Agave: A genus known for fibers obtained from their leaves: sisal from A. sisalana, henequen from A. fourcroyoides and A. cantala, or Manila-Maguey fiber from A. cantala. Some species provide a sap that is fermented to an intoxicating drink, called pulque in Mexico. Some contain agavesides.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Droughts: Prolonged dry periods in natural climate cycle. They are slow-onset phenomena caused by rainfall deficit combined with other predisposing factors.Transcriptome: The pattern of GENE EXPRESSION at the level of genetic transcription in a specific organism or under specific circumstances in specific cells.Adaptation, Biological: Changes in biological features that help an organism cope with its ENVIRONMENT. These changes include physiological (ADAPTATION, PHYSIOLOGICAL), phenotypic and genetic changes.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.AlaskaIndians, North American: Individual members of North American ethnic groups with ancient historic ancestral origins in Asia.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Protein Folding: Processes involved in the formation of TERTIARY PROTEIN STRUCTURE.Protein Denaturation: Disruption of the non-covalent bonds and/or disulfide bonds responsible for maintaining the three-dimensional shape and activity of the native protein.Introduced Species: Non-native organisms brought into a region, habitat, or ECOSYSTEM by human activity.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Inuits: Inuktitut-speakers generally associated with the northern polar region.Molecular Weight: The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Circular Dichroism: A change from planar to elliptic polarization when an initially plane-polarized light wave traverses an optically active medium. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Rhizome: Root-like underground horizontal stem of plants that produces shoots above and roots below. Distinguished from true roots which don't have buds and nodes. Similar to true roots in being underground and thickened by storage deposits.Desmosomal Cadherins: A single-pass transmembrane glycoproteins that mediate CALCIUM-dependent CELL ADHESION and are core components of DESMOSOMES.Crassulaceae: The stonecrop plant family of the order ROSALES, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida that grow in warm, dry regions. The leaves are thick. The flower clusters are red, yellow, or white.Flowers: The reproductive organs of plants.Cactaceae: The cactus plant family of the order Caryophyllales, subclass Caryophyllidae, class Magnoliopsida. Cacti are succulent perennial plants well adapted to dry regions.Helleborus: A plant genus of the family RANUNCULACEAE. Members contain hellebrin (BUFANOLIDES). The extract is the basis of Boicil preparation used to treat rheumatism.RestaurantsMenu PlanningMexican Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican descent.BooksMexicoFast Foods: Prepared food that is ready to eat or partially prepared food that has a final preparation time of a few minutes or less.Tea: The infusion of leaves of CAMELLIA SINENSIS (formerly Thea sinensis) as a beverage, the familiar Asian tea, which contains CATECHIN (especially epigallocatechin gallate) and CAFFEINE.Cotton Fiber: A TEXTILE fiber obtained from the pappus (outside the SEEDS) of cotton plant (GOSSYPIUM). Inhalation of cotton fiber dust over a prolonged period can result in BYSSINOSIS.Ceramics: Products made by baking or firing nonmetallic minerals (clay and similar materials). In making dental restorations or parts of restorations the material is fused porcelain. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed & Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Love: Affection; in psychiatry commonly refers to pleasure, particularly as it applies to gratifying experiences between individuals.Gossypium: A plant genus of the family MALVACEAE. It is the source of COTTON FIBER; COTTONSEED OIL, which is used for cooking, and GOSSYPOL. The economically important cotton crop is a major user of agricultural PESTICIDES.Vaccinium: A plant genus of the family ERICACEAE known for species with edible fruits.Botany: The study of the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of plants.United StatesDisasters: Calamities producing great damage, loss of life, and distress. They include results of natural phenomena and man-made phenomena. Normal conditions of existence are disrupted and the level of impact exceeds the capacity of the hazard-affected community.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Earthquakes: Sudden slips on a fault, and the resulting ground shaking and radiated seismic energy caused by the slips, or by volcanic or magmatic activity, or other sudden stress changes in the earth. Faults are fractures along which the blocks of EARTH crust on either side have moved relative to one another parallel to the fracture.Life Change Events: Those occurrences, including social, psychological, and environmental, which require an adjustment or effect a change in an individual's pattern of living.United States Food and Drug Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.September 11 Terrorist Attacks: Terrorism on September 11, 2001 against targets in New York, the Pentagon in Virginia, and an aborted attack that ended in Pennsylvania.
  • This doesn't mean you should swear off fruit (in fact please don't do that), but it is something to keep in mind when you encounter fructose-heavy foods like acai bowls and agave, which are marketed as healthy options. (goop.com)
  • Agave is marketed heavily for having a low glycemic load that doesn't cause insulin spikes, but that's because it is primarily fructose, which we know goes directly to the liver for processing. (goop.com)
  • Fructose in Agave -- A Real Problem! (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • Exudates (agave juice) from a tequila company were collected periodically, and color, Brix, fructose concentration, and reducing sugars were determined as inulin breakdown took place. (scribd.com)
  • However, agave contains significantly more fructose than sucrose (table sugar). (bbcgoodfood.com)
  • Because fructose is considered to be one of the most damaging forms of sugar, always use agave in small quantities and buy organic, raw agave rather than the cheaper, highly processed version. (bbcgoodfood.com)
  • Not only is agave a natural sweetener much healthier than sugar, but the plant is high in fibre, necessary for healthy digestion. (blogarama.com)
  • Agave has been cultivated for centuries, used as both a flavoring and a sweetener, as well as being fermented into mildly alcoholic drinks such as pulque , which dates back at least 2,000 years. (seriouseats.com)
  • While many succulents are native to tropical or desert environments, there are varieties that grow in Wisconsin, both indoors and out. (wpr.org)
  • The sap of Agave salmiana can be fermented and made into pulque, which is similar to beer. (gardenguides.com)
  • Here, we report a non-aggressive method to obtain nanocellulose (NC) from the parenchyma of Agave salmiana leaves. (springer.com)
  • Chávez-Guerrero L, Sepúlveda-Guzmán S, Rodríguez-Liñan C et al (2017b) Isolation and characterization of cellulose nanoplatelets from the parenchyma cells of Agave salmiana . (springer.com)
  • Enríquez-Salazar MI, Veana F, Aguilar CN et al (2017) Microbial diversity and biochemical profile of aguamiel collected from Agave salmiana and A. atrovirens during different seasons of year. (springer.com)
  • This beautiful subspecies of Agave utahensis naturally grows on the rocky limestone slopes of the Kaibab Plateau of northern Arizona. (learn2grow.com)
  • A native of New Zealand and all States of Australia where it grows on a wide range of soils (sand, clay or loam) either waterlogged or dry, and is tolerant of salt, frost and drought. (ebay.com.au)
  • In contrast to honeybees, these large bees are native to the Tucson area, are not eusocial, and do not produce large colonies. (tolweb.org)
  • Agave toumeyana v. bella's thin, stiff leaves are edged with white stripes and adorned with curling white threads giving the small rosettes an appealing tidy appearance. (highcountrygardens.com)
  • Relatively small in size but dramatic in impact, this Mexican native forms strikingly symmetrical rosettes of narrow spine-tipped evergreen leaves. (learn2grow.com)
  • 1991). 'Prevalence of Obesity in American Indians and Alaska Natives. (faqs.org)
  • The Native American population, including American Indians and Alaska Natives, once totaled nearly 24 million, with over 500 tribes. (faqs.org)
  • 11.7% of the deaths among Native Americans and Alaska Natives are alcohol-related. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alaska Natives showed the lowest incidence of alcohol-related death. (wikipedia.org)
  • In some tribes, the rate of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is as high as 1.5 to 2.5 per 1000 live births, more than seven times the national average, while among Alaska Natives , the rate of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is 5.6 per 1000 live births. (wikipedia.org)