular, osseous, and cartilaginous tissue. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in connective tissue.Neuroendocrine Tumors: Tumors whose cells possess secretory granules and originate from the neuroectoderm, i.e., the cells of the ectoblast or epiblast that program the neuroendocrine system. Common properties across most neuroendocrine tumors include ectopic hormone production (often via APUD CELLS), the presence of tumor-associated antigens, and isozyme composition.Neoplasm Grading: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the level of CELL DIFFERENTIATION in neoplasms as increasing ANAPLASIA correlates with the aggressiveness of the neoplasm.Primary Myelofibrosis: A de novo myeloproliferation arising from an abnormal stem cell. It is characterized by the replacement of bone marrow by fibrous tissue, a process that is mediated by CYTOKINES arising from the abnormal clone.Polycythemia Vera: A myeloproliferative disorder of unknown etiology, characterized by abnormal proliferation of all hematopoietic bone marrow elements and an absolute increase in red cell mass and total blood volume, associated frequently with splenomegaly, leukocytosis, and thrombocythemia. Hematopoiesis is also reactive in extramedullary sites (liver and spleen). In time myelofibrosis occurs.Thrombocythemia, Essential: A clinical syndrome characterized by repeated spontaneous hemorrhages and a remarkable increase in the number of circulating platelets.RNA, Neoplasm: RNA present in neoplastic tissue.Trophoblastic Neoplasms: Trophoblastic growth, which may be gestational or nongestational in origin. Trophoblastic neoplasia resulting from pregnancy is often described as gestational trophoblastic disease to distinguish it from germ cell tumors which frequently show trophoblastic elements, and from the trophoblastic differentiation which sometimes occurs in a wide variety of epithelial cancers. Gestational trophoblastic growth has several forms, including HYDATIDIFORM MOLE and CHORIOCARCINOMA. (From Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1691)Hemangioma: A vascular anomaly due to proliferation of BLOOD VESSELS that forms a tumor-like mass. The common types involve CAPILLARIES and VEINS. It can occur anywhere in the body but is most frequently noticed in the SKIN and SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE. (from Stedman, 27th ed, 2000)Head and Neck Neoplasms: Soft tissue tumors or cancer arising from the mucosal surfaces of the LIP; oral cavity; PHARYNX; LARYNX; and cervical esophagus. Other sites included are the NOSE and PARANASAL SINUSES; SALIVARY GLANDS; THYROID GLAND and PARATHYROID GLANDS; and MELANOMA and non-melanoma skin cancers of the head and neck. (from Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 4th ed, p1651)Rodent Diseases: Diseases of rodents of the order RODENTIA. This term includes diseases of Sciuridae (squirrels), Geomyidae (gophers), Heteromyidae (pouched mice), Castoridae (beavers), Cricetidae (rats and mice), Muridae (Old World rats and mice), Erethizontidae (porcupines), and Caviidae (guinea pigs).Thoracic NeoplasmsCecal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the CECUM.Leukemia, B-Cell: A malignant disease of the B-LYMPHOCYTES in the bone marrow and/or blood.Hemangioendothelioma: A neoplasm derived from blood vessels, characterized by numerous prominent endothelial cells that occur singly, in aggregates, and as the lining of congeries of vascular tubes or channels. Hemangioendotheliomas are relatively rare and are of intermediate malignancy (between benign hemangiomas and conventional angiosarcomas). They affect men and women about equally and rarely develop in childhood. (From Stedman, 25th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1866)Adenoma, Pleomorphic: A benign, slow-growing tumor, most commonly of the salivary gland, occurring as a small, painless, firm nodule, usually of the parotid gland, but also found in any major or accessory salivary gland anywhere in the oral cavity. It is most often seen in women in the fifth decade. Histologically, the tumor presents a variety of cells: cuboidal, columnar, and squamous cells, showing all forms of epithelial growth. (Dorland, 27th ed)Digestive System Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Tracheal NeoplasmsAdenocarcinoma, Follicular: An adenocarcinoma of the thyroid gland, in which the cells are arranged in the form of follicles. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Jejunal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer in the JEJUNUM region of the small intestine (INTESTINE, SMALL).Carcinoma, Neuroendocrine: A group of carcinomas which share a characteristic morphology, often being composed of clusters and trabecular sheets of round "blue cells", granular chromatin, and an attenuated rim of poorly demarcated cytoplasm. Neuroendocrine tumors include carcinoids, small ("oat") cell carcinomas, medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, Merkel cell tumor, cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma, pancreatic islet cell tumors, and pheochromocytoma. Neurosecretory granules are found within the tumor cells. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Neurilemmoma: A neoplasm that arises from SCHWANN CELLS of the cranial, peripheral, and autonomic nerves. Clinically, these tumors may present as a cranial neuropathy, abdominal or soft tissue mass, intracranial lesion, or with spinal cord compression. Histologically, these tumors are encapsulated, highly vascular, and composed of a homogenous pattern of biphasic fusiform-shaped cells that may have a palisaded appearance. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp964-5)Biopsy, Fine-Needle: Using fine needles (finer than 22-gauge) to remove tissue or fluid specimens from the living body for examination in the pathology laboratory and for disease diagnosis.Central Nervous System Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplastic processes that arise from or secondarily involve the brain, spinal cord, or meninges.Sarcoma: A connective tissue neoplasm formed by proliferation of mesodermal cells; it is usually highly malignant.Carcinosarcoma: A malignant neoplasm that contains elements of carcinoma and sarcoma so extensively intermixed as to indicate neoplasia of epithelial and mesenchymal tissue. (Stedman, 25th ed)Cyst Fluid: Liquid material found in epithelial-lined closed cavities or sacs.Carcinogens: Substances that increase the risk of NEOPLASMS in humans or animals. Both genotoxic chemicals, which affect DNA directly, and nongenotoxic chemicals, which induce neoplasms by other mechanism, are included.Adenoma, Liver Cell: A benign epithelial tumor of the LIVER.Pituitary Neoplasms: Neoplasms which arise from or metastasize to the PITUITARY GLAND. The majority of pituitary neoplasms are adenomas, which are divided into non-secreting and secreting forms. Hormone producing forms are further classified by the type of hormone they secrete. Pituitary adenomas may also be characterized by their staining properties (see ADENOMA, BASOPHIL; ADENOMA, ACIDOPHIL; and ADENOMA, CHROMOPHOBE). Pituitary tumors may compress adjacent structures, including the HYPOTHALAMUS, several CRANIAL NERVES, and the OPTIC CHIASM. Chiasmal compression may result in bitemporal HEMIANOPSIA.Histiocytic Sarcoma: Malignant neoplasms composed of MACROPHAGES or DENDRITIC CELLS. Most histiocytic sarcomas present as localized tumor masses without a leukemic phase. Though the biological behavior of these neoplasms resemble lymphomas, their cell lineage is histiocytic not lymphoid.Keratoacanthoma: A benign, non-neoplastic, usually self-limiting epithelial lesion closely resembling squamous cell carcinoma clinically and histopathologically. It occurs in solitary, multiple, and eruptive forms. The solitary and multiple forms occur on sunlight exposed areas and are identical histologically; they affect primarily white males. The eruptive form usually involves both sexes and appears as a generalized papular eruption.Pseudomyxoma Peritonei: A condition characterized by poorly-circumscribed gelatinous masses filled with malignant mucin-secreting cells. Forty-five percent of pseudomyxomas arise from the ovary, usually in a mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (CYSTADENOCARCINOMA, MUCINOUS), which has prognostic significance. Pseudomyxoma peritonei must be differentiated from mucinous spillage into the peritoneum by a benign mucocele of the appendix. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Carcinogenicity Tests: Tests to experimentally measure the tumor-producing/cancer cell-producing potency of an agent by administering the agent (e.g., benzanthracenes) and observing the quantity of tumors or the cell transformation developed over a given period of time. The carcinogenicity value is usually measured as milligrams of agent administered per tumor developed. Though this test differs from the DNA-repair and bacterial microsome MUTAGENICITY TESTS, researchers often attempt to correlate the finding of carcinogenicity values and mutagenicity values.Leukemia: A progressive, malignant disease of the blood-forming organs, characterized by distorted proliferation and development of leukocytes and their precursors in the blood and bone marrow. Leukemias were originally termed acute or chronic based on life expectancy but now are classified according to cellular maturity. Acute leukemias consist of predominately immature cells; chronic leukemias are composed of more mature cells. (From The Merck Manual, 2006)Genital Neoplasms, Male: Tumor or cancer of the MALE GENITALIA.Infratentorial Neoplasms: Intracranial tumors originating in the region of the brain inferior to the tentorium cerebelli, which contains the cerebellum, fourth ventricle, cerebellopontine angle, brain stem, and related structures. Primary tumors of this region are more frequent in children, and may present with ATAXIA; CRANIAL NERVE DISEASES; vomiting; HEADACHE; HYDROCEPHALUS; or other signs of neurologic dysfunction. Relatively frequent histologic subtypes include TERATOMA; MEDULLOBLASTOMA; GLIOBLASTOMA; ASTROCYTOMA; EPENDYMOMA; CRANIOPHARYNGIOMA; and choroid plexus papilloma (PAPILLOMA, CHOROID PLEXUS).Biliary Tract Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer in the BILIARY TRACT including the BILE DUCTS and the GALLBLADDER.Iris Neoplasms: Tumors of the iris characterized by increased pigmentation of melanocytes. Iris nevi are composed of proliferated melanocytes and are associated with neurofibromatosis and malignant melanoma of the choroid and ciliary body. Malignant melanoma of the iris often originates from preexisting nevi.Precancerous Conditions: Pathological processes that tend eventually to become malignant. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Urethral Neoplasms: Cancer or tumors of the URETHRA. Benign epithelial tumors of the urethra usually consist of squamous and transitional cells. Primary urethral carcinomas are rare and typically of squamous cells. Urethral carcinoma is the only urological malignancy that is more common in females than in males.Laryngeal Neoplasms: Cancers or tumors of the LARYNX or any of its parts: the GLOTTIS; EPIGLOTTIS; LARYNGEAL CARTILAGES; LARYNGEAL MUSCLES; and VOCAL CORDS.Granulosa Cell Tumor: A neoplasm composed entirely of GRANULOSA CELLS, occurring mostly in the OVARY. In the adult form, it may contain some THECA CELLS. This tumor often produces ESTRADIOL and INHIBIN. The excess estrogen exposure can lead to other malignancies in women and PRECOCIOUS PUBERTY in girls. In rare cases, granulosa cell tumors have been identified in the TESTES.Mammary Neoplasms, Animal: Tumors or cancer of the MAMMARY GLAND in animals (MAMMARY GLANDS, ANIMAL).Perivascular Epithelioid Cell Neoplasms: A family of mesenchymal tumors composed of histologically and immunohistochemically distinctive perivascular epithelioid cells. These cells do not have a normal anatomic homolog. (From Fletcher CDM, et. al., World Health Organization Classification of Tumors: Pathology and Genetics of Tumors of Soft Tissue and Bone, 2002).Rats, Inbred F344Carcinoma, Adenoid Cystic: Carcinoma characterized by bands or cylinders of hyalinized or mucinous stroma separating or surrounded by nests or cords of small epithelial cells. When the cylinders occur within masses of epithelial cells, they give the tissue a perforated, sievelike, or cribriform appearance. Such tumors occur in the mammary glands, the mucous glands of the upper and lower respiratory tract, and the salivary glands. They are malignant but slow-growing, and tend to spread locally via the nerves. (Dorland, 27th ed)Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Biopsy, Needle: Removal and examination of tissue obtained through a transdermal needle inserted into the specific region, organ, or tissue being analyzed.Immunoenzyme Techniques: Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.Astrocytoma: Neoplasms of the brain and spinal cord derived from glial cells which vary from histologically benign forms to highly anaplastic and malignant tumors. Fibrillary astrocytomas are the most common type and may be classified in order of increasing malignancy (grades I through IV). In the first two decades of life, astrocytomas tend to originate in the cerebellar hemispheres; in adults, they most frequently arise in the cerebrum and frequently undergo malignant transformation. (From Devita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2013-7; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1082)Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Mesenchymoma: A mixed mesenchymal tumor composed of two or more mesodermal cellular elements not commonly associated, not counting fibrous tissue as one of the elements. Mesenchymomas are widely distributed in the body and about 75% are malignant. (Dorland, 27th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1866)Rectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the RECTUM.Lymphoma, T-Cell: A group of heterogeneous lymphoid tumors representing malignant transformations of T-lymphocytes.Esophageal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ESOPHAGUS.Cat Diseases: Diseases of the domestic cat (Felis catus or F. domesticus). This term does not include diseases of the so-called big cats such as CHEETAHS; LIONS; tigers, cougars, panthers, leopards, and other Felidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Genital Neoplasms, Female: Tumor or cancer of the female reproductive tract (GENITALIA, FEMALE).Submandibular Gland NeoplasmsPapilloma: A circumscribed benign epithelial tumor projecting from the surrounding surface; more precisely, a benign epithelial neoplasm consisting of villous or arborescent outgrowths of fibrovascular stroma covered by neoplastic cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.Myoepithelioma: A usually benign tumor made up predominantly of myoepithelial cells.Prostatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PROSTATE.Eyelid Neoplasms: Tumors of cancer of the EYELIDS.Keratin-7: A type II keratin found associated with KERATIN-19 in ductal epithelia and gastrointestinal epithelia.Hypothalamic Neoplasms: Benign and malignant tumors of the HYPOTHALAMUS. Pilocytic astrocytomas and hamartomas are relatively frequent histologic types. Neoplasms of the hypothalamus frequently originate from adjacent structures, including the OPTIC CHIASM, optic nerve (see OPTIC NERVE NEOPLASMS), and pituitary gland (see PITUITARY NEOPLASMS). Relatively frequent clinical manifestations include visual loss, developmental delay, macrocephaly, and precocious puberty. (From Devita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, p2051)Oligodendroglioma: A relatively slow-growing glioma that is derived from oligodendrocytes and tends to occur in the cerebral hemispheres, thalamus, or lateral ventricle. They may present at any age, but are most frequent in the third to fifth decades, with an earlier incidence peak in the first decade. Histologically, these tumors are encapsulated, relatively avascular, and tend to form cysts and microcalcifications. Neoplastic cells tend to have small round nuclei surrounded by unstained nuclei. The tumors may vary from well-differentiated to highly anaplastic forms. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, p2052; Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p655)Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous: A benign tumor composed, wholly or in part, of cells with the morphologic characteristics of HISTIOCYTES and with various fibroblastic components. Fibrous histiocytomas can occur anywhere in the body. When they occur in the skin, they are called dermatofibromas or sclerosing hemangiomas. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, p1747)Meningioma: A relatively common neoplasm of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that arises from arachnoidal cells. The majority are well differentiated vascular tumors which grow slowly and have a low potential to be invasive, although malignant subtypes occur. Meningiomas have a predilection to arise from the parasagittal region, cerebral convexity, sphenoidal ridge, olfactory groove, and SPINAL CANAL. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2056-7)Keratins: A class of fibrous proteins or scleroproteins that represents the principal constituent of EPIDERMIS; HAIR; NAILS; horny tissues, and the organic matrix of tooth ENAMEL. Two major conformational groups have been characterized, alpha-keratin, whose peptide backbone forms a coiled-coil alpha helical structure consisting of TYPE I KERATIN and a TYPE II KERATIN, and beta-keratin, whose backbone forms a zigzag or pleated sheet structure. alpha-Keratins have been classified into at least 20 subtypes. In addition multiple isoforms of subtypes have been found which may be due to GENE DUPLICATION.Carcinoid Tumor: A usually small, slow-growing neoplasm composed of islands of rounded, oxyphilic, or spindle-shaped cells of medium size, with moderately small vesicular nuclei, and covered by intact mucosa with a yellow cut surface. The tumor can occur anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract (and in the lungs and other sites); approximately 90% arise in the appendix. It is now established that these tumors are of neuroendocrine origin and derive from a primitive stem cell. (From Stedman, 25th ed & Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1182)Lymphoma, B-Cell: A group of heterogeneous lymphoid tumors generally expressing one or more B-cell antigens or representing malignant transformations of B-lymphocytes.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Maxillary Sinus Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MAXILLARY SINUS. They represent the majority of paranasal neoplasms.

Caspase-mediated cleavage of p21Waf1/Cip1 converts cancer cells from growth arrest to undergoing apoptosis. (1/40131)

The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21waf1/Cip1 is a downstream effector of the p53-dependent cell growth arrest. We report herein that p21 was cleaved by caspase-3/CPP32 at the site of DHVD112L during the DNA damage-induced apoptosis of cancer cells. The cleaved p21 fragment could no more arrest the cells in G1 phase nor suppress the cells undergoing apoptosis because it failed to bind to the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and lost its capability to localize in the nucleus. Thus, caspase-3-mediated cleavage and inactivation of p21 protein may convert cancer cells from growth arrest to undergoing apoptosis, leading to the acceleration of chemotherapy-induced apoptotic process in cancer cells.  (+info)

Respiratory symptoms and long-term risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer and other causes in Swedish men. (2/40131)

BACKGROUND: Depressed respiratory function and respiratory symptoms are associated with impaired survival. The present study was undertaken to assess the relation between respiratory symptoms and mortality from cardiovascular causes, cancer and all causes in a large population of middle-aged men. METHODS: Prospective population study of 6442 men aged 51-59 at baseline, free of clinical angina pectoris and prior myocardial infarction. RESULTS: During 16 years there were 1804 deaths (786 from cardiovascular disease, 608 from cancer, 103 from pulmonary disease and 307 from any other cause). Men with effort-related breathlessness had increased risk of dying from all of the examined diseases. After adjustment for age, smoking habit and other risk factors, the relative risk (RR) associated with breathlessness of dying from coronary disease was 1.43 (95% CI : 1.16-1.77), from stroke 1.77 (95% CI: 1.07-2.93), from any cardiovascular disease 1.48 (95% CI : 1.24-1.76), cancer 1.36 (95% CI : 1.11-1.67) and from any cause 1.62 (95% CI: 1.44-1.81). An independent effect of breathlessness on cardiovascular death, cancer death and mortality from all causes was found in life-time non-smokers, and also if men with chest pain not considered to be angina were excluded. An independent effect was also found if all deaths during the first half of the follow-up were excluded. Men with cough and phlegm, without breathlessness, also had an elevated risk of dying from cardiovascular disease and cancer, but after adjustment for smoking and other risk factors this was no longer significant. However, a slightly elevated independent risk of dying from any cause was found (RR = 1.18 [95% CI: 1.02-1.36]). CONCLUSION: A positive response to a simple question about effort related breathlessness predicted subsequent mortality from several causes during a follow-up period of 16 years, independently of smoking and other risk factors.  (+info)

Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency and fluorouracil-related toxicity. (3/40131)

Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) is the initial and rate-limiting enzyme of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) catabolism. We report lymphocytic DPD data concerning a group of 53 patients (23 men, 30 women, mean age 58, range 36-73), treated by 5-FU-based chemotherapy in different French institutions and who developed unanticipated 5-FU-related toxicity. Lymphocyte samples (standard collection procedure) were sent to us for DPD determination (biochemical method). Among the whole group of 53 patients, 19 had a significant DPD deficiency (DD; below 150 fmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein, i.e. less than 70% of the mean value observed from previous population study). There was a greater majority of women in the DD group (15 out of 19, 79%) compared with the remaining 34 patients (15 out of 34, 44%, P<0.014). Toxicity was often severe, leading to patient death in two cases (both women). The toxicity score (sum of WHO grading, theoretical range 0-20) was twice as high in patients with marked DD (below 100 pmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein, n = 11, mean score = 13.2) compared with patients with moderate DD (between 150 and 100 pmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein, n = 8, mean score = 6.8), P = 0.008. In the DD group, there was a high frequency of neurotoxic syndromes (7 out of 19, 37%). The two deceased patients both had severe neurotoxicity. The occurrence of cardiac toxicity was relatively rare (1 out of 19, 5%). These data suggest that women are particularly prone to DPD deficiency and allow a more precise definition of the DD toxicity profile.  (+info)

Cancer incidence in the south Asian population of England (1990-92). (4/40131)

Cancer incidence among English south Asians (residents in England with ethnic origins in India, Pakistan or Bangladesh) is described and compared with non-south Asian and Indian subcontinent rates. The setting for the study was areas covered by Thames, Trent, West Midlands and Yorkshire cancer registries. The study identified 356 555 cases of incident cancer (ICD9:140-208) registered between 1990 and 1992, including 3845 classified as English south Asian. The main outcome measures were age specific and directly standardized incidence rates for all cancer sites (ICD9:140-208). English south Asian incidence rates for all sites combined were significantly lower than non-south Asian rates but higher than Indian subcontinent rates. English south Asian rates were substantially higher than Indian subcontinent rates for a number of common sites including lung cancer in males, breast cancer in females and lymphoma in both sexes. English south Asian rates for childhood and early adult cancer (0-29 years) were similar or higher than non-south Asian rates. English south Asian rates were significantly higher than non-south Asian rates for Hodgkin's disease in males, cancer of the tongue, mouth, oesophagus, thyroid gland and myeloid leukaemia in females, and cancer of the hypopharynx, liver and gall bladder in both sexes. The results are consistent with a transition from the lower cancer risk of the country of ethnic origin to that of the country of residence. They suggest that detrimental changes in lifestyle and other exposures have occurred in the migrant south Asian population.  (+info)

Cancer mortality by educational level in the city of Barcelona. (5/40131)

The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between educational level and mortality from cancer in the city of Barcelona. The data were derived from a record linkage between the Barcelona Mortality Registry and the Municipal Census. The relative risks (RR) of death and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) according to level of education were derived from Poisson regression models. For all malignancies, men in the lowest educational level had a RR of death of 1.21 (95% CI 1.13-1.29) compared with men with a university degree, whereas for women a significant decreasing in risk was observed (RR 0.81; 95% CI 0.74-0.90). Among men, significant negative trends of increasing risk according to level of education were present for cancer of the mouth and pharynx (RR 1.70 for lowest vs. highest level of education), oesophagus (RR 2.14), stomach (RR 1.99), larynx (RR 2.56) and lung (RR 1.35). Among women, cervical cancer was negatively related to education (RR 2.62), whereas a positive trend was present for cancers of the colon (RR 0.76), pancreas (RR 0.59), lung (RR 0.55) and breast (RR 0.65). The present study confirms for the first time, at an individual level, the existence of socioeconomic differences in mortality for several cancer sites in Barcelona, Spain. There is a need to implement health programmes and public health policies to reduce these inequities.  (+info)

p27kip1: a multifunctional cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor with prognostic significance in human cancers. (6/40131)

p27kip1 (p27) is a member of the universal cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKI) family. p27 expression is regulated by cell contact inhibition and by specific growth factors, such as transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. Since the cloning of the p27 gene in 1994, a host of other functions have been associated with this cell cycle protein. In addition to its role as a CDKI, p27 is a putative tumor suppressor gene, regulator of drug resistance in solid tumors, and promoter of apoptosis; acts as a safeguard against inflammatory injury; and has a role in cell differentiation. The level of p27 protein expression decreases during tumor development and progression in some epithelial, lymphoid, and endocrine tissues. This decrease occurs mainly at the post-translational level with protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. A large number of studies have characterized p27 as an independent prognostic factor in various human cancers, including breast, colon, and prostate adenocarcinomas. Here we review the role of p27 in the regulation of the cell cycle and other cell functions and as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in human neoplasms. We also review studies indicating the increasingly important roles of p27, other CDKIs, and cyclins in endocrine cell hyperplasia and tumor development.  (+info)

Angiogenesis: a new theory for endometriosis. (7/40131)

Excessive endometrial angiogenesis is proposed as an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. Evidence is reviewed for the hypothesis that the endometrium of women with endometriosis has an increased capacity to proliferate, implant and grow in the peritoneal cavity. Data is summarized indicating that the endometrium of patients with endometriosis shows enhanced endothelial cell proliferation. Results are also reviewed indicating that the cell adhesion molecule integrin alphavbeta3 is expressed in more blood vessels in the endometrium of women with endometriosis when compared with normal women. Taken together, these results provide evidence for increased endometrial angiogenesis in women with endometriosis when compared with normal subjects. Endometriosis is one of the family of angiogenic diseases. Other angiogenic diseases include solid tumours, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and diabetic retanopathy. Excessive endometrial angiogenesis suggests novel new medical treatments for endometriosis aimed at the inhibition of angiogenesis.  (+info)

Osteopenia in the patient with cancer. (8/40131)

Osteopenia is defined as a reduction in bone mass. It is commonly known to occur in elderly people or women who are postmenopausal due to hormonal imbalances. This condition, however, can result because of many other factors, such as poor nutrition, prolonged pharmacological intervention, disease, and decreased mobility. Because patients with cancer experience many of these factors, they are often predisposed to osteopenia. Currently, patients with cancer are living longer and leading more fulfilling lives after treatment. Therefore, it is imperative that therapists who are responsible for these patients understand the risk factors for osteopenia and their relevance to a patient with cancer.  (+info)

*Fibroepithelial neoplasms

... (or tumors) are biphasic tumors. This means they consist of epithelial tissue, and stromal or ...

*Neoplasm

ICD-10 classifies neoplasms into four main groups: benign neoplasms, in situ neoplasms, malignant neoplasms, and neoplasms of ... The term 'neoplasm' is a synonym of "tumor". 'Neoplasia' denotes the process of the formation of neoplasms/tumors, the process ... p. Neoplasm. ISBN 0781733901. "II Neoplasms". World Health Organization. Retrieved 19 June 2014. Abrams, Gerald. "Neoplasia I ... Neoplasm is an abnormal growth of tissue which, if it forms a mass, is commonly referred to as a tumor. This abnormal growth ( ...

*Neoplasms of the nailbed

... may often present with paronychia, ingrown nail, onycholysis, pyogenic granuloma, nail-plate dystrophy ... There are various benign and malignant neoplasms that may occur in or overlying the nail matrix and in the nailbed, and ...

*ICD-10 Chapter II: Neoplasms

Neoplasms. (C00) Malignant neoplasm of lip (C01) Malignant neoplasm of base of tongue (C02) Malignant neoplasm of other and ... Malignant neoplasm of breast (C51) Malignant neoplasm of vulva (C52) Malignant neoplasm of vagina (C53) Malignant neoplasm of ... Malignant neoplasm of penis (C61) Malignant neoplasm of prostate (C62) Malignant neoplasm of testis (C63) Malignant neoplasm of ... Benign neoplasm of eye and adnexa (D32) Benign neoplasm of meninges (D33) Benign neoplasm of brain and other parts of central ...

*Ductal, lobular, and medullary neoplasms

... is a group of tumors. An example is Paget's disease of the breast. Ductal Lobular ...

*Cystic, mucinous, and serous neoplasms

... is a group of tumors. An example is cystadenoma. Cyst Mucinous, Mucous gland Serous, ...

*Myeloproliferative neoplasm

Although not a malignant neoplasm like other cancers, MPNs are classified within the hematological neoplasms. There are four ... According to the WHO Classification of Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Neoplasms 2008 myeloproliferative neoplasms are divided into ... The myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), previously myeloproliferative diseases (MPDs), are a group of diseases of the bone ... Somatic CALR mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2. N Engl J Med 2013;369:2391-2405 Baxter EJ, Scott ...

*Trophoblastic neoplasm

Trophoblastic neoplasms are neoplasms which derive from trophoblastic tissue. Examples include: choriocarcinoma hydatidiform ...

*Adnexal and skin appendage neoplasms

... is a group of tumors which develop in the adnexal skin structures such as the sweat and ...

*Thyroid neoplasm

... is a neoplasm or tumor of the thyroid. It can be a benign tumor such as thyroid adenoma, or it can be a ... Thyroid neoplasm might be classified as benign or malignant. Thyroid adenoma is a benign neoplasm of the thyroid. Thyroid ... The first step in diagnosing a thyroid neoplasm is a physical exam of the neck area. If any abnormalities exist, a doctor needs ... Thyroid nodules are a major presentation of thyroid neoplasms, and are diagnosed by ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration ( ...

*Urogenital neoplasm

A urogenital neoplasm is a tumor of the urogenital system. Types include: Cancer of the breast and female genital organs: ( ...

*Eye neoplasm

Eye neoplasms can affect all parts of the eye, and can be a benign tumor or a malignant tumor (cancer). Eye cancers can be ...

*Ureteral neoplasm

A ureteral neoplasm is a type of tumor that can be primary, or associated with a metastasis from another site. Treatment may ...

*Fibrous tissue neoplasm

A fibrous tissue neoplasm is a tumor derived primarily from Fibrous connective tissue. An example is fibroma. Fibroepithelial ...

*Digestive system neoplasm

Digestive system neoplasms are tumors which affect the digestive system. Types include: esophageal cancer gastric cancer small ...

*Vascular tissue neoplasm

Vascular tissue neoplasms, like neoplasms of all tissues, are classified to benign and malignant ones, according to their ... A vascular tissue neoplasm is a tumor arising from endothelial cells, the cells that line the wall of blood vessels and ... Vascular tissue neoplasms is a group containing tumors with the same tissue origin; in other words, it denotes histological ... Casciato, Dennis A., Miscellaneous neoplasms, in: Casciato D.A. (ed), Manual of clinical oncology, Lippincott Williams & ...

*Nervous system neoplasm

A nervous system neoplasm is a tumor affecting the nervous system. Types include: Nerve sheath tumor Brain tumor Arachnoid cyst ...

*Endocrine gland neoplasm

An endocrine gland neoplasm is a neoplasm affecting one or more glands of the endocrine system. Examples include: Adrenal tumor ...

*Connective tissue neoplasm

A connective tissue neoplasm or connective tissue tumor is a neoplasm arising from the tissues of the connective tissue. (Not ...

*Gonadal tissue neoplasm

A gonadal tissue neoplasm should not be confused with a urogenital neoplasm, though the two topics are often studied together. ... A gonadal tissue neoplasm is a tumor having any histology characteristic of cells or tissues giving rise to the gonads. These ...

*Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm

Pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm Pancreatic serous cystadenoma Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm "Intraductal Papillary ... Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is a type of tumor that can occur within the cells of the pancreatic duct. IPMN ... Once a doctor has reason to believe that a patient may have an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, he or she can confirm ... Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms without an associated invasive cancer can be further subcategorized into three groups ...

*Pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm

... "mucinous cystic neoplasm with moderate dysplasia," "borderline mucinous cystic neoplasm," and "mucinous cystic neoplasm with ... Pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm, also mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas and mucinous cystic tumour, is a grouping of ... Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm Pancreatic serous cystadenoma Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm Theruvath TP, Morgan KA, ... Mucinous cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as cystic epithelial neoplasms ...

*List of cutaneous neoplasms associated with systemic syndromes

Many cutaneous neoplasms occur in the setting of systemic syndromes. List of cutaneous conditions List of contact allergens ...

*List of ICD-9 codes 140-239: neoplasms

Benign neoplasm of kidney and other urinary organs (224) Benign neoplasm of eye (225) Benign neoplasm of brain and other parts ... Malignant neoplasm of gum (144) Malignant neoplasm of floor of mouth (145) Malignant neoplasm of other and unspecified parts of ... Malignant neoplasm of eye (191) Malignant neoplasm of brain (192) Malignant neoplasm of other and unspecified parts of nervous ... Benign neoplasm of ovary (221) Benign neoplasm of other female genital organs (222) Benign neoplasm of male genital organs (223 ...

*Papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential

As their name suggests, PUNLMPs are neoplasms, i.e. clonal cellular proliferations, that are thought to have a low probability ... In urologic pathology, PUNLMP, short for papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential, is an exophytic (outward ... Jones TD, Cheng L (June 2006). "Papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential: evolving terminology and concepts". J ... MacLennan GT, Kirkali Z, Cheng L (April 2007). "Histologic grading of noninvasive papillary urothelial neoplasms". Eur. Urol. ...
Glutamine and glutamate are known to play important roles in cancer biology. However, no detailed information is available in terms of their levels of involvement in various biological processes across different cancer types, whereas such knowledge could be critical for understanding the distinct characteristics of different cancer types. Our computational study aimed to examine the functional roles of glutamine and glutamate across different cancer types. We conducted a comparative analysis of gene expression data of cancer tissues versus normal control tissues of 11 cancer types to understand glutamine and glutamate metabolisms in cancer. Specifically, we developed a linear regression model to assess differential contributions by glutamine and/or glutamate to each of seven biological processes in cancer versus control tissues. While our computational predictions were consistent with some of the previous observations, multiple novel predictions were made: (1) glutamine is generally not involved in
Data & statistics on Incidence Rates for Major Cancer Sites by Gender: Estimated Age-Standardized Incidence Rates for Major Cancer Sites by Gender and Province, Canada, 2002, Incidence Rates for Major Cancer Sites by Gender, Estimated Age-Standardized Incidence Rates for Major Cancer Sites by Sex and Province, Canada, 2006...
Cancer researchers warned Monday that the number of elderly cancer patients would likely double from 2000 to 2030, creating huge challenges to healthcare systems worldwide.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Glypican 3 expression in pediatric malignant solid tumors. AU - Kinoshita, Yoshiaki. AU - Tanaka, Sakura. AU - Souzaki, Ryota. AU - Miyoshi, Kina. AU - Kohashi, Kenichi. AU - Oda, Yoshinao. AU - Nakatsura, Tetsuya. AU - Taguchi, Tomoaki. PY - 2015/2. Y1 - 2015/2. N2 - Purpose Glypican 3 (GPC3) is one of the cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans that binds to the cell membrane, and it is known as an oncofetal protein in adult malignant tumors. Clinical trials using a GPC3 peptide vaccine have already been started in Japan as a new immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma in adult patients. To investigate the possibility of GPC3 immunotherapy for pediatric malignant tumors, we assessed the expression of GPC3 in pediatric malignant tumors. Methods Immunohistochemically, the GPC3 expression was examined in 159 pediatric solid tumors, including 35 cases of neuroblastoma, 30 cases of Wilms tumor, 10 cases of hepatoblastoma, 25 cases of germ cell tumors, 56 cases of ...
The subject carries the diagnosis of malignant solid tumor or a malignant or non-malignant hematologic disorder, and is being screened at the NIH for eligibility for an NIH Clinical Center treatment protocol.. OR. The subject carries the diagnosis of malignant solid tumor or a malignant or non-malignant hematologic disorder, and is already enrolled on a clinical protocol at the NIH Clinical Center.. OR. The subject is a related HLA-compatible family member of a patient (bearing a diagnosis of malignant solid tumor or a malignant or non-malignant hematologic) being evaluated for or already enrolled on a clinical protocol at the NIH Clinical Center and is identified as a potentially suitable donor of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation.. OR. The subject carries the diagnosis of malignant solid tumor or a malignant or non malignant hematologic disorder or a bone marrow failure condition and is not available to participate in an NIH Clinical Center treatment protocol, or travel ...
This pharmacokinetic study of nivolumab showed that there is little ethnic difference in the handling of nivolumab.Nivolumab was well tolerated in Korean patients.Background.This phase I study of nivolumab, an anti‐programmed cell death‐1 (anti‐PD‐1) monoclonal antibody, investigated the pharmacokinetics and safety of nivolumab in Korean patients with advanced solid tumors. Findings were compared with results from Japan and the U.S.Materials and Methods.In this two‐part study, patients received a single dose of nivolumab (1, 3, and 10 mg/kg; ONO‐4538‐13) and were followed up for 3 weeks. Those who met the required criteria proceeded to the second part (ONO‐4538‐14), and received the same dose as in part one every 2 weeks.Results.Six patients per dose level were enrolled (n = 18). The mean elimination half‐life of nivolumab among the groups ranged from 15.0 to 19.1 days. The maximum serum concentration and area under serum concentration-time curve increased almost ...
One of the things we do is we are part of the WHO specialised agency for cancer and for the last fifty years weve been developing statistics on the global burden of cancer. One of the key pieces that we work with WHO on is to develop the statistics and understand the future cancer burden as well. So we know there is going to be something in the order of thirty million new cancer cases by 2035, currently its about 14.1 million new cases. So the scale of cancer is increasing greatly, partially because of demographic effects, the impact of population aging and growth, but also increasing risk and the changing profile of cancers as well.. Thats important that we know that but we really need also local data and the best way to get better global data as well as local data is to support cancer surveillance, both in terms of incidence and mortality. We are buoyed by the high level impetus that we see for NCDs and cancers and governments now trying to tackle the increasing burden from NCDs and cancer. ...
Folakemi Odedina, Ph.D., a professor of pharmacy and the director of the UF Shands Cancer Centers Cancer Health Disparities Program, served on the planning committee for National Cancer Institute Global Cancer Research Day, which was held in Washington, DC in March in conjuction with the Consortium of Universities for Global Health Annual Meeting.. The meeting aimed to engage a diverse range of participants including both cancer researchers and global health professionals who may not necessarily have specific cancer expertise, but have an interest in exploring the intersection between global health and cancer. The Global Cancer Research Day meeting utilized a highly interactive format to engage the cancer research and global health communities in a rich dialogue about cross-cutting issues. Topics explored included capacity building, cancers related to infectious diseases (including HIV-related malignancies), lessons learned in global health and tapping into the global health communitys ...
Despite deep cuts in federal research spending due to sequestration, Associate Professor Muhammad Zaman (BME, MSE) has secured a five-year grant of more than $3 million from the National Institutes of Health to develop mathematical and computational models of how breast cancer cells move and communicate as they migrate from tumors, invade nearby tissue and proliferate.. By mapping this process from the molecular to the cellular level through detailed, comprehensive multiscale models based on strong experimental and computational data, Zaman and his collaborators-MIT Professors Frank Gertler, Roger Kamm and Douglas Lauffenberger, and a computational modeling team in Singapore-aim to uncover new pathways to control tumor development and metastasis in the breast, lung, and other organs.. Complex biochemical and biomechanical interactions govern how cancer cells spread from tumors and metastasize in nearby tissue. Much is known about the mechanics of how cancer cells migrate, but how biochemical ...
Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose, dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), and recommended phase II dose of dasatinib in metastatic solid tumors refractory to standard therapies or for which no effective standard therapy exists.. Experimental Design: In this phase I, open-label, dose-escalation study, patients received 35 to 160 mg of dasatinib twice daily in 28-day cycles either every 12 hours for 5 consecutive days followed by 2 nontreatment days every week (5D2) or as continuous, twice-daily (CDD) dosing.. Results: Sixty-seven patients were treated (5D2, n = 33; CDD, n = 34). The maximum tolerated doses were 120 mg twice daily 5D2 and 70 mg twice daily CDD. DLTs with 160 mg 5D2 were recurrent grade 2 rash, grade 3 lethargy, and one patient with both grade 3 prolonged bleeding time and grade 3 hypocalcemia; DLTs with 120 mg twice daily CDD were grade 3 nausea, grade 3 fatigue, and one patient with both grade 3 rash and grade 2 proteinuria. The most frequent treatment-related toxicities ...
Cancer therapies are designed to kill tumour cells, but produce tumour cell debris in the process.. In a study published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, researchers from Brigham and Womens Hospital and colleagues show that leftover debris can stimulate inflammation and tumour growth, but that molecules called resolvins can block that unwanted inflammatory response.. The findings point towards a new way to enhance the effectiveness of current cancer therapies and potentially prevent tumour recurrence.. When conventional cancer treatments, such as radiation or chemotherapy drugs, break apart tumours, they can also spread and stimulate the production of proinflammatory cytokines.. These signalling molecules, known to promote tumour growth, were at the centre of the investigation.. "Dead and dying tumour cells are an under-appreciated component of the tumour microenvironment that may promote tumour progression," said Professor Charles Serhan, PhD, DSc, Department of Anesthesiology, ...
Current Cancer Therapy Reviews publishes frontier reviews, original research articles, drug clinical trial studies and guest edited thematic issues on all the latest advances in clinical oncology, cancer therapy and pharmacology. The journals aim is to publish the highest quality review articles dedicated to clinical research in the field. The journal is essential reading for all researchers and clinicians in cancer therapy.
Weve shown that an aged immune system can combat cancer just as well as a young one if you remove the impediments to successful immunity, which are different that those in younger hosts," Dr. Curiel said. "Weve shown that if you test all your immune therapy just in young mice and young people, youll never learn how it works in older patients - the ones most at risk for cancer. You might conclude that drugs dont work in aged hosts, when they do. But they have to be combined with some help.". After discovering this in melanoma, the researchers then looked at whether the same action held true in colon cancer, a major cancer killer in the elderly.. "The details were different in colon cancer. The bad immune cells that increased in the aged mice and how they were knocked down by the drugs were different than in melanoma," Dr. Curiel said. "But the result was the same - we identified a drug combination that was highly effective in the aged mice.". That means that not only must this strategy be ...
Many of the worlds top cancer researchers presented the latest in cancer research when the Centre for Cancer Biomarkers invited to a two-day symposium at Solstrand.
... American Association for Cancer Research Aims to Raise Awareness a...PHILADELPHIA Sept. 24 /- ...News facts: ...-- Most Americans with cancer would be receptive to participating in...,Video:,The,Looming,Crisis,in,Cancer,Drug,Development:,97%,of,Adult,Cancer,Patients,Do,Not,Take,Advantage,of,Clinical,Trial,Programs,medicine,advanced medical technology,medical laboratory technology,medical device technology,latest medical technology,Health
Patient accrual. A phase I, single center, open-label design was used to assess the safety, PK characteristics, and efficacy of 2ME2. This study was conducted at the University of Wisconsin Paul P. Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center after institutional review board approval. Patients ages ,18 y, with biopsy-proven disease, a life expectancy of ,3 mo, Karnofsky performance status of ,80%, and unresectable or metastatic solid malignancy were eligible. Patients were required to have either progressed on a previous therapy or to lack effective treatment options. Inclusion criteria included at least one measurable lesion as defined by the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (15) or, in the case of patients with prostate cancer, an increasing serum level of prostate-specific antigen.. Exclusion criteria excluded hematopoietic (Hgb, ,10 g/dL; platelets, ,75,000/mm3), hepatic (aspartate aminotransferase or ALT of ,2.5 times the upper limit of normal) or renal (Cr of ,1.5 times upper limit of ...
Current Cancer Drug Targets aims to cover all the latest and outstanding developments on the medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, molecular biology, ...
This said, however, it is clear that work remains to be done in improving late effects. This may mean modifying current cancer treatments to reduce their neurotoxicity, or introducing new therapies and interventions for survivors. For those interested in developing new intervention strategies, the CCSS data is likely to prove an excellent starting point.. "Findings from this study indicate that current therapies, with the continued goal of 100% cure, may still result in poor perceived health outcomes, and more work is needed to address these toxicities in treatment," says Ness. "For those who develop adverse outcomes, rehabilitation strategies that work in other populations with pain and mobility limitations may be effective and need to be tested.". Already, several randomised intervention studies have been completed off the back of CCSS-based research. Having recruited a cohort of high-risk childhood cancer survivors, these studies looked into the benefits of breast cancer screening, ...
New research finds that gut bacteria affect cancer risk; in particular, an unhealthy gut flora balance may contribute to colorectal cancer.
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The purpose of this study is to develop and pilot test a behavioral intervention for elderly adults in treatment for colon cancer, to enhance their skills for managing the challenges of completing chemotherapy regimens. The investigators will assess feasibility and acceptability of the intervention, and explore preliminary efficacy of the intervention for reducing psychological distress and improving rates of optimal chemotherapy adherence ...
Bogenberger, James M. et al "Abstract A28: Identification of HDAC inhibitor potentiating targets in acute myeloid leukemia cells by large-scale RNA-interference." Molecular Cancer Therapeutics 12.5 Supplement (2013): A28. Web. 20 Jan. 2018. ...
The relationship between diet and exercise and its positive effects on treatment outcomes in obese cancer patients has sparked interest for quite some time, but for paediatric patients, the research has been limited.. While healthy eating is encouraged during and after treatment, special diet interventions as part of treatment for paediatric patients are uncommon.. Additionally, when it comes to physical activity, clinicians are cautious about administering an exercise regimen in a cancer care setting.. "The purpose of the review was to delineate between obesity reduction as a goal for energy balance interventions versus simply changing diet or adding exercise," said Joya Chandra, Ph.D., associate professor of Paediatric Research and lead author on the study.. "For example, our review confirmed modifying diet or adding moderate exercise can improve chemotherapy efficacy independent of weight loss.". Obesity, an epidemic and risk factor for several cancers, is on the rise in paediatric cancer ...
Background: Both dietary and serum levels of inorganic phosphate (Pi) have been linked to development of cancer in experimental studies. This is the first population-based study investigating the relation between serum Pi and risk of cancer in humans. Methods: From the Swedish Apolipoprotein Mortality Risk (AMORIS) study, we selected all participants (,20 years old) with baseline measurements of serum Pi, calcium, alkaline phosphatase, glucose, and creatinine (n = 397,292). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to assess serum Pi in relation to overall cancer risk. Similar analyses were performed for specific cancer sites. Results: We found a higher overall cancer risk with increasing Pi levels in men (HR: 1.02 (95% CI: 1.00-1.04) for every SD increase in Pi), and a negative association in women (HR: 0.97 (95% CI: 0.96-0.99) for every SD increase in Pi). Further analyses for specific cancer sites showed a positive link between Pi quartiles and the risk of cancer of ...
Jolly, Mohit Kumar et al "E-cadherin represses anchorage-independent growth in sarcomas through both signaling and mechanical mechanisms." Molecular Cancer Research (2019): molcanres.0763.2018. Web. 22 Jan. 2020. ...
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New research published in Diabetologia reveals that type 1 diabetes is associated with an increased risk of various cancer types including cancers of the stomach, liver, pancreas, endometrium, ovary and kidney, but a reduced risk of other cancer types, including prostate and breast cancer. The study analysed more than 9000 cancer cases in type 1 diabetes patients diagnosed across five countries, using data from five nationwide diabetes registers: Australia (2000-2008), Denmark (1995-2014), Finland (1972-2012), Scotland (1995-2012) and Sweden (1987-2012). Using the data of those in national cancer registries, the authors were able to compare the cancer incidence among people with type 1 diabetes to that of the general population. "The analyses across all cancers combined revealed no increased overall cancer risk among men with type 1 diabetes, whereas women with type 1 diabetes experienced a 7% increased overall cancer risk. The neutral overall cancer risk among men with type 1 diabetes was ...
Constipation in advanced cancer • Delirium in Adult Cancer • Diarrhoea in adult cancer patients Patients • Management of anaemia and iron deficiency in patients with cancer • Management of infusion reactions to systemic anticancer therapy • Management of toxicities from immunotherapy • Management of febrile neutropaenia • MASCC and ESMO consensus guidelines for the prevention of chemotherapy and radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting • Treatment of dyspnoea in advanced cancer patients • Central venous access in oncology • Management of oral and gastrointestinal mucosal injury • Management of refractory symptoms at the end of life and the use of palliative sedation • Advanced care planning in palliative care • Bone health in cancer patients • Cancer, fertility and pregnancy • Management of chemotherapy extravasation • Cardiovascular toxicity induced by chemotherapy, targeted agents and radiotherapy • Management of cancer pain • Management of venous ...
Constipation in advanced cancer • Delirium in Adult Cancer • Diarrhoea in adult cancer patients Patients • Management of anaemia and iron deficiency in patients with cancer • Management of infusion reactions to systemic anticancer therapy • Management of toxicities from immunotherapy • Management of febrile neutropaenia • MASCC and ESMO consensus guidelines for the prevention of chemotherapy and radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting • Treatment of dyspnoea in advanced cancer patients • Central venous access in oncology • Management of oral and gastrointestinal mucosal injury • Management of refractory symptoms at the end of life and the use of palliative sedation • Advanced care planning in palliative care • Bone health in cancer patients • Cancer, fertility and pregnancy • Management of chemotherapy extravasation • Cardiovascular toxicity induced by chemotherapy, targeted agents and radiotherapy • Management of cancer pain • Management of venous ...
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The BRAF protein kinase is widely studied as a cancer driver and therapeutic target. However, the regulation of its expression is not completely understood. Taking advantage of the RNA-seq data of more than 4800 patients belonging to 9 different cancer types, we show that BRAF mRNA exists as a pool of 3 isoforms (reference BRAF, BRAF-X1, and BRAF-X2) that differ in the last part of their coding sequences, as well as in the length (BRAF-ref: 76 nt; BRAF-X1 and BRAF-X2: up to 7 kb) and in the sequence of their 3UTRs. The expression levels of BRAF-ref and BRAF-X1/X2 are inversely correlated, while the most prevalent among the three isoforms varies from cancer type to cancer type. In melanoma cells, the X1 isoform is expressed at the highest level in both therapy-naïve cells and cells with acquired resistance to vemurafenib driven by BRAF gene amplification or expression of the Δ[3-10] splicing variant. In addition to the BRAF-ref protein, the BRAF-X1 protein (the full length as well as the Δ[3-10]
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Cancer/testis (CT) genes have expression normally restricted to the testis, but become activated during oncogenesis, so they have excellent potential as cancer-specific biomarkers. Evidence is starting to emerge to indicate that they also provide function(s) in the oncogenic programme. Human TEX19 is a recently identified CT gene, but a functional role for TEX19 in cancer has not yet been defined. siRNA was used to deplete TEX19 levels in various cancer cell lines. This was extended using shRNA to deplete TEX19 in vivo. Western blotting, fluorescence activated cell sorting and immunofluorescence were used to study the effect of TEX19 depletion in cancer cells and to localize TEX19 in normal testis and cancer cells/tissues. RT-qPCR and RNA sequencing were employed to determine the changes to the transcriptome of cancer cells depleted for TEX19 and Kaplan-Meier plots were generated to explore the relationship between TEX19 expression and prognosis for a range of cancer types. Depletion of TEX19 levels in
A team of British scientists has shed more light on how cancer might be spread in the body, describing a so-called chase-and-run phenomenon involving malignant and healthy cells.
Founded in 1907, the American Association for Cancer Research is a professional society of more than 24,000 laboratory, translational, and clinical scientists engaged in all areas of cancer research in the United States and in more than 60 other countries. AACRs mission is to accelerate the prevention and cure of cancer through research, education, communication, and advocacy. Its principal activities include the publication of five major peer-reviewed scientific journals: Cancer Research; Clinical Cancer Research; Molecular Cancer Therapeutics; Molecular Cancer Research; and Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. AACRs Annual Meeting attracts more than 15,000 participants who share new and significant discoveries in the cancer field. Specialty meetings, held throughout the year, focus on the latest developments in all areas of cancer research. ...
Learn your options for getting pregnant once cancer treatment ends. Find out how cancer treatment can affect female fertility, and how to be proactive about your fertility before cancer treatment begins.
The primary objective of this clinical research study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of intravenous (IV) MST-
Research indicates that physical activity not only helps prevent cancer (29, 30), it also confers mortality benefits for cancer survivors (31, 32). Yet, current cancer therapies do not address the association of lifestyle factors on prognosis and survivorship, despite the fact that obesity, weight gain, and physical inactivity are common in cancer patients before and after a cancer diagnosis (33). There is a strong association between having a higher body mass index (BMI) before cancer diagnosis and mortality from different cancer types. For instance, uterine cancer survivors who had a prediagnosis BMI greater than 35 have a 6-fold increase risk of mortality compared with survivors who had a prediagnosis BMI less than 25 (34). In early-stage breast cancer, a BMI greater than or equal to 40 is associated with at least a 5-fold increase of mortality risk compared with BMI less than 25 (35). Furthermore, a higher BMI may explain up to 14% and 20% of all deaths from cancer in men and women, ...
In what could be a major step forward in our understanding of how cancer moves around the body, researchers have observed the spread of cancer cells from the initial tumour to the bloodstream. The findings suggest that secondary growths called metastases punch their way through the walls of small blood vessels by targeting a molecule…
Cancer is a major health problem that can debilitate and destroy human lives. One out of every 4 deaths in the United States is caused by cancer. More than $124.6 billion was spent in direct medical costs for 13.7 million cancer survivors and 1.5 million newly diagnosed cancer patients in the United States in 2010. Increasing human life expectancy will inevitably raise cancer prevalence and the related costs. Consequently, the development of effective cancer prevention strategies is increasingly important. Histologically, the development of cancer involves multiple steps, which occur over several years after the initial carcinogen exposure from normal to hyperplasia, mild, moderate, and severe dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ, before finally progressing to invasive cancer (1). Throughout this long, multi-step developmental course, there is a wide scope of possible preventive approaches that can delay or prevent the development of cancer. Different cancer prevention strategies such as behavioral ...
WASHINGTON-The search for cancer prevention agents is hampered by the fact that only one biomarker-the prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-now offers a simple, noninvasive measure of the cancer process in the body, Robert W. Day, MD, PhD, said at a meeting of the Cancer Prevention Working Group, sponsored by the Cancer Research Foundation of America (CRFA). The need for cancer biomarkers is critical, not only for their diagnostic benefits but also to provide endpoints for judging the effectiveness of any proposed chemopreventive agents. 1
Cancer therapies are designed to kill tumor cells, but produce tumor cell debris in the process. In a study published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, researchers from Brigham and Womens Hospital and colleagues show that leftover debris can stimulate inflammation and tumor growth, but that molecules called resolvins can block that unwanted inflammatory response. The findings point towards a new way to enhance the effectiveness of current cancer therapies and potentially prevent tumor recurrence.
Cancer researcher Tom Marsilje is racing to cure his colon cancer. His team iw working on a personalized vaccine to rev up his immune system.
Introduction: This measure comprises national data on the distribution of cancer stage at diagnosis for sixteen major childhood (paediatric) cancers. In 2018, Cancer Australia reported the first national data on stage at diagnosis for selected childhood cancers for children aged 0 -14 years, for the diagnostic period 2006−2010. This release presents more detailed information
How many proteins can be identified in a 2-DE gel spot within an analysis of a complex human cancer tissue proteome Electrophoresis , 2018, online Xianquan Zhan, Haiyan Yang, Fang Peng, Jianglin Li, Yun Mu, Ying Long, Tingting Cheng, Yuda Huang, Zhao Li, Miaolong Lu, Na Li, Maoyu Li, Jianping Liu and Peter R. Jungblut Abstract Two-dimensional gel...
A former University of Pennsylvania cancer researcher used Department of Defense research money to fund a for-profit business, according to an indictment by the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.
The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the safety and tolerability of ONO-7746 across multiple doses in patients with solid tumors and chemo
Molecular and cellular events that drive premalignant progression are on the verge of being comprehensively characterized in a report that lays out an agenda for the immediate future of cancer prevention research.
Study of MK-1454 Alone or in Combination With Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) in Participants With Advanced / Metastatic Solid Tumors or Lymphomas (MK-1454-001) - NCT03010176
Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found a naturally occurring compound that can destroy cancer cells in mice by targeting MYC, a cancer-causing gene that has remained elusive until now.
Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found a naturally occurring compound that can destroy cancer cells in mice by targeting MYC, a cancer-causing gene that has remained elusive until now.
Clinical trial for Solid Tumor | Lymphoma | Malignant neoplasm of brain | Neuroblastoma , Trial of CUDC-907 in Children and Young Adults With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors CNS Tumors or Lymphoma
A protein responsible for cancer-promoting cell signaling is also thought to keep the key component of its signalling pathway tied down and inactive, scientists suggest
Many cancer researchers lack access to affordable, well-characterized, and analytically validated renewable affinity reagents, a problem that could be hindering cancer biomarker discovery and validation, cancer diagnostics development, and therapeutics monitoring.
NaturalSociety, You can bet that polio vaccines will now be promoted since the Glaxo Smith Kline (accidental) dumping of live polio viruses into a Belgium lake.. On the same token, you can bet that forced Ebola vaccinations are just around the corner due to fear of Ebola spreading through the U.S., but do we really want to trust an industry which already puts carcinogenic adjuvants into the vaccines used to "treat" measles, mumps, polio, rubella, cervical cancer, and more? I doubt it.. Vaccines are full of adjuvants, compounds that are meant to enhance the specific immune response against co-inoculated antigens. The word comes from the Latin word adjuvare, which means to help or to enhance. But these adjuvants dont enhance anything but a compromised immune system.. Following are cancer-causing ingredients, neuro-toxins, and immune-destroying extras as well as some disturbing evidence as to the true intent behind vaccines overall.. Formaldehyde - This is classified as a known carcinogen. Both ...
A team of scientists, led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, has shown for the first time how cancer cells control the ON/OFF switch of a program used by developing embryos to effectively metastasize in vivo, breaking free and spreading to other parts of the body, where they can proliferate and grow into secondary tumors.. The findings are published in the December 11 issue of the journal Cancer Cell.. In 90 percent of cancer deaths, it is the spreading of cancer, known as metastasis, which ultimately kills the patient by impacting ever-more tissues and functions until the body fails. Ten years ago, a French cancer researcher named Jean Paul Thiery hypothesized that tumor cells metastasized by exploiting a developmental process known as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition or EMT.. EMT is seen in developing embryos whose cells transform from stationary epithelial cells into more mobile mesenchymal cells, the latter able to migrate to new locations and ...
Specialists at Mayo Clinic are among the nations leading cancer researchers. Cancer research is conducted in coordination with the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center receives funding from the National Cancer Institute and is designated as a comprehensive cancer center - recognition for an institutions scientific excellence and multidisciplinary resources focused on cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment. ...
ACS: 1/29/13. This report provides the estimated numbers of new cancer cases and deaths for African Americans during 2013, as well as current statistics on cancer incidence, mortality, and survival. It also includes information on cancer risk factors such as tobacco use, physical inactivity, and use of cancer screening examinations. Read More. ...
The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) issued congratulations to Allison S. Betof, MD, PhD, on her election to Chairperson-elect of the Associate Member Council (AMC) of AACR. Dr. Betof assumed office at the AACR Annual Meeting earlier this month and will serve as Chairperson-elect from 2017-2018. Dr. Betof is a medical oncology fellow at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. She will become AMC Chairperson in 2018-2019.. The Associate Member Council was established by AACR in 1993 to help in cultivating the next generation of cancer researchers. On behalf of the AACR, the Associate Member Council extended further congratulations to four other individuals elected to join the council this year. These new Council members also took office at the AACR Annual Meeting and will serve a 3-year term.. The four new members of the AMC selected to take office in April 2017 are Renée de Leeuw, PhD, Kelsey R. Hampton, BS, Robert T. Jones, BS, and Neil Vasan, MD.. Dr. de Leeuw is a ...
Many of todays medicines were discovered by trial and error: a substance is found which helps alleviate the symptoms of a disease, and it may take years before scientists really understand how it works. Typically they find that a drug has its effects by attaching itself to a particular molecule in a cell and blocking part of its activity, the way you might prevent someone from turning a light on or off by putting a lock over the switch. Scientists now hope to take the opposite approach, and custom-design drugs to block specific switches. To do so, they will need precise "technical diagrams" of the molecules they want to lock up. Now the Italian researcher Giulio Superti-Furga and his colleagues at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) have produced such a diagram of a cancer-causing molecule, and their work gives researchers a good idea of how to go about designing drugs. Their report appears in the current issue of the journal Cell.. ...
Background Integrin signaling is an attractive target for anti-cancer treatment. GLPG0187 is a broad spectrum integrin receptor antagonist (IRA). GLPG0187 inhibited tumor growth and metastasis in mouse models. Methods We aimed to determine the Recommended Phase II Dose (RP2D) and to assess safety and tolerability of continuous i.v. infusion in ... read more patients with advanced malignant solid tumors. Anticipated dose levels were 20, 40, 80, 160, 320, and 400 mg/day in a modified 3 + 3 design. Plasma concentrations of GLPG0187 were assessed to characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK). C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) was used as pharmacodynamics marker. Results Twenty patients received GLPG0187. No dose limiting toxicities (DLTs) were observed. The highest possible and tested dose was 400 mg/day. Fatigue was the most frequently reported side effect (25 %). Recurrent Port-A-Cath-related infections and skin toxicity suggest cutaneous integrin inhibition. No dose-dependent toxicity ...
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The FDA is expanding its recall of some blood pressure and heart failure medications because traces of cancer-causing NDMA were found in valsartan-based medications.
11 Jan 2018. A team of cancer researchers from the University of Liverpool, has made an important contribution to our understanding of cancer cell regulation which could better inform future cancer treatments.. The research is funded by North West Cancer Research, which has ring-fenced £180,000 for the three year-long project which started in 2015.. Led by Professor Ian Prior at the University of Liverpool, in collaboration with researchers at AstraZeneca, the research focuses on a group of proteins found in the human body called kinases.. Their research measures how changes in kinase activity can influence the growth, development and regulation of cancer cells.. They measure kinase network rewiring that occurs in cancer patients so that they can identify new strategies for killing cancer cells.. Their insights into this important family of proteins have been published in the journal Cancer Research and will provide a foundation for future research on the use of kinases in cancer ...
The cover features an image of RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) results for a processed transcript of the mucin 5AC gene (MUC5AC, foreground), a potentially important smoking- and lung cancer-related gene. The output is superimposed on an image of human ciliated columnar bronchial epithelial cells obtained by endoscopic brushings of the mainstem bronchi (100X, modified Wright-Giemsa stain). The MUC5AC read coverage plot displays reads aligning to the transcript normalized by the total number of reads on the y-axis versus the genomic coordinates on the x-axis. The MUC5AC processed transcript shows marked upregulation in healthy current smokers compared with never smokers and downregulation in smokers with lung cancer compared with smokers having benign lung disease. The detection of MUC5AC expression highlights the advantage of RNA-Seq because the transcript is not annotated in RefSeq and there are no probes on the Affymetrix Exon 1.0 ST microarray to interrogate it. RNA-Seq is one of several ...
A human gene called p53, which is commonly known as the "guardian of the genome," is widely known to combat the formation and progression of tumors. Yet, mutant forms of p53 have been linked to more cases of human cancer than any other gene.. Investigating core mechanisms of how cancer cells respond to their surroundings in the human body, biologists at the University of California San Diego have discovered new evidence about mutant p53 that may reshape our understanding of tumor growth and ultimately how we treat cancer.. A study published in the journal Nature Communications led by Homa Rahnamoun in Shannon Lauberths laboratory at UC San Diegos Division of Biological Sciences uncovered a new mechanism linking mutant p53 function to chronic inflammation-a long-term condition typically associated with a response in the bodys immune system-which can be induced in situations ranging from stress to food consumption. Lauberth said increasing evidence supports the role of chronic inflammation in ...
Childhood cancer remains the leading cause of death by disease among children in the United States. Every day, 42 children are diagnosed with cancer and the average age of diagnosis is 6. Cancer affects all ethnic, gender, and socio-economic groups and more than 40,000 children undergo treatment for cancer each year. [Source: CureSearch]. The causes of childhood cancers are largely unknown, and for the most part they cannot be prevented. A few conditions, such as Down syndrome, other specific chromosomal and genetic abnormalities, and ionizing radiation exposures, explain a small percentage of cases. Children with AIDS have an increased risk of developing certain cancers, predominantly non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Kaposi sarcoma. [Source: CureSearch]. The average age of death for a child with cancer is 8, causing a child to lose 69 years of expected life. [Source: Kids V Cancer]. Incidence of invasive pediatric cancers is up 29% in the past 20 years. [Source: Kids V Cancer]. The National Cancer ...
Posted on 28 February 2017. Scientists at the Universities of York and Huddersfield have improved understanding of a molecule that destroys cancerous tumours without harming healthy cell tissue.. The discovery opens up the potential for highly effective new cancer treatments that are free of serious side effects.. The research team has developed and patented a cancer treatment regime that exploits the unique properties of the molecule - a protein named Cluster of Differentiation 40 (CD40).. Professor Jenny Southgate said: "Most cancer therapies are toxic to all cells and finding a therapy that can kill cancer cells selectively whilst sparing a patients normal cells is the Holy Grail for cancer researchers. By using the urothelial research platform developed by our team, we were able to discover how one promising drug target, called CD40, is able to distinguish between normal and cancer cells, resulting in cancer cell death.". Protective properties. Tumour cells proliferate by continuously ...
Pollutant carcinogens are missing from this document. Cancer Action NY contacted the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC) regarding revising the Promotional Toolkit. The answer that we received was that the Toolkit would not be revised because it was no longer in use. The DCPC leads State Health Departments in the development and implementation of comprehensive cancer control plans. These plans are used by the health departments to provide direction to cancer burden reduction efforts at the state level. If the DCPC were to begin including pollutant carcinogen exposure reduction education among the cancer burden reduction endeavors that it promotes, the state health departments would follow this leadership and begin to provide such education to the general public. Cancer Action NY entered into a dialogue with Dr. Marcus Plescia, Director of the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control on the subject of dioxin exposure cancer risk reduction via dioxin exposure reduction education. At ...
[120 Pages Report] Check for Discount on Global Cancer Biomarkers Sales Market Report 2016 report by QYResearch Group. Notes: Sales, means the sales volume of Cancer Biomarkers Revenue,...
BioAssay record AID 902 submitted by NCGC: qHTS Screen for Compounds that Selectively Target Cancer Cells with p53 Mutations: Cytotoxicity of p53ts Cells at the Nonpermissive Temperature.
Mitchell S. Cairo, M.D. ‌New York Medical College Chief, Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Stem Cell Transplantation‌ Director, Children and Adolescent Cancer…
[PRESS INVITATION 21 February 2013] Karolinska Institutet invites you to a conference on the latest findings in cancer research, at which many of the worlds most influential scientists in the field will be talking about the microbiology behind cancer as well as cancer drugs and clinical studies.
Oncology/Anti-cancer drugs are used for treating various cancer types for improving and prolonging a patients survival time. Biological drugs, based on monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) would emerge as a preferred option for treating various cancer types, especially blood cancer (leukaemia). The rising incidence and prevalence of various cancer types, new cancer treatments and growing importance of biological and targeted drug therapies, are driving the market growth of LAMEA oncology/anti-cancer drugs. In addition, increasing demand of anti-cancer drugs for the treatment of ageing population, rising government funds and improved treatment results, are major factors boosting the market growth. However, the high cost involved in new drug development, coupled with threat of failure and adverse effects associated with anti-cancer drugs therapies, would restrain the growth of the LAMEA market. Moreover, accessibility of anti-cancer drugs incurred by high cost, is a major challenge that is expected to ...
The ultimate goal of cancer research is the development of effective anticancer therapy. During the last several decades, the discovery of oncogenes, tumor suppressors, growth factors, signal transduction pathways has dramatically escalated our understanding of cancer cell biology and mechanisms of cell transformation.1-3 Hundreds of cellular proteins and pathways have been logically considered as molecular targets in a mechanism-based approaches of anticancer drug development.4-6 Yet, the progress in cancer treatment has not paralleled these dramatic achievements in basic research. ...
An international team of scientists in Japan, Switzerland, and the United States has confirmed that combining chemotherapy and immunotherapy in cancer treatment enhances the immune systems ability to find and eliminate cancer cells, even when the cancer-associated proteins targeted by the immune system are hidden behind the cancer cell membrane. In a study published online on February 8, 2012 in Cancer Research, the scientists show that antibodies, which have been successful in treating certain types of cancers, can effectively reach elusive intracellular targets, delaying tumor growth and prolonging survival when combined with chemotherapy. "The study provides proof-of-principle for a powerful new strategy that may greatly expand the arsenal of potential targets for cancer drug development and that could be broadly applicable to many different cancer types," said Dr. Hiroyoshi Nishikawa, a Cancer Research Institute (CRI)-funded associate professor in the Department of Experimental Immunology ...
Describe Activity Response, including but not limited to: Your response of resource use and effectiveness, participant response, etc.* ...
To appraise the feasibility of current adult medical and surgical techniques for ovarian preservation in pre-pubertal and adolescent girls with cancer. Literature search using PubMed and SCOPUS up to
Cancer is typically a consequence of imbalance between cell death and proliferation in a way favorable to cell proliferation and survival. Most conventional cancer therapies are based on targeting rapidly growing cancerous cells to block growth or enhance cell death, thereby, restoring the balance between these processes. In many instances, malignancies that develop resistance to current treatment modalities, such as chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and radiotherapy often present the greatest challenge in subsequent management of the patient. Studies have shown that under normal circumstances, cells utilize different death mechanisms, such as apoptosis (programmed cell death), autophagy, mitotic catastrophe, and necrosis to maintain homeostasis and physiological integrity of the organism, but these processes often appear to be altered in cancer. Thus, in recent years developing various strategies for administration of cytotoxic chemotherapeutics in combination with apoptosis-sensitizing reagents is
WASHINGTON, Sept. 30 (Xinhua) -- A clinical trial showed that the use of a bacterial spores had early efficacy and manageable toxicities in patients with treatment-refractory solid tumor malignancies.. "Even after a single injection of this bacterial therapy, we see biological and, in some patients, clinically meaningful activity," said Filip Janku, associate professor at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.. Janku reported the findings on Sunday at the ongoing CRI-CIMT-EATI-AACR International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference from Sept. 30 to Oct. 3.. "This strategy is feasible, has manageable adverse effects, and could be clinically meaningful in patients with few therapeutic options," said Janku.. Unlike prior anticancer bacterial therapies that may cause infection and severe side effects, the bacteria called C. novyi-NT is an attenuated bacterium that requires a low-oxygen environment to survive and proliferate and therefore does not affect healthy cells, according to the ...
Belly fat has already been linked to an increased risk of heart disease and diabetes. Now research suggests it plays a role in certain cancers, as
Dear Friends,. I am buzzing off my hair in an event to raise money for children and their families fighting pediatric cancer. Its called the One Mission Kids Cancer Buzz-Off and will be held on Sunday, June 3, at Gillette Stadium. All proceeds will benefit Childrens Hospital Boston and the vital programs and services they provide to help kids beat cancer.. I have chosen to buzz off my hair because the toll pediatric cancer takes on patients and their families is profound. Children must endure painful treatments and lengthy hospital stays while their families cope with unimaginable stress, anxiety, and financial strain. Your generous support will assist One Mission in funding vital programs and services that bring help, hope, care and support to pediatric cancer patients and their families.. Donating through this website is simple, fast, and totally secure. It is also the most efficient way to support my fundraising efforts.. Many thanks for your support -- and dont forget to forward this to ...
Childhood cancer is rare. Childhood cancer arises from the primitive cells, thus the types of cancer found in children is significantly different than cancer in adults. And, because children are still growing they often have special physical and emotional needs. Childhood cancers tend to be more aggressive than adult cancers. Children are often treated at specialized Centers by team specialists who know the difference between childhood and adult cancers. The team specialists include pediatric oncologists, surgeons, radiation oncologists, pediatric oncology nurses and nurse practitioners. Childhood cancer typically refers to the type of cancer that affects the age groups from infancy to twenty one years old. However, it is possible for young adults to also develop a childhood cancer.
Cancer survival rates have doubled over the past 40 years due to the advances being made in research. Our support of cancer research has led to discoveries in many different cancers types including; breast, colorectal, prostate, leukaemia, oesophageal, ovarian, and lung among others. Some of our major successes are featured below.. Additionally, through our support of Cancer Trials Ireland, we can offer hope to cancer patients by providing them with access to treatments not currently available outside of the clinical research arena.. ...
Since cancer shares the same molecular machinery as the host, most therapeutic interventions which aim to target cancer would inadvertently also adversely affect the host. Additionally, cancer continuously evolves, streamlining its host-derived genome for a new single-celled existence. In particular, short-term clinical success observed with most antineoplastic therapies directly relate to the fact that cancer is constantly evolving. However, the clonal evolution of cancer occasionally also render cancer cells uniquely susceptible to therapeutic interventions, as is exemplified by the clinical relevance of synthetic lethality. Synthetic lethality describes a situation where the simultaneous loss of function in two genes results in lethality, but where a loss of function in either single gene is tolerated. This observation suggests that the evolution of cancer, usually seen as a major clinical challenge, may also afford a key opportunity in lowering on-target toxicities accosted with chemotherapy. As an
It is biochemically appropriate to consider that MUC13 consists of 2 distinct subunits, an extracellular α-subunit (consisting of the TR domain, 1 EGF-like domain, and a portion of the SEA domain) and a β-subunit (consisting of a portion of the SEA domain, 2 EGF-like domains, the TM domain, and the cytoplasmic tail, shown in Fig. 1). As described earlier, the SEA domain is predicted to contain a cleavage site and, although the amino acid sequence is unknown, there is biochemical evidence that MUC13 undergoes cleavage (9, 17). Williams and colleagues carried out a comprehensive Western blot analysis of MUC13 protein expressed in 2 cancer cell lines by using a polyclonal MUC13 antibody (9). In this experiment, under nonreducing conditions, MUC13 migrated as a 47-kDa band plus a 93-kDa band homodimer. In contrast, under reducing conditions, MUC13 appeared as a 58-kDa single band. The size difference observed with different conditions can be explained by the denaturation of MUC13 in the reducing ...
Overview. SEER is an authoritative source of information on cancer incidence and survival in the United States. SEER currently collects and publishes cancer incidence and survival data from population-based cancer registries covering approximately 28 percent of the U.S. population.. Read Full Overview. ...
Meet Global Medical, Surgical and Radiation Oncologists from USA, Europe, Asia Pacific and Middle East at Cancer Conference, Oncology Conference, World Cancer Conference scheduled from November 27-28, 2017 Dubai, UAE
Not Beyond Us. This is the theme of World Cancer Day 2015. But how will we achieve it? Cancer can seem insurmountable. The global cancer burden is great. In 2012, 8.2 million people died from cancer-related causes-most of them in Africa, Asia, and Central and South America, which experiences more cases and more deaths than anywhere else: 60 percent of the 14 million new cancer cases annually and 70 percent of all cancer-related deaths occur in the developing world. The same countries bearing the brunt of the cancer burden have the fewest resources to tackle it.. Still we know and remind one another today, the 4th of February: We can and must stop vaccine-preventable cancers and reduce preventable cancer deaths. We must reduce the cancer inequities.. Cancer, you are not beyond us. Among women, cervical cancer is one of the deadliest -- and most easily preventable -- cancers. Women in the developing world account for 85 percent of the 270,000 deaths every year. Yet we know that effective ...
Since its inception, the primary focus area of our company has been oncology. Every year we expand our procurement network to include new clinical and research centers around the world in order to collect genetically-diverse human tumor specimens, including frozen tumor, tumor FFPE and matching blood products. Currently we manage human tumor tissue acquisition projects in Russia, Eastern Europe, India, the Philippines and the USA.
Beyond the misplaced reluctance of parents to have their children inoculated--or the lack of understanding of the importance of this for boys as well as girls--I wonder if part of the problem here is that insurance companies see no real payback in helping to promote this. After all, what is the chance that a child I am covering today with insurance is likely to be my subscriber by the time he or she gets cancer? Unlike polio, measles, and mumps, which show up during childhood, the head and neck cancers are not likely to show up until adulthood. While the cost per delivered dosage would be remarkably small, especially measured against the societal savings, there is currently no way to internalize that cost-benefit equation into insurance practice ...
Overview. SEER is an authoritative source of information on cancer incidence and survival in the United States. SEER currently collects and publishes cancer incidence and survival data from population-based cancer registries covering approximately 28 percent of the U.S. population.. Read Full Overview. ...
Warburgs ideas are now making their way back into science. Once forgotten, they are being used to develop new approaches to cancer treatment. If it is extremely difficult to affect all the genetic factors that drive malignization, why not deprive cancer cells of the energy source they need so badly? Without nutrients, cancer cells will be unable to grow.. One more reason to take the Warburg hypothesis seriously again is that research has shown that the oncogenes involved in cell division also take part in regulation of nutrient consumption.. The focus on cancer metabolism could help develop ways to either block the genes responsible for the shift towards glucose consumption or prevent the cells from devouring glucose some other way. The problem is that cancer cells adapt fast. You take away glucose, they turn to glutamine, and so on.. As of this moment, it remains unclear whether the revived approach will yield significant results. One of the reasons for its possible failure is the diversity of ...
Gentaur molecular products has all kinds of products like :search , Biochai \ cDNA Panel _ Human Tumor Tissue, Same Tumor Type, Different Donors \ C8235543 for more molecular products just contact us
CHICAGO - The American Association for Cancer Research and the Kirk A. and Dorothy P. Landon Foundation will present three INNOVATOR Awards at the AACR Annual Meeting 2012, held here March 31 - April 4. The Fifth Annual Landon Foundation-AACR INNOVATOR Award for Cancer Prevention Research will be presented to Guang Peng, M.D., Ph.D., at…
Lowering the cervical screening age in England from 25 to 20 would have little impact on rates of invasive cervical cancer, UK research suggests.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Follow-Up Care Provider Preferences of Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivors. AU - Ramsay, Joemy M.. AU - Mann, Karely. AU - Kaul, Sapna. AU - Zamora, Eduardo R.. AU - Smits-Seemann, Rochelle R.. AU - Kirchhoff, Anne C.. PY - 2018/4/1. Y1 - 2018/4/1. N2 - Purpose: To explore the experiences and perspectives of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors regarding patient-provider relationships and their preferences surrounding type of healthcare provider for follow-up care. Methods: We recruited AYA cancer survivors who were diagnosed between the ages of 15 and 39 using the Utah Cancer Registry. Twenty-eight survivors participated in six focus groups held between March and May of 2015 in Salt Lake City and St. George, Utah. This analysis focuses on how survivors preferences about type of healthcare provider may influence their transition into, and utilization of, follow-up care. Results: On average, survivors were 6.3 (standard deviation = 1.7) years from their ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Radiation-related new primary solid cancers in the childhood cancer survivor study. T2 - Comparative radiation dose response and modification of treatment effects. AU - Inskip, Peter D.. AU - Sigurdson, Alice J.. AU - Veiga, Lene. AU - Bhatti, Parveen. AU - Ronckers, Cécile. AU - Rajaraman, Preetha. AU - Boukheris, Houda. AU - Stovall, Marilyn. AU - Smith, Susan. AU - Hammond, Sue. AU - Henderson, Tara O.. AU - Watt, Tanya C.. AU - Mertens, Ann C.. AU - Leisenring, Wendy. AU - Stratton, Kayla. AU - Whitton, John. AU - Donaldson, Sarah S.. AU - Armstrong, Gregory T.. AU - Robison, Leslie L.. AU - Neglia, Joseph P.. PY - 2016/3/15. Y1 - 2016/3/15. N2 - Objectives The majority of childhood cancer patients now achieve long-term survival, but the treatments that cured their malignancy often put them at risk of adverse health outcomes years later. New cancers are among the most serious of these late effects. The aims of this review are to compare and contrast radiation dose-response ...
CLEVELAND, July 12, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- In memory of their daughter, Angie, who died of melanoma at age 14, Char and Chuck Fowler have donated $17 million to establish The Angie Fowler Child & Young Adult Cancer Institute at University Hospitals (UH) Rainbow Babies & Childrens Hospital. Their daughters and sons-in-law, Chann and Ed Spellman and Holley and Rob Martens join them in making this transformational gift. (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20110712/CL33727 ). The largest individual donation in the history of UH Rainbow Babies & Childrens Hospital, the Fowlers lead gift will further the hospitals national leadership in childhood, adolescent and young adult cancers and blood disorders. The Angie Fowler Child & Young Adult Cancer Institute will include a new dedicated outpatient treatment facility and an expanded inpatient unit for pediatric and young adult patients, along with a rooftop garden at UH Rainbow Babies & Childrens Hospital.. "Char and Chuck Fowler, along with ...
1 From Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; Stanford Cancer Institute; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; Fox Chase Cancer Center; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center; Roswell Park Cancer Institute; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; Duke Cancer Institute; Consultant; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Womens Cancer Center; Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; University of Colorado Cancer Center; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; UC San Diego Moores ...
Surgical oncology is the branch of surgery applied to oncology; it focuses on the surgical management of tumors, especially cancerous tumors. As one of several modalities in the management of cancer, the specialty of surgical oncology, before modern medicine the only cancer treatment with a chance of success, has evolved in steps similar to medical oncology (pharmacotherapy for cancer), which grew out of hematology, and radiation oncology, which grew out of radiology. The Ewing Society known today as the Society of Surgical Oncology was started by surgeons interested in promoting the field of oncology. Complex General Surgical Oncology was ratified by a specialty Board certification in 2011 from the American Board of Surgery. The proliferation of cancer centers will continue to popularize the field, as will developments in minimally invasive techniques, palliative surgery, and neo-adjuvant treatments. Whether surgical oncology constitutes a medical specialty per se is the topic of a heated ...
Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment Anal Cancer Treatment Basal Cell Carcinoma Treatment Bladder Cancer Treatment Bone & Spine Sarcoma Treatment Bone Cancer Treatment Brain Cancer Treatment Breast Cancer Treatment Cervical Cancer Treatment Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Treatment Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Treatment Colon Cancer Treatment Cranial Base Center Treatment Cutaneous Lymphoma Treatment Endocrine Cancers Treatment Endometrial Cancer Treatment Esophageal Cancer Treatment Gallbladder Cancer Treatment Gastrointestinal Cancers Treatment Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Treatment Genitourinary Cancers Treatment Gliomas Treatment Gynecologic Cancers Treatment Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment Head & Neck Cancers Treatment Hemophilia Treatment Hodgkins Lymphoma Treatment Kaposi Sarcoma Treatment Kidney Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Leukemia Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Cancer Treatment Liver Cancer Treatment Lung Cancers Treatment Lymphoma Treatment ...
Herbal medicine expert witnesses may opine on herbal medicine, acupuncture, and homeopathy. The Alternative Medicine Blog writes: Many children with cancer - April 15, 2010
Context. The Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) is a brief, widely adopted, multidimensional questionnaire to evaluate patient-reported symptoms. Objectives. To develop a Korean version of the ESAS (K-ESAS) and to perform a psychometric analysis in Korean patients with advanced cancer. Methods. We tested the K-ESAS in two pilot studies with 15 patients each. We assessed internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and concurrent validity in 163 Korean patients, who completed the K-ESAS along with the Korean versions of the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory (K-MDASI) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (K-HADS) twice. A total of 38 patients completed the questionnaires again seven days later to assess responsiveness. Results. The K-ESAS scores had good internal consistency, with a Cronbachs alpha coefficient of 0.88, indicating that no questions had undue influence on the score. Pearson correlation coefficients for K-ESAS symptom scores between baseline and after two to four ...
Full Text CA-96-016 MINORITY-BASED COMMUNITY CLINICAL ONCOLOGY PROGRAM NIH GUIDE, Volume 25, Number 20, June 21, 1996 RFA: CA-96-016 P.T. 34, FF Keywords: Autoimmunity Oncology Disease Prevention+ Treatment, Medical+ Clinical Trial National Cancer Institute Letter of Intent Receipt Date: August 7, 1996 Application Receipt Date: September 25, 1996 PURPOSE The Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC), National Cancer Institute (NCI), is continuing the established cancer control effort, which involves practicing oncologists who serve large minority populations in the NCI clinical trials program. The Community Oncology and Rehabilitation Branch (CORB), DCPC, invites applications from domestic institutions with greater than 50 percent of new cancer patients from minority populations for cooperative agreements in response to this Minority-Based Community Clinical Oncology Program (Minority-Based CCOP) Request for Applications (RFA). Applicants for new and currently funded Minority-Based CCOPs ...

CHAPTER 104 PLASMA CELL NEOPLASMS: GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS | Free Medical TextbookCHAPTER 104 PLASMA CELL NEOPLASMS: GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS | Free Medical Textbook

BAIRD Definition and History Plasma Cell Neoplasms Essential Monoclonal Gammopathy Chronic Cold Agglutinin Syndrome ... GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS Williams Hematology CHAPTER 104 PLASMA CELL NEOPLASMS: GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS STEPHEN M. ... PLASMA CELL NEOPLASMS. Plasma cell neoplasms are monoclonal tumors comprised of plasma cells and their precursors. All the ... CHAPTER 104 PLASMA CELL NEOPLASMS: GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS. Williams Hematology. CHAPTER 104 PLASMA CELL NEOPLASMS: GENERAL ...
more infohttps://medtextfree.wordpress.com/2012/01/23/chapter-104-plasma-cell-neoplasms-general-considerations/

Plasma Cell Neoplasms: General Considerations | Williams Hematology, 9e | AccessHemOnc | McGraw-Hill MedicalPlasma Cell Neoplasms: General Considerations | Williams Hematology, 9e | AccessHemOnc | McGraw-Hill Medical

Plasma cell neoplasms are tumors derived from an expansion of mutated mature B-cells and their precursors. These neoplasms ... "Plasma Cell Neoplasms: General Considerations." Williams Hematology, 9e Kaushansky K, Lichtman MA, Prchal JT, Levi MM, Press OW ... Chapter 105: Plasma Cell Neoplasms: General Considerations Guido Tricot; Siegfried Janz; Kalyan Nadiminti; Erik Wendlandt; ... 109). The prototype of a malignant plasma cell neoplasm is myeloma, which is characterized by complex genetic alterations, best ...
more infohttp://hemonc.mhmedical.com/content.aspx?bookid=1581§ionid=108076158

Oral lipoma: Many features of a rare oral benign neoplasm | IRInSubriaOral lipoma: Many features of a rare oral benign neoplasm | IRInSubria

The unusual characteristics of this case report were the large-sized dimensions of the neoplasm, which were 3 cm along the main ... Introduction Lipomas are common benign soft tissue neoplasms composed of mature white adipocytes. They are the most common soft ... tissue mesenchymal neoplasms. However, they are relatively uncommon in the oral and maxillofacial regions. Their overall ...
more infohttps://irinsubria.uninsubria.it/handle/11383/2023163

Neoplasms | The BMJNeoplasms | The BMJ

Neoplasms. Br Med J 1951; 2 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.2.4745.1446-a (Published 15 December 1951) Cite this as: Br Med J ...
more infohttp://www.bmj.com/content/2/4745/1446.2/submit-a-rapid-response

Neuroendocrine Neoplasms | SpringerLinkNeuroendocrine Neoplasms | SpringerLink

Endocrine neoplasms; Islet cell tumors (pancreatic NET); Small cell and large cell... ... Schmitt-Graeff A. (2015) Neuroendocrine Neoplasms. In: Schwab M. (eds) Encyclopedia of Cancer. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. * ... Carcinoid (well differentiated neuroendocrine tumor (NET) of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract); Endocrine neoplasms; ... Klöppel G (2011) Classification and pathology of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. Endocr Relat Cancer 18:S1-S16 ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/referenceworkentry/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_4032-2

Myeloproliferative Neoplasms | SpringerLinkMyeloproliferative Neoplasms | SpringerLink

Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are clonal stem cell diseases that, under the World Health Organization classification, are ... The reader will find Critical Concepts and Management Recommendations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms to be an invaluable and ... Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are clonal stem cell diseases that, under the World Health Organization classification, are ... Critical Issues About the Diagnosis of Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: World Health Organization Classification ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-3-642-24989-1

Neoplasms | Open LibraryNeoplasms | Open Library

This is a chart to show the publishing history of editions of works about this subject. Along the X axis is time, and on the y axis is the count of editions published. Click here to skip the chart. Reset chart or continue zooming in. This graph charts editions published on this subject. ...
more infohttps://openlibrary.org/subjects/neoplasms

Myeloproliferative neoplasms for studentsMyeloproliferative neoplasms for students

This presentation is prepared for undergraduate students about the various myeloproliferative neoplasms with updated ... Myeloproliferative neoplasms for students * 1. By Dr MONKEZ MYOUSIF Professor of Internal Medicine Zagazig university 2016 ... A. Other myeloproliferative neoplasms (CML, CIMF, PV) B. Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) C. Secondary thrombocytosis − ... This presentation is prepared for undergraduate students about the various myeloproliferative neoplasms with updated ...
more infohttps://www.slideshare.net/monqithyousif/myeloproliferative-neoplasms-for-students

Kidney Neoplasms - MeSH - NCBIKidney Neoplasms - MeSH - NCBI

All MeSH CategoriesDiseases CategoryNeoplasmsNeoplasms by SiteUrogenital NeoplasmsUrologic NeoplasmsKidney NeoplasmsCarcinoma, ... All MeSH CategoriesDiseases CategoryMale Urogenital DiseasesUrogenital NeoplasmsUrologic NeoplasmsKidney NeoplasmsCarcinoma, ... Urogenital Diseases and Pregnancy ComplicationsFemale Urogenital DiseasesUrogenital NeoplasmsUrologic NeoplasmsKidney Neoplasms ... All MeSH CategoriesDiseases CategoryMale Urogenital DiseasesUrologic DiseasesKidney DiseasesKidney NeoplasmsCarcinoma, Renal ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/mesh?term=Kidney%20Neoplasms

Bladder Neoplasms | The BMJBladder Neoplasms | The BMJ

Bladder Neoplasms. Br Med J 1970; 2 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.2.5705.351-b (Published 09 May 1970) Cite this as: Br Med ...
more infohttp://www.bmj.com/content/2/5705/351.3

Brain Neoplasms - MeSH - NCBIBrain Neoplasms - MeSH - NCBI

NeoplasmsNeoplasms by SiteNervous System NeoplasmsCentral Nervous System NeoplasmsBrain NeoplasmsCerebral Ventricle Neoplasms ... NeoplasmsBrain Stem NeoplasmsCerebellar NeoplasmsNeurocytomaPinealomaSupratentorial NeoplasmsHypothalamic Neoplasms + ... NeoplasmsBrain Stem NeoplasmsCerebellar NeoplasmsNeurocytomaPinealomaSupratentorial NeoplasmsHypothalamic Neoplasms + ... Nervous System NeoplasmsCentral Nervous System NeoplasmsBrain NeoplasmsCerebral Ventricle NeoplasmsChoroid Plexus Neoplasms + ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/mesh?Db=mesh&Cmd=DetailsSearch&Term=%22Brain+Neoplasms%22%5BMeSH+Terms%5D

Neoplasms | ASPENeoplasms | ASPE

A number of studies have examined the most common chronic condition clusters in men and women (Ashman et al. 2013, Lochner et al. 2013, Steiner et al. 2013, Steinman et al. 2012, Ward et al. 2013). Exhibit 6 contains chronic condition dyads (2) and triads (3) that were examined in the studies. Although many chronic condition clusters, such as hype ...
more infohttps://aspe.hhs.gov/document-terms/neoplasms?page=6

Neoplasms | ASPENeoplasms | ASPE

According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, no persons are required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a valid OMB control number. The valid OMB control number for this information collection is 0990-0379. The time required to complete this information collection is estimated to average 5 minutes per response, including the time to review instructions, search existing data resources, gather the data needed, and complete and review the information collection. If you have comments concerning the accuracy of the time estimate(s) or suggestions for improving this form, please write to: U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, OS/OCIO/PRA, 200 Independence Ave., S.W., Suite 336-E, Washington D.C. 20201, Attention: PRA Reports Clearance Officer ...
more infohttps://aspe.hhs.gov/document-terms/neoplasms?page=3

Neoplasm - WikipediaNeoplasm - Wikipedia

ICD-10 classifies neoplasms into four main groups: benign neoplasms, in situ neoplasms, malignant neoplasms, and neoplasms of ... The term neoplasm is a synonym of "tumor". Neoplasia denotes the process of the formation of neoplasms/tumors, the process ... "II Neoplasms". World Health Organization. Retrieved 19 June 2014.. *^ a b Abrams, Gerald. "Neoplasia I". Retrieved 23 January ... Malignant neoplasms[edit]. DNA damage[edit]. The central role of DNA damage and epigenetic defects in DNA repair genes in ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tumours

Myeloproliferative neoplasms | Disease InformationMyeloproliferative neoplasms | Disease Information

Myeloproliferative neoplasms are a type of blood cancer that includes myelofibrosis, polycythemia vera and essential ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms. Myeloproliferative neoplasms are a type of blood cancer that includes myelofibrosis, polycythemia ... Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are types of blood cancer that begin with an abnormal mutation (change) in a stem cell in ... Is one of a related group of blood cancers known as "myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs)" in which bone marrow cells that ...
more infohttp://www.lls.org/myeloproliferative-neoplasms

NeoplasmsNeoplasms

Sinus Center provides state-of-the-art care to patients with sinus and allergy disorders including treatment of neoplasms. ... Conditions We Treat: Neoplasms. A neoplasm, typically a benign tumor, can behave more aggressively if not fully treated, rarely ... Neoplasms: What You Need to Know. *Some malignant tumors that occur in the nose include esthesioneuroblastoma (olfactory ... in the Head and Neck Cancer Surgery Center and the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery to treat patients with neoplasms. ...
more infohttps://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/otolaryngology/specialty_areas/sinus_center/conditions/neoplasms.html

Morphology of NeoplasmsMorphology of Neoplasms

I was wondering if anyone has experience using the Morphology of Neoplasm codes for billing purposes. Can they/should they be ... I was wondering if anyone has experience using the Morphology of Neoplasm codes for billing purposes. Can they/should they be ...
more infohttps://www.aapc.com/memberarea/forums/56630-morphology-neoplasms.html

brain neoplasms | MagCloudbrain neoplasms | MagCloud

Make newsstand-quality magazines, catalogs, zines, posters, comic books, and more. Create print and digital versions using Adobe InDesign and Photoshop with our custom publishing platform.
more infohttp://www.magcloud.com/shop/tag/brain%20neoplasms?p=0

urethral neoplasmurethral neoplasm

Neoplasm, Urethra, Neoplasms, Urethral, Urethra Neoplasms, Urethra Cancer, Cancer, Urethral, Urethral Neoplasms, Neoplasms, ... Synonyms: Urethral Cancer, Neoplasm, Urethral, NEOPL URETHRAL, Cancer of the Urethra, Urethra Neoplasm, Cancer of Urethra, ...
more infohttps://www.ebi.ac.uk/ols/ontologies/efo/terms?short_form=EFO_0003846

Myeloproliferative neoplasm - WikipediaMyeloproliferative neoplasm - Wikipedia

Although not a malignant neoplasm like other cancers, MPNs are classified within the hematological neoplasms. There are four ... According to the WHO Classification of Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Neoplasms 2008 myeloproliferative neoplasms are divided into ... The myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), previously myeloproliferative diseases (MPDs), are a group of diseases of the bone ... Somatic CALR mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2. N Engl J Med 2013;369:2391-2405 ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myeloproliferative_disease

Myeloproliferative NeoplasmsMyeloproliferative Neoplasms

The Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Online Medical Reference - definition, incidence, pathophysiology and natural history, signs ... Mutations of JAK2, MPL, or CALR occur in most myeloproliferative neoplasms and serves as a pivotal diagnostic criterion. ... The myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), previously termed the myeloproliferative disorders, are characterized by the clonal ... The evolving genomic landscape of myeloproliferative neoplasms. Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program 2014; 2014:287-296. ...
more infohttp://www.clevelandclinicmeded.com/medicalpubs/diseasemanagement/hematology-oncology/chronic-myeloproliferative-disorders/

How I Treat Myeloproliferative NeoplasmsHow I Treat Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

... sessions on myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) will take place at the ASH Meeting on Hematologic Malignancies. ... How I Treat Myeloproliferative Neoplasms. The following "How I Treat" sessions on myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) took ... He is a physician investigator with a career focus on developing new therapies for patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms ... Ruben Mesa will discuss how he treats problematic cases of patients with the myeloproliferative neoplasms of essential ...
more infohttps://www.hematology.org/Malignancies/Program/7154.aspx

Treatment Status in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine NeoplasmsTreatment Status in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms

Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (P-NENs) are a group of pathologically and clinically heterogeneous tumors. In the past ... Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) once called carcinoid tumors, endocrine tumors or neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are a group of ... Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (P-NENs), commonly be called pancreatic endocrine tumors, insulinoma, gastrinoma or ...
more infohttps://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/913671

Prostatic Neoplasms ArticlesProstatic Neoplasms Articles

To verify the quality of pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) performed at radical prostatectomy (RP) and its impact on nodal recurrence in patients undergoing salvage lymph node dissection (sLND).. Retrospective review of 48 patients who underwent sLND for presumed nodal recurrence, to describe the PLND characteristics at RP and correlate the anatomical sites and number of suspicious nodes reported in radiological imaging and final pathology of sLND. ...
more infohttps://www.urotoday.com/tags/prostatic-neoplasms.html

Rare neoplasmsRare neoplasms

Tranexamic Acid in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia. Sabbà, Carlo; Gallitelli, Mauro; Ciavarella, Nicola // New England Journal of Medicine;2/7/2002, Vol. 346 Issue 6, p457 A response by Mauro Gallitelli and colleagues to a letter to the editor about their article on the efficacy of tranexamic acid in reducing epistaxis in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia in the September 20, 2001 is presented. ...
more infohttp://connection.ebscohost.com/c/letters/33327015/rare-neoplasms
  • A neoplasm, typically a benign tumor, can behave more aggressively if not fully treated, rarely giving rise to a cancer. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Standard resections for benign and borderline neoplasms of the pancreas are associated with a significant risk of long‐term functional impairment, whereas enucleation preserves healthy parenchyma and pancreatic function. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • Neuroendocrine neoplams (NENs) are neoplasms with a broad range of morphologic patterns, grade of differentiation, and biological behavior that share common features of neuroendocrine (NE) programming. (springer.com)
  • Depending on the nature of the myeloproliferative neoplasm, diagnostic tests may include red cell mass determination (for polycythemia), bone marrow aspirate and trephine biopsy, arterial oxygen saturation and carboxyhaemoglobin level, neutrophil alkaline phosphatase level, vitamin B 12 (or B 12 binding capacity), serum urate or direct sequencing of the patient's DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • A neoplasm can be caused by an abnormal proliferation of tissues, which can be caused by genetic mutations. (wikipedia.org)