Penetrating stab wounds caused by needles. They are of special concern to health care workers since such injuries put them at risk for developing infectious disease.
Unforeseen occurrences, especially injuries in the course of work-related activities.
Gloves, usually rubber, worn by surgeons, examining physicians, dentists, and other health personnel for the mutual protection of personnel and patient.
Infectious organisms in the BLOOD, of which the predominant medical interest is their contamination of blood-soiled linens, towels, gowns, BANDAGES, other items from individuals in risk categories, NEEDLES and other sharp objects, MEDICAL WASTE and DENTAL WASTE, all of which health workers are exposed to. This concept is differentiated from the clinical conditions of BACTEREMIA; VIREMIA; and FUNGEMIA where the organism is present in the blood of a patient as the result of a natural infectious process.
The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens from patients to health professionals or health care workers. It includes transmission via direct or indirect exposure to bacterial, fungal, parasitic, or viral agents.
The hospital department which is responsible for the organization and administration of nursing activities.
Individuals with a degree in veterinary medicine that provides them with training and qualifications to treat diseases and injuries of animals.
Assistants to a veterinarian, biological or biomedical researcher, or other scientist who are engaged in the care and management of animals, and who are trained in basic principles of animal life processes and routine laboratory and animal health care procedures. (Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)
Emergency care or treatment given to a person who suddenly becomes ill or injured before full medical services become available.
The individuals employed by the hospital.
The medical science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases in animals.
Prudent standard preventive measures to be taken by professional and other health personnel in contact with persons afflicted with a communicable disease, to avoid contracting the disease by contagion or infection. Precautions are especially applicable in the diagnosis and care of AIDS patients.
Sharp instruments used for puncturing or suturing.
The process of minimizing risk to an organization by developing systems to identify and analyze potential hazards to prevent accidents, injuries, and other adverse occurrences, and by attempting to handle events and incidents which do occur in such a manner that their effect and cost are minimized. Effective risk management has its greatest benefits in application to insurance in order to avert or minimize financial liability. (From Slee & Slee: Health care terms, 2d ed)
Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.
The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.
Use of a device for the purpose of controlling movement of all or part of the body. Splinting and casting are FRACTURE FIXATION.
Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.
A specialty concerned with the study of anesthetics and anesthesia.
Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.
Truthful revelation of information, specifically when the information disclosed is likely to be psychologically painful ("bad news") to the recipient (e.g., revelation to a patient or a patient's family of the patient's DIAGNOSIS or PROGNOSIS) or embarrassing to the teller (e.g., revelation of medical errors).
Hospitals engaged in educational and research programs, as well as providing medical care to the patients.
Blood, mucus, tissue removed at surgery or autopsy, soiled surgical dressings, and other materials requiring special disposal procedures.
INFLAMMATION of the LIVER in humans caused by a member of the ORTHOHEPADNAVIRUS genus, HEPATITIS B VIRUS. It is primarily transmitted by parenteral exposure, such as transfusion of contaminated blood or blood products, but can also be transmitted via sexual or intimate personal contact.
Hospital department which manages and provides the required housekeeping functions in all areas of the hospital.
Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.
Wounds caused by objects penetrating the skin.
Personnel who provide nursing service to patients in a hospital.
Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
Penetrating and non-penetrating injuries to the spinal cord resulting from traumatic external forces (e.g., WOUNDS, GUNSHOT; WHIPLASH INJURIES; etc.).
Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)

Glove usage and reporting of needlestick injuries by junior hospital medical staff. (1/257)

The use of gloves when conducting invasive procedures and the reporting of needlestick injuries have been strongly encouraged. Despite this, neither practice appears to be universal. In order to determine the rates of glove usage and needlestick injury reporting, we conducted a survey of junior doctors in three hospitals in the UK. Of the 190 respondents, the majority rarely wore gloves for venesection, insertion of intravenous cannulas or arterial blood gas sampling. For more major procedures (insertion of central venous lines, insertion of thoracostomy tubes, suturing) gloves were invariably worn. Only 17.5% of needlestick injuries were reported. The rates of glove usage and needlestick injury reporting were lower than previous studies have demonstrated in North America. Surgeons suffered the most needlestick injuries and were the least likely to report them. The low reporting rate may have serious implications, particularly in view of the new Government guidelines on needlestick injuries which involve HIV-infected blood. By failing to use gloves and report needlestick injuries, junior doctors, in particular surgeons, are placing themselves and patients at increased risk of blood-borne transmissible diseases.  (+info)

Needlestick and sharps injuries among health-care workers in Taiwan. (2/257)

Sharps injuries are a major cause of transmission of hepatitis B and C viruses and human immunodeficiency virus in health-care workers. To determine the yearly incidence and causes of sharps injuries in health-care workers in Taiwan, we conducted a questionnaire survey in a total of 8645 health care workers, including physicians, nurses, laboratory technicians, and cleaners, from teaching hospitals of various sizes. The reported incidence of needlestick and other sharps injuries was 1.30 and 1.21 per person in the past 12 months, respectively. Of most recent episodes of needlestick/sharps injury, 52.0% were caused by ordinary syringe needles, usually in the patient units. The most frequently reported circumstances of needlestick were recapping of needles, and those of sharps injuries were opening of ampoules/vials. Of needles which stuck the health-care workers, 54.8% had been used in patients, 8.2% of whom were known to have hepatitis B or C, syphilis, or human immunodeficiency virus infection. Sharps injuries in health-care workers in Taiwan occur more frequently than generally thought and risks of contracting blood-borne infectious diseases as a result are very high.  (+info)

Needlestick injury in clothing industry workers and the risks of blood-borne infection. (3/257)

This paper identifies the hazard of a hollow needle device used extensively in the clothing industry and assesses the risk of transmission for HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C. A substantial risk of transmission is suggested and measures have been advised for its control. Occupational Health Physicians are advised to be aware of hollow needles in other industrial processes and where risks of cross-infection exist, the same safety considerations should be applied as in clinical medicine and veterinary work to avoid needlestick injuries. Needle sharing must be avoided.  (+info)

Sensible approaches to avoid needle stick accidents in nuclear medicine. (4/257)

OBJECTIVE: Needle sticks are a continuous concern in the health care environment because of the prevalence of bloodborne pathogens in today's society. Radioactive contamination is another concern with needle sticks during nuclear medicine and nuclear pharmacy procedures. In our institution, substantial efforts have been made to prevent needle sticks, but they still occur occasionally. The purpose of this project was to analyze different practices and products to determine the best protocol in an effort to avoid further needle sticks. METHODS: The nuclear medicine technologists were surveyed to determine how many needle sticks have occurred and the situation behind each occurrence. Using our initial survey, the circumstances involved in each incident were reviewed, suggestions considered, and various means of protection analyzed. Five options were presented in a second survey. RESULTS: The results of the second survey showed that technologists favored the newly designed needle-capping blocks for preventing needle sticks in their daily routine procedures. CONCLUSION: The newly designed needle-capping block is best suited for both nuclear medicine and nuclear pharmacy laboratories. We will continue to monitor the effectiveness of this new approach in preventing needle sticks.  (+info)

Reported needlestick and sharp injuries among health care workers in a Greek general hospital. (5/257)

Between July 1990 and June 1996, 284 exposures to infectious material were reported by 247 health care workers (HCWs) at AHEPA University Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece, representing an overall rate of 2.4% reported injuries per 100 HCWs/year. Nurses reported the highest rates of incidents (3.0%) and in all but one working group women exhibited higher injury rates per year than male HCWs. Young workers (21-30 years old) were primarily affected in incidents (P < 0.001). Needles were the most common implement causing injury (60.6%) and resheathing of used needles as well as garbage collection were common causes of injury. None of the HCWs seroconverted in exposures where immune status to blood-borne pathogens was estimated. Efforts by the infection control committee need to be more intense, in order to increase the rate of reported staff injuries. This will facilitate identification of unsafe practices and provide more adequate preventive measures.  (+info)

Safety of immunization injections in Africa: not simply a problem of logistics. (6/257)

In 1995, the WHO Regional Office for Africa launched a logistics project to address the four main areas of immunization logistics: the cold chain, transport, vaccine supply and quality, and the safety of injections in the countries of the region. The impact of this logistic approach on immunization injection safety was evaluated through surveys of injection procedures and an analysis of the injection materials (e.g. sterilizable or disposable syringes) chosen by the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) and those actually seen to be used. Re-use of injection materials without sterilization, accidental needle-stick injuries among health care workers, and injection-related abscesses in patients were common in countries in the WHO African Region. Few health centres used time-steam saturation-temperature (TST) indicators to check the quality of sterilization and, in many centres, the injection equipment was boiled instead of being steam sterilized. Facilities for the proper disposal of used materials were rarely present. Although the official EPI choice was to use sterilizable equipment, use of a combination of sterilizable and disposable equipment was observed in the field. Unsafe injection practices in these countries were generally due to a failure to integrate nursing practices and public awareness with injection safety issues, and an absence of the influence of EPI managers on health care service delivery. Holistic rather than logistic approaches should be adopted to achieve safe injections in immunization, in the broader context of promoting safe vaccines and safety of all injections.  (+info)

A comparison of certain practice characteristics of dental anesthesiologists in Canada and the United States. (7/257)

An existing database was used to compare aspects of dental anesthesiology practice of dental anesthesiologists in Canada (n = 32) and the United States (n = 123). Data focusing on percutaneous injuries were obtained through a mailed questionnaire that was returned anonymously. Respondents provided information on the treatment of patients under deep sedation or general anesthesia only. Eighty-one percent of Canadians and 61% of Americans returned the questionnaire. The vast majority (84%) of injuries reported were due to sharps associated with general dentistry compared with those associated with anesthesiology. Canadians were more likely to be operator-anesthetists (P < .01) and to experience a percutaneous injury (P < .01) than US practitioners. American practitioners were more likely to have a greater proportion of the caseload under the age of 20 (P < .02). No other significant differences were observed. These results illustrate a number of unique attributes of the practice of dental anesthesiology in these 2 countries.  (+info)

The occupational risk to dental anesthesiologists of acquiring 3 bloodborne pathogens. (8/257)

OBJECTIVE: To estimate the occupational risk to dental anesthesiologists of contracting 3 bloodborne pathogens: hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). METHODS: Through an anonymously returned, mailed questionnaire, dental anesthesiologists in Canada and the United States provided information regarding percutaneous and mucocutaneous contacts with contaminated fluid during the treatment of patients under deep sedation and general anesthesia as well as other general practice information. A mathematical model was applied to determine the occupational risk. RESULTS: Of the 101 (65%) returned questionnaires, 98 reported having treated patients within the previous 6 months. Of these, 41 (42%) had at least one percutaneous accident (89 accidents in total), and the projected mean annual injury rate for dental anesthesiologists overall was 1.82. The most common causes of injury were burs, intraoral needles, and dental instruments. Operator error during use was associated with 31% of reported accidents. Significantly more injuries were reported by those who also reported a mucocutaneous contact and by those working more than 25 hours per week. The projected mean annual number of mucocutaneous exposures was 0.88 for dental anesthesiologists overall. CONCLUSIONS: The calculated annual risk to the average dental anesthesiologist of acquiring HBV (if not immune), HCV, and HIV following percutaneous injury was very low for all infections (HBV the most; HIV the least). The risk of contracting HIV following mucocutaneous contact was extremely low.  (+info)

Needlestick injuries are sharp object injuries typically involving hollow-bore needles, which can result in exposure to bloodborne pathogens. They often occur during the use or disposal of contaminated needles in healthcare settings. These injuries pose a significant risk for transmission of infectious diseases such as HIV, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. It is essential to follow strict protocols for handling and disposing of needles and other sharp objects to minimize the risk of needlestick injuries.

Occupational accidents are defined as unexpected and unplanned events that occur in the context of work and lead to physical or mental harm. These accidents can be caused by a variety of factors, including unsafe working conditions, lack of proper training, or failure to use appropriate personal protective equipment. Occupational accidents can result in injuries, illnesses, or even death, and can have significant impacts on individuals, families, and communities. In many cases, occupational accidents are preventable through the implementation of effective safety measures and risk management strategies.

Surgical gloves are a form of personal protective equipment (PPE) used by healthcare professionals during medical procedures, particularly surgical procedures. They are designed to provide a barrier between the healthcare professional's hands and the patient's sterile field, helping to prevent contamination and reduce the risk of infection.

Surgical gloves are typically made of latex, nitrile rubber, or vinyl and come in various sizes to fit different hand shapes and sizes. They have a powder-free interior and an exterior that is coated with a substance to make them easier to put on and remove. The gloves are usually sterile and are packaged in pairs, often with a protective covering to maintain their sterility until they are ready to be used.

The use of surgical gloves is a critical component of standard precautions, which are measures taken to prevent the transmission of infectious agents from patients to healthcare professionals or from one patient to another. By wearing surgical gloves, healthcare professionals can protect themselves and their patients from potentially harmful bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms that may be present during medical procedures.

Blood-borne pathogens are microorganisms that are present in human blood and can cause disease. They include viruses such as HIV, Hepatitis B and C, and other bacteria and parasites. These pathogens can be transmitted through contact with infected blood or other bodily fluids, primarily through needlesticks or other sharps-related injuries, mucous membrane exposure, or skin exposure with open wounds or cuts. It's important for healthcare workers and others who may come into contact with blood or bodily fluids to be aware of the risks and take appropriate precautions to prevent exposure and transmission.

Patient-to-professional transmission of infectious diseases refers to the spread of an infectious agent or disease from a patient to a healthcare professional. This can occur through various routes, including:

1. Contact transmission: This includes direct contact, such as touching or shaking hands with an infected patient, or indirect contact, such as touching a contaminated surface or object.
2. Droplet transmission: This occurs when an infected person coughs, sneezes, talks, or breathes out droplets containing the infectious agent, which can then be inhaled by a nearby healthcare professional.
3. Airborne transmission: This involves the spread of infectious agents through the air over long distances, usually requiring specialized medical procedures or equipment.

Healthcare professionals are at risk of patient-to-professional transmission of infectious diseases due to their close contact with patients and the potential for exposure to various pathogens. It is essential for healthcare professionals to follow standard precautions, including hand hygiene, personal protective equipment (PPE), and respiratory protection, to minimize the risk of transmission. Additionally, proper vaccination and education on infection prevention and control measures can further reduce the risk of patient-to-professional transmission of infectious diseases.

A "Hospital Nursing Service" is a department within a hospital that provides round-the-clock, comprehensive nursing care to patients. It is responsible for the assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation of patient care, in collaboration with other healthcare professionals. The nursing service aims to promote, maintain, and restore patients' health, while ensuring their safety, comfort, and dignity.

The hospital nursing service is typically staffed by registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) or vocational nurses (LVNs), and nursing assistants who work together as a team to deliver evidence-based, patient-centered care. They provide various nursing interventions, such as medication administration, wound care, pain management, patient education, and emotional support, among others.

The nursing service also plays a crucial role in coordinating care across different hospital departments, ensuring continuity of care and optimal use of resources. Additionally, hospital nurses are often involved in quality improvement initiatives, research, and professional development activities to enhance their knowledge and skills and improve patient outcomes.

A veterinarian is a licensed medical professional who practices veterinary medicine. They are dedicated to the health and well-being of animals, ranging from pets and livestock to wild animals and exotic creatures. Veterinarians diagnose, treat, and prevent diseases and injuries in animals, and they also provide advice and guidance on animal care and nutrition.

Veterinarians may specialize in a particular area of veterinary medicine, such as surgery, internal medicine, dentistry, dermatology, or emergency care. They may work in private clinical practice, research institutions, government agencies, zoos, wildlife rehabilitation centers, or the animal health industry.

To become a veterinarian, one must complete a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree from an accredited veterinary school and pass a licensing exam. Veterinary schools typically require applicants to have a bachelor's degree with a strong background in science courses. Additionally, veterinarians must adhere to strict ethical standards and maintain their knowledge and skills through ongoing education and training.

An Animal Technician, also known as a Laboratory Animal Technician, is a professional who cares for and handles animals in a research or testing facility. They are responsible for ensuring the welfare and well-being of the animals, which includes providing them with proper housing, feeding, and medical care. They also assist researchers and veterinarians with procedures and experiments involving animals, and help to maintain accurate records of animal health and behavior.

Animal Technicians must have a strong understanding of animal biology, husbandry, and ethology, as well as knowledge of relevant regulations and guidelines governing the use of animals in research. They may work with a variety of species, including rodents, dogs, cats, non-human primates, and farm animals.

In addition to their technical skills, Animal Technicians must also have excellent observational and communication skills, as they are often responsible for monitoring animal behavior and reporting any changes or concerns to researchers or veterinarians. They must be able to work independently and as part of a team, and may need to work flexible hours, including evenings and weekends, to meet the needs of the animals in their care.

First Aid is the immediate and temporary treatment or care given to a sick, injured, or wounded person until full medical services become available. It can include simple procedures like cleaning and dressing wounds, administering CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation), preventing shock, or placing a splint on a broken bone. The goal of first aid is to preserve life, prevent further harm, and promote recovery.

'Hospital Personnel' is a general term that refers to all individuals who are employed by or provide services on behalf of a hospital. This can include, but is not limited to:

1. Healthcare professionals such as doctors, nurses, pharmacists, therapists, and technicians.
2. Administrative staff who manage the hospital's operations, including human resources, finance, and management.
3. Support services personnel such as maintenance workers, food service workers, housekeeping staff, and volunteers.
4. Medical students, interns, and trainees who are gaining clinical experience in the hospital setting.

All of these individuals play a critical role in ensuring that the hospital runs smoothly and provides high-quality care to its patients.

Veterinary medicine is the branch of medical science that deals with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases, disorders, and injuries in non-human animals. The profession of veterinary medicine is dedicated to the care, health, and welfare of animals, as well as to the promotion of human health through animal research and public health advancements. Veterinarians employ a variety of diagnostic methods including clinical examination, radiography, laboratory testing, and ultrasound imaging. They use a range of treatments, including medication, surgery, and dietary management. In addition, veterinarians may also advise on preventative healthcare measures such as vaccination schedules and parasite control programs.

Universal Precautions are a set of guidelines and procedures used in the medical field to prevent the transmission of bloodborne pathogens and other potentially infectious materials, regardless of whether a patient is known to be infected or not. These precautions were introduced by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 1987, in response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

The key components of Universal Precautions include:

1. Hand hygiene: Washing hands with soap and water or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer before and after patient contact, as well as after removing gloves.
2. Use of personal protective equipment (PPE): This includes wearing gloves, gowns, masks, face shields, or eye protection when there is potential for exposure to blood or other bodily fluids.
3. Safe injection practices: Using sterile needles and syringes for each patient, never reusing or recapping used needles, and safely disposing of sharps in designated containers.
4. Mouthpieces or resuscitation bags should be used during resuscitation instead of mouth-to-mouth breathing.
5. Proper handling and disposal of contaminated equipment and waste: Using appropriate methods to clean and disinfect reusable equipment, as well as safely disposing of single-use items.
6. Implementing engineering controls: Utilizing devices such as needleless systems, safety catheters, and self-sheathing needles to minimize the risk of accidental injuries from sharp objects.
7. Regularly updating policies and procedures related to Universal Precautions and providing ongoing training for healthcare personnel.

By following these guidelines, healthcare professionals can significantly reduce the risk of exposure to bloodborne pathogens such as HIV, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C while caring for patients.

In the context of medicine, "needles" are thin, sharp, and typically hollow instruments used in various medical procedures to introduce or remove fluids from the body, administer medications, or perform diagnostic tests. They consist of a small-gauge metal tube with a sharp point on one end and a hub on the other, where a syringe is attached.

There are different types of needles, including:

1. Hypodermic needles: These are used for injections, such as intramuscular (IM), subcutaneous (SC), or intravenous (IV) injections, to deliver medications directly into the body. They come in various sizes and lengths depending on the type of injection and the patient's age and weight.
2. Blood collection needles: These are used for drawing blood samples for diagnostic tests. They have a special vacuum-assisted design that allows them to easily penetrate veins and collect the required amount of blood.
3. Surgical needles: These are used in surgeries for suturing (stitching) wounds or tissues together. They are typically curved and made from stainless steel, with a triangular or reverse cutting point to facilitate easy penetration through tissues.
4. Acupuncture needles: These are thin, solid needles used in traditional Chinese medicine for acupuncture therapy. They are inserted into specific points on the body to stimulate energy flow and promote healing.

It is essential to follow proper infection control procedures when handling and disposing of needles to prevent the spread of bloodborne pathogens and infectious diseases.

Risk management in the medical context refers to the systematic process of identifying, assessing, and prioritizing risks to patients, staff, or healthcare organizations, followed by the development, implementation, and monitoring of strategies to manage those risks. The goal is to minimize potential harm and optimize patient safety, quality of care, and operational efficiency.

This process typically involves:

1. Identifying potential hazards and risks in the healthcare environment, procedures, or systems.
2. Assessing the likelihood and potential impact of each identified risk.
3. Prioritizing risks based on their severity and probability.
4. Developing strategies to mitigate, eliminate, transfer, or accept the prioritized risks.
5. Implementing the risk management strategies and monitoring their effectiveness.
6. Continuously reviewing and updating the risk management process to adapt to changing circumstances or new information.

Effective risk management in healthcare helps organizations provide safer care, reduce adverse events, and promote a culture of safety and continuous improvement.

Occupational diseases are health conditions or illnesses that occur as a result of exposure to hazards in the workplace. These hazards can include physical, chemical, and biological agents, as well as ergonomic factors and work-related psychosocial stressors. Examples of occupational diseases include respiratory illnesses caused by inhaling dust or fumes, hearing loss due to excessive noise exposure, and musculoskeletal disorders caused by repetitive movements or poor ergonomics. The development of an occupational disease is typically related to the nature of the work being performed and the conditions in which it is carried out. It's important to note that these diseases can be prevented or minimized through proper risk assessment, implementation of control measures, and adherence to safety regulations.

Occupational exposure refers to the contact of an individual with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents as a result of their job or occupation. This can include exposure to hazardous substances such as chemicals, heavy metals, or dusts; physical agents such as noise, radiation, or ergonomic stressors; and biological agents such as viruses, bacteria, or fungi.

Occupational exposure can occur through various routes, including inhalation, skin contact, ingestion, or injection. Prolonged or repeated exposure to these hazards can increase the risk of developing acute or chronic health conditions, such as respiratory diseases, skin disorders, neurological damage, or cancer.

Employers have a legal and ethical responsibility to minimize occupational exposures through the implementation of appropriate control measures, including engineering controls, administrative controls, personal protective equipment, and training programs. Regular monitoring and surveillance of workers' health can also help identify and prevent potential health hazards in the workplace.

Physical restraint, in a medical context, refers to the use of physical force or equipment to limit a person's movements or access to their own body. This is typically done to prevent harm to the individual themselves or to others. It can include various devices such as wrist restraints, vest restraints, or bed rails. The use of physical restraints should be a last resort and must be in accordance with established guidelines and regulations to ensure the safety and rights of the patient are respected.

'Medical Staff, Hospital' is a general term that refers to the group of licensed physicians and other healthcare professionals who are responsible for providing medical care to patients in a hospital setting. The medical staff may include attending physicians, residents, interns, fellows, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and other advanced practice providers.

The medical staff is typically governed by a set of bylaws that outline the structure, authority, and responsibilities of the group. They are responsible for establishing policies and procedures related to patient care, quality improvement, and safety. The medical staff also plays a key role in the hospital's credentialing and privileging process, which ensures that healthcare professionals meet certain standards and qualifications before they are allowed to practice in the hospital.

The medical staff may work in various departments or divisions within the hospital, such as internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, psychiatry, and radiology. They may also participate in teaching and research activities, as well as hospital committees and leadership roles.

Anesthesiology is a medical specialty concerned with providing anesthesia, which is the loss of sensation or awareness, to patients undergoing surgical, diagnostic, or therapeutic procedures. Anesthesiologists are responsible for administering various types of anesthetics, monitoring the patient's vital signs during the procedure, and managing any complications that may arise. They also play a critical role in pain management before, during, and after surgery, as well as in the treatment of chronic pain conditions.

Anesthesiologists work closely with other medical professionals, including surgeons, anesthetists, nurses, and respiratory therapists, to ensure that patients receive the best possible care. They must have a thorough understanding of human physiology, pharmacology, and anatomy, as well as excellent communication skills and the ability to make quick decisions under high pressure.

The primary goal of anesthesiology is to provide safe and effective anesthesia that minimizes pain and discomfort while maximizing patient safety and comfort. This requires a deep understanding of the risks and benefits associated with different types of anesthetics, as well as the ability to tailor the anesthetic plan to each individual patient's needs and medical history.

In summary, anesthesiology is a critical medical specialty focused on providing safe and effective anesthesia and pain management for patients undergoing surgical or other medical procedures.

A wound is a type of injury that occurs when the skin or other tissues are cut, pierced, torn, or otherwise broken. Wounds can be caused by a variety of factors, including accidents, violence, surgery, or certain medical conditions. There are several different types of wounds, including:

* Incisions: These are cuts that are made deliberately, often during surgery. They are usually straight and clean.
* Lacerations: These are tears in the skin or other tissues. They can be irregular and jagged.
* Abrasions: These occur when the top layer of skin is scraped off. They may look like a bruise or a scab.
* Punctures: These are wounds that are caused by sharp objects, such as needles or knives. They are usually small and deep.
* Avulsions: These occur when tissue is forcibly torn away from the body. They can be very serious and require immediate medical attention.

Injuries refer to any harm or damage to the body, including wounds. Injuries can range from minor scrapes and bruises to more severe injuries such as fractures, dislocations, and head trauma. It is important to seek medical attention for any injury that is causing significant pain, swelling, or bleeding, or if there is a suspected bone fracture or head injury.

In general, wounds and injuries should be cleaned and covered with a sterile bandage to prevent infection. Depending on the severity of the wound or injury, additional medical treatment may be necessary. This may include stitches for deep cuts, immobilization for broken bones, or surgery for more serious injuries. It is important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully to ensure proper healing and to prevent complications.

"Truth disclosure" is not a standard term in medicine, but it may refer to the act of revealing or expressing the truth, particularly in the context of medical communication. This can include:

1. Informed Consent: Disclosing all relevant information about a medical treatment or procedure, including its risks and benefits, so that a patient can make an informed decision about their care.
2. Breaking Bad News: Communicating difficult medical news to patients honestly, clearly, and compassionately, such as telling a patient they have a serious illness.
3. Medical Error Disclosure: Admitting and explaining mistakes made in the course of medical treatment, including any harm that may have resulted.
4. Research Integrity: Disclosing all relevant information and conflicts of interest in the conduct and reporting of medical research.

The term "truth disclosure" is not commonly used in these contexts, but the principle of honesty and transparency in medical communication is a fundamental aspect of ethical medical practice.

A "Teaching Hospital" is a healthcare institution that provides medical education and training to future healthcare professionals, such as medical students, residents, and fellows. These hospitals are often affiliated with medical schools or universities and have a strong focus on research and innovation in addition to patient care. They typically have a larger staff of specialized doctors and medical professionals who can provide comprehensive care for complex and rare medical conditions. Teaching hospitals also serve as important resources for their communities, providing access to advanced medical treatments and contributing to the development of new healthcare technologies and practices.

Medical waste, also known as healthcare waste, is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as any waste generated within the healthcare system that may pose a risk to human health and the environment. This includes waste produced by hospitals, clinics, laboratories, research centers, and other healthcare-related facilities, as well as waste generated by individuals during the course of receiving medical treatment at home.

Medical waste can take many forms, including sharps (such as needles, syringes, and scalpels), infectious waste (such as used bandages, gloves, and surgical instruments), pharmaceutical waste (such as expired or unused medications), chemical waste (such as disinfectants and solvents), and radioactive waste (such as materials used in medical imaging and cancer treatments). Proper management of medical waste is essential to prevent the spread of infectious diseases, protect healthcare workers from injury and infection, and minimize the environmental impact of these wastes.

Hepatitis B is a viral infection that attacks the liver and can cause both acute and chronic disease. The virus is transmitted through contact with infected blood, semen, and other bodily fluids. It can also be passed from an infected mother to her baby at birth.

Acute hepatitis B infection lasts for a few weeks to several months and often causes no symptoms. However, some people may experience mild to severe flu-like symptoms, yellowing of the skin and eyes (jaundice), dark urine, and fatigue. Most adults with acute hepatitis B recover completely and develop lifelong immunity to the virus.

Chronic hepatitis B infection can lead to serious liver damage, including cirrhosis and liver cancer. People with chronic hepatitis B may experience long-term symptoms such as fatigue, joint pain, and depression. They are also at risk for developing liver failure and liver cancer.

Prevention measures include vaccination, safe sex practices, avoiding sharing needles or other drug injection equipment, and covering wounds and skin rashes. There is no specific treatment for acute hepatitis B, but chronic hepatitis B can be treated with antiviral medications to slow the progression of liver damage.

Hospital housekeeping, also known as environmental services, refers to the department within a hospital responsible for maintaining cleanliness, hygiene, and overall sanitation of the healthcare facility. This includes tasks such as:

1. Cleaning patient rooms, bathrooms, and common areas: This involves dusting, vacuuming, mopping, and disinfecting surfaces to prevent the spread of infections and ensure a safe and comfortable environment for patients, visitors, and staff.
2. Linen management: Hospital housekeeping personnel are responsible for managing laundry services, including collecting soiled linens, transporting them to the laundry facility, washing, drying, folding, and delivering clean linens back to the appropriate units.
3. Waste management: Proper disposal of medical waste, such as sharps, biohazardous materials, and regular trash, is essential for infection prevention and ensuring a safe environment. Hospital housekeeping staff follow strict protocols for handling and disposing of different types of waste.
4. Equipment cleaning and maintenance: Hospital housekeeping staff may be responsible for cleaning and maintaining various types of equipment, such as stretchers, wheelchairs, and other non-medical devices, to ensure they are in good working order and free from dust, dirt, and germs.
5. Infection prevention and control: Adhering to strict infection prevention policies and procedures is crucial for hospital housekeeping staff. This includes using personal protective equipment (PPE), following proper hand hygiene practices, and implementing cleaning and disinfection protocols according to established guidelines.
6. Environmental services training and education: Hospital housekeeping departments often provide ongoing training and education to their staff to ensure they are up-to-date on the latest infection prevention techniques, equipment, and best practices.
7. Participating in quality improvement initiatives: Hospital housekeeping staff may collaborate with other healthcare professionals to identify areas for improvement and implement evidence-based strategies to enhance patient care, safety, and satisfaction.

A brain injury is defined as damage to the brain that occurs following an external force or trauma, such as a blow to the head, a fall, or a motor vehicle accident. Brain injuries can also result from internal conditions, such as lack of oxygen or a stroke. There are two main types of brain injuries: traumatic and acquired.

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is caused by an external force that results in the brain moving within the skull or the skull being fractured. Mild TBIs may result in temporary symptoms such as headaches, confusion, and memory loss, while severe TBIs can cause long-term complications, including physical, cognitive, and emotional impairments.

Acquired brain injury (ABI) is any injury to the brain that occurs after birth and is not hereditary, congenital, or degenerative. ABIs are often caused by medical conditions such as strokes, tumors, anoxia (lack of oxygen), or infections.

Both TBIs and ABIs can range from mild to severe and may result in a variety of physical, cognitive, and emotional symptoms that can impact a person's ability to perform daily activities and function independently. Treatment for brain injuries typically involves a multidisciplinary approach, including medical management, rehabilitation, and supportive care.

Penetrating wounds are a type of traumatic injury that occurs when an object pierces through the skin and underlying tissues, creating a hole or cavity in the body. These wounds can vary in severity, depending on the size and shape of the object, as well as the location and depth of the wound.

Penetrating wounds are typically caused by sharp objects such as knives, bullets, or glass. They can damage internal organs, blood vessels, nerves, and bones, leading to serious complications such as bleeding, infection, organ failure, and even death if not treated promptly and properly.

The management of penetrating wounds involves a thorough assessment of the wound and surrounding tissues, as well as the identification and treatment of any associated injuries or complications. This may include wound cleaning and closure, antibiotics to prevent infection, pain management, and surgery to repair damaged structures. In some cases, hospitalization and close monitoring may be necessary to ensure proper healing and recovery.

'Hospital Nursing Staff' refers to the group of healthcare professionals who are licensed and trained to provide nursing care to patients in a hospital setting. They work under the direction of a nurse manager or director and collaborate with an interdisciplinary team of healthcare providers, including physicians, therapists, social workers, and other support staff.

Hospital nursing staff can include registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) or vocational nurses (LVNs), and unlicensed assistive personnel (UAPs) such as nursing assistants, orderlies, and patient care technicians. Their responsibilities may vary depending on their role and the needs of the patients, but they typically include:

* Administering medications and treatments prescribed by physicians
* Monitoring patients' vital signs and overall condition
* Providing emotional support and education to patients and their families
* Assisting with activities of daily living such as bathing, dressing, and grooming
* Documenting patient care and progress in medical records
* Collaborating with other healthcare professionals to develop and implement individualized care plans.

Hospital nursing staff play a critical role in ensuring the safety, comfort, and well-being of hospitalized patients, and they are essential members of the healthcare team.

Athletic injuries are damages or injuries to the body that occur while participating in sports, physical activities, or exercise. These injuries can be caused by a variety of factors, including:

1. Trauma: Direct blows, falls, collisions, or crushing injuries can cause fractures, dislocations, contusions, lacerations, or concussions.
2. Overuse: Repetitive motions or stress on a particular body part can lead to injuries such as tendonitis, stress fractures, or muscle strains.
3. Poor technique: Using incorrect form or technique during exercise or sports can put additional stress on muscles, joints, and ligaments, leading to injury.
4. Inadequate warm-up or cool-down: Failing to properly prepare the body for physical activity or neglecting to cool down afterwards can increase the risk of injury.
5. Lack of fitness or flexibility: Insufficient strength, endurance, or flexibility can make individuals more susceptible to injuries during sports and exercise.
6. Environmental factors: Extreme weather conditions, poor field or court surfaces, or inadequate equipment can contribute to the risk of athletic injuries.

Common athletic injuries include ankle sprains, knee injuries, shoulder dislocations, tennis elbow, shin splints, and concussions. Proper training, warm-up and cool-down routines, use of appropriate protective gear, and attention to technique can help prevent many athletic injuries.

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

Spinal cord injuries (SCI) refer to damage to the spinal cord that results in a loss of function, such as mobility or feeling. This injury can be caused by direct trauma to the spine or by indirect damage resulting from disease or degeneration of surrounding bones, tissues, or blood vessels. The location and severity of the injury on the spinal cord will determine which parts of the body are affected and to what extent.

The effects of SCI can range from mild sensory changes to severe paralysis, including loss of motor function, autonomic dysfunction, and possible changes in sensation, strength, and reflexes below the level of injury. These injuries are typically classified as complete or incomplete, depending on whether there is any remaining function below the level of injury.

Immediate medical attention is crucial for spinal cord injuries to prevent further damage and improve the chances of recovery. Treatment usually involves immobilization of the spine, medications to reduce swelling and pressure, surgery to stabilize the spine, and rehabilitation to help regain lost function. Despite advances in treatment, SCI can have a significant impact on a person's quality of life and ability to perform daily activities.

"Health personnel" is a broad term that refers to individuals who are involved in maintaining, promoting, and restoring the health of populations or individuals. This can include a wide range of professionals such as:

1. Healthcare providers: These are medical doctors, nurses, midwives, dentists, pharmacists, allied health professionals (like physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, dietitians, etc.), and other healthcare workers who provide direct patient care.

2. Public health professionals: These are individuals who work in public health agencies, non-governmental organizations, or academia to promote health, prevent diseases, and protect populations from health hazards. They include epidemiologists, biostatisticians, health educators, environmental health specialists, and health services researchers.

3. Health managers and administrators: These are professionals who oversee the operations, finances, and strategic planning of healthcare organizations, such as hospitals, clinics, or public health departments. They may include hospital CEOs, medical directors, practice managers, and healthcare consultants.

4. Health support staff: This group includes various personnel who provide essential services to healthcare organizations, such as medical records technicians, billing specialists, receptionists, and maintenance workers.

5. Health researchers and academics: These are professionals involved in conducting research, teaching, and disseminating knowledge related to health sciences, medicine, public health, or healthcare management in universities, research institutions, or think tanks.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines "health worker" as "a person who contributes to the promotion, protection, or improvement of health through prevention, treatment, rehabilitation, palliation, health promotion, and health education." This definition encompasses a wide range of professionals working in various capacities to improve health outcomes.

Another problem is underreporting of needlestick injuries. It is estimated that half of all occupational needlestick injuries ... reporting a needlestick within the past year. Needlestick injuries are among the top three injuries that occur among material- ... scalpel injuries tend to be larger than a needlestick. Generally, needlestick injuries cause only minor visible trauma or ... reported a needlestick injury they received; 42% of which occurred during their evening shift. Most of the needlestick injuries ...
Needlestick injuries can be very serious and potentially expose a healthcare professional to bloodborne infectious diseases ... "Needlestick injury , betterhealth.vic.gov.au". www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au. Retrieved 2021-03-16. "Bloodborne Infectious ... Needleless connectors (also known as NC's) were developed to reduce needlestick injuries, which occurs when the skin is ... "CDC - Bloodborne Infectious Diseases - Emergency Needlestick Information - NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topic". www.cdc. ...
... blade injuries were among the most frequent sharps injuries, second only to needlesticks. Scalpel injuries made up 7 ... "Needlestick and Sharp-Object Injury Report. US EPINet Network". Advances in Exposure Prevention. 7 (4): 44-45. 2005. Fuentes, H ... "Sharps Injury Prevention Workbook". Cdc.gov (Centre for Disease Control and Prevention). Sinnott M.; Wall D. (2007). "'Scalpel ... According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as many as 1,000 people were subject to accidental needle sticks ...
Caldas, JP; Valdoleiros, SR; Rebelo, S; Tavares, M (17 October 2022). "Monkeypox after Occupational Needlestick Injury from ...
A safety syringe is a syringe with a built-in safety mechanism to reduce the risk of needlestick injuries to healthcare workers ... The direct cost of needlestick injuries was calculated in a recent study to be between $539 and $672 million US dollars[ ... Legislation requiring safety syringes or equivalents has been introduced in many nations since needlestick injuries and re-use ... "Health Care Worker Health and Safety: Preventing Needlestick Injury and Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens" (PDF). ...
Accidental injection or needlestick injuries are a common injury that plague agriculture workers and veterinarians. The ... In 2010-2011, injuries to the upper limb injuries made up 47% of non-fatal injuries at work in the UK. In all, over 1,900,000 ... In 2013-2014, an estimated 629,000 injuries occurred at work. Of these injuries 629,000 injuries, 203,000 led to more than 3 ... Due to the wide variety of biologics used in animal agriculture, needlestick injuries can result in bacterial or fungal ...
Needlestick injuries can result in bloodborne-pathogen exposures; they are the most common accidents among veterinarians, but ... Health professionals are at risk for contracting blood-borne diseases through needlestick injuries or contact with bodily ... The animal species, work setting, health and safety practices, and training can all affect the risk of injury and illness. ... Lavoie, Marie-Claude; Verbeek, Jos H.; Pahwa, Manisha (2014). "Devices for preventing percutaneous exposure injuries caused by ...
Strauss K. Risk of needlestick injury from injecting needles. Nurs Times. 2012;108:12, 14, 16. Strauss K. Synopsis of the WISE ... Needlestick injuries in European nurses in diabetes. Diabetes Metab. 2012;38 Suppl 1:S9-14. Strauss K. L'innovazione ...
She has been devoted to reducing needle stick injuries. 2002 MacArthur Fellows Program Prevention and Control of Nosocomial ... While We Were Sleeping: Success Stories in Injury and Violence Prevention, David Hemenway, University of California Press, 2009 ... "Progress in Preventing Sharps Injuries in the United States", Handbook of Modern Hospital Safety, Second Edition, CRC Press, ...
"Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens;Needlestick and Other Sharps Injuries; Final Rule. - 66:5317-5325". Osha.gov. ...
Healthcare workers who in January 2015 had sustained needlestick injuries while caring for Ebola patients abroad were put under ... "Second UK military Ebola worker flies back home after needlestick injury". The Guardian. 2 February 2015. "BBC News - Ebola: ... when a laboratory technician contracted the disease in a needlestick injury while handling samples from Africa. All cases ... contracted Ebola in an accidental needlestick injury from a contaminated needle while handling samples from Africa. He was ...
93 to 4.68 injuries per person and per year, which is five times higher than in industrialized nations. Needle-stick injuries ... One of the most common causes of needle-stick injuries, which the Needlestick Act and Bloodborne Pathogens Standard were ... In developing countries, the risk of disease transmission is elevated due to the high percentage of needle-stick injuries, ... 27-28 Wilburn, S. (2004). Preventing Needlestick Injuries among Health Care Workers: A WHO-ICN Collaboration. Int J Occup ...
She was a nurse's aide in 1990, when she received a needlestick injury while clearing a table in an emergency room. She learned ... OSHA's Compliance Directive on Bloodborne Pathogens and the Prevention of Needlestick Injuries. U.S. Government Printing Office ... She worked for changes in the law to require hospitals to use safety needles to prevent similar injuries in others. In a 1992 ... At the federal level, the Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act became a national law in 2000. Ferro was briefly married in the ...
Newer catheters have been equipped with additional safety features to avoid needlestick injuries. Modern catheters consist of ...
Criminal transmission of HIV Needle spiking Needlestick injury Craig Wolff (1989-11-04). "10 Teen-Age Girls Held in Upper ...
Blood poses the greatest threat to health in a laboratory or clinical setting due to needlestick injuries (e.g., lack of proper ... Use needles with safety devices to help prevent needlestick injury and exposure to blood-borne pathogens.[citation needed] A ... This has been shown to reduce blood-borne diseases transmitted via needlestick injuries. Engineering controls: Isolate people ... 2010) Sharps Injuries among Hospital Workers in Massachusetts, 2010: Findings from the Massachusetts Sharps Injury Surveillance ...
"Laboratory-acquired dengue virus infection by needlestick injury: a case report, South Korea, 2014". Annals of Occupational and ...
It may be used for prevention after a needlestick injury or other potential exposure. It is sold both by itself and in ... needlestick injuries, certain types of unprotected sex, etc.). Efavirenz is safe to use during the first trimester of pregnancy ...
When he operates on Susan he loses concentration and has a needle stick injury. He is then told he has probably caught the ... Writers continued to create dramatic stories for the character when he contracts Hepatitis C from a needle stick injury. ... Dom's internal injuries to his bowel mean that he is fitted with a stoma. Writers pitched the idea to Ames in 2020 and he ... Holby City began a new story for Dom after he is involved in a car accident that leaves him with life changing injuries. ...
It may be used for prevention after a needlestick injury or other potential exposure. However, it is not a first-line treatment ... needlestick) or through exposure to infected blood or other bodily fluids. It is always used in combination with other HIV ...
Needlestick injuries are the most common accidents among veterinarians, but they are likely underreported. Needlesticks can ... needlestick injuries, ionizing radiation, and noise. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, 12% of workers in the ... They manage a wide range of health conditions and injuries in non-human animals. Along with this, veterinarians also play a ... Most states in the US allow for malpractice lawsuit in case of death or injury to an animal from professional negligence. ...
It may be used for prevention after a needlestick injury or other potential exposure. It is taken by mouth once to twice a day ...
Among other benefits, the technology may help reduce the potential for needle-stick injuries. A needleless device may also help ...
Occupational exposures include needlestick injury of health care professionals from an HIV-infected source. In 2012, the US ... needlestick injuries, or sharing needles). The CDC recommends PEP for any HIV-negative person who has recently been exposed to ... "Ignorance of post-exposure prophylaxis guidelines following HIV needlestick injury may increase the risk of seroconversion". ...
To combat this, safety syringes exist which contain features to prevent accidental needlestick injury and reuse of the syringe ... To help prevent accidental needlestick injury to the person administering the injection, and prevent reuse of the syringe for ... Dart injection Jet injector Injection port Lethal injection Needlestick injury Needle remover Safety syringe "injection". ... both reuse prevention devices and a needlestick injury prevention mechanism for all injections to prevent accidental injury and ...
Needle Stick Injury among Baltimore Police". Journal of Urban Health. 94 (1): 100-103. doi:10.1007/s11524-016-0115-0. ISSN 1468 ...
Contrasts between the industrialized and developing world segment can be seen in accidental needle stick injuries. These occur ... Sharps injuries: global burden of disease from sharps injuries to health-care workers. WHO Environmental Burden of Disease ... Injuries from sharps waste can pose a large public health concern, as used sharps may contain biohazardous material. It is ... Steps must be taken along the way to minimize the risk of injury from this material, while maximizing the amount of sharps ...
As a disinfectant it may be applied to small wounds such as a needle stick injury. A small amount may also be used for ...
2011). "Case report: Trichophyton verrucosum infection after needlestick injury with an attenuated live vaccine against cattle ... and needlestick injury during vaccination. Contact with horse blankets and cattle posts can also cause infection, and T. ...
It may be used for prevention after a needlestick injury or other potential exposure (postexposure prophylaxis (PEP)). It is ...
Another problem is underreporting of needlestick injuries. It is estimated that half of all occupational needlestick injuries ... reporting a needlestick within the past year. Needlestick injuries are among the top three injuries that occur among material- ... scalpel injuries tend to be larger than a needlestick. Generally, needlestick injuries cause only minor visible trauma or ... reported a needlestick injury they received; 42% of which occurred during their evening shift. Most of the needlestick injuries ...
Certain work practices may increase the risk of needlestick injury. ... Whenever a needle or other sharp device is exposed, injuries can occur. ... What to do if you experience a needlestick injury. If you experienced a needlestick injury or were exposed to the blood or ... Prevent needlestick injuries. Needlestick injuries can be avoided by eliminating the unnecessary use of needles, using devices ...
She had no previous history of needlestick injury. She notified the hospital occupational medicine department of her injury on ... falciparum infection after a needlestick injury may be rare; however, such an injury can be potentially severe in nonimmune ... The needlestick pierced the nurses glove and caused a deep, blood-letting injury on the anterior aspect of the left wrist. ... Microbiological hazards of occupational needlestick and "sharps" injuries. J Appl Bacteriol. 1987;62:385-402.PubMedGoogle ...
... June 24, 2008. Article ... Needlestick Injuries. Sixty-four percent of nurses report being accidentally stuck by a needle while working. This mirrors ... Underreporting of Needlestick Injuries. While the overwhelming majority of nurses (91 percent) are familiar with their ... "This study spotlights cause for concern when those individuals most susceptible to on-the-job needlestick injuries are not a ...
... The needles are packaged in trays and standard tubs, including ... It is estimated that around one million needle stick injuries occur in Europe every year," explains Maximilian Vogl, Product ... Gx InnoSafe reliably protects against inadvertent needlestick injuries and prevents repeated use. Unlike many existing ... Gerresheimer is now offering a syringe with an integrated passive safety system that avoids inadvertent needle stick injuries, ...
Health & Safety: A Culture of Safety: Nurses can take an active role in preventing needlestick injuries. ...
Occupational Risk Factors Associated with Needle-Stick Injury among Healthcare Workers in Hawassa City, Southern Ethiopia ... The needle stick injury rate in the study area was 35.8%. Number of clinical procedures performed per day (p value=0.04) and ... Objective: The study examined the prevalence and health risk factors associated with needle stick injury in Hawassa City, ... Citation: Beyene H, Desalegn Yirsaw B (2014) Occupational Risk Factors Associated with Needle-Stick Injury among Healthcare ...
Self-reported needle-stick injuries among dentists in north Jordan ... The incidence of needle-stick injuries by demographic characteristics and work-related variables is shown in Table 1. Needle- ... Of those who were injured, 77.9% did not report the injury. Reasons for not reporting needle-stick injury were: because it took ... Of the injured dentists, 77.9% had never reported any of their injuries. Reasons for not reporting the needle-stick injury were ...
Nearly one-third (31%) of the injuries occurred in emergency unit and 122 (71.3%) of the materials caused injury were used on ... The prevalence of needle stick and sharp injury in the past 12 months preceding the study and entire job were 25.9% ... Thus, the aim of this study was to assess prevalence of needle sticks and sharp injury and associated factors among health care ... The magnitude of Needle stick and sharp injury is high in the study area. Policy makers should formulate strategies to improve ...
Needlestick injuries account for up to 80 percent of accidental exposures to blood. Nurses in hospitals are the most frequently ... you should know that there are an estimated 800,000 needlesticks each year in the U.S. About 2 percent, or 16,000, of these, ... Will These Devices Prevent Needlestick Injuries?. Not all needlestick injuries are preventable, but the number can be reduced ... Tags: Biohazards Blood bloodborne pathogens Injuries Monitor work place needlestick Injuries risks safety ...
Management of needlestick injuries: a house officer who has a needlestick. JAMA. 2012 Jan 4. 307(1):75-84. [QxMD MEDLINE Link] ... encoded search term (Needle-stick Guideline) and Needle-stick Guideline What to Read Next on Medscape ... Needle-stick Guideline Treatment & Management. Updated: Jul 01, 2021 * Author: Megan A Stobart-Gallagher, DO; Chief Editor: ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Needlestick Surveillance Group. N Engl J Med. 1997 Nov 20. 337(21):1485-90. [QxMD ...
The management of needlestick injuries.. Heiko Himmelreich, Holger F Rabenau, Matthias Rindermann, Christoph Stephan, Markus ... The purpose of this study was to assess (and improve) the procedures for the reporting and treatment of needlestick injuries in ... BACKGROUND: An estimated 1 million needlestick injuries (NSIs) occur in Europe each year. The Council Directive 2010/32/EU on ...
Needle Stick Injury. Needlestick injuries are wounds caused by needles that accidentally puncture the skin. Needlestick ... Hazards of Needle stick injury These injuries transmit infectious diseases, especially blood-borne viruses. Concern includes ... They still demonstrate, however, that needlestick and sharps injuries can have serious consequences. ... These injuries can occur at any time when people use, disassemble, or dispose of needles. When not disposed of properly, ...
If you go to the Puncture website, youll a great deal about needlestick injuries as well as the scourge of these GPOs, which ... The needle is a retractable one that makes it almost impossible for a nurse or anyone else to get a needlestick injury. The two ... Be aware, your son or daughter could be at great risk for a needlestick injury because the same kind of corporate greed that ... Which is why there are 800,000 needlestick injuries in the US every year. Yes, every year, nurses, doctors, aides, housekeepers ...
Prevent needlestick injuries and protect yourself and your staff with Septodont Aim Safe, a autoclavable and safe recapping ...
MARTINS, Andréa Maria Eleutério Barros de Lima et al. Needlestick and sharp instrument injuries among dentists in Montes Claros ... This study evaluated the prevalence and characteristics of needlestick and sharp instrument injuries and the factors associated ... Percutaneous injuries within the previous six months and during the course of professional life were reported by 19.1% and 81.3 ... Percutaneous injuries are a common problem among dentists, who are among the healthcare professionals most involved in ...
WHO-ICN tool kit : preventing needlestick injuries and occupational exposure to HIV/AIDS [electronic resource]. by , World ... Sharps injuries : assessing the burden of disease from sharps injuries to health-care workers at national and local levels / ... Sharps injuries: global burden of disease from sharps injuries to health-care workers / Annette Prüss-Üstun, Elisabetta Rapiti ... Global burden of disease from sharps injuries to health-care workers..Online access: Click here to access online Availability: ...
... requests assistance in preventing needlestick injuries among health care workers. ... The document focuses on needlestick injuries as a key element in a broader effort to prevent all sharpsrelated injuries and ... Prevention and Management of Needlestick Injuries in Health Care Settings By Emergency Live Last updated Aug 19, 2015. ... This Alert provides current scientific information about the risk of needlestick injury and the transmission of bloodborne ...
Needle Stick Injury/Body Fluid Exposure (RECIPIENT). Test/Investigation. Needle Stick Injury/Body Fluid Exposure (RECIPIENT) ...
Sharps Disposal and Needlestick Injuries Poster. Add ${ errors.first(quantity field) } £19.50 ...
... six people suffer a needlestick injury somewhere in the world. Every day, 3 people die as a result of those injuries[1]. ... These needlestick injury and infection statistics are frightening, result in billions of dollars spent on related health care, ... There are more than 20 blood borne pathogens that can be transmitted by needlestick injuries. These include: Hepatitis B; ... Needlestick Injury - the pointy end of a preventable pandemic. November 5th, 2020 ...
Micropore™, Transpore™, 3M silk tape **Needlestick Injury. A total of thirty-five (35) subdermal needlesticks were reported ... Needle-Stick Injuries in Ophthalmic PracticeAugust 31, 2023 - 3:31 pm. *. Top 10 Health Technology Hazards in Health CareMarch ... Needle-Stick Injuries in Ophthalmic PracticeAugust 31, 2023 - 3:31 pm. *. Top 10 Health Technology Hazards in Health CareMarch ... This reduction in needlestick injuries could be attributed to a higher level of awareness due to the integration of the ...
... about how The Compensation Experts can assist you with Coronavirus crisis and lack of training blamed for rise in needlestick ... Needlestick Injuries. A needlestick injury happens when a contaminated needle goes through the skin. Needlestick injuries are ... As with any workplace injury, reporting needlestick injuries is important. Reporting a needlestick injury means that your ... What to do if you get a needlestick injury?. If you suffer a needlestick injury, the NHS guidelines encourage you to wash the ...
Topic: Injury Control--Needlesticks. (Please note that the documents listed below are sorted by date.). Public Health Service ... Evaluation of Blunt Suture Needles in Preventing Percutaneous Injuries Among Health-Care Workers During Gynecologic Surgical ... Evaluation of Safety Devices for Preventing Percutaneous Injuries Among Health-Care Workers During Phlebotomy Procedures -- ...
2) how many needlestick injuries have been reported in the NHS; what the estimated figure including unreported needlestick ... Data on needlestick injuries to National Health Service staff and any absence resulting from such injuries, are not collected ... Needlestick Injuries. Mr. Clapham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many settlements the NHS has made for ... 4) if he will list the 10 NHS trusts with the (a) highest and (b) lowest rate of needlestick injuries, indicating how many in ( ...
tubing and no luer adapter is clinically demonstrated to reduce needlestick injuries.. ...
Needle-stick injuries (NSIs) are a significant health hazard to nurses due to the risk of contracting blood-borne pathogens ... Needle-stick injuries have been defined as a percutaneous piercing wound by a needlepoint or other sharp instrument, which is ... Smith, D. R., Choe, M., Jeong, J. S., Jeon, M., & Chae, Y. R. (2006). Epidemiology of Needlestick and Sharps Injuries Among ... Needle-stick injuries: Significant health risk for New Zealand nurses. Grace Emeny ...
You may file for a lawsuit against your employer for injuries due to chemical exposure under occupational exposure laws. Call ... Healthcare Workers and Needlestick Injuries. Healthcare workers are frequently at risk of injuries from needles and other sharp ... The employees injuries were not actually caused by exposure in the workplace, but by some other factor outside of work. ... This contact could lead to various health hazards or occupational exposure injuries. The exposure can occur through different ...
Helps reduce needlestick injuries by up to 88% over forward-shielding safety wingsets.2 ... Helps reduce needlestick injuries by up to 88% over forward-shielding safety wingsets.2 ... Button Blood Collection Set features a push button safety mechanism that instantly helps protect you against needlestick injury ... potentially debilitating needlesticks, allowing you and your staff to focus on delivering superior patient care. ...
  • Even though the acute physiological effects of a needlestick injury are generally negligible, these injuries can lead to transmission of blood-borne diseases, placing those exposed at increased risk of infection from disease-causing pathogens, such as the hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). (wikipedia.org)
  • Needlestick injuries can lead to serious or fatal infections with bloodborne pathogens such as hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, or HIV. (cdc.gov)
  • The risk of infection by pathogens other than HBV, HCV, or HIV following a needlestick injury was not discussed during her postexposure interview, and the nurse was not made aware of that risk. (cdc.gov)
  • More than 20 pathogens have been reportedly transmitted from needlesticks. (hsseworld.com)
  • These injuries may cause a number of serious and potentially fatal infections with bloodborne pathogens such as hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-the virus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). (emergency-live.com)
  • This Alert provides current scientific information about the risk of needlestick injury and the transmission of bloodborne pathogens to health care workers. (emergency-live.com)
  • There are more than 20 blood borne pathogens that can be transmitted by needlestick injuries. (numedico.com)
  • Sharps injuries are responsible for placing healthcare workers (HCW) at risk through the transmission of bloodborne pathogens like Hepatitis, HIV and other infectious diseases. (mareaenterprises.com)
  • Needle-stick injuries (NSIs) are a significant health hazard to nurses due to the risk of contracting blood-borne pathogens following a contaminated NSI. (nursingjournal.co.nz)
  • Healthcare workers are frequently at risk of injuries from needles and other sharp objects, potentially exposing them to blood-borne pathogens like hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and HIV. (legalmatch.com)
  • Per the CDC, "[o]ccupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens from needlesticks and other sharps injuries is a serious problem, resulting in approximately 385,000 needlesticks and other sharps-related injuries to hospital-based healthcare personnel each year. (workinjuryhelp.com)
  • Per the CDC, "[s]harps injuries are primarily associated with occupational transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but they have been implicated in the transmission of more than 20 other pathogens. (workinjuryhelp.com)
  • Needlestick injuries may also occur when needles are exchanged between personnel, loaded into a needle driver, or when sutures are tied off while still connected to the needle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Promptly disposing of used needles in appropriate sharps disposal containers is one way you can help prevent needlestick injuries. (cdc.gov)
  • Healthcare personnel who use or may be exposed to needles are at increased risk of needlestick injury. (cdc.gov)
  • Needlestick injuries can be avoided by eliminating the unnecessary use of needles, using devices with safety features, and promoting education and safe work practices for handling needles and related systems. (cdc.gov)
  • If you're an employer of health care workers who are potentially exposed to blood and contaminated needles, you should know that there are an estimated 800,000 needlesticks each year in the U.S. About 2 percent, or 16,000, of these, are likely to be contaminated with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). (hsseworld.com)
  • Needlestick injuries may occur when employees dispose of needles, collect and dispose of materials used during patient care procedures, administer injections, draw blood, or handle trash or dirty linens where needles have been inappropriately discarded. (hsseworld.com)
  • Hollow-bore needles are the cause of injury in 68.5 percent of all cases. (hsseworld.com)
  • Using needleless IV connectors, self re-sheathing needles, or blunted surgical needles, for example, can help reduce the risk of injury. (hsseworld.com)
  • In fact, almost 83 percent of injuries from hollow bore needles are potentially preventable. (hsseworld.com)
  • Needlestick injuries are wounds caused by needles that accidentally puncture the skin. (beautytrainingportal.com)
  • These injuries can occur at any time when people use, disassemble, or dispose of needles. (beautytrainingportal.com)
  • Yes, every year, nurses, doctors, aides, housekeepers and more are threatened by injuries that could be prevented immediately if hospitals used the kind of safe needles you'll see on display in this movie. (suzannecgordon.com)
  • These injuries are caused by needles such as hypodermic needles, blood collection needles, intravenous (IV) stylets, and needles used to connect parts of IV delivery systems. (emergency-live.com)
  • These needlestick injury and infection statistics are frightening, result in billions of dollars spent on related health care, and are largely preventable if the use of safe medical devices designed to reduce this risk of these injuries, and where the re-use of needles is tempting, was mandated. (numedico.com)
  • ClickZip™ Needle Retractable Safety Syringe and Retractable Safety Butterfly Needles are a globally patented Swiss technology active, high quality needle with a simple to use manual retraction mechanism to protect against needlestick injury and prevent needle reuse. (numedico.com)
  • The data collected compares the efficacy of various medical adhesives that are used to affix needles to patients as they pertain to reducing needlesticks during IOM procedures. (mareaenterprises.com)
  • Of these injuries, thirty-three percent (33%) are caused by non-cannulated needles. (mareaenterprises.com)
  • In the few published studies on IOM and NSI, IOM clinicians report that they have experienced needlesticks at least once by subdermal needles during the course of their career. (mareaenterprises.com)
  • 5 , 6 The IOM community has acknowledged an under-reporting of these injuries, much like is found in other healthcare sectors where needles and other sharps are employed that are at-times causal in accidental needlesticks. (mareaenterprises.com)
  • And as long as we are talking about needles, what about inoculation injuries of other kinds such as the widely anticipated COVID-19 vaccine, when they occur in the workplace? (wcdefenseinstitute.com)
  • Pen needles are an easy and practical way to give medication, but they can also cause pain, hyperglycemia, scars from needlesticks, and infections. (globenewswire.com)
  • Third, mechanisms should be in place so that "sharps" (i.e. needles and syringes) are so disposed of as to ensure that dirty injection equipment is not reused and the risk of accidental needle-stick injuries is minimized. (who.int)
  • Among healthcare workers and laboratory personnel worldwide, more than 25 blood-borne virus infections have been reported to have been caused by needlestick injuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Increasing recognition of the unique occupational hazard posed by needlestick injuries, as well as the development of efficacious interventions to minimize the largely preventable occupational risk, encouraged legislative regulation in the US, causing a decline in needlestick injuries among healthcare workers. (wikipedia.org)
  • In places with higher rates of blood-borne diseases in the general population, healthcare workers are more susceptible to contracting these diseases from a needlestick injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • Beyene H, Desalegn Yirsaw B (2014) Occupational Risk Factors Associated with Needle-Stick Injury among Healthcare Workers in Hawassa City, Southern Ethiopia. (omicsonline.org)
  • Globally, more than 35 million healthcare workers suffer from occupational needle stick and sharp injury every year [ 6 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Sharps/needlestick injuries are a common occupational hazard among healthcare workers (HCWs). (annals.edu.sg)
  • Background: Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at risk of acquiring blood-borne infections such as hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and human immunodeficiency virus through needlestick injuries (NSIs). (bvsalud.org)
  • INTRODUCTION: Needlestick injuries (NSIs) are a major hazard in the workplace for healthcare workers. (bvsalud.org)
  • OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of needlestick and sharps injuries (NSSIs) and associated factors among healthcare workers (HCWs) at King Hussein Cancer Centre (KHCC), Amman, Jordan. (bvsalud.org)
  • The management of needlestick injuries. (qxmd.com)
  • In addition to needlestick injuries, transmission of these viruses can also occur as a result of contamination of the mucous membranes, such as those of the eyes, with blood or body fluids, but needlestick injuries make up more than 80% of all percutaneous exposure incidents in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • Needlestick injuries occur in the healthcare environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Injuries also commonly occur during needle recapping or via improper disposal of devices into an overfilled or poorly located sharps container. (wikipedia.org)
  • Whenever a needle or other sharp device is exposed, injuries can occur. (cdc.gov)
  • It is estimated that around one million needle stick injuries occur in Europe every year," explains Maximilian Vogl, Product Manager Injection Devices, adding that in the worst case, it can lead to serious infections. (gerresheimer.com)
  • Serious infections can be transmitted in the dental practice when percutaneous injuries occur. (who.int)
  • An estimated 1 million needlestick injuries (NSIs) occur in Europe each year. (qxmd.com)
  • Similar injuries occur in other healthcare settings, such as nursing homes, clinics, emergency care services, and private homes. (workinjuryhelp.com)
  • Needlestick and Sharps Injuries can occur in many different settings as well. (workinjuryhelp.com)
  • This article will discuss needle stick and sharps, how work injuries can occur, what occupations are risk for needle stick or sharp injuries, what Labor Code Sections may assist Injured Workers who sustain needle stick or sharp injuries and caselaw concerning needle stick or sharp injuries. (workinjuryhelp.com)
  • A needlestick injury is the penetration of the skin by a hypodermic needle or other sharp object that has been in contact with blood, tissue or other body fluids before the exposure. (wikipedia.org)
  • In cases where an injury was sustained with a clean needle (i.e. exposure to body fluids had not occurred), the likelihood of infection is generally minimal. (wikipedia.org)
  • WHO-ICN tool kit : preventing needlestick injuries and occupational exposure to HIV/AIDS [electronic resource]. (who.int)
  • Nearly 30% of injured HCW are incidentally affected by sharps and needlestick injury due to their exposure in the operating room. (mareaenterprises.com)
  • This contact could lead to various health hazards or occupational exposure injuries . (legalmatch.com)
  • Although nurses note less frequent injury of managers and physicians-"They don't see it [e.g. heavy lifting] as part of their job"-chemical injury and exposure is perceived as "the great equalizer" because regardless of job description, "the fact that you were in the building, breathing on a regular basis was your risk factor. (cdc.gov)
  • According to the latest research, nearly two-thirds (64 percent) of U.S. nurses say needlestick injuries and bloodborne infections remain major concerns, and 55 percent believe their workplace safety climate negatively impacts their own personal safety. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • Background: Accidental occupational injuries to health care workers continue to have a significant problem in healthcare systems owing to the associated risk of acquiring infections such as hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency viruses. (omicsonline.org)
  • The document focuses on needlestick injuries as a key element in a broader effort to prevent all sharpsrelated injuries and associated bloodborne infections. (emergency-live.com)
  • The document describes five cases of health care workers with needlestick-related infections and presents intervention strategies for reducing these risks. (emergency-live.com)
  • Needle-stick and sharp injuries are the most common and preventable occupational hazards that health care workers are exposed for the transmission of a variety of blood borne infections such as HBV, HCV, and HIV/AIDS. (surgicalnursingjournal.com)
  • Impact of stress and trauma on physical and emotional health: The stress emanating from the fast pace, overtime, noise from telemetry, fear of potentially dangerous patients, and chronic fatigue is insidious-out of the nurse's immediate awareness-but cumulative, eventually revealing itself in conditions such as dental pain, sleep deprivation, a compromised immune system, and subsequent increased vulnerability to infections and injuries from various exposures. (cdc.gov)
  • SILVER SPRING, Md. - The American Nurses Association (ANA) today announced the findings of the 2008 Study of Nurses' Views on Workplace Safety and Needlestick Injuries, an independent nationwide survey of more than 700 nurses, developed and co-sponsored by ANA and Inviro Medical Devices. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • Among those nurses reporting needlestick injuries, a staggering 74 percent have been stuck by a contaminated needle while working. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • While the overwhelming majority of nurses (91 percent) are familiar with their workplace's protocol regarding needlestick injuries, 79 percent of those accidentally stuck by a needle while working say they reported the incident, compared to 83 percent in 2006. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • Although the vast majority (86 percent)) of nurses believe their department strongly encourages and supports the reporting of needlestick injuries, nearly three-quarters (74 percent) of nurses believe needlesticks are still underreported, down from 86 percent reported in 2006. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • Health & Safety: A Culture of Safety: Nurses can take an active role in preventing needlestick injuries. (nursingcenter.com)
  • 2 A large portion of these injuries (48%) take place in the operating room (OR), and are incurred by physicians, nurses, surgical technicians and other surgical personnel. (mareaenterprises.com)
  • According to recent reports, there has been a rise in needlestick injuries amongst nurses giving out COVID-19 vaccines. (the-compensation-experts.co.uk)
  • When nurses are overworked in an acute hospital is there an increase in needlestick injuries? (nursingjournal.co.nz)
  • Whether the true NSI incidence is high or low, prevention strategies must still be put into place, as every injury can pose significant health issues for nurses. (nursingjournal.co.nz)
  • Method: In 1998, 2287 medical-surgical unit nurses in 22 US hospitals were surveyed in regard to staffing and organizational climate in their hospitals and about patient and nurse outcomes, including needlestick injuries. (nyu.edu)
  • Results: Poor organizational climate and high workloads were associated with 50% to 2-fold increases in the likelihood of needlestick injuries and near-misses to hospital nurses. (nyu.edu)
  • However, there is limited information in the study area that describes about the prevalence of needle-stick and sharp injuries and associated factors among nurses. (surgicalnursingjournal.com)
  • to assess the prevalence of needle stick and sharp injuries and associated factors among nurses working in Dire Dawa city administration public health facilities. (surgicalnursingjournal.com)
  • This study indicated that there is high prevalence of needle stick and sharp injuries among nurses. (surgicalnursingjournal.com)
  • Nurses are at risk of injuries caused by sharp instruments in hospitals. (ac.ir)
  • The objective of this study was to investigate the frequency of injuries due to sharp instruments and its relevant factors among nurses of Imam Reza Hospital, Kermanshah, Iran. (ac.ir)
  • According to the findings, 73.3%(n=191) of nurses were exposed to sharp injuries at workplace. (ac.ir)
  • Also, 38.52% of injured nurses performed the tests after injury screening, while 48.7% did nothing after being injured. (ac.ir)
  • Occupational injuries among nurses and aides in a hospital setting. (cdc.gov)
  • Results: Aides have substantially higher injury rates per 100 full-time equivalent workers (FTEs) than nurses for both injuries involving days away from work (11.3 vs. 7.2) and those involving no days away (9.9 vs. 5.7). (cdc.gov)
  • Operating rooms and the float pool had high DA injury rates for both occupations, and stepdown units had high rates for nurses. (cdc.gov)
  • NDA injuries were highest in the operating room for both nurses and aides. (cdc.gov)
  • Disparities among workers at risk: Overall, direct care workers are at greatest risk of injury, especially nurses and nursing assistants, although this varies according to type of injury, language, ethnicity, and class. (cdc.gov)
  • The upward age trend and accompanying decreased physical stamina among nurses (95% female) puts them at greater risk of injury from stressors of short staffing, heavy workloads, long shifts, and many years of work. (cdc.gov)
  • Objective: The study examined the prevalence and health risk factors associated with needle stick injury in Hawassa City, Southern Ethiopia. (omicsonline.org)
  • Thus, the aim of this study was to assess prevalence of needle sticks and sharp injury and associated factors among health care workers working in Central Zone Tigray northern Ethiopia. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The prevalence of needle stick and sharp injury in the past 12 months preceding the study and entire job were 25.9% and 38.5% respectively. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The sample size was determined using Open-Epi version 2.3.1 software by taking 19.1% prevalence from previous studies on needle stick and other sharp injury [ 19 ], considering 5% marginal error, design effect of 2 and with a contingency of 10%, we obtained 456 respondents. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This study evaluated the prevalence and characteristics of needlestick and sharp instrument injuries and the factors associated with these accidents among dentists. (bvsalud.org)
  • This paper evaluates data reported from a single IOM surgical practitioner demonstrating the incidence and prevalence of accidental needlestick injuries (NSI) during IOM procedures over a thirteen-year period. (mareaenterprises.com)
  • This study revealed that the one year and lifelong prevalence of needle stick and sharp injury was 33.16% (95%CI: 29.93%, 36.01%) and 52.3% (95%CI: 47.2%, 56.8%) respectively. (surgicalnursingjournal.com)
  • We aimed to investigate the prevalence of needlestick injuries and other related indicators among HCWs in Iran through a systematic review and meta-analysis. (bvsalud.org)
  • In this study, 56% (95% CI = 45-67, I2 = 98.6%) of HCWs with NSIs did not report their injury. (bvsalud.org)
  • On June 21, 2001, she sustained an accidental needlestick injury while taking a blood sample with an 18-gauge, peripheral venous catheter that had no safety feature. (cdc.gov)
  • Accidental occupational injuries to health care workers (HCWs) continue to have a significant problem in the healthcare system. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Needlestick injuries account for up to 80 percent of accidental exposures to blood. (hsseworld.com)
  • Injuries incurred by accidental needlesticks continue to pose a serious problem in healthcare settings and particularly during surgical procedures. (mareaenterprises.com)
  • This paper demonstrates how risk management strategies can positively impact outcomes as they pertain to accidental needlestick injuries during IOM procedures. (mareaenterprises.com)
  • Which is why there are 800,000 needlestick injuries in the US every year. (suzannecgordon.com)
  • How to Prevent Needlestick Injuries? (hsseworld.com)
  • Will These Devices Prevent Needlestick Injuries? (hsseworld.com)
  • Most sharps injuries can be prevented and there are legal requirements on employers to take steps to prevent healthcare staff being exposed to infectious agents from sharps injuries. (the-compensation-experts.co.uk)
  • We now need to see greater efforts for better reporting and training to not only prevent injuries but to ensure there are stronger procedures to follow up and protect nursing staff after injuries. (the-compensation-experts.co.uk)
  • Background: Recently passed federal legislation requires institutions to adopt safety equipment to prevent needlesticks, but there is little empirical evidence of the effectiveness of specific types of safety devices or the contribution of safety devices to reducing needlesticks relative to the contributions of staffing, organizational climate, and clinicians' experience. (nyu.edu)
  • Rotate job functions to prevent overuse injuries. (ccohs.ca)
  • To prevent these injuries, it is essential to determine the important factors affecting the occurrence of them. (bvsalud.org)
  • Various other occupations are also at increased risk of needlestick injury, including law enforcement, laborers, tattoo artists, food preparers, and agricultural workers. (wikipedia.org)
  • 40 per week, job dissatisfaction and work experience less than 5 years were found factors significantly associated with needle stick and sharp injury for health care workers. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Most needlestick injuries, however, result from unsafe needle devices rather than carelessness by health care workers. (hsseworld.com)
  • Injuries have transmitted many other diseases involving viruses, bacteria, fungi, and other microorganisms to health care workers, laboratory researchers, and veterinarian staff. (beautytrainingportal.com)
  • The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) requests assistance in preventing needlestick injuries among health care workers. (emergency-live.com)
  • Sharps injuries: global burden of disease from sharps injuries to health-care workers / Annette Prüss-Üstun, Elisabetta Rapiti, Yvan Hutin. (who.int)
  • Global burden of disease from sharps injuries to health-care workers. (who.int)
  • In this article we take an in-depth examination of the compensability of inoculation or needle stick injuries under the Texas Workers' Compensation Act. (wcdefenseinstitute.com)
  • Well established Texas law holds that an employee who becomes ill as a result of the flu or a cold is generally not considered to have suffered a compensable injury under the Workers' Compensation Act. (wcdefenseinstitute.com)
  • You must act now to limit the continuing spread of serious infectious diseases among health care workers, who each year sustain approximately 590,000 needlestick injuries in their care of patients nationwide. (citizen.org)
  • Background: Patient care workers in acute care hospitals are at high risk of injury. (cdc.gov)
  • Workers who have sustained an injury at work often face difficulties returning to work, according to a study showing that over 40% of injured workers. (annals.edu.sg)
  • Percutaneous injuries are a common problem among dentists, who are among the healthcare professionals most involved in occupational accidents. (bvsalud.org)
  • Percutaneous injuries within the previous six months and during the course of professional life were reported by 19.1% and 81.3%, respectively. (bvsalud.org)
  • Needle-stick injuries have been defined as a percutaneous piercing wound by a needlepoint or other sharp instrument, which is potentially contaminated with the body fluid of another person (Adib-Hajbaghery & Lotfi, 2013). (nursingjournal.co.nz)
  • The Ontario Hospital Association/Ontario Medical Association (2016) estimate that after an injury in workplace situations from a needle contaminated with hepatitis B virus, there is a 6 to 30% chance that an exposed person will be infected. (beautytrainingportal.com)
  • As soon as you've received appropriate medical care, record the injury in your workplace accident log. (the-compensation-experts.co.uk)
  • As with any workplace injury , reporting needlestick injuries is important. (the-compensation-experts.co.uk)
  • Dear Editor, Of all hand injuries encountered at an emergency department, 54% are sustained in the workplace,1 in part contributed by occupational injuries among food. (annals.edu.sg)
  • Data from 63 hospitals show that the overall rate of such injuries is 27 per 100 occupied beds annually. (hsseworld.com)
  • If you go to the Puncture website , you'll a great deal about needlestick injuries as well as the scourge of these GPOs , which are purchasing cartels that negotiate over $100 billion in contracts each year and are actually allowed, by law, to give kickbacks to hospitals who purchase from them. (suzannecgordon.com)
  • Afin de définir l'épidémiologie de la maladie, une surveillance sentinelle a été mise en place en 2001 dans cinq hôpitaux de différentes régions du pays. (who.int)
  • Because needlestick injuries are a major cause of these exposures in the health care setting, it is important to recognize that there are work practices and engineering controls to help reduce these exposures and injuries. (hsseworld.com)
  • Safer needle devices have been shown to significantly reduce needlesticks and exposures to potentially fatal bloodborne illnesses. (hsseworld.com)
  • Reporting a needlestick injury means that your employer is aware of the issue. (the-compensation-experts.co.uk)
  • Any analysis of the compensability of employer-sponsored needle injuries in Texas should begin with City of Austin v. Smith , 579 S.W.2d 84 (Tex. Civ. (wcdefenseinstitute.com)
  • Arguably then, absent a combination of strong urging by the employer and some element of mutual benefit, an inoculation injury will not be compensable under the Texas Act. (wcdefenseinstitute.com)
  • It meets international standards for medical devices and OSHA recommendations for needlestick safety devices. (numedico.com)
  • However, no detailed studies to date have used OSHA injury definitions to allow for better comparability across studies. (cdc.gov)
  • Every 60 minutes, of every day, six people suffer a needlestick injury somewhere in the world. (numedico.com)
  • If you suffer a needlestick injury, the NHS guidelines encourage you to wash the wound with soap and running water. (the-compensation-experts.co.uk)
  • The reasons for the rise in needlestick injuries include: the pandemic causing fatigue, low staffing levels, lack of training and safer sharps and sharps bins not being available. (the-compensation-experts.co.uk)
  • These injuries transmit infectious diseases, especially blood-borne viruses. (beautytrainingportal.com)
  • If working with a substance or an infectious agent that may cause injuries to humans, take extra precautions, such manipulating animals or agents in fume hoods or biosafety cabinets. (jove.com)
  • If an Injured Worker, as a result of a cut or puncture develops any of these conditions, they may make a work injury claim. (workinjuryhelp.com)
  • Of the 52 such cases documented during 1996, 45 were from needlesticks or cuts. (hsseworld.com)
  • These punctures or cuts can give rise a work-related injury. (workinjuryhelp.com)
  • Rose Gallagher, RCN Professional Lead for Infection Prevention and Control, added: "In 2013 new regulations were brought in to reduce sharps injuries but these findings suggest there is still some way to go to protect all parts of the nursing workforce. (the-compensation-experts.co.uk)
  • METHODS An analysis was conducted with self-reported needlestick incidence data collected over a thirteen (13) year period of time within an individual surgical IOM practice. (mareaenterprises.com)
  • It can also lead to physical and mental fatigue resulting in errors, injuries, and accidents. (medscape.com)
  • The study highlights the need for continuous education programmes about handling of sharp dental instruments and reporting injuries. (who.int)
  • The magnitude of Needle stick and sharp injury is high in the study area. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The risk of pathogen transmission from an injury with a sharp object has been estimated to be 6-30% for Hepatitis B virus (HBV) in non-immune individuals, 5-10% for Hepatitis C virus (HCV), and 0.3% for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) [ 10 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • What Types of Medical Conditions Can Rise from Needle Sticks or Sharp Injuries? (workinjuryhelp.com)
  • The purpose of this study was to assess (and improve) the procedures for the reporting and treatment of needlestick injuries in a German tertiary-care hospital. (qxmd.com)
  • The BD Vacutainer ® Push Button Blood Collection Set with Pre-Attached Holder can help guard against costly, potentially debilitating needlesticks, allowing you and your staff to focus on delivering superior patient care. (bd.com)
  • Despite the requirements of the 2000 Needlestick Act mandating the use of safety syringes, 75 percent of the needlestick injuries reported involved a standard (non-safety) syringe. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • Needlestick injuries are a hazard for people who work with hypodermic syringes and another needle equipment. (beautytrainingportal.com)
  • Needlestick injuries can be very serious if, for example, a needle has taken infected blood and it accidentally pierces someone's skin, the infection could be transmitted to that person. (the-compensation-experts.co.uk)
  • Due to ongoing needlesticks experienced by the clinical practice, a new adhesive solution was introduced. (mareaenterprises.com)
  • A significant (90%) reduction in needlesticks were experienced by the clinical practice as compared to previous needle fixation methods. (mareaenterprises.com)
  • The procedural and needlestick data gleaned from this practice, serves as the basis of this paper and subsequent analyses. (mareaenterprises.com)
  • Lack of access to appropriate personal protective equipment, or alternatively, employee failure to use provided equipment, increases the risk of occupational needlestick injuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Relationships between nurse and hospital characteristics and protective equipment and the likelihood of needlestick injuries and near-miss incidents were examined. (nyu.edu)
  • About 43.5% of the observed injuries occurred while trying to recap the needle-sticks. (ac.ir)
  • With the Gx InnoSafe, Gerresheimer is now offering a syringe with an integrated passive safety system that avoids inadvertent needle stick injuries, prevents repeated use, and is designed with pharmaceutical companies' production processes in mind as well as being optimized for simple and intuitive use by medical specialists. (gerresheimer.com)
  • Gx InnoSafe reliably protects against inadvertent needlestick injuries and prevents repeated use. (gerresheimer.com)
  • Injuries with a hollow-bore needle, deep penetration, visible blood on the needle, a needle located in a deep artery or vein, or a biomedical device contaminated with blood from a terminally ill patient increase the risk for contracting a blood-borne infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although existing needle protection systems reduce the risk of injury for the end user, they are more complex for pharma companies to fill and must be handled by medical specialists. (gerresheimer.com)
  • A safer needle device has built-in safety controls to reduce needlestick injuries before, during, or after use, and to make needlesticks less likely. (hsseworld.com)
  • tubing and no luer adapter is clinically demonstrated to reduce needlestick injuries. (bd.com)
  • Conclusions: Nurse staffing and organizational climate are key determinants of needlestick risk and must be considered with the adoption of safety equipment to effectively reduce sharps injuries. (nyu.edu)
  • Needle-stick injury was significantly associated with higher age and a higher number of patients treated daily. (who.int)
  • While needlestick injuries have the potential to transmit bacteria, protozoa, viruses and prions, the risk of contracting hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and HIV is the highest. (wikipedia.org)
  • Abuse included verbal attacks by physicians and the emotional toll of "constant negative evaluations" by management, labeling them as "malingerers" if injury was not physically apparent, and humiliating them in front of patients and other staff. (cdc.gov)
  • Be aware, your son or daughter could be at great risk for a needlestick injury because the same kind of corporate greed that has jeopardized our economy continues to jeopardize the health of almost every healthcare worker in America. (suzannecgordon.com)
  • It is noted that "On needlestick claims, at least one treatment with an ICD-9 code in the psychological range was observed on 94 of the 3,338 nonhealthcare worker claims or about 2.8% of these claims. (workinjuryhelp.com)