Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.
All deaths reported in a given population.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Number of fetal deaths with stated or presumed gestation of 20 weeks or more in a given population. Late fetal mortality is death after of 28 weeks or more.
The event that a FETUS is born dead or stillborn.
Diseases of newborn infants present at birth (congenital) or developing within the first month of birth. It does not include hereditary diseases not manifesting at birth or within the first 30 days of life nor does it include inborn errors of metabolism. Both HEREDITARY DISEASES and METABOLISM, INBORN ERRORS are available as general concepts.
Deaths occurring from the 28th week of GESTATION to the 28th day after birth in a given population.
Respiratory failure in the newborn. (Dorland, 27th ed)
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
Maternal deaths resulting from complications of pregnancy and childbirth in a given population.
Childbirth taking place in the home.
The care of women and a fetus or newborn given before, during, and after delivery from the 28th week of gestation through the 7th day after delivery.
Care of infants in the home or institution.
Death of the developing young in utero. BIRTH of a dead FETUS is STILLBIRTH.
Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.
A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.
An infant having a birth weight of 2500 gm. (5.5 lb.) or less but INFANT, VERY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT is available for infants having a birth weight of 1500 grams (3.3 lb.) or less.
The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual at BIRTH. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.
The event that a FETUS is born alive with heartbeats or RESPIRATION regardless of GESTATIONAL AGE. Such liveborn is called a newborn infant (INFANT, NEWBORN).
The destruction of germs causing disease.
The care provided to women and their NEWBORNS for the first few months following CHILDBIRTH.
The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.
The practice of assisting women in childbirth.
Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.
Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.
Delivery of the FETUS and PLACENTA under the care of an obstetrician or a health worker. Obstetric deliveries may involve physical, psychological, medical, or surgical interventions.
Care provided the pregnant woman in order to prevent complications, and decrease the incidence of maternal and prenatal mortality.
Number of deaths of children between one year of age to 12 years of age in a given population.
CHILDBIRTH before 37 weeks of PREGNANCY (259 days from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period, or 245 days after FERTILIZATION).
Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.
A human infant born before 37 weeks of GESTATION.
A subspecialty of Pediatrics concerned with the newborn infant.
A method, developed by Dr. Virginia Apgar, to evaluate a newborn's adjustment to extrauterine life. Five items - heart rate, respiratory effort, muscle tone, reflex irritability, and color - are evaluated 60 seconds after birth and again five minutes later on a scale from 0-2, 0 being the lowest, 2 being normal. The five numbers are added for the Apgar score. A score of 0-3 represents severe distress, 4-7 indicates moderate distress, and a score of 7-10 predicts an absence of difficulty in adjusting to extrauterine life.
Professional nurses who have received postgraduate training in midwifery.
A disinfectant and topical anti-infective agent used also as mouthwash to prevent oral plaque.
Malformations of organs or body parts during development in utero.
A method of continuously holding a partially wrapped baby to the chest, involving skin-to-skin contact. Originally it was a method of caring for LOW-BIRTH-WEIGHT INFANT in developing countries and is now more widespread in developed nations. Aside from encouraging breast feeding, the extra sleep that the infant gets assists in regulating body temperature, helps the baby conserve energy, and redirects calorie expenditures toward growth and weight gain.
An infant whose weight at birth is less than 1500 grams (3.3 lbs), regardless of gestational age.
Hospital units providing continuing surveillance and care to acutely ill newborn infants.
Substances used on humans and other animals that destroy harmful microorganisms or inhibit their activity. They are distinguished from DISINFECTANTS, which are used on inanimate objects.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
A republic in southern Africa, south of DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO and TANZANIA, and north of ZIMBABWE. Its capital is Lusaka. It was formerly called Northern Rhodesia.
Hospital facilities which provide care for newborn infants.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
The branch of medicine dealing with the fetus and infant during the perinatal period. The perinatal period begins with the twenty-eighth week of gestation and ends twenty-eight days after birth. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.
Continuous care and monitoring of newborn infants with life-threatening conditions, in any setting.
A disease caused by tetanospasmin, a powerful protein toxin produced by CLOSTRIDIUM TETANI. Tetanus usually occurs after an acute injury, such as a puncture wound or laceration. Generalized tetanus, the most common form, is characterized by tetanic muscular contractions and hyperreflexia. Localized tetanus presents itself as a mild condition with manifestations restricted to muscles near the wound. It may progress to the generalized form.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
The repetitive uterine contraction during childbirth which is associated with the progressive dilation of the uterine cervix (CERVIX UTERI). Successful labor results in the expulsion of the FETUS and PLACENTA. Obstetric labor can be spontaneous or induced (LABOR, INDUCED).
The ash, dust, gases, and lava released by volcanic explosion. The gases are volatile matter composed principally of about 90% water vapor, and carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen. The ash or dust is pyroclastic ejecta and lava is molten extrusive material consisting mainly of magnesium silicate. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The killing of infants at birth or soon after.
A condition of the newborn marked by DYSPNEA with CYANOSIS, heralded by such prodromal signs as dilatation of the alae nasi, expiratory grunt, and retraction of the suprasternal notch or costal margins, mostly frequently occurring in premature infants, children of diabetic mothers, and infants delivered by cesarean section, and sometimes with no apparent predisposing cause.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Official certifications by a physician recording the individual's birth date, place of birth, parentage and other required identifying data which are filed with the local registrar of vital statistics.
Official records of individual deaths including the cause of death certified by a physician, and any other required identifying information.
The age of the mother in PREGNANCY.
Special hospitals which provide care to women during pregnancy and parturition.
The condition of carrying two or more FETUSES simultaneously.
The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.
The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.
A republic in western Africa, south of BURKINA FASO and west of TOGO. Its capital is Accra.
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
Medical problems associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR, such as BREECH PRESENTATION; PREMATURE OBSTETRIC LABOR; HEMORRHAGE; or others. These complications can affect the well-being of the mother, the FETUS, or both.
Mechanical or anoxic trauma incurred by the infant during labor or delivery.
Onset of OBSTETRIC LABOR before term (TERM BIRTH) but usually after the FETUS has become viable. In humans, it occurs sometime during the 29th through 38th week of PREGNANCY. TOCOLYSIS inhibits premature labor and can prevent the BIRTH of premature infants (INFANT, PREMATURE).
Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.
Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of infants.
The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.
Two individuals derived from two FETUSES that were fertilized at or about the same time, developed in the UTERUS simultaneously, and born to the same mother. Twins are either monozygotic (TWINS, MONOZYGOTIC) or dizygotic (TWINS, DIZYGOTIC).
The number of offspring a female has borne. It is contrasted with GRAVIDITY, which refers to the number of pregnancies, regardless of outcome.
The sequence in which children are born into the family.
Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
CHILDBIRTH at the end of a normal duration of PREGNANCY, between 37 to 40 weeks of gestation or about 280 days from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period.
The pit in the center of the ABDOMINAL WALL marking the point where the UMBILICAL CORD entered in the FETUS.
The status of health in rural populations.
The nursing specialty concerning care of children from birth to adolescence. It includes the clinical and psychological aspects of nursing care.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
Allowing a woman to be in LABOR, OBSTETRIC long enough to determine if vaginal birth may be anticipated.
Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the mother.
Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.
Persons trained to assist professional health personnel in communicating with residents in the community concerning needs and availability of health services.
The proportion of patients with a particular disease during a given year per given unit of population.
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
A class of hospitals that includes profit or not-for-profit hospitals that are controlled by a legal entity other than a government agency. (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed)
An international organization whose members include most of the sovereign nations of the world with headquarters in New York City. The primary objectives of the organization are to maintain peace and security and to achieve international cooperation in solving international economic, social, cultural, or humanitarian problems.
Spontaneous tearing of the membranes surrounding the FETUS any time before the onset of OBSTETRIC LABOR. Preterm PROM is membrane rupture before 37 weeks of GESTATION.
The lengths of intervals between births to women in the population.
A colloidal system of semisolid hydrocarbons obtained from PETROLEUM. It is used as an ointment base, topical protectant, and lubricant.
The restoration to life or consciousness of one apparently dead. (Dorland, 27th ed)
A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.
Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.
Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.
Pregnancy in human adolescent females under the age of 19.
Organized services to provide health care for children.
Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.
The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.
A malpresentation of the FETUS at near term or during OBSTETRIC LABOR with the fetal cephalic pole in the fundus of the UTERUS. There are three types of breech: the complete breech with flexed hips and knees; the incomplete breech with one or both hips partially or fully extended; the frank breech with flexed hips and extended knees.
The number of births in a given population per year or other unit of time.
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
The process of giving birth to one or more offspring.
Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.
A republic stretching from the Indian Ocean east to New Guinea, comprising six main islands: Java, Sumatra, Bali, Kalimantan (the Indonesian portion of the island of Borneo), Sulawesi (formerly known as the Celebes) and Irian Jaya (the western part of New Guinea). Its capital is Djakarta. The ethnic groups living there are largely Chinese, Arab, Eurasian, Indian, and Pakistani; 85% of the peoples are of the Islamic faith.
An infant having a birth weight lower than expected for its gestational age.
Visits to the patient's home by professional personnel for the purpose of diagnosis and/or treatment.
The flexible rope-like structure that connects a developing FETUS to the PLACENTA in mammals. The cord contains blood vessels which carry oxygen and nutrients from the mother to the fetus and waste products away from the fetus.
A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.
The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.
Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.
A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.
The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.
Deaths that occur before LIFE EXPECTANCY is reached within a given population.
Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Africa.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.
The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.
The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.
Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.
The nursing of an infant at the breast.
A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.
Hospitals controlled by various types of government, i.e., city, county, district, state or federal.
Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.
The co-occurrence of pregnancy and an INFECTION. The infection may precede or follow FERTILIZATION.
Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.
Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.
Hospitals located in metropolitan areas.
A republic in eastern Africa, south of UGANDA and north of MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Dar es Salaam. It was formed in 1964 by a merger of the countries of TANGANYIKA and ZANZIBAR.
The study of chance processes or the relative frequency characterizing a chance process.
The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
The co-occurrence of pregnancy and parasitic diseases. The parasitic infection may precede or follow FERTILIZATION.
A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.
The largest of the continents. It was known to the Romans more specifically as what we know today as Asia Minor. The name comes from at least two possible sources: from the Assyrian asu (to rise) or from the Sanskrit usa (dawn), both with reference to its being the land of the rising sun, i.e., eastern as opposed to Europe, to the west. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p82 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p34)
A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.
A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).
The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.
The failure of a FETUS to attain its expected FETAL GROWTH at any GESTATIONAL AGE.
Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.
A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.
Female parents, human or animal.
The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.
Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.
Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.
Products in capsule, tablet or liquid form that provide dietary ingredients, and that are intended to be taken by mouth to increase the intake of nutrients. Dietary supplements can include macronutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates, and fats; and/or MICRONUTRIENTS, such as VITAMINS; MINERALS; and PHYTOCHEMICALS.
Based on known statistical data, the number of years which any person of a given age may reasonably expected to live.
New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.
The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.
In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.
A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
A distribution function used to describe the occurrence of rare events or to describe the sampling distribution of isolated counts in a continuum of time or space.
NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).
Substances and drugs that lower the SURFACE TENSION of the mucoid layer lining the PULMONARY ALVEOLI.
A complication of PREGNANCY, characterized by a complex of symptoms including maternal HYPERTENSION and PROTEINURIA with or without pathological EDEMA. Symptoms may range between mild and severe. Pre-eclampsia usually occurs after the 20th week of gestation, but may develop before this time in the presence of trophoblastic disease.
Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.
The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.
Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)
The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.
Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.
Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.
Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.
Therapy for the insufficient cleansing of the BLOOD by the kidneys based on dialysis and including hemodialysis, PERITONEAL DIALYSIS, and HEMODIAFILTRATION.
Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).
Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.
Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.
The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.
The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.
A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.
Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.
An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.
A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.
Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.
Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.
A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)
Litter size at birth, stillborn, early neonatal mortality for poodles in the Norwegian Kennel Club[75][76] Size. Average litter ... Toy Poodles have one of the smallest litter size of all breeds.[75] The stillborn rate and early neonatal mortality (death ... Tønnessen, R.; Borge, K. S.; Nødtvedt, A.; Indrebø, A. (2012). "Canine perinatal mortality: A cohort study of 224 breeds". ...
Neonatal mortality rate is 24 per 1,000 live births. Mortality rates are much higher in rural (55 deaths per 1,000 live births ... Infant mortality (under-1) is 39.14 deaths per 1,000 live births. Neonatal mortality rate is 24 per 1,000 live births. ... The under-5 mortality rate has dropped from 142 per 1,000 live births in 1990 to 42 deaths in 2012. Infant mortality (under-1) ... Shakya, K.; McMurray, C. (2001). "Neonatal mortality and maternal health care in Nepal: Searching for patterns of association ...
Neonatal mortality is increased. The WHO estimated in 2006 that an additional 10-20 babies die per 1,000 deliveries as a result ...
Furthermore, it has been implicated in neonatal mortality among puppies. Recently, SDSD has been described as an emerging ... "Neonatal mortality in puppies due to bacteremia by Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae". Journal of Clinical ... pathogen in fish, causing fulminant necrotic ulcers of the caudal peduncle, with ensuing high mortality rates. The clinical ...
"Relationship Between Cesarean Delivery Rate and Maternal and Neonatal Mortality". JAMA. 314 (21): 2263-70. doi:10.1001/jama. ... In Great Britain and Ireland, the mortality rate in 1865 was 85%. Key steps in reducing mortality were:. *Introduction of the ... Neonatal. Med. 23: 506-10. doi:10.3109/14767050903214590. PMID 19718582.. *^ "Academic Achievement Varies With Gestational Age ... "High infant mortality rate seen with elective c-section". Reuters Health-September 2006. Medicineonline.com. 14 September 2006 ...
7 (21). "Liberia: improving maternal and neonatal mortality". mcai.org.uk. Retrieved 31 March 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged ... In 2011 Professor Southall was also invited to be the key note speaker for The David Harvey Lecture an annual UK Neonatal ... The infants treated were all very premature babies in whom mortality and morbidity was expected, but there were no differences ... Neonatal and Child Healthcare (EMNCH) was established. The program was originally started in the Afghan refugee camps in ...
Infant and neonatal morbidity and mortality 91............................................Supposed prenatal influence. Prenatal ...
Infant mortality rate. Neo-natal mortality rate. Post neo-natal mortality rate. Under-five mortality rate. Sex ratio at birth ♀ ...
Delayed breastfeeding initiation increases risk of neonatal mortality. Pediatrics. 2006 Mar 1;117(3):e380-6. Cited 1147 times ...
"Infant mortality rate". Our World in Data. Retrieved 2020-10-01. "Mortality rate, neonatal (per 1,000 live births) - Portugal ... This improvement was mainly due to the decrease in neonatal mortality, from 29.4 neonates (per 1000 live births) dying in their ... At the same time, child mortality rate in Europe was 10.92%, while in the world it was on average 22.54%. In 2015, only 0.28% ... Roser, Max; Ritchie, Hannah; Dadonaite, Bernadeta (2013-05-10). "Child and Infant Mortality". Our World in Data. " ...
Neonatal mortality and hand‐rearing rates have decreased; transfers in most cases proved to be successful: almost all gorillas ...
Kaufman GE, Malone FD, Harvey-Wilkes KB, Chelmow D, Penzias AS, D'Alton ME (1998). "Neonatal morbidity and mortality associated ... "Morbidity and mortality of very low birth weight multiples compared with singletons". The Journal of Maternal-Fetal & Neonatal ... planned Cesarean section does not significantly decrease or increase the risk of fetal or neonatal death or serious neonatal ... Fetal Neonatal Ed. 75 (3): F174-7. doi:10.1136/fn.75.3.f174. PMC 1061194. PMID 8976682. Note: They conducted a study by looking ...
Infant mortality rate is 69 per 1,000 (2019). Neonatal mortality rate is 33 per 1,000(2019). The nutritional state of the ... The under 5 mortality rates in Chad is 113.8 per 1,000 live births(2019). ... The maternal mortality rate was 856 deaths per 100,000 (2015). 51% of women aged 20.24 gave birth before the age of 18. 22% of ...
"Neonatal behavioral and nutrition-related mortality in domestic swine." Journal of Animal Science 42 (1976): 235-41. Print. ... Neonatal competition also exists among piglets as they directly compete against their siblings for their mother's teats only ... Competition is responsible for 43% of piglet neonatal death due to starvation. Under normal conditions (i.e. stable environment ... "Fatal sibling aggression, precocial development, and androgens in neonatal spotted hyenas." Science 252.5006 (1991). Web. Wahaj ...
For services to reducing neo-natal mortality in Vietnam. Carol Ann Lyndon - Childline Counsellor, NSPCC. For services to ...
Joint Committee on Reducing Maternal Neonatal Mortality in Indonesia; Development, Security; Policy Global, Affairs; National ... Reducing Maternal and Neonatal Mortality in Indonesia: Saving Lives, Saving the Future , The National Academies Press. doi: ... Adashi co-chaired the Committee on Reducing Childbirth Mortality in Indonesia: Saving Lives, Saving the Future (2012-2013). ...
An application to neonatal mortality". Journal of Econometrics. Measurement Error Models. 200 (2): 363-377. Watson, S. I.; ... An application to neonatal mortality". Journal of Econometrics. Measurement Error Models. 200 (2): 363-377. doi:10.1016/j. ... "The effects of designation and volume of neonatal care on mortality and morbidity outcomes of very preterm infants in England: ... "The effects of designation and volume of neonatal care on mortality and morbidity outcomes of very preterm infants in England: ...
An important placental sign of neonatal morbidity and mortality". Arch Pathol Lab Med. 108 (1): 71-4. PMID 6546343. De La Ossa ...
"Thirty-five year mortality following receipt of SV40- contaminated polio vaccine during the neonatal period". British Journal ...
"Relationship Between Cesarean Delivery Rate and Maternal and Neonatal Mortality". JAMA. 314 (21): 2263-70. doi:10.1001/jama. ... Mortality rates resulting from some infections may be high, for example the overall perinatal mortality rate associated with ... "Mortality and Burden of Disease Estimates for WHO Member States in 2004" (xls). Department of Measurement and Health ... "Mortality and Burden of Disease Estimates for WHO Member States in 2004" (xls). Department of Measurement and Health ...
... their infant and childhood mortality rates are among the lowest in the Arab world. The causes of neonatal mortality among ... 2006). Neonatal and perinatal mortality : country, regional and global estimates. Åhman, Elisabeth., World Health Organization ... "QuickStats: Infant Mortality Rate,* by State - United States, 2016". MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 67 (33): 942 ... A study done in 2007 found that infants born to Mexican-immigrant women in the United States had a 10% lower mortality rate ...
"Relationship Between Cesarean Delivery Rate and Maternal and Neonatal Mortality". JAMA. 314 (21): 2263-70. doi:10.1001/jama. ... In Great Britain and Ireland, the mortality rate in 1865 was 85%. Key steps in reducing mortality were: Introduction of the ... Higher infant mortality risk: In caesarean sections performed with no indicated medical risk (singleton at full term in a head- ... "High infant mortality rate seen with elective c-section". Reuters Health-September 2006. Medicineonline.com. 14 September 2006 ...
The breed has a high stillborn and early neonatal mortality rate, with a stillborn rate of 14.2% and early neonatal mortality ( ... early neonatal mortality. Excluding stillborn and early deaths, the mean litter size is 6.1. UK Kennel Club data shows that ... Tønnessen, R.; Borge, K. S.; Nødtvedt, A.; Indrebø, A. (2012). "Canine perinatal mortality: A cohort study of 224 breeds". ... "Longevity and mortality of owned dogs in England". The Veterinary Journal. 198: 638-43. doi:10.1016/j.tvjl.2013.09.020. PMID ...
Low birth weight is associated with neonatal infection and infant mortality. A low birth weight can be caused either by a ... "The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit". Stanford Children Health. Retrieved 15 November 2018. "What is neonatal care?". Liverpools ... "Infant Mortality , Maternal and Infant Health , Reproductive Health , CDC". www.cdc.gov. 3 August 2018. Collins JW, David RJ, ... Non-Hispanic Blacks have the highest infant mortality rate in the United States (11.4 deaths per 1,000 live births compared to ...
Källén, K.; Olausson, PO (2007). "Letter: Neonatal Mortality for Low-Risk Women by Method of Delivery". Birth. 34 (1): 99-100. ... Pettker, C.; Funai, E (2007). "Letter: Neonatal Mortality for Low-Risk Women by Method of Delivery". Birth. 34 (1): 100-101. ... MacDorman, MF; Declercq, E; Menacker, F; Malloy, MH (2008). "Neonatal Mortality for Primary Cesarean and Vaginal Births to Low- ... MacDorman, MF; Declercq, E; Menacker, F; Malloy, MH (2006). "Infant and neonatal mortality for primary cesarean and vaginal ...
"FSI - Massive ambulance service reduces neonatal and infant mortality in India". fsi.stanford.edu. Retrieved 2019-12-24. ... "Ambulance Service Associated With Reduced Probabilities Of Neonatal And Infant Mortality In Two Indian States". Health Affairs ... conducted in two Indian states where GVK EMRI operates demonstrated their service helped reduce neonatal and infant mortality. ...
Kaufman GE, Malone FD, Harvey-Wilkes KB, Chelmow D, Penzias AS, D'Alton ME (1998). "Neonatal morbidity and mortality associated ... Mortality rate (stillbirth)Edit. Multiples are also known to have a higher mortality rate. It is more common for multiple ... Neonatal intensive careEdit. Multiple-birth infants are usually admitted to neonatal intensive care immediately after being ... Fetal Neonatal Ed. 75 (3): F174-7. doi:10.1136/fn.75.3.f174. PMC 1061194. PMID 8976682. Note: They conducted a study by looking ...
"Transcutaneous carbon dioxide monitoring for the prevention of neonatal morbidity and mortality". The Cochrane Database of ... Monitoring the level of carbon dioxide in neonatal infants to ensure that the level is not too high (hypercarbia) or too low ...
"Effect on neonatal tetanus mortality after a culturally-based health promotion programme". The Lancet. 358 (9282): 640-41. doi: ...
... and long-term mortality is decreased.[122] There however is some short-term mortality risk of less than 1% from the surgery.[ ... "Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and Maturity-onset Diabetes of the Young". National Diabetes ... Metformin is generally recommended as a first line treatment as there is some evidence that it decreases mortality;[7][25][104] ... Chen X, Yang L, Zhai SD (December 2012). "Risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality among diabetic patients ...
... , also known as ophthalmia neonatorum, is a form of conjunctivitis and a type of neonatal infection ... "Neonatal Conjunctivitis Treatment & Management: Treatment of Neonatal Herpetic Conjunctivitis". Retrieved 2013-08-11.. ... "Conjunctivitis, Neonatal: Overview-eMedicine".. *^ Mallika, PS; Asok, T; Faisal, HA; Aziz, S; Tan, AK; Intan, G (2008-08-31). " ... Neonatal conjunctivitis by definition presents during the first month of life. It may be infectious or non infectious.[3] In ...
Given Nepal's existing health service indicators, it becomes clear that strategies to address neonatal mortality in Nepal must ... Under-five mortality:From 136.9 per 1,000 live births in 1990 to 39.5 in 2015. Infant Mortality: From 97.70 to 29.40 in 2015. ... over time have shown that neonatal mortality in Nepal has been decreasing at a slower rate than infant and child mortality. The ... of the infant mortality rate (IMR) and 58% of the under 5 mortality rate (U5MR) in 2015 and is one of its challenges going ...
No clear differences in cerebral palsy, infant mortality or other standard measures of neonatal wellbeing, neither on any ... This nomenclature has been adopted by the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric, and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN), the American ... CTG was associated with fewer neonatal seizures but it is unclear if it had any impact on long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes ...
... perinatal mortality) There is no evidence that cerclage is effective in a multiple gestation pregnancy for preventing preterm ... cerclage is effective in a multiple gestation pregnancy for preventing preterm births and reducing perinatal deaths or neonatal ... births and reducing perinatal deaths or neonatal morbidity. Alfirevic, Zarko; Stampalija, Tamara; Medley, Nancy (2017). " ...
... no controlled studies have shown a reduction in the morbidity or mortality of prostate cancer when detected by DRE at any age.[ ... for screening with the goal of reducing prostate cancer mortality provide limited evidence to draw conclusions."[26] "The ...
Litter size at birth, stillborn, early neonatal mortality for poodles in the Norwegian Kennel Club[88][89]. Size. Average ... Toy Poodles have one of the smallest litter size of all breeds.[88] The stillborn rate and early neonatal mortality (death ... Tønnessen, R.; Borge, K. S.; Nødtvedt, A.; Indrebø, A. (2012). "Canine perinatal mortality: A cohort study of 224 breeds". ...
J.M. Sreenan; M.G. Diskin (6 December 2012). Embryonic Mortality in Farm Animals. Springer Science & Business Media. pp. 172-. ... Giuseppe Buonocore; Rodolfo Bracci; Michael Weindling (28 January 2012). Neonatology: A Practical Approach to Neonatal Diseases ...
A consequence from inbreeding for this species has been high juvenile mortality, low fecundity, and poor breeding success.[40] ... neonatal diabetes, limb malformations, disorders of sex development, schizophrenia and several others.[63][76] Moreover, there ... Wielebnowski, Nadja (1996). "Reassessing the relationship between juvenile mortality and genetic monomorphism in captive ... Some of the most harmful effects known from such breeding includes its effects on the mortality rate as well as on the general ...
Mortality associated with severe sepsis remains high at 30-50%. When shock is present, mortality is reported to be even higher ... Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). *Pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). *Coronary care unit (CCU) ... The Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) is a global initiative to bring together professional organizations in reducing mortality ... of the SSC is to create an international collaborative effort to improve the treatment of sepsis and reduce the high mortality ...
"Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and Maturity-onset Diabetes of the Young". National Diabetes ... "Effect of intensive glucose lowering treatment on all cause mortality, cardiovascular death, and microvascular events in type ...
GBD 2015 Mortality and Causes of Death, Collaborators. (8 October 2016). "Global, regional, and national life expectancy, all- ... Jagannath VA, Fedorowicz Z, Sud V, Verma AK, Hajebrahimi S (14 November 2012). "Routine neonatal circumcision for the ... cause mortality, and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes of death, 1980-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden ...
Neonatal. Med. 22 (3): 191-7. doi:10.1080/14767050802630169. PMID 19330702.. *^ AlFaleh K, Anabrees J (2014). "Probiotics for ... Despite a significant mortality risk, long-term prognosis for infants undergoing NEC surgery is improving, with survival rates ... Gross pathology of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis. Autopsy of infant showing abdominal distension, intestinal necrosis and ... Yee, Wendy H.; Soraisham, Amuchou Singh; Shah, Vibhuti S.; Aziz, Khalid; Yoon, Woojin; Lee, Shoo K.; Canadian Neonatal Network ...
"Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 53 (9): 1-32. PMID 15562258.. *^ "Mississippi 'Personhood' Amendment Vote Fails". ... In such situations, the child should receive the neonatal support and intensive care that is in the child's best interest and ... The pregnancy-associated mortality rate among women who delivered live neonates was 8.8 deaths per 100,000 live births. The ... April 2004). "Risk factors for legal induced abortion-related mortality in the United States". Obstetrics & Gynecology. 103 (4 ...
Morbidity and mortality weekly report 60 (21): 689-93. PMID 21637182.. *↑ Health Protection Agency (2010). HIV in the United ... Thorne, C; Newell, ML (2007 Jun). "HIV". Seminars in fetal & neonatal medicine 12 (3): 174-81. PMID 17321814. doi:10.1016/j. ... Recommendations and reports : Morbidity and mortality weekly report. Recommendations and reports / Centers for Disease Control ... Recommendations and reports : Morbidity and mortality weekly report. Recommendations and reports / Centers for Disease Control ...
The under 5 mortality rate, per 1,000 births is 95 and the neonatal mortality as a percentage of under 5's mortality are 37. In ... The 2010 maternal mortality rate per 100,000 births for Djibouti is 300. This is compared with 461.6 in 2008 and 606.5 in 1990 ...
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). 59 (15): 456-459. PMID 20414188. Retrieved 12 April 2011. Fatahzadeh M, Schwartz ... will have of their own infection is the horizontal transmission to a sexual partner or the vertical transmission of neonatal ...
... mortality. The mice uniformly die at 3-4 postnatal weeks. While this model is considered to be more severe than the phenotypes ... Neonatal problems. *EEG abnormalities. *Psychoses. *MRI or X-ray computed tomography abnormalities ...
... inpatient mortality rate, and case mix index.[34] ... Neonatal intensive care unit. *Cardiovascular intensive care ...
"Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 53 (3): 57-9. PMID 14749614. Archived from the original on 19 September 2007. Retrieved ... Bersani, I; Thomas, W; Speer, CP (Apr 2012). "Chorioamnionitis--the good or the evil for neonatal outcome?". The Journal of ... Intrauterine and neonatal insults (many of which are infectious) increase the risk.[63] ... "Neonatal interventions for preventing cerebral palsy: an overview of Cochrane systematic reviews". Cochrane Database of ...
In the USA drotrecogin was FDA approved for the reduction of mortality in adult patients with severe sepsis (sepsis associated ... Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). *Pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). *Coronary care unit (CCU) ... Drotrecogin alfa does not improve mortality in severe sepsis or septic shock but does increase bleeding risks. Therefore, a ...
Neonatal/pediatric neurosurgery is often required for avulsion fracture repair. Lesions may heal over time and function return ... Neonatal sepsis *Group B streptococcal infection. *Neonatal conjunctivitis. Other. *Miscarriage. *Perinatal mortality * ...
歐洲兒科學會與新生兒重症監護(英语:European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care) ... Assessing available information on the burden of sepsis: global estimates of incidence, prevalence and mortality. Journal of ... 新生兒加護病房(英语:Neonatal
Eshaghian, S; Horwich, TB; Fonarow, GC (2006). "An unexpected inverse relationship between HbA1c levels and mortality in ... neonatal research, functional brain monitoring, brain computer interface, urology (bladder contraction), neurology ( ... Natural selection seems to be the main force working on this gene because the mortality rate of offspring is significantly ... lower for women with higher hemoglobin-oxygen affinity when compared to the mortality rate of offspring from women with low ...
Ruan Q, Yang K, Wang W, Jiang L, Song J (Mart 2020). "Clinical predictors of mortality due to COVID-19 based on an analysis of ... Baud D, Qi X, Nielsen-Saines K, Musso D, Pomar L, Favre G (Mart 2020). "Real estimates of mortality following COVID-19 ... Ji Y, Ma Z, Peppelenbosch MP, Pan Q (Şubat 2020). "Potential association between COVID-19 mortality and health-care resource ... "Clinical course and risk factors for mortality of adult inpatients with COVID-19 in Wuhan, China: a retrospective cohort study ...
A 2014 meta-analysis concluded that an elevated consumption of olive oil is associated with reduced risk of all-cause mortality ... Implications for Neonatal Skin Care". Pediatric Dermatology. 30 (1): 42-50. doi:10.1111/j.1525-1470.2012.01865.x. PMID 22995032 ... There is preliminary evidence that regular consumption of olive oil may lower risk of all-cause mortality and several chronic ...
"Archives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal and Neonatal Edition. United Kingdom: British Medical Journal Publishing Group. 76 (1 ...
"Maternal and neonatal urinary iodine status and its effect on neonatal TSH levels in a mildly iodine-deficient area". Journal ... "Mortality and Burden of Disease Estimates for WHO Member States in 2002" (xls). World Health Organization. 2002.. ... GBD 2013 Mortality and Causes of Death, Collaborators (17 December 2014). "Global, regional, and national age-sex specific all- ... mostly due to neonatal exposure to iodine-containing disinfectants.[35] A 2014 meta-analysis found that iodine supplementation ...
... higher ICU volume was significantly associated with lower ICU and hospital mortality rates. For example, adjusted ICU mortality ... ESPNIC: The society for paediatric and neonatal intensive care healthcare professionals in Europe ... In this fashion, mortality declined from 90% to around 25%. Patients were managed in three special 35-bed areas, which aided ... Because of the lack of critical care and the high rate of infection, there was a high mortality rate of hospitalised soldiers, ...
... stats on infant and maternal mortality, life expectancy, suicide rates, teenage pergnancy and other health related topics. We ...
Tackling neonatal mortality is essential if the millennium development goal for child mortality is to be met. Our findings ... Early initiation of breastfeeding could affect neonatal mortality risk by ≥4 mechanisms. First, the lower rate of mortality in ... 2 Tackling neonatal mortality is essential if the millennium development goal for child mortality is to be met.3,4 Sub-Saharan ... it had little impact on neonatal mortality.1,2 In 2002, ∼4 million infants died during the first month of life, and neonatal ...
... neonatal and child mortality, Amman, Jordan 29 March-2 April 2015  World Health Organization, Regional Office for the Eastern ... neonatal and child mortality, Amman, Jordan 29 March -2 April 2015  World Health Organization, Regional Office for the Eastern ... 2006)‎. Neonatal and perinatal mortality : country, regional and global estimates. World Health Organization. https://apps.who. ... 1. The WHO, UNICEF, UNFPA and World Bank maternal mortality estimates for 2005 revealed that more than half of the maternal ...
Here, we calculated absolute change in neonatal mortality over time by deprivation tenth (difference in neonatal mortality per ... Neonatal deaths would be 39% lower if all areas had the same neonatal mortality rates as the least deprived areas. This ... Rates of very preterm birth in Europe and neonatal mortality rates. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed2009;94:F253-6. ... All cause neonatal mortality. CMACE received notification of 18 524 neonatal deaths of singleton infants between 1997 and 2007 ...
The study also found a 43% decrease in neonatal morbidity and mortality. Vaginal progesterone significantly reduced the risk of ... Vaginal Progesterone Reduces Preterm Birth, Neonatal Morbidity And Mortality In Women At Risk. by editor ... and significantly reduced the composite neonatal morbidity/mortality of twins. Dr. Romero indicated that a study of vaginal ... Moreover, preterm birth is also the main cause of infant mortality (death to the age of one year). Approximately 12.9 million ...
Causes of neonatal and child mortality in India: a nationally representative mortality survey.. Million Death Study ... Causes of neonatal and child mortality in India: nationally representative mortality survey ... Causes of neonatal and child mortality in India: nationally representative mortality survey ... Causes of neonatal and child mortality in India: nationally representative mortality survey ...
Artificial neural networks can be trained to predict outcomes in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). This paper expands on ...
... and WIC in trends in black neonatal mortality between 1964 and 1977. They also underscore the importance of schooling, neonatal ... and to a lesser extent poverty and organized family planning clinics in trends in white neonatal mortality in those years. A ... the rapid decline in neonatal mortality since 1964. The regressions and the extrapolations point to the importance of abortion ... aim of this paper is to contribute to an understanding of the determinants of differences in race-specific neonatal mortality ...
Preterm birth and neonatal mortality in a rural Bangladeshi cohort: implications for health programs.. Baqui AH1, Rosen HE, Lee ... The population attributable fraction of neonatal mortality in premature babies was 0.16 for very preterm, 0.07 for moderately ... To estimate the burden of prematurity, determine gestational age (GA)-specific neonatal mortality rates and provide ... Prospective data on pregnancy, childbirth, GA and newborn mortality collected by trained community health workers from 10 585 ...
... the crude mortality rate was significantly different from the mean mortality rate. Adjusting the mortality rates for patient ... Variations in mortality rates among Canadian neonatal intensive care units. CMAJ 2002;166(2):173-8. Available: www .cma .ca / ... Variations in mortality rates among Canadian neonatal intensive care units: interpretation and implications. Jon Tyson and ... Annual league tables of mortality in neonatal intensive care units: longitudinal study. BMJ 1998;316:1931-5. ...
Maternal and neonatal separation and mortality associated with concurrent admissions to intensive care units. Joel G. Ray, ... Maternal and neonatal separation and mortality associated with concurrent admissions to intensive care units ... Maternal and neonatal separation and mortality associated with concurrent admissions to intensive care units ... Maternal and neonatal separation and mortality associated with concurrent admissions to intensive care units ...
DEFINITION: Mortality rate, neonatal (per 1,000 live births). Neonatal mortality rate is the number of neonates dying before ... Landlocked countries Compared by People , Fertility , Mortality rate, neonatal , Per 1,000 live births *Home ... Interesting observations about People , Fertility , Mortality rate, neonatal , Per 1,000 live births. ... Landlocked countries Compared by People , Fertility , Mortality rate, neonatal , Per 1,000 live births ...
p,When compared with rates in previous reports, mortality rates appear to have improved, especially at gestational ages , 29 ... A multicenter study of preterm birth weight and gestational age-specific neonatal mortality Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1993 Jan;168(1 ... Objective: This analysis was performed to present updated neonatal mortality data by age and birth weight for preterm newborns ... Mortality for black term infants was significantly higher. The largest improvement in survival occurred between 25 and 26 weeks ...
This is due to a 13.6% reduction in neonatal mortality and a 2.6% reduction in stillbirths. These results were highlighted in ... Interventions lead to reduction in neonatal mortality. While ASSIST works across the RMNCH+A continuum, the project focuses on ... In India, we saw a 13 percent reduction in neonatal mortality in USAID-supported facilities targeted with a quality improvement ... Progress on neonatal survival, and particularly early neonatal survival, has been slower than progress in other age groups. ...
2009) Neonatal mortality, risk factors and causes: a prospective population-based cohort study in urban Pakistan. Bulletin of ... 2006b) Trend and causes of neonatal mortality in the Kassena-Nankana district of northern Ghana, 1995-2002. Tropical Medicine ... World Health Organization (2006) Neonatal and Perinatal Mortality: Country, Regional and Global Estimates. Geneva. *Web of ... 2009a) Stillbirth and early neonatal mortality in rural Central Africa. International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics 105 ...
An investigation of the nature of socioeconomic inequalities in neonatal mortality: a population based study. BMJ2010;341:c6654 ... Neasham D, Dolk H, Vrijheid M, Jensen T, Best N. Stillbirth and neonatal mortality due to congenital anomalies: temporal trends ... Rate of neonatal mortality of infants with an anomaly (denominator: total live births). ... Congenital anomalies are a major cause of neonatal and infant mortality, especially in developed countries, accounting for ...
... role in reducing neonatal mortality and should be strongly emphasised by programmes attempting to reduce neonatal mortality. ... Can improvements in breast-feeding practices reduce neonatal mortality in developing countries? Midwifery. 2001 Jun;17(2):80-92 ... Methods: Medline and Cochrane databases were searched using the keywords breastfeeding, and neonatal mortality, supplemented ... to review the literature on the relationship between breast-feeding practices in the first month of life and neonatal mortality ...
VOA News: Study Examines Factors Associated With High African Newborn Mortality Rate. "…A U.N. study of neonatal mortality ... Giving Birth In Medical Facilities With Trained Health Care Workers Could Reduce Neonatal Mortality In Africa, Study Says. Jun ... Grady and her student investigators found that neonatal mortality was significantly associated with, among other factors, home ... Newsweek Examines Maternal Mortality, Health Care In South Sudan * Indias PM Asks Physicians To Provide Free Maternal Care 12 ...
Delayed diagnosis of fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: a cause of perinatal mortality and morbidity. Authors. *. ... Suzanne F Gunnink, Roos Vlug, Karin Fijnvandraat, Johanna G van der Bom, Simon J Stanworth, Enrico Lopriore, Neonatal ... Please cite this paper as: Madani K, Kamphuis M, Lopriore E, Porcelijn L, Oepkes D. Delayed diagnosis of fetal and neonatal ... Objective To evaluate the rate and consequences of a late or missed diagnosis of fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia ...
Neonatal mortality rate (per 1000 live births) (Global strategy for womens, childrens and adolescents health). This ... Neonatal mortality rate (per 1000 live births) (Global strategy for womens, childrens and adolescents health) ...
2-3 Change in Trends of Neonatal Mortality Rate (A), Infant Mortality Rate (B), and Under-5 Mortality Rate (C) by Time Period, ... 2-4 Comparison of Neonatal Mortality Rate (A), Infant Mortality Rate (B), and Under-5 Mortality Rate (C), Indonesia: IDHS, ... 2-5 Direct Estimates of Childhood Mortality and Percentage Contribution of Neonatal Mortality Rate to Infant Mortality Rate and ... neonatal mortality). Because of the close relationship between neonatal mortality and the other issues surrounding childbirth, ...
Keywords: neonatal sepsis, hypothermia, neonatal mortality, neonatal admission ... The aim of this study was to identify the patterns of neonatal admission and factors associated with mortality among neonates ... Implementing a better referral link and timely intervention could decrease neonatal mortality and morbidities in Gondar, ... As a result, there are high rates of morbidity and mortality. The three major causes of mortality in developing countries ...
Indonesia - Mortality rate; neonatal (per 1;000 live births) - actual values, historical data, forecasts and projections were ... neonatal (per 1,000 live births) in Indonesia was reported at 12.7 in 2018, according to the World Bank collection of ... Neonatal mortality rate is the number of neonates dying before reaching 28 days of age, per 1,000 live births in a given year. ... Mortality rate, neonatal (per 1,000 live births) in Indonesia was reported at 12.7 in 2018, according to the World Bank ...
Maternal immunization confers antibody-mediated protection against neonatal HSV, preventing mortality and long-term behavioral ... Maternal immunization confers antibody-mediated protection against neonatal HSV, preventing mortality and long-term behavioral ... Maternal immunization confers protection against neonatal herpes simplex mortality and behavioral morbidity ... Maternal immunization confers protection against neonatal herpes simplex mortality and behavioral morbidity ...
... and neonatal mortality. 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for each selected study. Random-effect non-linear ... The pooled neonatal death rate for 1991-2013 studies was 0.8% (95% CIs 0.0-1.6), and 6.4% (95% CIs 0.0-20.8) for 1969-1990. The ... Compared with published national mortality estimates, the RR for fetal death of 5.8 (95% CIs 2.9-11.3) was calculated for Haiti ... Relative risk (RR) estimates and 95% CIs were obtained by comparing mortality of selected recent studies with published ...
Reducing Neonatal Mortality by Increasing the Use of Chlorhexidine Reducing Neonatal Mortality by Increasing the Use of ...
The Effect of Early Initiation of Breastfeeding on Neonatal Mortality among Low Birth Weight in Aceh Province, Indonesia: An ... Satrinawati Berkat and Rosnah Sutan, "The Effect of Early Initiation of Breastfeeding on Neonatal Mortality among Low Birth ...
... neonatal and child mortality in developing countries. Acquaints students with methods on using epidemiological data effectively ... Neonatal and Child Mortality: Introduces students to the new Lives Saved Tool (LiST) software, which is used widely in the ... 223.691.01 Modeling Change in Maternal, Neonatal and Child Mortality. Discontinued. Department:. International Health Term:. ... Home , 223.691.01 Modeling Change in Maternal, Neonatal and Child Mortality, 2017 4th term - Course Catalog - Johns Hopkins ...
In 2010, the maternal mortality rate in the province of Kampong Speu was 206 per 100,000 births and the neonatal mortality rate ... This project aims to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality by stepping up care services, especially in obstetric and neonatal ... Midwives and doulas, two key professions for reducing maternal and neonatal mortality in the province of Kampong Speu in ... Doulas and Midwives: Key Professions for Reducing Maternal & Neonatal Mortality. Kampong Speu is the poorest province in ...
  • Our analysis provides compelling evidence that vaginal progesterone prevents preterm birth and reduces neonatal morbidity/mortality in women with a short cervix," said lead investigator Dr. Roberto Romero, Chief of the Perinatology Research Branch and Head of the Program in Perinatal Research and Obstetrics of the Division of Intramural Research for the NICHD/NIH/DHHS, Bethesda, MD and Detroit, MI. (redorbit.com)
  • Preterm birth is the leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. (redorbit.com)
  • and 2) a composite index of perinatal morbidity and mortality. (redorbit.com)
  • The study also found a 43% decrease in neonatal morbidity and mortality. (redorbit.com)
  • The mortality rate for each NICU was adjusted for traditional risk factors (e.g., gestational age, 5-minute Apgar score, congenital anomalies and outborn status [born at another hospital and requiring transfer to the NICU]) and for a relatively new measure of illness severity that is highly correlated with neonatal morbidity and mortality (the Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology, version II, known as SNAP-II). (cmaj.ca)
  • Madani K, Kamphuis M, Lopriore E, Porcelijn L, Oepkes D. Delayed diagnosis of fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: a cause of perinatal mortality and morbidity. (wiley.com)
  • As a result, there are high rates of morbidity and mortality. (dovepress.com)
  • There is currently no doubt that it is possible to significantly reduce perinatal mortality and morbidity rates by organizing the identification of "mother-child" couples at risk, to refer them intently to centres better equipped with technical and human resources to care for them. (scirp.org)
  • The review assessed whether SNFRT programmes can reduce neonatal mortality and morbidity, improve knowledge and skills, or change teamwork and resuscitation behaviour (compared to no SNFRT). (who.int)
  • To determine whether SFNRT programmes reduce neonatal mortality and morbidity, improve acquisition and retention of knowledge and skills, or change teamwork and resuscitation behaviour. (who.int)
  • This review sought to evaluate the effectiveness of community-based intervention packages in reducing maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality and improving neonatal outcomes. (who.int)
  • Four per cent chlorhexidine solution is considered as an ideal antiseptic for cord cleansing after birth in newborns for the prevention of infection-related mortality and morbidity. (bmj.com)
  • A community-based, parallel cluster-randomised trial was conducted in Sylhet, Bangladesh to test the efficacy of two regimens of single and multiple applications of 4% chlorhexidine for cord cleansing compared to dry cord care in reducing neonatal morbidity and mortality. (bmj.com)
  • Gestational age and birthweight are considered, and group predictions for mortality (and indirectly for morbidity) are made, and can be used for comparison. (up.ac.za)
  • Significant effects on neonatal morbidity and mortality after regional change in management of post-term pregnancy. (lu.se)
  • To evaluate the effects on neonatal morbidity of a regional change in induction policy for post-term pregnancy from 43(+0) to 42(+0) gestational weeks (GWs). (lu.se)
  • These findings could be used to set the agenda for preventative interventions aimed at reducing childhood mortality and morbidity. (diva-portal.org)
  • 43.1% of 144 surviving infants developed severe neonatal morbidity (retinopathy of prematurity grade ≥3, bronchopulmonary dysplasia and/or severe brain injury). (eur.nl)
  • Surviving infants had less severe neonatal morbidity compared to previous studies. (eur.nl)
  • Disability was associated with gestational age and neonatal morbidity. (eur.nl)
  • Neonatal sepsis is a leading cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity in the world. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Birth weight may be a predictor for survival as low birth weight infants have a greater risk of morbidity and mortality [ 2 , 3 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Information extracted from the neonates' records include: sex, gestational age at delivery, birth weight, morbidity, outcome and duration of illness before mortality. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Hydramnios and small for gestational age are independent risk factors for neonatal mortality and maternal morbidity. (afar.info)
  • OBJECTIVE: The objective was to evaluate the contribution of hydramnios and small for gestational age (SGA) as a combined pathology to maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. (afar.info)
  • It is a major cause of morbidity and mortality for the woman and her child. (uwc.ac.za)
  • However, there is no depth study done in Namibia that looks at the extent of confirmed pre-eclampia and its contribution to maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. (uwc.ac.za)
  • Fetal/Neonatal Morbidity and Mortality. (rxlist.com)
  • Morbidity and mortality rates are greater among neonates and infants delivered during the early-term period compared with those delivered between 39 weeks and 40 weeks of gestation. (acog.org)
  • however, more research is necessary to further characterize pregnancies at risk for in utero morbidity or mortality. (acog.org)
  • Although the child survival revolution of the 1980s led to dramatic reductions in overall child mortality, it had little impact on neonatal mortality. (aappublications.org)
  • 1 , 2 Tackling neonatal mortality is essential if the millennium development goal for child mortality is to be met. (aappublications.org)
  • Causes of neonatal and child mortality in India: a nationally representative mortality survey. (nih.gov)
  • We investigated the causes of neonatal and child mortality in India and their differences by sex and region. (nih.gov)
  • The broad generalization is poor country = higher child mortality. (tableau.com)
  • Introduces students to the new Lives Saved Tool (LiST) software, which is used widely in the international health and development field, and helps countries, NGOs, and other partners understand the causal impacts of health interventions on maternal, neonatal and child mortality in developing countries. (jhsph.edu)
  • Its actions revolve around three major objectives: controlling childhood cancer, fighting against maternal and child mortality, and ensuring access to healthcare for the world's poorest populations. (devex.com)
  • While maternal, infant and under-five child mortality rates in developing countries have declined significantly in the past two to three decades, newborn mortality rates have reduced much more slowly. (who.int)
  • To isolate the effect of Gavi funding in our primary model, we controlled for known and likely predictors of child mortality. (archives-ouvertes.fr)
  • While child mortality worldwide has decreased in recent decades, neonatal deaths are expected to increase from 41.6% of under-5 deaths in 2013 to 52% in 2030. (ovid.com)
  • Child mortality [CM] had two peaks, June-August and November. (diva-portal.org)
  • In January, 2013 the UNFPA, UNICEF and WHO launched an initiative Saving the Lives of Mothers and Children: Rising to the Challenge with the aim of accelerating efforts to reduce maternal and child mortality in high-burden countries in the Region. (who.int)
  • However, two year on, maternal and child mortality remains a major public health problem in the Region. (who.int)
  • Several overarching factors contribute to the continued high burden of maternal and child mortality that exists in some countries. (who.int)
  • National maternal, neonatal and child health programme managers play a critical role in programme support and implementation to tackle maternal, neonatal and child mortality. (who.int)
  • Therefore, to review progress made in reducing maternal, neonatal and child mortality, address its main causes and identify continuing challenges, a meeting was held of programme managers from countries of the Eastern Mediterranean Region in Amman, Jordan, from 29 March to 2 April 2015. (who.int)
  • lack of a surveillance system for maternal and child mortality. (who.int)
  • Although post-neonatal and child mortality rates have declined dramatically in many developing countries in recent decades, neonatal mortality rates have remained relatively unchanged. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Effect of breastfeeding on infant and child mortality due to infectious diseases in less developed countries: a pooled analysis. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Identifying trends in maternal and neonatal mortality will help to track progress in MDGs 4 and 5 and will serve in evaluating interventions focusing on reducing maternal and child mortality in the country. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Monitoring progress towards Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) 4 and 5 (reducing child and maternal mortality, respectively, between 1990 and 2015) requires valid and reliable estimates of maternal and child mortality in the country. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Recent estimates from the United Nations Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation (UN-IGME) and Maternal Mortality Estimation Inter-agency Group (MMEIG) indicated that South Africa did not achieve the MDG 4 and 5 targets by 2015 [ 15 , 16 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • However, there are widely divergent estimates, wherein the two most frequently cited estimates are from institutional reporting and WHO metrics, which makes it difficult to both understand trends in these outcomes and assess the successes or failures of interventions focusing on reducing maternal and child mortality in the country over the past decade. (biomedcentral.com)
  • GBD 2015 Child Mortality Collaborators None. (ox.ac.uk)
  • At the country level, the pace of progress in improving child survival has varied markedly, highlighting a crucial need to further examine potential drivers of accelerated or slowed decreases in child mortality. (ox.ac.uk)
  • METHODS: Drawing from analytical approaches developed and refined in previous iterations of the GBD study, we generated updated estimates of child mortality by age group (neonatal, post-neonatal, ages 1-4 years, and under 5) for 195 countries and territories and selected subnational geographies, from 1980-2015. (ox.ac.uk)
  • For GBD 2015, we did a series of novel analyses to systematically quantify the drivers of trends in child mortality across geographies. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Second, we examined the ratio of recorded and expected levels of child mortality, on the basis of SDI, across geographies, as well as differences in recorded and expected annualised rates of change for under-5 mortality. (ox.ac.uk)
  • We documented each step of the GBD 2015 child mortality estimation process, as well as data sources, in accordance with the Guidelines for Accurate and Transparent Health Estimates Reporting (GATHER). (ox.ac.uk)
  • Measuring and monitoring progress towards Millennium Development Goals (MDG) 4 and 5 required valid and reliable estimates of maternal and child mortality. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Monitoring progress towards MDG 4 and 5 (reducing child and maternal mortality between 1990 and 2015) required valid, reliable and internationally comparable estimates of maternal and child mortality in the country. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In Rwanda, a target was set to reduce child mortality from 152/1000 live births in 1990 to 50/1000 live births by 2015 [ 1 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Improving complementary feeding for babies, or giving foods in addition to breast milk, has led to significant reduction in the child mortality caused by undernutrition. (mdgmonitor.org)
  • It consists of "early neonatal mortality" for deaths in the first week, "late neonatal mortality" for those in the following three weeks [1]. (scirp.org)
  • Does Place and Attendance at Birth Improve Early Neonatal Mortality? (ovid.com)
  • This study aimed to determine the beneficial effects of facility births by examining the association between birth place/attendance and early neonatal mortality while adjusting for reported complications at birth. (ovid.com)
  • I will be looking at TOTAL neonatal mortality rates, which is simply early neonatal mortality plus late neonatal mortality. (blogspot.com)
  • Neonatal mortality fell between 1997-9 and 2006-7 (from 31.4 to 25.1 per 10 000 live births). (bmj.com)
  • Mortality rate, neonatal (per 1,000 live births). (nationmaster.com)
  • Neonatal mortality rate is the number of neonates dying before reaching 28 days of age, per 1,000 live births in a given year. (nationmaster.com)
  • A U.N. study of neonatal mortality around the world found that Africa has the highest rate, at 28 deaths for every 1,000 live births. (kff.org)
  • Mortality rate, neonatal (per 1,000 live births) in Indonesia was reported at 12.7 in 2018, according to the World Bank collection of development indicators, compiled from officially recognized sources. (tradingeconomics.com)
  • neonatal (per 1;000 live births) - actual values, historical data, forecasts and projections were sourced from the World Bank on August of 2020. (tradingeconomics.com)
  • In 2010, the maternal mortality rate in the province of Kampong Speu was 206 per 100,000 births and the neonatal mortality rate was 31 per 1,000 live births, with significant disparities between urban and rural areas. (devex.com)
  • Africa has the highest estimated neonatal mortality rate at 45 deaths per 1000 live births compared to 5 deaths in developed countries [6]. (scirp.org)
  • Indeed, over the past 24 years (1992 to 2016), neonatal mortality has risen from 66.6 deaths per 1000 live births to its current level (20‰) for the country. (scirp.org)
  • South Sudan has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world at 2,054 to 100,000 live births. (healthcanal.com)
  • For every $1 per capita invested by the Gavi Vaccine Alliance, there are highly statistically significant effects- decreasing the vaccine-preventable disease post-neonatal mortality rate by 2.535 per 1,000 live births. (archives-ouvertes.fr)
  • yielding a maternal mortality ratio of 425 per 100,000 live births (95% CI:318-556). (uib.no)
  • resulting in a neonatal mortality ratio of 27 per 1000 live births (95% CI: 24-30). (uib.no)
  • Methods Data about live births, stillbirths and neonatal deaths by gestational age (GA) were collected using a common protocol by the Euro-Peristat project in 2004 and 2010. (bmj.com)
  • We analysed stillbirths at ≥28 weeks GA in 22 countries and live births ≥24 weeks GA for neonatal mortality in 18 countries. (bmj.com)
  • Perinatal birth outcomes have improved markedly in high-income countries over past decades: rates of neonatal mortality (deaths of live born infants in the first 28 days of life) were between 10 and 20/1000 live births in the 1970s and are now under 3/1000 in most countries. (bmj.com)
  • Compared with the least deprived areas, the most deprived areas had a 61% higher rate of live births (1.61, 1.21 to 2.15) and a 98% higher neonatal mortality rate (1.98, 1.20 to 3.27) associated with a congenital anomaly. (le.ac.uk)
  • The neonatal mortality was 25.2 deaths per 1000 live births for boys and 18.0 for girls. (biomedcentral.com)
  • For each municipality, the infant mortality (in both neonatal and post-neonatal dimensions) and maternal mortality rates were calculated for every 1000 live births , referring to 2013. (bvsalud.org)
  • Between 1989 to 1991 and 1997 to 1999, the crude neonatal mortality rates among twins who weighed ≥500 g declined by 37% (95% CI, 35%-40%) from 21.5 to 13.6 per 1000 twin live births. (afar.info)
  • In the United States, the infant mortality rate decreased 86%, from 47.0 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in 1940 to 6.7 in 2006. (cdc.gov)
  • During the same period, the neonatal rate decreased 85%, from 28.8 to 4.5 deaths per 1,000 live births, and the postneonatal rate decreased 88%, from 18.3 to 2.2 deaths per 1,000 live births. (cdc.gov)
  • The aim of the United Nations' Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG4) is to reduce under-five mortality worldwide to 30 deaths per 1000 live births by 2015. (biomedcentral.com)
  • It is in the very-low-birth-weight groups, numbering less than 1% of all live births, that approximately 30% of all neonatal deaths occurred in California. (jamanetwork.com)
  • The number of neonatal deaths per 1000 live births. (steelframeofindia.org)
  • High-income countries have an average newborn mortality rate (the number of deaths per thousand live births) of just 3.3 In comparison, low-income countries have a newborn mortality rate of 27. (steelframeofindia.org)
  • 28 days old) comprising 27/1000 live births, and the reduction in neonatal mortality was slower than that in older children. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In the Congo, the neonatal mortality rate is 16 per 1000 live births [1]. (scirp.org)
  • Reducing neonatal mortality to less than 10 per 1000 live births is a target of the goals for sustainable development [3] [4]. (scirp.org)
  • The overall neonatal mortality rate for the United States is 4/1000 (4 deaths for every 1000 live births -- which is the same neonatal mortality rate as Canada). (blogspot.com)
  • A decrease in worldwide rate of mortality in children under-five by over 50 percent, reducing from 90 to 43 deaths per 1,000 live births between 1990 and 2015. (mdgmonitor.org)
  • Preliminary estimates suggest that universal under-five mortality has dropped by more than 50 percent - from 90 to 43 deaths per 1,000 live births in that period. (mdgmonitor.org)
  • In the last 25 years, the universal neonatal mortality rate has dropped from 33 to 19 deaths per 1,000 live births, though this rate has been slower than the decline in mortality for children aged 1-59 months. (mdgmonitor.org)
  • Objective To evaluate the rate and consequences of a late or missed diagnosis of fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT). (wiley.com)
  • Results In four of 26 pregnancies, timely diagnostic testing for FNAIT was not performed despite fetal or neonatal thrombocytopenia or ICH. (wiley.com)
  • Statistical analysis were carried out to study the correlations between maternal and fetal dystocia, neonatal mortality and the following parameters: age, breed category, weight, number of previous whelpings, duration of parturition, number of pups per litter and pregnancy length (from the day of ovulation estimated by plasma progesterone assays). (vin.com)
  • The objective of this research is to systematically review the literature and determine the risk of fetal, neonatal and maternal death associated with cholera during pregnancy. (msf.org)
  • A prospective study of maternal, fetal and neonatal deaths in low- and middle-income countries. (msf.org)
  • In children aged 1-59 months, girls in central India had a five-times higher mortality rate (per 1000 livebirths) from pneumonia (20·9, 19·4-22·6) than did boys in south India (4·1, 3·0-5·6) and four-times higher mortality rate from diarrhoeal disease (17·7, 16·2-19·3) than did boys in west India (4·1, 3·0-5·5). (nih.gov)
  • I use nationally representative data from Nepal, where 22 children per 1000 die within the first month of their birth, and evaluate the impact of Community-Based Neonatal Care Package. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • The birth weight specific mortality rate was 126 per 1000 for the preterm low birth weight and 5 per 1000 for the term babies. (biomedcentral.com)
  • However, absolute levels of under-5 mortality remained high in many countries, with 11 countries still recording rates exceeding 100 per 1000 livebirths in 2015. (ox.ac.uk)
  • i)India saw the 31st highest newborn-mortality rate, at 25.4 deaths per 1000 in 2016, while Pakistan had the highest. (steelframeofindia.org)
  • SFNRT (compared to basic newborn care or resuscitation) in developing country settings can maydecrease early and late neonatal mortality. (who.int)
  • To determine the frequency of late neonatal mortality, to determine the causes of death and to identify the factors associated with late neonatal mortality at Brazzaville University Hospital. (scirp.org)
  • Reducing late neonatal mortality requires the implementation of measures to improve the human and material capacities of the service. (scirp.org)
  • Also, it seemed useful to us to carry out this study on the late neonatal mortality. (scirp.org)
  • During the late neonatal period, most deaths in developing countries are due to infections such as sepsis, acute respiratory tract infection, meningitis, omphalitis and diarrhoea. (nih.gov)
  • We have estimated the effect of providing oral, or injectable antibiotics at home or in first-level facilities, and of in-patient hospital care on neonatal mortality from pneumonia and sepsis for use in the Lives Saved Tool (LiST). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Delphi consensus (median from 20 respondents) effects on sepsis-specific mortality were 30% reduction for oral antibiotics, 65% for injectable antibiotics and 75% for injectable antibiotics on pneumonia-specific mortality. (biomedcentral.com)
  • No trials were identified assessing effect of hospital management for neonatal infections and Delphi consensus suggested 80%, and 90% reductions for sepsis and pneumonia-specific mortality respectively. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Therapy with appropriate antibiotics and supportive management in neonatal nurseries is the cornerstone of management of neonatal sepsis and pneumonia, with strong biological plausibility that such therapy saves lives. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The objective of the current study was to detect the common causative microorganisms of neonatal sepsis and their antimicrobial resistance patterns in a rural secondary hospital in Tamil Nadu, India. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Economic burden of neonatal sepsis in sub-Saharan Africa. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Reliable and comprehensive estimates of the incidence and aetiology surrounding neonatal sepsis in SSA remain incompletely available. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Neonatal sepsis was a common denominator among the babies that died. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Oral zinc supplementation for reducing mortality in probable neonatal sepsis: a double blind randomized placebo controlled trial. (semanticscholar.org)
  • OBJECTIVE To study the role of Zinc in the treatment of neonatal sepsis. (semanticscholar.org)
  • PARTICIPANTS 614 neonates with probable neonatal sepsis. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Role of zinc in neonatal sepsis: emerging data. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Efficacy of zinc supplementation for neonatal sepsis: a systematic review and meta-analysis. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Efficacy of zinc supplementation on serum calprotectin, inflammatory cytokines and outcome in neonatal sepsis - a randomized controlled trial. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Neonatal sepsis: an international perspective. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Most neonatal deaths are caused by preterm birth complications (35 percent), complications during labor and pregnancy (24 percent), and sepsis (15 percent). (mdgmonitor.org)
  • Moreover, they do not help us understand the severity or predict mortality due to sepsis. (steamindiareports.com)
  • Recently, Malay B. Mukherjee and team from the ICMR-National Institute of Immuno-haematology, Mumbai showed that variations in red cell sizes, or red cell distribution width, can be used as marker for mortality risk in neonatal sepsis. (steamindiareports.com)
  • Yet even with extensive and accurate data collection and sophisticated risk adjustment, the assessments of mortality rate are likely to be too imprecise and the differences among individual hospitals too small to justify rank ordering these hospitals according to their outcomes. (cmaj.ca)
  • The Global Network Maternal Newborn Health Registry provides a rich source of data of neonatal mortality risk factors and outcomes to identify direct causes and higher-level determinants, however performing causal inference using observational data is difficult and remains an open problem in epidemiology. (rti.org)
  • In this paper we sought to determine whether Bayesian networks can be used to identify the complex causal pathways leading to neonatal mortality outcomes and to quantify the effect of each cause on mortality. (rti.org)
  • Studying centre-to-centre (CTC) variation in mortality rates is important because inferences about quality of care can be made permitting changes in practice to improve outcomes. (ovid.com)
  • This wide range of outcomes is attributable to differences in the severity of illness of patients and to the organisation of resources devoted to obstetric and neonatal care. (who.int)
  • These two factors ing Hospital, from 2011 to 2015, for the purposes of doc- are in turn determined by national resource allocation to umentation, analysis of associated factors, dissemination, health and education, by the effectiveness of obstetric and the provision of data to facilitate planning and im- services, and by individual patient factors including con- provement of neonatal outcomes. (who.int)
  • Training healthcare providers in standardised formal neonatal resuscitation training (SFNRT) programmes may improve neonatal outcomes. (who.int)
  • and improving neonatal outcomes. (who.int)
  • 3- 7 While these views have been echoed in neonatal care, there is little evidence of the impact of nursing levels on infant outcomes. (bmj.com)
  • A few studies have attempted to empirically test the relationship between staffing and neonatal outcomes, but they provide us with inconclusive evidence. (bmj.com)
  • 18 In the absence of less equivocal evidence, the relationship between neonatal outcomes and nurse staffing warrants further investigation. (bmj.com)
  • The primary outcomes were maternal and neonatal mortality and a secondary outcome was the rate of institutional delivery. (uib.no)
  • The nonmetropolitan, not adjacent (UI = 9) disadvantage observed for postneonatal mortality supports the idea that the isolation of these areas combined with the combination of risk factors across the most nonmetropolitan counties leads to poorer postneonatal health outcomes in these areas. (ed.gov)
  • Early care interventions are critical if we are to address and prevent neonatal and infant mortality, because they allow us to address conditions that could lead to poor birth outcomes. (amsterdamnews.com)
  • We evaluated the impact of a low-cost package of community-based interventions implemented through government sector lady health workers (LHWs) and community health workers (CHWs) of a NGO namely Aga Khan Health Services on perinatal and neonatal outcomes in a sub-population of the remote mountainous district of Gilgit, Northern Pakistan. (biomedcentral.com)
  • For certain medical conditions, available data and expert opinion support optimal timing of delivery in the late-preterm or early-term period for improved neonatal and infant outcomes. (acog.org)
  • This document will focus on neonatal and infant outcomes and the potential neonatal complications related to nonmedically indicated early-term delivery. (acog.org)
  • Objective To investigate time trends in socioeconomic inequalities in cause specific neonatal mortality in order to assess changing patterns in mortality due to different causes, particularly prematurity, and identify key areas of focus for future intervention strategies. (bmj.com)
  • When these details were projected nationally, three causes accounted for 78% (0·79 million of 1·01 million) of all neonatal deaths: prematurity and low birthweight (0·33 million, 99% CI 0·31 million to 0·35 million), neonatal infections (0·27 million, 0·25 million to 0·29 million), and birth asphyxia and birth trauma (0·19 million, 0·18 million to 0·21 million). (nih.gov)
  • To estimate the burden of prematurity, determine gestational age (GA)-specific neonatal mortality rates and provide recommendations for country programs. (nih.gov)
  • The three major causes of mortality in developing countries include prematurity, infection, and perinatal asphyxia. (dovepress.com)
  • Risk factors associated with neonatal mortality were gravidity (p = 0.0019), parity (p = 0.0323), occupational activities requiring physical effort (p = 0.0257), birth weight (p = 0.0008) and prematurity (p = 0.0039). (scirp.org)
  • Prematurity accounts for 10% of neonatal mortality globally. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Prematurity OR = 3.62 (95% CI: 1.2 - 10.6) is the factor associated with late mortality. (scirp.org)
  • Prospective data on pregnancy, childbirth, GA and newborn mortality collected by trained community health workers from 10 585 mother-newborn pairs in a community-based study. (nih.gov)
  • SFNRT in developing countries appears to confer benefit in reducing newborn mortality. (who.int)
  • 2 , 3 , 5 Because the majority of neonatal deaths occur at home, 1 feasible interventions for home-based implementation are needed urgently. (aappublications.org)
  • 3 Furthermore, the recent Lancet neonatal survival series included breastfeeding in its recommended package of interventions to reduce neonatal mortality. (aappublications.org)
  • 4 Public health interventions targeting major potentially modifiable risk factors for mortality are essential. (bmj.com)
  • Design of such interventions requires an understanding of current trends in cause specific mortality, as specific causes of death are likely to have different effects on the widening relative deprivation gap in all cause mortality. (bmj.com)
  • Our objective was to better understand the interventions that have decreased the rates of RDS-specific mortality in high-income countries over the past 60 years. (rti.org)
  • We argue that these 2 interventions applied widely in low-resource settings, with appropriate supportive infrastructure and general newborn care, will have the greatest impact on decreasing neonatal mortality. (rti.org)
  • Two studies (1 RCT, 1 observational study), evaluated community-based neonatal care packages including injectable antibiotics and reported mortality reductions of 44% (RR= 0.56, 95% CI 0.41-0.77) and 34% (RR =0.66, 95% CI 0.47-0.93), but the interpretation of these results is complicated by co-interventions. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Conclusion: High mortality with socio-economic inequality and low institutional delivery highlight the importance of strengthening obstetric interventions in rural south-west Ethiopia. (uib.no)
  • Regional surveys undertaken to assess the implementation of cost-effective, evidence-based interventions for maternal, neonatal and child health and the status of human resources in countries have revealed a wide discrepancy in the implementation coverage rate. (who.int)
  • The interventions had a significant impact in reduction of the burden of perinatal and neonatal mortality. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Although there is an extensive scientific basis for its impact on postneonatal mortality, evidence is sparse for its impact on neonatal mortality. (aappublications.org)
  • 7 , 8 Although there is an extensive scientific basis for the impact of breastfeeding on postneonatal mortality, 3 , 9 , 10 evidence is sparse for its impact on neonatal mortality 1 , 6 and, to our knowledge, nonexistent for the contribution of the timing of initiation to any mortality impact. (aappublications.org)
  • The analysis is based on 10947 breastfed singleton infants born between July 2003 and June 2004 who survived to day 2 and whose mothers were visited in the neonatal period. (aappublications.org)
  • 16% of neonatal deaths could be saved if all infants were breastfed from day 1 and 22% if breastfeeding started within the first hour. (aappublications.org)
  • This has particular relevance for sub-Saharan Africa, where neonatal and infant mortality rates are high but most women already exclusively or predominantly breastfeed their infants. (aappublications.org)
  • Elucidating the role of timing of initiation of breastfeeding is particularly relevant for sub-Saharan Africa, where neonatal and infant mortality rates are high but most women already exclusively or predominantly breastfeed their infants. (aappublications.org)
  • Participants All neonatal deaths in singleton infants born between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2007. (bmj.com)
  • Results 18 524 neonatal deaths occurred in singleton infants born in the 11 year study period. (bmj.com)
  • The study encompassed data for 19 265 infants admitted to 17 NICUs accounting for 75% of the tertiary-level neonatal beds in Canada. (cmaj.ca)
  • The performance of regional NICUs can be gauged and compared on the basis of mortality rates achieved for all infants in particular risk categories within the NICU's referral region. (cmaj.ca)
  • For example, gestational age clearly has a substantial effect on mortality rate among the infants at highest risk. (cmaj.ca)
  • for each gestational age group heavier infants had less mortality. (nih.gov)
  • Mortality for black term infants was significantly higher. (nih.gov)
  • Characteristics of infants admitted to NICUs differ, and comparing unadjusted mortality rates should be avoided. (ovid.com)
  • To assess whether risk-adjusted mortality in very low birthweight or preterm infants is associated with levels of nursing provision. (bmj.com)
  • Prospective study of risk-adjusted mortality in infants admitted to a random sample of neonatal units. (bmj.com)
  • Increasing the ratio of nurses with neonatal qualifications to intensive care and high dependency infants to 1:1 was associated with a decrease in risk-adjusted mortality of 48% (OR: 0.52, 95% CI: 0.33, 0.83). (bmj.com)
  • However, survival in neonatal care for very low birthweight or preterm infants was related to proportion of nurses with neonatal qualifications per shift. (bmj.com)
  • Rather, a number of studies have reported declining mortality in low birthweight and preterm infants associated with technical advances in intensive care and improved obstetric management, 8, 9, 10 while others have evidenced increasing demands for neonatal intensive care services. (bmj.com)
  • One study conducted in seven Scottish and two Australian neonatal units suggested that risk-adjusted mortality is independently related to infant:nurse ratios in the first three days after birth with a 79% increase in odds of mortality when more than 1.7 infants were assigned per nurse per shift. (bmj.com)
  • 16 However, another Australian study, based in one neonatal unit, reported a decline in risk-adjusted mortality associated with fewer nurses caring for high-risk infants. (bmj.com)
  • We hypothesised that declines might be greater for countries with higher mortality in 2004 and disproportionally affect very preterm infants at highest risk. (bmj.com)
  • Background: Extremely preterm infants are at high risk of neonatal mortality and adverse outcome. (eur.nl)
  • Early neonatal death occurred in 96 (34.8%) live born infants, including 61 cases of delivery room death. (eur.nl)
  • 29 (10.5%) infants died during the late neonatal period. (eur.nl)
  • Socioeconomic variation in decisions regarding termination of pregnancy after antenatal detection, however, has resulted in wide socioeconomic inequalities in liveborn infants with a congenital anomaly and subsequent neonatal mortality. (le.ac.uk)
  • 2.5 kg) infants have shown that Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine nonspecifically reduces all-cause mortality in the neonatal period. (dtu.dk)
  • Zinc supplementation in infants born small for gestational age reduces mortality: a prospective, randomized, controlled trial. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Sankaran and colleagues used state-of-the-art methods, but the differences among hospitals in risk-adjusted mortality rate might be further attenuated if there were better methods to measure and adjust for risk. (cmaj.ca)
  • Methods: Neonatal and postneonatal mortality rates were calculated from the 1998 to 2002 Compressed Mortality Files from the National Center for Health Statistics. (ed.gov)
  • This study will, in particular, provide the context for understanding inconsistencies in reported estimates of maternal and neonatal mortality by considering estimation methods, data sources and definitions used. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Moreover, it aims to provide the context for understanding inconsistencies in reported estimates of maternal and neonatal mortality by the institutional reporting and the global metrics by considering estimation methods, data sources and definitions used. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A particularly striking finding is that the increase in abortion availability is the single most important factor in the reduction in the black neonatal mortality rate. (repec.org)
  • The unadjusted (crude) mortality rates varied 10-fold among the NICUs (range about 1% to 11%), and for 12 of the 17 NICUs, the crude mortality rate was significantly different from the mean mortality rate. (cmaj.ca)
  • Altogether neonatal mortality rate was 13.7% (SD = 24.3), and 37.5% of the litters were concerned. (vin.com)
  • The overall unadjusted hospital mortality rate for the network was 7.9% (n=572 deaths). (ovid.com)
  • In Guinea in 2012, the Demographic Health Survey (DHS) reports that the neonatal mortality rate was 33% [7]. (scirp.org)
  • The mortality rate in a neonatal unit reflects quality of The aim of this study was to review the numbers of ad- care but is also profoundly affected by the severity of ill- missions and deaths at the NICU of the Korle Bu Teach- ness of neonates offered for admission. (who.int)
  • We separately tested a composite VPD mortality rate and five vaccine-preventable mortality rates: pertussis, meningitis, measles, diarrhea, and pneumonia (lower-respiratory infection) as dependent variables. (archives-ouvertes.fr)
  • Consequently there were significant socioeconomic inequalities in the rate of live birth and neonatal mortality associated with the presence of any of these nine anomalies. (le.ac.uk)
  • Using data from 3 RCTs of early BCG (n = 6583) we examined potential sex differences in the timing of the mortality reduction in the neonatal period, presenting metaestimates of the main outcome mortality rate ratios (MRR) for BCG-vaccinated and controls. (dtu.dk)
  • Babies delivered at less than 37 weeks of gestation recorded a higher rate of mortality than those of 37 weeks and above (p = 0.000). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Between 1990 and 2015, global under-5 mortality decreased at an annualised rate of decrease of 3·0% (2·6-3·3), falling short of the 4·4% annualised rate of decrease required to achieve MDG4. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Adjustments for preterm labor induction, preterm cesarean delivery, term labor induction, term cesarean delivery, and sociodemographic factors had little influence on neonatal mortality rate trends. (afar.info)
  • Neonatal mortality rate refers to the death of a baby any time after live birth and through the first 27 days. (blogspot.com)
  • If a baby dies prior to labor or prior to birth, the baby will not be included in the neonatal mortality rate. (blogspot.com)
  • Only babies born alive but die some time in those first full 27 days are included in the neonatal mortality rate. (blogspot.com)
  • For obvious reasons, this is not the correct comparison to the MANA study neonatal mortality rate. (blogspot.com)
  • Three-fold increase in the rate of reduction of under-five mortality since the early 1990s. (mdgmonitor.org)
  • Conclusions Stillbirths and neonatal deaths declined at all gestational ages in countries with both high and low levels of mortality in 2004. (bmj.com)
  • Expanded neonatal and intrapartum care, case management of diarrhoea and pneumonia, and addition of new vaccines to immunisation programmes could substantially reduce child deaths in India. (nih.gov)
  • While ASSIST works across the RMNCH+A continuum, the project focuses on the intrapartum and early neonatal period, as this is the most efficient strategy to save lives. (urc-chs.com)
  • The NMR is a key outcome indicator for newborn care and directly reflects prenatal, intrapartum, and neonatal care. (steelframeofindia.org)
  • The aim of this study was to identify the patterns of neonatal admission and factors associated with mortality among neonates admitted at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of University of Gondar Hospital. (dovepress.com)
  • Nevertheless, given the limited access to care for sick neonates in low income countries, it is important to assess the potential mortality effect of oral antibiotics and injectable antibiotics delivered in domiciliary or primary care settings. (biomedcentral.com)
  • These contributors to neonatal mortality globally are also the top three reasons why neonates are dying in Ghana. (gvsu.edu)
  • A total of 5033 inborn neonates admitted to a neonatal care unit (NCU) from 2000 to 2010 registered at the KCMC Medical Birth Registry and neonatal registry were studied. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This project aims to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality by stepping up care services, especially in obstetric and neonatal emergencies, and provide better resources for communities. (devex.com)
  • To reduce maternal and neonatal mortality, the international medical organisation provides emergency obstetrics and neonatal care in collaboration with the Jigawa State Ministry of Health. (einpresswire.com)
  • Variations in infant mortality rates among counties of the United States: The roles of public policies and programs ," Demography , Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 18(4), pages 695-713, November. (repec.org)
  • Variations in Infant Mortality Rates among Counties in the United States: The Roles of Social Policies and Programs ," NBER Working Papers 0615, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc. (repec.org)
  • Purpose: To examine differences in correlates of neonatal and postneonatal infant mortality rates, across counties, by degree of rurality. (ed.gov)
  • To reduce socioeconomic inequalities in mortality, a change in focus is needed to concentrate on these two influential causes of death. (bmj.com)
  • Socioeconomic inequalities in infant mortality exist in many developed countries despite improvements in overall mortality. (bmj.com)
  • 1 The UK government has made major attempts to tackle socioeconomic inequalities in infant mortality by setting a public service agreement target in 2003 to reduce the relative deprivation gap in England and Wales by 10% by 2010. (bmj.com)
  • Recent UK evidence on inequalities in cause specific mortality is contradictory and predominantly cross sectional, preventing the investigation of trends over time. (bmj.com)
  • We did a cause specific analysis of time trends in socioeconomic inequalities in neonatal mortality in England over an 11 year period to understand the effect of specific causes of death on the widening relative deprivation gap in all cause mortality. (bmj.com)
  • The aim of this study was to estimate maternal and neonatal mortality and the socio-economic inequalities of these mortalities in rural south-west Ethiopia. (uib.no)
  • CM seemed to be the only group with increased mortality also in the second rain period, not reflected in the overall mortality index. (diva-portal.org)
  • Overall mortality was 10.7% (536 deaths). (biomedcentral.com)
  • However, postneonatal mortality rates were higher in the most rural nonmetropolitan counties. (ed.gov)
  • The figure above shows infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality rates in the United States from 1940-2006. (cdc.gov)
  • The regressions and the extrapolations point to the importance of abortion availability, neonatal intensive care availability, females schooling levels, and to a lesser extent Medicaid, BCHS projects, and WIC in trends in black neonatal mortality between 1964 and 1977. (repec.org)
  • Ghana is part of sub-Saharan Africa, which has the highest rates of neonatal mortality worldwide. (gvsu.edu)
  • After estimating cross-sectional regressions, we apply their coefficients to national trends in the exogenous variables to 'explain' the rapid decline in neonatal mortality since 1964. (repec.org)
  • The slow decline in neonatal mortality as compared to post-neonatal mortality calls for attention and efforts to reverse this trend. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This is due to a 13.6% reduction in neonatal mortality and a 2.6% reduction in stillbirths. (urc-chs.com)
  • In India, we saw a 13 percent reduction in neonatal mortality in USAID-supported facilities targeted with a quality improvement methodology. (urc-chs.com)
  • In 2005, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported that of the 130 million children born each year worldwide, about 4 million die during the neonatal period and neonatal mortality increased from 37% to 44% from 1990 to 2012 [2]. (scirp.org)
  • Major maternal, neonatal and child health-related policies, programs and projects in Nepal (1990-2015). (biomedcentral.com)
  • The state of São Paulo recorded a significant reduction in infant mortality from 1990 to 2013, but the desired reduction in maternal mortality was not achieved. (bvsalud.org)
  • This study aims to systematically review the estimates made of maternal and neonatal mortality in the period from 1990 to 2015 in South Africa and determine trends over this period. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This review is aimed at providing an overview of estimates of maternal and neonatal mortality for the period 1990 to 2015 in South Africa and determining the temporal trends during this period. (biomedcentral.com)
  • BACKGROUND: Established in 2000, Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG4) catalysed extraordinary political, financial, and social commitments to reduce under-5 mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Neonatal deaths and stillbirths fell at a slower pace since 1990, decreasing by 42·4% (41·3-43·6) to 2·6 million (2·6-2·7) neonatal deaths and 47·0% (35·1-57·0) to 2·1 million (1·8-2·5) stillbirths in 2015. (ox.ac.uk)
  • As a result, neonatal mortality rates had been stable since 1990, despite the increase in preterm deliveries. (elsevier.com)
  • Kampong Speu is the poorest province in Cambodia where there is only very limited access to medical care, especially obstetric and neonatal care. (devex.com)
  • 11 However, epidemiologic data indicate that a high proportion of neonatal deaths are a result of obstetric complications, 1 , 12 and these are unlikely to be affected by colostrum, transitional breast milk, or mature breast milk. (aappublications.org)
  • While implementation of community-based interventional care packages was not associated with reductions in maternal mortality, significant reductions were recorded in maternal illnesses and pregnancy complications, stillbirths, and perinatal and neonatal deaths. (who.int)
  • It must be emphasized that most complications can be prevented and maternal mortality can be decreased by avoiding delays in getting medical care. (einpresswire.com)
  • Prior studies did not show a strong association between lower neonatal mortality and place of birth nor type of attendance, although this may not account for the late referral of women for whom serious complications arise during home birth. (ovid.com)
  • Many of these deaths occur in the neonatal phase of development - the critical period from birth to 28 days of life in which babies are more vulnerable to disease, infection and other complications. (amsterdamnews.com)
  • CONCLUSION: The combination of hydramnios and SGA is an independent risk factor for perinatal mortality and maternal complications. (afar.info)
  • We suggest that the growth restriction of these fetuses is responsible for the neonatal complications, while the hydramnios contributes mainly to maternal complications. (afar.info)
  • To identify if care delivery improved, audits of nutritional support, CPAP use and its complications, and documentation in newly developed neonatal medical records were conducted. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Main outcome measure Cause specific neonatal mortality per 10 000 births by deprivation tenth (deprivation measured with UK index of multiple deprivation 2004 at super output area level). (bmj.com)
  • A birth weight and gestational age-specific mortality chart for preterm births was created with live-birth data. (nih.gov)
  • In a study pertaining to 14 sub-Saharan African countries, [Michigan State University medical geographer Sue] Grady and her student investigators found that neonatal mortality was significantly associated with, among other factors, home births, where babies are delivered without the supervision of a trained professional. (kff.org)
  • Were it possible to include all births, deaths, weights, and gestational ages and to complete all linkages in vital statistics information, the differences in weight-specific mortality between blacks and whites of low birth weight could be greater than the authors report, and all mortality rates could be higher, particularly in the very-low-birth-weight groups (500 to 1,499 g). (jamanetwork.com)
  • Small yes, but per 10,000 it is an additional 3-4 babies that die at home births during the neonatal period . (blogspot.com)
  • We completed a retrospective multivariate panel and longitudinal trend study to evaluate the effect of Gavi Vaccine Alliance grants on vaccine-preventable disease (VPD) post-neonatal mortality. (archives-ouvertes.fr)
  • Feasible Generalized Least Squares (fGLS) regression analysis was used to examine the association between VPD post-neonatal mortality rates and Gavi funding. (archives-ouvertes.fr)
  • We also applied segmented regression analysis to assess the structural trend in VPD post-neonatal mortality rates, the impact of Gavi funding, and trend changes following Gavi support. (archives-ouvertes.fr)
  • Post-neonatal mortality [PM] had the earliest onset (April-May) followed by NM (May-August). (diva-portal.org)
  • It is concluded that there is a need for greater education, not only in Ghana, but worldwide, to lower neonatal mortality and save the preventable neonatal deaths that are occurring each year. (gvsu.edu)
  • Implementing a better referral link and timely intervention could decrease neonatal mortality and morbidities in Gondar, Ethiopia. (dovepress.com)
  • Regionalization of perinatal care, which links a tiered structure of facilities and refers women with high-risk pregnancies to a central facility with advanced technology and increased staff, has been established to improve perinatal health care and decrease neonatal mortality [ 1 - 3 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The aim of this partnership was to improve neonatal care and reduce neonatal mortality in 4 major neonatal units, including the 2 University hospitals and 2 District hospitals, one of which was the largest maternity unit in the country and the other a medium-sized district hospital. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Preterm birth weight and gestational age-specific mortality rates were compiled from the five centers that participated in the March of Dimes Multicenter Preterm Birth Prevention Project. (nih.gov)
  • Newborn care improved, and gestational-age-specific mortality rates had fallen by about 50% since 1982. (elsevier.com)
  • Conclusions Almost 80% of the relative deprivation gap in all cause mortality was explained by premature birth and congenital anomalies. (bmj.com)
  • CONCLUSIONS: Antenatal screening for congenital anomalies has reduced neonatal mortality through termination of pregnancy. (le.ac.uk)
  • Compared with gains achieved for infectious diseases and nutritional deficiencies, the persisting toll of neonatal conditions and congenital anomalies on child survival became evident, especially in low-income and low-middle-income countries. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Congenital anomalies, prolapse of cord, hydramnios, SGA and grand multiparity were also independent risk factors for perinatal mortality. (afar.info)
  • Adjusting the mortality rates for patient risk substantially reduced both the variation among NICUs (range about 2% to 6%) and the number of NICUs that differed significantly from the mean (only 5). (cmaj.ca)
  • Mortality rates were progressively and significantly higher in babies with lower admission weights and earlier gestations. (who.int)
  • Furthermore, we found Gavi support to be significantly associated with both immediate impacts and trend changes on vaccine-preventable mortality rates. (archives-ouvertes.fr)
  • Findings: The bivariate analysis indicated neonatal and postneonatal mortality was significantly higher in the most nonmetropolitan counties compared to the most metropolitan counties. (ed.gov)
  • We compared the differences between observed mortality rates of the SARS period and predicted rates to examine whether the shifting in maternity services during the SARS epidemic significantly affected neonatal mortality rates. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The increase in the HDI of the city and proportion of Family Health Care Strategy implemented were significantly associated with the reduction in both infant mortality (neonatal + post-neonatal) and maternal mortality rates. (bvsalud.org)
  • The mortality (35%) and patent DA incidence due to absence of COX-2 is, however, significantly increased (79%) when one copy of the gene encoding COX-1 is also inactivated. (pnas.org)
  • Conclusion: Neonatal mortality associated with referrals is a major health problem in developing countries. (scirp.org)
  • Adjusted mortality rates for each NICU were produced using a multiple logistic regression model. (ovid.com)
  • Among these, 4 evaluated oral antibiotics for neonatal pneumonia in non-randomised, concurrently controlled designs. (biomedcentral.com)
  • No studies were identified evaluating injectable antibiotics alone for neonatal pneumonia. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Oral antibiotics administered in the community are effective for neonatal pneumonia mortality reduction based on a meta-analysis, but expert opinion suggests much higher impact from injectable antibiotics in the community or primary care level and even higher for facility-based care. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Furthermore, we found evidence of a longer term catalytic effect of Gavi funding with accelerated reductions in the trend for post-neonatal meningitis, diarrhea, and pneumonia mortality rates. (archives-ouvertes.fr)
  • They also underscore the importance of schooling, neonatal intensive care, abortion, Medicaid, WIC, and to a lesser extent poverty and organized family planning clinics in trends in white neonatal mortality in those years. (repec.org)
  • In this issue (page 173), Sankaran and colleagues 3 of the Canadian Neonatal Network report a study of exemplary quality that assesses variation in mortality rates among Canadian neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). (cmaj.ca)
  • The findings could be used to support specific standards of specialist nursing provision in neonatal and other areas of intensive and high dependency care. (bmj.com)
  • Medical centers and regional hospitals provide neonatal intensive care for high-risk pregnancies, while district hospitals provide premature observation care for mild-risk pregnancies. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Intensive neonatal training was provided on 27 short-term visits by 10 specialist health professionals. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In addition to responding to humanitarian emergencies, the Foundation's actions are in line with the Millennium Development Goals, particularly those relating to fighting diseases, improving maternal and neonatal health, promoting gender equality and empowering women, fighting poverty and implementing a global partnership for development. (devex.com)
  • This study showed that undiagnosed underlying diseases were related to neonatal mortality, which highlights the importance of caring for and counseling about the underlying diseases, screening, and controlling blood sugar levels before and during pregnancy to prevent infant mortality by all means possible. (magiran.com)
  • The factors that influence neonatal health are myriad and complex, but we must continue our efforts to build a culture of health in the Black community - one that competently serves the unique needs of mothers on their pregnancy journey and ensures they are at her healthiest even before they conceive. (amsterdamnews.com)
  • Management decisions, therefore, should balance the risks of pregnancy prolongation with the neonatal and infant risks associated with early-term delivery. (acog.org)
  • Impact of education and training on neonatal resuscitation practices in 14 teaching hospitals in India. (semanticscholar.org)
  • For each hospital the 95% confidence interval (indicating the precision with which risk-adjusted mortality could be estimated) overlapped that of multiple other hospitals. (cmaj.ca)
  • Logistic regression-derived risk-adjusted mortality rates plotted on funnel plots provide a powerful visual graphical tool for presenting quality performance data. (ovid.com)
  • Risk-adjusted mortality did not differ across neonatal units. (bmj.com)