The development and use of techniques to study physical phenomena and construct structures in the nanoscale size range or smaller.
The branch of medicine concerned with the application of NANOTECHNOLOGY to the prevention and treatment of disease. It involves the monitoring, repair, construction, and control of human biological systems at the molecular level, using engineered nanodevices and NANOSTRUCTURES. (From Freitas Jr., Nanomedicine, vol 1, 1999).
Materials which have structured components with at least one dimension in the range of 1 to 100 nanometers. These include NANOCOMPOSITES; NANOPARTICLES; NANOTUBES; and NANOWIRES.
Nanometer-sized particles that are nanoscale in three dimensions. They include nanocrystaline materials; NANOCAPSULES; METAL NANOPARTICLES; DENDRIMERS, and QUANTUM DOTS. The uses of nanoparticles include DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS and cancer targeting and imaging.
Systems for the delivery of drugs to target sites of pharmacological actions. Technologies employed include those concerning drug preparation, route of administration, site targeting, metabolism, and toxicity.
Nanoparticles produced from metals whose uses include biosensors, optics, and catalysts. In biomedical applications the particles frequently involve the noble metals, especially gold and silver.
Nanometer-sized tubes composed mainly of CARBON. Such nanotubes are used as probes for high-resolution structural and chemical imaging of biomolecules with ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY.
Forms to which substances are incorporated to improve the delivery and the effectiveness of drugs. Drug carriers are used in drug-delivery systems such as the controlled-release technology to prolong in vivo drug actions, decrease drug metabolism, and reduce drug toxicity. Carriers are also used in designs to increase the effectiveness of drug delivery to the target sites of pharmacological actions. Liposomes, albumin microspheres, soluble synthetic polymers, DNA complexes, protein-drug conjugates, and carrier erythrocytes among others have been employed as biodegradable drug carriers.
Nanometer sized fragments of semiconductor crystalline material which emit PHOTONS. The wavelength is based on the quantum confinement size of the dot. They can be embedded in MICROBEADS for high throughput ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY TECHNIQUES.
Relating to the size of solids.
Nanometer-sized tubes composed of various substances including carbon (CARBON NANOTUBES), boron nitride, or nickel vanadate.
Tree-like, highly branched, polymeric compounds. They grow three-dimensionally by the addition of shells of branched molecules to a central core. The overall globular shape and presence of cavities gives potential as drug carriers and CONTRAST AGENTS.
Application of pharmaceutically active agents on the tissues of the EYE.
Complex compounds in which a dumbbell shaped molecule is encircled by a macrocycle. They are named after rota (wheel) and axis (axle). Notation with a prefix is used to indicate the number of interlocked components. They have potential use in NANOTECHNOLOGY. Rotaxanes have been made with CYCLODEXTRINS and CYCLIC ETHERS.
Silver. An element with the atomic symbol Ag, atomic number 47, and atomic weight 107.87. It is a soft metal that is used medically in surgical instruments, dental prostheses, and alloys. Long-continued use of silver salts can lead to a form of poisoning known as ARGYRIA.
Accumulations of microflora that lead to pathological plaque and calculus which cause PERIODONTAL DISEASES. It can be considered a type of BIOFILMS. It is subtly distinguished from the protective DENTAL PELLICLE.
Nanometer-sized, hollow, spherically-shaped objects that can be utilized to encapsulate small amounts of pharmaceuticals, enzymes, or other catalysts (Glossary of Biotechnology and Nanobiotechnology, 4th ed).
Any of a variety of procedures which use biomolecular probes to measure the presence or concentration of biological molecules, biological structures, microorganisms, etc., by translating a biochemical interaction at the probe surface into a quantifiable physical signal.
Pollution prevention through the design of effective chemical products that have low or no toxicity and use of chemical processes that reduce or eliminate the use and generation of hazardous substances.
A yellow metallic element with the atomic symbol Au, atomic number 79, and atomic weight 197. It is used in jewelry, goldplating of other metals, as currency, and in dental restoration. Many of its clinical applications, such as ANTIRHEUMATIC AGENTS, are in the form of its salts.
The application of technology to the solution of medical problems.
Computers whose input, output and state transitions are carried out by biochemical interactions and reactions.
Any visual display of structural or functional patterns of organs or tissues for diagnostic evaluation. It includes measuring physiologic and metabolic responses to physical and chemical stimuli, as well as ultramicroscopy.
New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.
Body of knowledge related to the use of organisms, cells or cell-derived constituents for the purpose of developing products which are technically, scientifically and clinically useful. Alteration of biologic function at the molecular level (i.e., GENETIC ENGINEERING) is a central focus; laboratory methods used include TRANSFECTION and CLONING technologies, sequence and structure analysis algorithms, computer databases, and gene and protein structure function analysis and prediction.
Viruses whose host is Bacillus. Frequently encountered Bacillus phages include bacteriophage phi 29 and bacteriophage phi 105.
The profession concerned with the teeth, oral cavity, and associated structures, and the diagnosis and treatment of their diseases including prevention and the restoration of defective and missing tissue.
Substances intended to be applied to the human body for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance without affecting the body's structure or functions. Included in this definition are skin creams, lotions, perfumes, lipsticks, fingernail polishes, eye and facial makeup preparations, permanent waves, hair colors, toothpastes, and deodorants, as well as any material intended for use as a component of a cosmetic product. (U.S. Food & Drug Administration Center for Food Safety & Applied Nutrition Office of Cosmetics Fact Sheet (web page) Feb 1995)
Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.
Nanometer-scale wires made of materials that conduct electricity. They can be coated with molecules such as antibodies that will bind to proteins and other substances.
The folding of an organism's DNA molecule into a compact, orderly structure that fits within the limited space of a CELL or VIRUS PARTICLE.
A type of scanning probe microscopy in which a probe systematically rides across the surface of a sample being scanned in a raster pattern. The vertical position is recorded as a spring attached to the probe rises and falls in response to peaks and valleys on the surface. These deflections produce a topographic map of the sample.
All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.
Synthetic or natural materials, other than DRUGS, that are used to replace or repair any body TISSUES or bodily function.
A medical specialty concerned with the skin, its structure, functions, diseases, and treatment.
A polyhedral CARBON structure composed of around 60-80 carbon atoms in pentagon and hexagon configuration. They are named after Buckminster Fuller because of structural resemblance to geodesic domes. Fullerenes can be made in high temperature such as arc discharge in an inert atmosphere.
Synthesized magnetic particles under 100 nanometers possessing many biomedical applications including DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS and CONTRAST AGENTS. The particles are usually coated with a variety of polymeric compounds.
Spherical particles of nanometer dimensions.
Clinical protocols used to inhibit the growth or spread of NEOPLASMS.
Electron microscopy in which the ELECTRONS or their reaction products that pass down through the specimen are imaged below the plane of the specimen.
A mild astringent and topical protectant with some antiseptic action. It is also used in bandages, pastes, ointments, dental cements, and as a sunblock.
A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).
The spatial arrangement of the atoms of a nucleic acid or polynucleotide that results in its characteristic 3-dimensional shape.
The science concerned with the detection, chemical composition, and biological action of toxic substances or poisons and the treatment and prevention of toxic manifestations.
An interdisciplinary field in materials science, ENGINEERING, and BIOLOGY, studying the use of biological principles for synthesis or fabrication of BIOMIMETIC MATERIALS.
Nanometer-scale composite structures composed of organic molecules intimately incorporated with inorganic molecules. (Glossary of Biotechnology and Nanobiotechology Terms, 4th ed)
Treatment of disease by exposure to light, especially by variously concentrated light rays or specific wavelengths.
Generating tissue in vitro for clinical applications, such as replacing wounded tissues or impaired organs. The use of TISSUE SCAFFOLDING enables the generation of complex multi-layered tissues and tissue structures.
The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.
Submicron-sized fibers with diameters typically between 50 and 500 nanometers. The very small dimension of these fibers can generate a high surface area to volume ratio, which makes them potential candidates for various biomedical and other applications.
Procedures, such as TISSUE CULTURE TECHNIQUES; mathematical models; etc., when used or advocated for use in place of the use of animals in research or diagnostic laboratories.
Compounds formed by the joining of smaller, usually repeating, units linked by covalent bonds. These compounds often form large macromolecules (e.g., BIOPOLYMERS; PLASTICS).
The study of MAGNETIC PHENOMENA.
Materials fabricated by BIOMIMETICS techniques, i.e., based on natural processes found in biological systems.
The protection of animals in laboratories or other specific environments by promoting their health through better nutrition, housing, and care.
The application of scientific knowledge or technology to pharmacy and the pharmaceutical industry. It includes methods, techniques, and instrumentation in the manufacture, preparation, compounding, dispensing, packaging, and storing of drugs and other preparations used in diagnostic and determinative procedures, and in the treatment of patients.
Therapeutic approach tailoring therapy for genetically defined subgroups of patients.
The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.
The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents by inhaling them.
The use of molecularly targeted imaging probes to localize and/or monitor biochemical and cellular processes via various imaging modalities that include RADIONUCLIDE IMAGING; ULTRASONOGRAPHY; MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; FLUORESCENCE IMAGING; and MICROSCOPY.
Chemistry dealing with the composition and preparation of agents having PHARMACOLOGIC ACTIONS or diagnostic use.
A biocompatible polymer used as a surgical suture material.
Inorganic or organic compounds containing trivalent iron.
The preparation, mixing, and assembling of a drug. (From Remington, The Science and Practice of Pharmacy, 19th ed, p1814)
Drugs intended for human or veterinary use, presented in their finished dosage form. Included here are materials used in the preparation and/or formulation of the finished dosage form.
Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.
Transparent, tasteless crystals found in nature as agate, amethyst, chalcedony, cristobalite, flint, sand, QUARTZ, and tridymite. The compound is insoluble in water or acids except hydrofluoric acid.
A polynucleotide consisting essentially of chains with a repeating backbone of phosphate and ribose units to which nitrogenous bases are attached. RNA is unique among biological macromolecules in that it can encode genetic information, serve as an abundant structural component of cells, and also possesses catalytic activity. (Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)
A dark-gray, metallic element of widespread distribution but occurring in small amounts; atomic number, 22; atomic weight, 47.90; symbol, Ti; specific gravity, 4.5; used for fixation of fractures. (Dorland, 28th ed)

In vitro and in vivo study of two types of long-circulating solid lipid nanoparticles containing paclitaxel. (1/2854)

Paclitaxel (Taxol), a diterpenoid isolated from Taxus brevifolia, is effective against several murine tumors, and is one of the most exciting anticancer molecules currently available. Due to its low solubility in water, it is clinically administered with polyethoxylated castor oil (Cremophor EL), which causes serious side effects. Inclusion of paclitaxel in solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) has proved to be a good approach to eliminate the need for Cremophor EL and improve the drug's antitumor efficacy. This paper describes the development of two types of long-circulating SLNs as colloidal carriers for paclitaxel. SLNs are constituted mainly of bioacceptable and biodegradable lipids. In vitro release kinetics showed that the release was very slow, the release of paclitaxel from F68-SLN is linear, and the release of paclitaxel from Brij78-SLN followed the Weibull equation. Pharmacokinetics was evaluated in KM mice after injection of paclitaxel formulated in Cremophor EL or in Brij78-SLN and F68-SLN. Encapsulation of paclitaxel in both SLNs produced marked differences compared with the free drug pharmacokinetics. F68-SLN and Brij78-SLN are long-circulating (t 1/2 beta, 10.06 and 4.88 h, respectively) compared with paclitaxel injection (t 1/2 beta, 1.36 h).  (+info)

Uptake of cyclosporine A loaded colloidal drug carriers by mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. (2/2854)

AIM: To investigate the uptake of cyclosporine A loaded colloidal drug carriers by mouse peritoneal macrophage (MPM) in vitro. METHODS: The [3H]cyclosporine A loaded colloidal particles: polylactic acid nanospheres, polylactic acid nanocapsules, and microemulsions were prepared. The [3H]cyclosporine A loaded colloidal particles were incubated with MPM for 30 min at 37 degrees C, then the cells were separated from the colloidal particles and the radioactivity was measured by a liquid scintillation counter. RESULTS: In comparison to the cyclosporine A solution, the binding to polylactic acid nanospheres produced a 20-fold increase in the uptake of cyclosporine A by MPM in 30 min incubation, whereas some obvious decrease in the uptake of cyclosporine A by MPM was observed in the binding of cyclosporine A with polylactic acid nanocapsules or microemulsions. The surfactant coating and plasma protein adsorption were found to have marked effects on the uptake of cyclosporine A loaded nanospheres by MPM. CONCLUSION: Our present study indicated that colloidal drug carriers might affect the targeting of cyclosporine A to mononuclear phagocyte system.  (+info)

PEGylated polycyanoacrylate nanoparticles as salvicine carriers: synthesis, preparation, and in vitro characterization. (3/2854)

AIM: To synthesized poly(methoxypolyethyleneglycol cyanoacrylate-co-n-hexadecyl cyanoacrylate) (PEGylated PHDCA) with polyethylene glycol (PEG, Mr = 5000), prepare PEGylated PHDCA and poly(n-hexadecyl cyanoacrylate) (PHDCA) nanoparticles loading salvicine and determine their in vitro characterizations. METHODS: The structure of PEGylated PHDCA was determined with 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FTIR). Its molecular weight was determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Nanoparticles were prepared by emulsion/solvent evaporation method. RESULTS: 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and FTIR were consistent with structure of PEGylated PHDCA, whose average molecular weight is 6680. Entrapment efficiency could be determined by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) method without endogenous interference at the retention time of salvicine. The entrapment efficiency was 92.6 % for PEGylated PHDCA nanoparticles and 98.9 % for PHDCA nanoparticles. The nanoparticles size was about 250 nm. The values of the zeta potential were obviously influenced by the composition of the copolymer. Compared with PHDCA nanoparticles (-23.1 mV), PEGylated PHDCA nanoparticles showed a low surface potential (-9.6 mV). Salvicine release from nanoparticles showed an initial burst effect, then a plateau for an extended period, and finally sustained release phase. CONCLUSION: These results showed that the PEGylated PHDCA nanoparticles could be an effective carrier for salvicine delivery in the respect of anti-tumor potency.  (+info)

In vitro and in vivo evaluation of oral heparin-loaded polymeric nanoparticles in rabbits. (4/2854)

BACKGROUND: Owing to its short half-life and lack of oral absorption, heparin has to be administered by the parenteral route. An oral heparin formulation, however, would avoid the disadvantages of parenteral injections and would consequently be highly desirable for patients. Polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) prepared with biodegradable poly-epsilon-caprolactone (PCL) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and nonbiodegradable positively charged polymers (Eudragit RS and RL), used alone or in combination, were evaluated in vitro and in vivo after a single oral administration of heparin-loaded NPs in rabbits. METHODS AND RESULTS: After oral administration of heparin-loaded NPs in rabbits (600 IU/kg), increases in both anti-factor Xa activity and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) were detected with each formulation. Moreover, the anti-Xa activity was detected for a longer period than when a heparin solution was administered intravenously. A peak concentration of 0.16+/-0.01 IU/mL and an average aPTT of 24 seconds (2-fold increase) were obtained 7 hours after oral dosing of Eudragit RL/PCL NPs containing heparin, exhibiting an absolute bioavailability of 23%. CONCLUSIONS: The significant increases in anti-factor Xa activity and aPTT confirmed the oral absorption in rabbits of heparin released from polymeric NPs.  (+info)

Protein nanoarrays generated by dip-pen nanolithography. (5/2854)

Dip-pen nanolithography was used to construct arrays of proteins with 100- to 350-nanometer features. These nanoarrays exhibit almost no detectable nonspecific binding of proteins to their passivated portions even in complex mixtures of proteins, and therefore provide the opportunity to study a variety of surface-mediated biological recognition processes. For example, reactions involving the protein features and antigens in complex solutions can be screened easily by atomic force microscopy. As further proof-of-concept, these arrays were used to study cellular adhesion at the submicrometer scale.  (+info)

Magnetofection: enhancing and targeting gene delivery by magnetic force in vitro and in vivo. (6/2854)

Low efficiencies of nonviral gene vectors, the receptor-dependent host tropism of adenoviral or low titers of retroviral vectors limit their utility in gene therapy. To overcome these deficiencies, we associated gene vectors with superparamagnetic nanoparticles and targeted gene delivery by application of a magnetic field. This potentiated the efficacy of any vector up to several hundred-fold, allowed reduction of the duration of gene delivery to minutes, extended the host tropism of adenoviral vectors to nonpermissive cells and compensated for low retroviral titer. More importantly, the high transduction efficiency observed in vitro was reproduced in vivo with magnetic field-guided local transfection in the gastrointestinal tract and in blood vessels. Magnetofection provides a novel tool for high throughput gene screening in vitro and can help to overcome fundamental limitations to gene therapy in vivo.  (+info)

Array-based electrical detection of DNA with nanoparticle probes. (7/2854)

A DNA array detection method is reported in which the binding of oligonucleotides functionalized with gold nanoparticles leads to conductivity changes associated with target-probe binding events. The binding events localize gold nanoparticles in an electrode gap; silver deposition facilitated by these nanoparticles bridges the gap and leads to readily measurable conductivity changes. An unusual salt concentration-dependent hybridization behavior associated with these nanoparticle probes was exploited to achieve selectivity without a thermal-stringency wash. Using this method, we have detected target DNA at concentrations as low as 500 femtomolar with a point mutation selectivity factor of approximately 100,000:1.  (+info)

Micro/nano encapsulation via electrified coaxial liquid jets. (8/2854)

We report a method to generate steady coaxial jets of immiscible liquids with diameters in the range of micrometer/nanometer size. This compound jet is generated by the action of electro-hydrodynamic (EHD) forces with a diameter that ranges from tens of nanometers to tens of micrometers. The eventual jet breakup results in an aerosol of monodisperse compound droplets with the outer liquid surrounding or encapsulating the inner one. Following this approach, we have produced monodisperse capsules with diameters varying between 10 and 0.15 micrometers, depending on the running parameters.  (+info)

Nanotechnology is not a medical term per se, but it is a field of study with potential applications in medicine. According to the National Nanotechnology Initiative, nanotechnology is defined as "the understanding and control of matter at the nanoscale, at dimensions between approximately 1 and 100 nanometers, where unique phenomena enable novel applications."

In the context of medicine, nanotechnology has the potential to revolutionize the way we diagnose, treat, and prevent diseases. Nanomedicine involves the use of nanoscale materials, devices, or systems for medical applications. These can include drug delivery systems that target specific cells or tissues, diagnostic tools that detect biomarkers at the molecular level, and tissue engineering strategies that promote regeneration and repair.

While nanotechnology holds great promise for medicine, it is still a relatively new field with many challenges to overcome, including issues related to safety, regulation, and scalability.

Nanomedicine is a branch of medicine that utilizes nanotechnology, which deals with materials, devices, or systems at the nanometer scale (typically between 1-100 nm), to prevent and treat diseases. It involves the development of novel therapeutics, diagnostics, and medical devices that can interact with biological systems at the molecular level for improved detection, monitoring, and targeted treatment of various diseases and conditions.

Nanomedicine encompasses several areas, including:

1. Drug delivery: Nanocarriers such as liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers, and inorganic nanoparticles can be used to encapsulate drugs, enhancing their solubility, stability, and targeted delivery to specific cells or tissues, thereby reducing side effects.
2. Diagnostics: Nanoscale biosensors and imaging agents can provide early detection and monitoring of diseases with high sensitivity and specificity, enabling personalized medicine and improved patient outcomes.
3. Regenerative medicine: Nanomaterials can be used to create scaffolds and matrices for tissue engineering, promoting cell growth, differentiation, and vascularization in damaged or diseased tissues.
4. Gene therapy: Nanoparticles can be employed to deliver genetic material such as DNA, RNA, or gene-editing tools (e.g., CRISPR-Cas9) for the targeted correction of genetic disorders or cancer treatment.
5. Medical devices: Nanotechnology can improve the performance and functionality of medical devices by enhancing their biocompatibility, strength, and electrical conductivity, as well as incorporating sensing and drug delivery capabilities.

Overall, nanomedicine holds great promise for addressing unmet medical needs, improving diagnostic accuracy, and developing more effective therapies with reduced side effects. However, it also presents unique challenges related to safety, regulation, and scalability that must be addressed before widespread clinical adoption.

Nanostructures, in the context of medical and biomedical research, refer to materials or devices with structural features that have at least one dimension ranging between 1-100 nanometers (nm). At this size scale, the properties of these structures can differ significantly from bulk materials, exhibiting unique phenomena that are often influenced by quantum effects.

Nanostructures have attracted considerable interest in biomedicine due to their potential applications in various areas such as drug delivery, diagnostics, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering. They can be fabricated from a wide range of materials including metals, polymers, ceramics, and carbon-based materials.

Some examples of nanostructures used in biomedicine include:

1. Nanoparticles: These are tiny particles with at least one dimension in the nanoscale range. They can be made from various materials like metals, polymers, or lipids and have applications in drug delivery, imaging, and diagnostics.
2. Quantum dots: These are semiconductor nanocrystals that exhibit unique optical properties due to quantum confinement effects. They are used as fluorescent labels for bioimaging and biosensing applications.
3. Carbon nanotubes: These are hollow, cylindrical structures made of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice. They have exceptional mechanical strength, electrical conductivity, and thermal stability, making them suitable for various biomedical applications such as drug delivery, tissue engineering, and biosensors.
4. Nanofibers: These are elongated nanostructures with high aspect ratios (length much greater than width). They can be fabricated from various materials like polymers, ceramics, or composites and have applications in tissue engineering, wound healing, and drug delivery.
5. Dendrimers: These are highly branched, nanoscale polymers with a well-defined structure and narrow size distribution. They can be used as drug carriers, gene delivery vehicles, and diagnostic agents.
6. Nanoshells: These are hollow, spherical nanoparticles consisting of a dielectric core covered by a thin metallic shell. They exhibit unique optical properties that make them suitable for applications such as photothermal therapy, biosensing, and imaging.

Nanoparticles are defined in the field of medicine as tiny particles that have at least one dimension between 1 to 100 nanometers (nm). They are increasingly being used in various medical applications such as drug delivery, diagnostics, and therapeutics. Due to their small size, nanoparticles can penetrate cells, tissues, and organs more efficiently than larger particles, making them ideal for targeted drug delivery and imaging.

Nanoparticles can be made from a variety of materials including metals, polymers, lipids, and dendrimers. The physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles, such as size, shape, charge, and surface chemistry, can greatly affect their behavior in biological systems and their potential medical applications.

It is important to note that the use of nanoparticles in medicine is still a relatively new field, and there are ongoing studies to better understand their safety and efficacy.

Drug delivery systems (DDS) refer to techniques or technologies that are designed to improve the administration of a pharmaceutical compound in terms of its efficiency, safety, and efficacy. A DDS can modify the drug release profile, target the drug to specific cells or tissues, protect the drug from degradation, and reduce side effects.

The goal of a DDS is to optimize the bioavailability of a drug, which is the amount of the drug that reaches the systemic circulation and is available at the site of action. This can be achieved through various approaches, such as encapsulating the drug in a nanoparticle or attaching it to a biomolecule that targets specific cells or tissues.

Some examples of DDS include:

1. Controlled release systems: These systems are designed to release the drug at a controlled rate over an extended period, reducing the frequency of dosing and improving patient compliance.
2. Targeted delivery systems: These systems use biomolecules such as antibodies or ligands to target the drug to specific cells or tissues, increasing its efficacy and reducing side effects.
3. Nanoparticle-based delivery systems: These systems use nanoparticles made of polymers, lipids, or inorganic materials to encapsulate the drug and protect it from degradation, improve its solubility, and target it to specific cells or tissues.
4. Biodegradable implants: These are small devices that can be implanted under the skin or into body cavities to deliver drugs over an extended period. They can be made of biodegradable materials that gradually break down and release the drug.
5. Inhalation delivery systems: These systems use inhalers or nebulizers to deliver drugs directly to the lungs, bypassing the digestive system and improving bioavailability.

Overall, DDS play a critical role in modern pharmaceutical research and development, enabling the creation of new drugs with improved efficacy, safety, and patient compliance.

Medical definitions generally refer to terms and concepts within the medical field. The term "metal nanoparticles" is more commonly used in materials science, chemistry, and physics. However, I can provide a general scientific definition that could be relevant to medical applications:

Metal nanoparticles are tiny particles with at least one dimension ranging from 1 to 100 nanometers (nm), composed of metals or metal compounds. They have unique optical, electronic, and chemical properties due to their small size and high surface-to-volume ratio, making them useful in various fields, including medical research. In medicine, metal nanoparticles can be used in drug delivery systems, diagnostics, and therapeutic applications such as photothermal therapy and radiation therapy. Examples of metals used for nanoparticle synthesis include gold, silver, and iron.

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are defined in medical literature as hollow, cylindrical structures composed of rolled graphene sheets, with diameters typically measuring on the nanoscale (ranging from 1 to several tens of nanometers) and lengths that can reach several micrometers. They can be single-walled (SWCNTs), consisting of a single layer of graphene, or multi-walled (MWCNTs), composed of multiple concentric layers of graphene.

Carbon nanotubes have unique mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties that make them promising for various biomedical applications, such as drug delivery systems, biosensors, and tissue engineering scaffolds. However, their potential toxicity and long-term effects on human health are still under investigation, particularly concerning their ability to induce oxidative stress, inflammation, and genotoxicity in certain experimental settings.

A drug carrier, also known as a drug delivery system or vector, is a vehicle that transports a pharmaceutical compound to a specific site in the body. The main purpose of using drug carriers is to improve the efficacy and safety of drugs by enhancing their solubility, stability, bioavailability, and targeted delivery, while minimizing unwanted side effects.

Drug carriers can be made up of various materials, including natural or synthetic polymers, lipids, inorganic nanoparticles, or even cells and viruses. They can encapsulate, adsorb, or conjugate drugs through different mechanisms, such as physical entrapment, electrostatic interaction, or covalent bonding.

Some common types of drug carriers include:

1. Liposomes: spherical vesicles composed of one or more lipid bilayers that can encapsulate hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs.
2. Polymeric nanoparticles: tiny particles made of biodegradable polymers that can protect drugs from degradation and enhance their accumulation in target tissues.
3. Dendrimers: highly branched macromolecules with a well-defined structure and size that can carry multiple drug molecules and facilitate their release.
4. Micelles: self-assembled structures formed by amphiphilic block copolymers that can solubilize hydrophobic drugs in water.
5. Inorganic nanoparticles: such as gold, silver, or iron oxide nanoparticles, that can be functionalized with drugs and targeting ligands for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.
6. Cell-based carriers: living cells, such as red blood cells, stem cells, or immune cells, that can be loaded with drugs and used to deliver them to specific sites in the body.
7. Viral vectors: modified viruses that can infect cells and introduce genetic material encoding therapeutic proteins or RNA interference molecules.

The choice of drug carrier depends on various factors, such as the physicochemical properties of the drug, the route of administration, the target site, and the desired pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. Therefore, selecting an appropriate drug carrier is crucial for achieving optimal therapeutic outcomes and minimizing side effects.

Quantum dots are not a medical term per se, but they are often referred to in the field of medical research and technology. Quantum dots are semiconductor nanocrystals that exhibit unique optical properties, making them useful for various applications in biology and medicine. They can range in size from 1 to 10 nanometers in diameter and can be composed of materials such as cadmium selenide (CdSe), indium arsenide (InAs), or lead sulfide (PbS).

In the medical context, quantum dots have been explored for use in bioimaging, biosensing, and drug delivery. Their small size and tunable optical properties make them ideal for tracking cells, proteins, and other biological molecules in real-time with high sensitivity and specificity. Additionally, quantum dots can be functionalized with various biomolecules, such as antibodies or peptides, to target specific cell types or disease markers.

However, it is important to note that the use of quantum dots in medical applications is still largely in the research stage, and there are concerns about their potential toxicity due to the heavy metals used in their composition. Therefore, further studies are needed to evaluate their safety and efficacy before they can be widely adopted in clinical settings.

In the context of medical and health sciences, particle size generally refers to the diameter or dimension of particles, which can be in the form of solid particles, droplets, or aerosols. These particles may include airborne pollutants, pharmaceutical drugs, or medical devices such as nanoparticles used in drug delivery systems.

Particle size is an important factor to consider in various medical applications because it can affect the behavior and interactions of particles with biological systems. For example, smaller particle sizes can lead to greater absorption and distribution throughout the body, while larger particle sizes may be filtered out by the body's natural defense mechanisms. Therefore, understanding particle size and its implications is crucial for optimizing the safety and efficacy of medical treatments and interventions.

Nanotubes, in the context of nanotechnology and materials science, refer to hollow cylindrical structures with extremely small diameters, measured in nanometers (nm). They are typically composed of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice structure, similar to graphene. The most common types of nanotubes are single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs).

In the field of medicine, nanotubes have been studied for their potential applications in drug delivery, tissue engineering, and medical devices. For example, researchers have explored the use of nanotubes as drug carriers, where drugs can be loaded into the hollow interior of the tube and released in a controlled manner at the target site. Additionally, nanotubes have been used to create conductive scaffolds for tissue engineering, which may help promote nerve regeneration or muscle growth.

However, it's important to note that while nanotubes have shown promise in preclinical studies, their potential use in medical applications is still being researched and developed. There are concerns about the potential toxicity of nanotubes, as well as challenges related to their large-scale production and functionalization for specific medical applications.

Dendrimers are a type of synthetic, nanoscale polymer structures with a well-defined, highly branched, and regularly repeating architecture. They consist of a central core, an inner layer of repetitive branches, and an outer surface that can be functionalized with various groups. Dendrimers have unique properties such as monodispersity, a high degree of symmetry, and the ability to encapsulate or conjugate drugs, genes, and imaging agents, making them useful in drug delivery, gene therapy, diagnostics, and other biomedical applications.

Ophthalmic administration refers to the application or delivery of medications directly into the eye or on the surface of the eye. This route is commonly used for treating various eye conditions such as infections, inflammation, or glaucoma. The medication can be administered in several ways, including:

1. Eye drops: A liquid solution that is instilled into the lower conjunctival sac (the space between the eyeball and the lower eyelid) using a dropper. The patient should be advised to tilt their head back, look up, and pull down the lower eyelid to create a pocket for the drop.
2. Eye ointment: A semi-solid preparation that is applied to the lower conjunctival sac or the edge of the eyelid using a small tube or applicator. Ointments provide a longer contact time with the eye surface compared to eye drops, making them suitable for nighttime use or treating conditions that require prolonged medication exposure.
3. Eye inserts or pellets: Slow-release devices that contain medications and are placed either in the conjunctival sac or on the surface of the eye. These inserts gradually dissolve, releasing the active ingredient over an extended period.
4. Eye patches or bandages: In some cases, medication may be applied to an eye patch or bandage, which is then placed over the affected eye. This method is less common and typically used when other forms of administration are not feasible.

When administering ophthalmic medications, it's essential to follow proper techniques to ensure the correct dosage reaches the target area and minimize systemic absorption. Patients should also be advised about potential side effects, precautions, and storage requirements for their specific medication.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "rotaxanes" is not a term commonly used in medical definitions. Rotaxanes are actually a concept from the field of chemistry, specifically supramolecular chemistry. They refer to mechanically interlocked molecules, consisting of a dumbbell-shaped component with two large rings that thread onto the ends of the dumbbell and cannot come off, much like a macrocycle around an axle.

While rotaxanes have potential applications in various fields, including nanotechnology and materials science, they are not directly related to medical definitions or human health. If you have any questions about medical terminologies or concepts, I'd be happy to help with those instead!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Silver" is not a medical term. It is a chemical element with the symbol Ag and atomic number 47. Silver is a soft, white, lustrous transition metal that occurs in its pure, free form (native silver) as an alloy with gold and other metals, and in minerals such as argentite and chlorargyrite.

In the medical field, silver compounds have been used for their antimicrobial properties. For example, silver sulfadiazine is a common topical cream used to prevent or treat wound infections. Colloidal silver, a suspension of silver particles in a liquid, has also been promoted as a dietary supplement and alternative treatment for various conditions, but its effectiveness and safety are not well-established.

Dental deposits, also known as dental plaque or calculus, are accumulations of bacteria and other substances on the surface of teeth. Plaque is a soft, sticky film that constantly forms on the teeth due to the presence of bacteria in the mouth. When plaque is not removed regularly through brushing and flossing, it can harden into a rough, crusty deposit called calculus or tartar.

Calculus can form above and below the gum line and can cause inflammation and irritation of the gums, leading to gum disease if left untreated. Dental deposits can also contribute to tooth decay, bad breath, and other oral health problems. Regular dental checkups and cleanings are necessary to remove dental deposits and prevent further buildup.

A nanocapsule is a type of nanoparticle that is characterized by its hollow, spherical structure. It is composed of a polymeric membrane that encapsulates an inner core or "cargo" which can be made up of various substances such as drugs, proteins, or imaging agents. The small size of nanocapsules (typically ranging from 10 to 1000 nanometers in diameter) allows them to penetrate cells and tissue more efficiently than larger particles, making them useful for targeted drug delivery and diagnostic applications.

The polymeric membrane can be designed to be biodegradable or non-biodegradable, depending on the desired application. Additionally, the surface of nanocapsules can be functionalized with various moieties such as antibodies, peptides, or small molecules to enhance their targeting capabilities and improve their stability in biological environments.

Overall, nanocapsules have great potential for use in a variety of medical applications, including cancer therapy, gene delivery, and vaccine development.

Biosensing techniques refer to the methods and technologies used to detect and measure biological molecules or processes, typically through the use of a physical device or sensor. These techniques often involve the conversion of a biological response into an electrical signal that can be measured and analyzed. Examples of biosensing techniques include electrochemical biosensors, optical biosensors, and piezoelectric biosensors.

Electrochemical biosensors measure the electrical current or potential generated by a biochemical reaction at an electrode surface. This type of biosensor typically consists of a biological recognition element, such as an enzyme or antibody, that is immobilized on the electrode surface and interacts with the target analyte to produce an electrical signal.

Optical biosensors measure changes in light intensity or wavelength that occur when a biochemical reaction takes place. This type of biosensor can be based on various optical principles, such as absorbance, fluorescence, or surface plasmon resonance (SPR).

Piezoelectric biosensors measure changes in mass or frequency that occur when a biomolecule binds to the surface of a piezoelectric crystal. This type of biosensor is based on the principle that piezoelectric materials generate an electrical charge when subjected to mechanical stress, and this charge can be used to detect changes in mass or frequency that are proportional to the amount of biomolecule bound to the surface.

Biosensing techniques have a wide range of applications in fields such as medicine, environmental monitoring, food safety, and biodefense. They can be used to detect and measure a variety of biological molecules, including proteins, nucleic acids, hormones, and small molecules, as well as to monitor biological processes such as cell growth or metabolism.

"Green Chemistry Technology," also known as "Sustainable Chemistry," refers to the design of chemical products and processes that reduce or eliminate the use and generation of hazardous substances. It aims to minimize negative impacts on human health and the environment, while maximizing economic benefits. This is achieved through the application of principles such as preventing waste, designing safer chemicals, using renewable feedstocks, and minimizing energy use. Green Chemistry Technology involves the development and implementation of novel chemical reactions, catalysts, and processes that are inherently safer and more environmentally benign than traditional methods.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. Gold is typically a chemical element with the symbol Au and atomic number 79. It is a dense, soft, malleable, and ductile metal. It is one of the least reactive chemical elements and is solid under standard conditions.

However, if you are referring to "Gold" in the context of medical terminology, it may refer to:

1. Gold salts: These are a group of compounds that contain gold and are used in medicine for their anti-inflammatory properties. They have been used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, although they have largely been replaced by newer drugs with fewer side effects.
2. Gold implants: In some cases, a small amount of gold may be surgically implanted into the eye to treat conditions such as age-related macular degeneration or diabetic retinopathy. The gold helps to hold the retina in place and can improve vision in some patients.
3. Gold thread embedment: This is an alternative therapy used in traditional Chinese medicine, where gold threads are embedded into the skin or acupuncture points for therapeutic purposes. However, there is limited scientific evidence to support its effectiveness.

I hope this information helps! If you have any further questions, please let me know.

Biomedical technology is a field that applies technological principles and methods to the development of medical solutions, diagnostics, and treatments. It combines engineering, physics, biology, and chemistry to create devices, instruments, software, and systems used in healthcare. This can include things like medical imaging equipment, prosthetics, genetic testing technologies, and biocompatible materials for use in the body. The goal of biomedical technology is to improve patient outcomes, enhance diagnostic capabilities, and advance medical research.

Molecular computers are a hypothetical concept in the field of computer science and nanotechnology, which involve the use of molecular-scale devices to perform computational operations. The idea is to create systems that can manipulate individual molecules or groups of molecules to process information, similar to how traditional computers use silicon-based transistors to process digital data.

The field of molecular computing is still in its infancy, and significant scientific and engineering challenges must be overcome before practical applications can be realized. However, researchers are actively exploring the potential of molecular computers for a variety of applications, including medical diagnostics, drug discovery, and environmental monitoring.

In summary, molecular computers refer to hypothetical computing devices that operate at the molecular scale, with the potential to revolutionize various fields, including medicine, once developed and perfected.

Diagnostic imaging is a medical specialty that uses various technologies to produce visual representations of the internal structures and functioning of the body. These images are used to diagnose injury, disease, or other abnormalities and to monitor the effectiveness of treatment. Common modalities of diagnostic imaging include:

1. Radiography (X-ray): Uses ionizing radiation to produce detailed images of bones, teeth, and some organs.
2. Computed Tomography (CT) Scan: Combines X-ray technology with computer processing to create cross-sectional images of the body.
3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Uses a strong magnetic field and radio waves to generate detailed images of soft tissues, organs, and bones.
4. Ultrasound: Employs high-frequency sound waves to produce real-time images of internal structures, often used for obstetrics and gynecology.
5. Nuclear Medicine: Involves the administration of radioactive tracers to assess organ function or detect abnormalities within the body.
6. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Scan: Uses a small amount of radioactive material to produce detailed images of metabolic activity in the body, often used for cancer detection and monitoring treatment response.
7. Fluoroscopy: Utilizes continuous X-ray imaging to observe moving structures or processes within the body, such as swallowing studies or angiography.

Diagnostic imaging plays a crucial role in modern medicine, allowing healthcare providers to make informed decisions about patient care and treatment plans.

Neoplasms are abnormal growths of cells or tissues in the body that serve no physiological function. They can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are typically slow growing and do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant neoplasms are aggressive, invasive, and can metastasize to distant sites.

Neoplasms occur when there is a dysregulation in the normal process of cell division and differentiation, leading to uncontrolled growth and accumulation of cells. This can result from genetic mutations or other factors such as viral infections, environmental exposures, or hormonal imbalances.

Neoplasms can develop in any organ or tissue of the body and can cause various symptoms depending on their size, location, and type. Treatment options for neoplasms include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy, among others.

Biotechnology is defined in the medical field as a branch of technology that utilizes biological processes, organisms, or systems to create products that are technologically useful. This can include various methods and techniques such as genetic engineering, cell culture, fermentation, and others. The goal of biotechnology is to harness the power of biology to produce drugs, vaccines, diagnostic tests, biofuels, and other industrial products, as well as to advance our understanding of living systems for medical and scientific research.

The use of biotechnology has led to significant advances in medicine, including the development of new treatments for genetic diseases, improved methods for diagnosing illnesses, and the creation of vaccines to prevent infectious diseases. However, it also raises ethical and societal concerns related to issues such as genetic modification of organisms, cloning, and biosecurity.

Bacillus phages are viruses that infect and replicate within bacteria of the genus Bacillus. These phages, also known as bacteriophages or simply phages, are a type of virus that is specifically adapted to infect and multiply within bacteria. They use the bacterial cell's machinery to produce new copies of themselves, often resulting in the lysis (breakdown) of the bacterial cell. Bacillus phages are widely studied for their potential applications in biotechnology, medicine, and basic research.

Dentistry is the branch of medicine that is concerned with the examination, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of diseases, disorders, and conditions of the oral cavity (mouth), including the teeth, gums, and other supporting structures. Dentists use a variety of treatments and procedures to help patients maintain good oral health and prevent dental problems from developing or worsening. These may include:

* Routine cleanings and checkups to remove plaque and tartar and detect any potential issues early on
* Fillings, crowns, and other restorative treatments to repair damaged teeth
* Root canal therapy to treat infected or inflamed tooth pulp
* Extractions of severely decayed or impacted teeth
* Dentures, bridges, and implants to replace missing teeth
* Orthodontic treatment to align crooked or misaligned teeth
* Treatment for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders and other issues affecting the jaw and surrounding muscles

Dental health is an important part of overall health and well-being. Poor oral health has been linked to a variety of systemic conditions, including heart disease, diabetes, and respiratory infections. Regular dental checkups and good oral hygiene practices can help prevent these and other dental problems from developing.

Cosmetics are defined in the medical field as products that are intended to be applied or introduced to the human body for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, and altering the appearance. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), cosmetics include skin creams, lotions, makeup, perfumes, lipsticks, fingernail polishes, eye and facial makeup preparations, shampoos, permanent waves, hair colors, toothpastes, and deodorants, as well as any material intended for use as a component of a cosmetic product.

It's important to note that the FDA classifies cosmetics and drugs differently. Drugs are defined as products that are intended to diagnose, cure, mitigate, treat, or prevent disease, and/or affect the structure or function of the body. Some products, such as anti-dandruff shampoos or toothpastes with fluoride, can be considered both a cosmetic and a drug because they have both cleansing and therapeutic properties. These types of products are subject to regulation by both the FDA's Office of Cosmetics and Colors and its Center for Drug Evaluation and Research.

Cosmetics must not be adulterated or misbranded, meaning that they must be safe for use under labeled or customary conditions, properly packaged and labeled, and not contain any harmful ingredients. However, the FDA does not have the authority to approve cosmetic products before they go on the market, with the exception of color additives. Manufacturers are responsible for ensuring that their products are safe and properly labeled.

Surface properties in the context of medical science refer to the characteristics and features of the outermost layer or surface of a biological material or structure, such as cells, tissues, organs, or medical devices. These properties can include physical attributes like roughness, smoothness, hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity, and electrical conductivity, as well as chemical properties like charge, reactivity, and composition.

In the field of biomaterials science, understanding surface properties is crucial for designing medical implants, devices, and drug delivery systems that can interact safely and effectively with biological tissues and fluids. Surface modifications, such as coatings or chemical treatments, can be used to alter surface properties and enhance biocompatibility, improve lubricity, reduce fouling, or promote specific cellular responses like adhesion, proliferation, or differentiation.

Similarly, in the field of cell biology, understanding surface properties is essential for studying cell-cell interactions, cell signaling, and cell behavior. Cells can sense and respond to changes in their environment, including variations in surface properties, which can influence cell shape, motility, and function. Therefore, characterizing and manipulating surface properties can provide valuable insights into the mechanisms of cellular processes and offer new strategies for developing therapies and treatments for various diseases.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "nanowires" is not a medical term. It is a term used in the field of materials science and nanotechnology. Nanowires are one-dimensional structures with a diameter of 1-100 nanometers (nm) and an aspect ratio (length/diameter) greater than 1000. They have unique electrical, mechanical, and optical properties that make them useful in various applications such as electronics, sensors, energy storage, and biomedical devices.

DNA packaging refers to the way in which DNA molecules are compacted and organized within the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell. In order to fit into the nucleus, which is only a small fraction of the size of the cell, the long DNA molecule must be tightly packed. This is accomplished through a process called "supercoiling," in which the DNA double helix twists and coils upon itself, as well as through its association with histone proteins.

Histones are small, positively charged proteins that bind to the negatively charged DNA molecule, forming structures known as nucleosomes. The DNA wraps around the outside of the histone octamer (a complex made up of eight histone proteins) in a repeating pattern, creating a "bead on a string" structure. These nucleosomes are then coiled and compacted further to form higher-order structures, ultimately resulting in the highly condensed chromatin that is found within the cell nucleus.

Proper DNA packaging is essential for the regulation of gene expression, as well as for the protection and maintenance of genetic information. Abnormalities in DNA packaging have been linked to a variety of diseases, including cancer.

Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is a type of microscopy that allows visualization and measurement of surfaces at the atomic level. It works by using a sharp probe, called a tip, that is mounted on a flexible cantilever. The tip is brought very close to the surface of the sample and as the sample is scanned, the forces between the tip and the sample cause the cantilever to deflect. This deflection is measured and used to generate a topographic map of the surface with extremely high resolution, often on the order of fractions of a nanometer. AFM can be used to study both conductive and non-conductive samples, and can operate in various environments, including air and liquid. It has applications in fields such as materials science, biology, and chemistry.

Biological science disciplines are fields of study that deal with the principles and mechanisms of living organisms and their interactions with the environment. These disciplines employ scientific, analytical, and experimental approaches to understand various biological phenomena at different levels of organization, ranging from molecules and cells to ecosystems. Some of the major biological science disciplines include:

1. Molecular Biology: This field focuses on understanding the structure, function, and interactions of molecules that are essential for life, such as DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. It includes sub-disciplines like genetics, biochemistry, and structural biology.
2. Cellular Biology: This discipline investigates the properties, structures, and functions of individual cells, which are the basic units of life. Topics covered include cell division, signaling, metabolism, transport, and organization.
3. Physiology: Physiologists study the functioning of living organisms and their organs, tissues, and cells. They investigate how biological systems maintain homeostasis, respond to stimuli, and adapt to changing environments.
4. Genetics: This field deals with the study of genes, heredity, and variation in organisms. It includes classical genetics, molecular genetics, population genetics, quantitative genetics, and genetic engineering.
5. Evolutionary Biology: This discipline focuses on understanding the processes that drive the origin, diversification, and extinction of species over time. Topics include natural selection, adaptation, speciation, phylogeny, and molecular evolution.
6. Ecology: Ecologists study the interactions between organisms and their environment, including the distribution, abundance, and behavior of populations, communities, and ecosystems.
7. Biotechnology: This field applies biological principles and techniques to develop products, tools, and processes that improve human health, agriculture, and industry. It includes genetic engineering, bioprocessing, bioremediation, and synthetic biology.
8. Neuroscience: Neuroscientists investigate the structure, function, development, and disorders of the nervous system, including the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves.
9. Biophysics: This discipline combines principles from physics and biology to understand living systems' properties and behaviors at various scales, from molecules to organisms.
10. Systems Biology: Systems biologists study complex biological systems as integrated networks of genes, proteins, and metabolites, using computational models and high-throughput data analysis.

Biocompatible materials are non-toxic and non-reacting substances that can be used in medical devices, tissue engineering, and drug delivery systems without causing harm or adverse reactions to living tissues or organs. These materials are designed to mimic the properties of natural tissues and are able to integrate with biological systems without being rejected by the body's immune system.

Biocompatible materials can be made from a variety of substances, including metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. The specific properties of these materials, such as their mechanical strength, flexibility, and biodegradability, are carefully selected to meet the requirements of their intended medical application.

Examples of biocompatible materials include titanium used in dental implants and joint replacements, polyethylene used in artificial hips, and hydrogels used in contact lenses and drug delivery systems. The use of biocompatible materials has revolutionized modern medicine by enabling the development of advanced medical technologies that can improve patient outcomes and quality of life.

Dermatology is a medical specialty that focuses on the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases and conditions related to the skin, hair, nails, and mucous membranes. A dermatologist is a medical doctor who has completed specialized training in this field. They are qualified to treat a wide range of skin conditions, including acne, eczema, psoriasis, skin cancer, and many others. Dermatologists may also perform cosmetic procedures to improve the appearance of the skin or to treat signs of aging.

Fullerene is not typically considered a medical term, but it is a term used in the field of materials science and nanotechnology. Fullerene refers to a specific type of carbon molecule that forms a hollow cage-like structure. The most common fullerene is buckminsterfullerene (C60), which has a soccer ball shape with 60 carbon atoms.

While fullerene itself is not a medical term, it has been studied in various medical and biomedical research contexts due to its unique chemical and physical properties. For example, fullerenes have been explored for their potential use as drug delivery vehicles, antioxidants, and imaging agents. However, more research is needed to fully understand the potential benefits and risks of using fullerene-based materials in medical applications.

Magnetite nanoparticles are defined as extremely small particles, usually with a diameter less than 100 nanometers, of the mineral magnetite (Fe3O4). These particles have unique magnetic properties and can be manipulated using magnetic fields. They have been studied for various biomedical applications such as drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, hyperthermia treatment for cancer, and tissue engineering due to their ability to generate heat when exposed to alternating magnetic fields. However, the potential toxicity of magnetite nanoparticles is a concern that needs further investigation before widespread clinical use.

Nanospheres are defined in the medical context as tiny, spherical particles that have a diameter in the nanometer range (typically between 1 to 1000 nm). They can be made up of various materials such as polymers, lipids, metals or ceramics. Nanospheres have unique properties due to their small size and large surface area, making them useful for a variety of medical applications including drug delivery, diagnostic imaging, and tissue engineering.

In the field of drug delivery, nanospheres can be used to encapsulate drugs and deliver them to specific sites in the body, improving the efficacy and safety of treatments. They can also be designed to target certain cell types or release their cargo in response to specific stimuli. Additionally, nanospheres can be used as contrast agents for medical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT).

Overall, nanospheres are a promising tool in the development of new medical technologies and therapies.

Antineoplastic protocols refer to the standardized treatment plans used in cancer therapy that involve the use of antineoplastic agents or drugs. These protocols are developed based on clinical research and evidence-based medicine, and they outline the specific types, dosages, schedules, and routes of administration of antineoplastic drugs for the treatment of various types of cancer.

The main goal of antineoplastic protocols is to optimize the effectiveness of cancer therapy while minimizing toxicity and adverse effects. They may involve single-agent or multi-agent chemotherapy, as well as other forms of cancer treatment such as radiation therapy, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy. Antineoplastic protocols are often individualized based on the patient's age, performance status, tumor type and stage, genetic makeup, and other factors that may affect their response to treatment.

It is important for healthcare providers to follow antineoplastic protocols carefully to ensure that patients receive safe and effective cancer therapy. Regular monitoring and assessment of the patient's response to treatment are also crucial components of antineoplastic protocols, as they allow healthcare providers to adjust the treatment plan as needed to maximize its benefits and minimize its risks.

Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a type of microscopy in which an electron beam is transmitted through a ultra-thin specimen, interacting with it as it passes through. An image is formed from the interaction of the electrons with the specimen; the image is then magnified and visualized on a fluorescent screen or recorded on an electronic detector (or photographic film in older models).

TEM can provide high-resolution, high-magnification images that can reveal the internal structure of specimens including cells, viruses, and even molecules. It is widely used in biological and materials science research to investigate the ultrastructure of cells, tissues and materials. In medicine, TEM is used for diagnostic purposes in fields such as virology and bacteriology.

It's important to note that preparing a sample for TEM is a complex process, requiring specialized techniques to create thin (50-100 nm) specimens. These include cutting ultrathin sections of embedded samples using an ultramicrotome, staining with heavy metal salts, and positive staining or negative staining methods.

Zinc oxide is an inorganic compound with the formula ZnO. It exists as a white, odorless, and crystalline powder. In medicine, zinc oxide is used primarily as a topical agent for the treatment of various skin conditions, including diaper rash, minor burns, and irritations caused by eczema or psoriasis.

Zinc oxide has several properties that make it useful in medical applications:

1. Antimicrobial activity: Zinc oxide exhibits antimicrobial properties against bacteria, viruses, and fungi, which can help prevent infection and promote wound healing.
2. Skin protectant: It forms a physical barrier on the skin, protecting it from external irritants, friction, and moisture. This property is particularly useful in products like diaper rash creams and sunscreens.
3. Astringent properties: Zinc oxide can help constrict and tighten tissues, which may reduce inflammation and promote healing.
4. Mineral sunscreen agent: Zinc oxide is a common active ingredient in physical (mineral) sunscreens due to its ability to reflect and scatter UV light, protecting the skin from both UVA and UVB radiation.

Zinc oxide can be found in various medical and skincare products, such as creams, ointments, pastes, lotions, and powders. It is generally considered safe for topical use, but it may cause skin irritation or allergic reactions in some individuals.

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the genetic material present in the cells of organisms where it is responsible for the storage and transmission of hereditary information. DNA is a long molecule that consists of two strands coiled together to form a double helix. Each strand is made up of a series of four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - that are linked together by phosphate and sugar groups. The sequence of these bases along the length of the molecule encodes genetic information, with A always pairing with T and C always pairing with G. This base-pairing allows for the replication and transcription of DNA, which are essential processes in the functioning and reproduction of all living organisms.

Nucleic acid conformation refers to the three-dimensional structure that nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) adopt as a result of the bonding patterns between the atoms within the molecule. The primary structure of nucleic acids is determined by the sequence of nucleotides, while the conformation is influenced by factors such as the sugar-phosphate backbone, base stacking, and hydrogen bonding.

Two common conformations of DNA are the B-form and the A-form. The B-form is a right-handed helix with a diameter of about 20 Å and a pitch of 34 Å, while the A-form has a smaller diameter (about 18 Å) and a shorter pitch (about 25 Å). RNA typically adopts an A-form conformation.

The conformation of nucleic acids can have significant implications for their function, as it can affect their ability to interact with other molecules such as proteins or drugs. Understanding the conformational properties of nucleic acids is therefore an important area of research in molecular biology and medicine.

Toxicology is a branch of medical science that deals with the study of the adverse effects of chemicals or toxins on living organisms and the environment, including their detection, evaluation, prevention, and treatment. It involves understanding how various substances can cause harm, the doses at which they become toxic, and the factors that influence their toxicity. This field is crucial in areas such as public health, medicine, pharmacology, environmental science, and forensic investigations.

Biomimetics, also known as biomimicry, is the process of mimicking or taking inspiration from nature and biological systems to design materials, structures, or processes that solve human problems. It involves studying the models, systems, and elements of nature and then applying the knowledge gained to create new technologies and solutions.

In a medical context, biomimetics can be used to develop new therapies, medical devices, and diagnostic tools. For example, researchers might look to the structure of a spider's web to design a better surgical mesh or take inspiration from the way a gecko sticks to surfaces to create a new type of adhesive bandage.

Biomimetics is an interdisciplinary field that draws on knowledge from biology, chemistry, physics, engineering, and materials science. It has the potential to lead to innovative solutions in healthcare, sustainability, energy, transportation, and other areas.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "nanocomposites" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a term used in materials science and engineering to refer to a type of composite material where at least one of the phases has dimensions in the nanoscale (typically less than 100 nanometers). Nanocomposites can have unique properties that make them useful for various applications, including biomedical applications such as drug delivery systems or tissue engineering scaffolds. However, the term itself is not a medical definition.

Phototherapy is a medical treatment that involves the use of light to manage or improve certain conditions. It can be delivered in various forms, such as natural light exposure or artificial light sources, including lasers, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), or fluorescent lamps. The wavelength and intensity of light are carefully controlled to achieve specific therapeutic effects.

Phototherapy is most commonly used for newborns with jaundice to help break down bilirubin in the skin, reducing its levels in the bloodstream. This type of phototherapy is called bilirubin lights or bili lights.

In dermatology, phototherapy can be applied to treat various skin conditions like psoriasis, eczema, vitiligo, and acne. Narrowband ultraviolet B (UVB) therapy, PUVA (psoralen plus UVA), and blue or red light therapies are some examples of dermatological phototherapies.

Phototherapy can also be used to alleviate symptoms of seasonal affective disorder (SAD) and other mood disorders by exposing patients to bright artificial light, which helps regulate their circadian rhythms and improve their mood. This form of phototherapy is called light therapy or bright light therapy.

It's essential to consult a healthcare professional before starting any phototherapy treatment, as inappropriate use can lead to adverse effects.

Tissue engineering is a branch of biomedical engineering that combines the principles of engineering, materials science, and biological sciences to develop functional substitutes for damaged or diseased tissues and organs. It involves the creation of living, three-dimensional structures that can restore, maintain, or improve tissue function. This is typically accomplished through the use of cells, scaffolds (biodegradable matrices), and biologically active molecules. The goal of tissue engineering is to develop biological substitutes that can ultimately restore normal function and structure in damaged tissues or organs.

I'm happy to help! However, I must clarify that "materials testing" is not a medical term per se. It is a term used in various fields, including engineering and materials science, to describe the process of subjecting materials to different tests to evaluate their properties and performance under various conditions.

In the context of medical devices or implants, materials testing may refer to the evaluation of the physical and mechanical properties of materials used in their construction. These tests can include assessments of strength, durability, biocompatibility, and other factors that are critical to ensuring the safety and efficacy of medical devices.

Medical device manufacturers must comply with regulatory standards for materials testing to ensure that their products meet specific requirements for performance, safety, and quality. These standards may vary depending on the type of device, its intended use, and the country or region in which it will be marketed and sold.

Nanofibers are defined in the medical field as fibrous structures with extremely small diameters, typically measuring between 100 nanometers to 1 micrometer. They can be made from various materials such as polymers, ceramics, or composites and have a high surface area-to-volume ratio, which makes them useful in a variety of biomedical applications. These include tissue engineering, drug delivery, wound healing, and filtration. Nanofibers can be produced using different techniques such as electrospinning, self-assembly, and phase separation.

Animal testing alternatives, also known as alternative methods or replacement methods, refer to scientific techniques that can be used to replace the use of animals in research and testing. These methods aim to achieve the same scientific objectives while avoiding harm to animals. There are several categories of animal testing alternatives:

1. In vitro (test tube or cell culture) methods: These methods involve growing cells or tissues in a laboratory setting, outside of a living organism. They can be used to study the effects of chemicals, drugs, and other substances on specific cell types or tissues.
2. Computer modeling and simulation: Advanced computer programs and algorithms can be used to model biological systems and predict how they will respond to various stimuli. These methods can help researchers understand complex biological processes without using animals.
3. In silico (using computer models) methods: These methods involve the use of computational tools and databases to predict the potential toxicity or other biological effects of chemicals, drugs, and other substances. They can be used to identify potential hazards and prioritize further testing.
4. Microdosing: This method involves giving human volunteers very small doses of a drug or chemical, followed by careful monitoring to assess its safety and pharmacological properties. This approach can provide valuable information while minimizing the use of animals.
5. Tissue engineering: Scientists can create functional tissue constructs using cells, scaffolds, and bioreactors. These engineered tissues can be used to study the effects of drugs, chemicals, and other substances on human tissues without using animals.
6. Human-based approaches: These methods involve the use of human volunteers, donated tissues, or cells obtained from consenting adults. Examples include microdosing, organ-on-a-chip technology, and the use of human cell lines in laboratory experiments.

These animal testing alternatives can help reduce the number of animals used in research and testing, refine experimental procedures to minimize suffering, and replace the use of animals with non-animal methods whenever possible.

In the context of medical definitions, polymers are large molecules composed of repeating subunits called monomers. These long chains of monomers can have various structures and properties, depending on the type of monomer units and how they are linked together. In medicine, polymers are used in a wide range of applications, including drug delivery systems, medical devices, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Some examples of polymers used in medicine include polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and biodegradable polymers such as polylactic acid (PLA) and polycaprolactone (PCL).

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "magnetics" is not a term that is commonly used in medical definitions. It is a term more frequently used in physics and engineering to refer to things related to magnets or magnetic fields. If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to try to help with those!

Biomimetic materials are synthetic or natural substances that mimic the chemical, physical, and biological properties of living systems or tissues. These materials are designed to interact with cells, tissues, and organs in ways that resemble the body's own structures and processes. They can be used in a variety of medical applications, including tissue engineering, drug delivery, and medical devices.

Biomimetic materials may be composed of polymers, ceramics, metals, or composites, and they can be designed to have specific properties such as mechanical strength, biocompatibility, and degradability. They may also incorporate bioactive molecules, such as growth factors or drugs, to promote healing or prevent infection.

The goal of using biomimetic materials is to create medical solutions that are more effective, safer, and more compatible with the body than traditional synthetic materials. By mimicking the body's own structures and processes, these materials can help to reduce inflammation, promote tissue regeneration, and improve overall patient outcomes.

Animal welfare is a concept that refers to the state of an animal's physical and mental health, comfort, and ability to express normal behaviors. It encompasses factors such as proper nutrition, housing, handling, care, treatment, and protection from harm and distress. The goal of animal welfare is to ensure that animals are treated with respect and consideration, and that their needs and interests are met in a responsible and ethical manner.

The concept of animal welfare is based on the recognition that animals are sentient beings capable of experiencing pain, suffering, and emotions, and that they have intrinsic value beyond their usefulness to humans. It is guided by principles such as the "Five Freedoms," which include freedom from hunger and thirst, freedom from discomfort, freedom from pain, injury or disease, freedom to express normal behavior, and freedom from fear and distress.

Animal welfare is an important consideration in various fields, including agriculture, research, conservation, entertainment, and companionship. It involves a multidisciplinary approach that draws on knowledge from biology, ethology, veterinary medicine, psychology, philosophy, and law. Ultimately, animal welfare aims to promote the humane treatment of animals and to ensure their well-being in all aspects of their lives.

Medical technology, also known as health technology, refers to the use of medical devices, medicines, vaccines, procedures, and systems for the purpose of preventing, diagnosing, or treating disease and disability. This can include a wide range of products and services, from simple devices like tongue depressors and bandages, to complex technologies like MRI machines and artificial organs.

Pharmaceutical technology, on the other hand, specifically refers to the application of engineering and scientific principles to the development, production, and control of pharmaceutical drugs and medical devices. This can include the design and construction of manufacturing facilities, the development of new drug delivery systems, and the implementation of quality control measures to ensure the safety and efficacy of pharmaceutical products.

Both medical technology and pharmaceutical technology play crucial roles in modern healthcare, helping to improve patient outcomes, reduce healthcare costs, and enhance the overall quality of life for individuals around the world.

Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine, is a medical model that uses molecular profiling and various diagnostic tests to understand the genetic and environmental variations affecting an individual's health and disease susceptibility. It aims to tailor medical treatments, including prevention strategies, diagnostics, therapies, and follow-up care, to each person's unique needs and characteristics. By incorporating genomic, proteomic, metabolomic, and other "omics" data into clinical decision-making, individualized medicine strives to improve patient outcomes, reduce adverse effects, and potentially lower healthcare costs.

Environmental health is a branch of public health that focuses on the study of how environmental factors, including physical, chemical, and biological factors, impact human health and disease. It involves the assessment, control, and prevention of environmental hazards in order to protect and promote human health and well-being.

Environmental health encompasses a wide range of issues, such as air and water quality, food safety, waste management, housing conditions, occupational health and safety, radiation protection, and climate change. It also involves the promotion of healthy behaviors and the development of policies and regulations to protect public health from environmental hazards.

The goal of environmental health is to create safe and healthy environments that support human health and well-being, prevent disease and injury, and promote sustainable communities. This requires a multidisciplinary approach that involves collaboration between various stakeholders, including policymakers, researchers, healthcare providers, community organizations, and the public.

Inhalation exposure is a term used in occupational and environmental health to describe the situation where an individual breathes in substances present in the air, which could be gases, vapors, fumes, mist, or particulate matter. These substances can originate from various sources, such as industrial processes, chemical reactions, or natural phenomena.

The extent of inhalation exposure is determined by several factors, including:

1. Concentration of the substance in the air
2. Duration of exposure
3. Frequency of exposure
4. The individual's breathing rate
5. The efficiency of the individual's respiratory protection, if any

Inhalation exposure can lead to adverse health effects, depending on the toxicity and concentration of the inhaled substances. Short-term or acute health effects may include irritation of the eyes, nose, throat, or lungs, while long-term or chronic exposure can result in more severe health issues, such as respiratory diseases, neurological disorders, or cancer.

It is essential to monitor and control inhalation exposures in occupational settings to protect workers' health and ensure compliance with regulatory standards. Various methods are employed for exposure assessment, including personal air sampling, area monitoring, and biological monitoring. Based on the results of these assessments, appropriate control measures can be implemented to reduce or eliminate the risks associated with inhalation exposure.

Molecular imaging is a type of medical imaging that provides detailed pictures of what is happening at the molecular and cellular level in the body. It involves the use of specialized imaging devices and radiopharmaceuticals (radiotracers) to visualize and measure biological processes, such as gene expression, protein expression, or metabolic activity, within cells and tissues. This information can be used to detect disease at its earliest stages, monitor response to therapy, and guide the development of new treatments.

Molecular imaging techniques include positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and computed tomography (CT). These techniques differ in their ability to provide functional, anatomical, or molecular information about the body.

Overall, molecular imaging is a powerful tool for non-invasively visualizing and understanding biological processes at the molecular level, which can lead to improved diagnosis, treatment planning, and patient outcomes.

Pharmaceutical chemistry is a branch of chemistry that deals with the design, synthesis, and development of chemical entities used as medications. It involves the study of drugs' physical, chemical, and biological properties, as well as their interactions with living organisms. This field also encompasses understanding the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) of drugs in the body, which are critical factors in drug design and development. Pharmaceutical chemists often work closely with biologists, medical professionals, and engineers to develop new medications and improve existing ones.

Polyglycolic acid (PGA) is a synthetic polymer of glycolic acid, which is commonly used in surgical sutures. It is a biodegradable material that degrades in the body through hydrolysis into glycolic acid, which can be metabolized and eliminated from the body. PGA sutures are often used for approximating tissue during surgical procedures due to their strength, handling properties, and predictable rate of absorption. The degradation time of PGA sutures is typically around 60-90 days, depending on factors such as the size and location of the suture.

Ferric compounds are inorganic compounds that contain the iron(III) cation, Fe3+. Iron(III) is a transition metal and can form stable compounds with various anions. Ferric compounds are often colored due to the d-d transitions of the iron ion. Examples of ferric compounds include ferric chloride (FeCl3), ferric sulfate (Fe2(SO4)3), and ferric oxide (Fe2O3). Ferric compounds have a variety of uses, including as catalysts, in dye production, and in medical applications.

Drug compounding is the process of combining, mixing, or altering ingredients to create a customized medication to meet the specific needs of an individual patient. This can be done for a variety of reasons, such as when a patient has an allergy to a certain ingredient in a mass-produced medication, or when a patient requires a different dosage or formulation than what is available commercially.

Compounding requires specialized training and equipment, and compounding pharmacists must follow strict guidelines to ensure the safety and efficacy of the medications they produce. Compounded medications are not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), but the FDA does regulate the ingredients used in compounding and has oversight over the practices of compounding pharmacies.

It's important to note that while compounding can provide benefits for some patients, it also carries risks, such as the potential for contamination or incorrect dosing. Patients should only receive compounded medications from reputable pharmacies that follow proper compounding standards and procedures.

Pharmaceutical preparations refer to the various forms of medicines that are produced by pharmaceutical companies, which are intended for therapeutic or prophylactic use. These preparations consist of an active ingredient (the drug) combined with excipients (inactive ingredients) in a specific formulation and dosage form.

The active ingredient is the substance that has a therapeutic effect on the body, while the excipients are added to improve the stability, palatability, bioavailability, or administration of the drug. Examples of pharmaceutical preparations include tablets, capsules, solutions, suspensions, emulsions, ointments, creams, and injections.

The production of pharmaceutical preparations involves a series of steps that ensure the quality, safety, and efficacy of the final product. These steps include the selection and testing of raw materials, formulation development, manufacturing, packaging, labeling, and storage. Each step is governed by strict regulations and guidelines to ensure that the final product meets the required standards for use in medical practice.

Molecular models are three-dimensional representations of molecular structures that are used in the field of molecular biology and chemistry to visualize and understand the spatial arrangement of atoms and bonds within a molecule. These models can be physical or computer-generated and allow researchers to study the shape, size, and behavior of molecules, which is crucial for understanding their function and interactions with other molecules.

Physical molecular models are often made up of balls (representing atoms) connected by rods or sticks (representing bonds). These models can be constructed manually using materials such as plastic or wooden balls and rods, or they can be created using 3D printing technology.

Computer-generated molecular models, on the other hand, are created using specialized software that allows researchers to visualize and manipulate molecular structures in three dimensions. These models can be used to simulate molecular interactions, predict molecular behavior, and design new drugs or chemicals with specific properties. Overall, molecular models play a critical role in advancing our understanding of molecular structures and their functions.

Silicon dioxide is not a medical term, but a chemical compound with the formula SiO2. It's commonly known as quartz or sand and is not something that would typically have a medical definition. However, in some cases, silicon dioxide can be used in pharmaceutical preparations as an excipient (an inactive substance that serves as a vehicle or medium for a drug) or as a food additive, often as an anti-caking agent.

In these contexts, it's important to note that silicon dioxide is considered generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). However, exposure to very high levels of respirable silica dust, such as in certain industrial settings, can increase the risk of lung disease, including silicosis.

RNA (Ribonucleic Acid) is a single-stranded, linear polymer of ribonucleotides. It is a nucleic acid present in the cells of all living organisms and some viruses. RNAs play crucial roles in various biological processes such as protein synthesis, gene regulation, and cellular signaling. There are several types of RNA including messenger RNA (mRNA), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), transfer RNA (tRNA), small nuclear RNA (snRNA), microRNA (miRNA), and long non-coding RNA (lncRNA). These RNAs differ in their structure, function, and location within the cell.

Titanium is not a medical term, but rather a chemical element (symbol Ti, atomic number 22) that is widely used in the medical field due to its unique properties. Medically, it is often referred to as a biocompatible material used in various medical applications such as:

1. Orthopedic implants: Titanium and its alloys are used for making joint replacements (hips, knees, shoulders), bone plates, screws, and rods due to their high strength-to-weight ratio, excellent corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility.
2. Dental implants: Titanium is also commonly used in dental applications like implants, crowns, and bridges because of its ability to osseointegrate, or fuse directly with bone tissue, providing a stable foundation for replacement teeth.
3. Cardiovascular devices: Titanium alloys are used in the construction of heart valves, pacemakers, and other cardiovascular implants due to their non-magnetic properties, which prevent interference with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans.
4. Medical instruments: Due to its resistance to corrosion and high strength, titanium is used in the manufacturing of various medical instruments such as surgical tools, needles, and catheters.

In summary, Titanium is a chemical element with unique properties that make it an ideal material for various medical applications, including orthopedic and dental implants, cardiovascular devices, and medical instruments.

  • On the other hand, nanotechnology raises many of the same issues as any new technology, including concerns about the toxicity and environmental impact of nanomaterials, [9] and their potential effects on global economics, as well as speculation about various doomsday scenarios . (wikipedia.org)
  • RAND researchers develop a preliminary logic model to help the Nanotechnology Research Center identify and assess its contributions to improving the safety and health of workers who could be affected by engineered nanomaterials. (rand.org)
  • The U.S. government is providing insufficient funding and other resources to understand and manage risks that nanomaterials pose to the health of workers in the rapidly growing nanotechnology industry. (rand.org)
  • The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Nanotechnology Research Center (NTRC) has taken on a global leadership role on research and guidance for nanomaterials in the workplace since the formation of NTRC in 2004 [1]. (cdc.gov)
  • As the NIOSH Nanotechnology Research Center (NTRC) celebrates its 20th anniversary, we look back over two decades of NIOSH NTRC published guidance to help reduce worker exposures to engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). (cdc.gov)
  • It is therefore common to see the plural form "nanotechnologies" as well as " nanoscale technologies" to refer to the broad range of research and applications whose common trait is size. (wikipedia.org)
  • Inspired by Feynman's concepts, K. Eric Drexler used the term "nanotechnology" in his 1986 book Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology , which proposed the idea of a nanoscale "assembler" which would be able to build a copy of itself and of other items of arbitrary complexity with atomic control. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nanotechnology enables the design and fabrication of molecular structures of nanoscale dimensions that hold a great potential for several applications in the near future, including biomedicine. (eurekalert.org)
  • Nanotechnology is a collection of sciences that encompasses chemistry, biology, physics, engineering, and advanced computing technology to create or manipulate materials or processes at the nanoscale. (acs.org)
  • Very much like a White Paper, we seek to provide a forum and format that helps clarify nanotechnology and nanoscale science, to laymen, general business persons, non-specialists, highly skilled technicians, professionals, and academics. (nanotech-now.com)
  • The approach allows nanoscale scientists and engineers to explore nanotechnologies where they matter to people and places. (springer.com)
  • Micro- and nanotechnology hold great potential to fabricate biomimetic spatiotemporally controlled scaffolds as well as control stem cell behavior and fate by micro- and nanoscale cues. (routledge.com)
  • Below is a list of all articles, highlights, profiles, projects, and organizations related specifically to nanoscience and nanotechnology. (anl.gov)
  • The Master of Science in Nanotechnology Non-Thesis Track program provides students with knowledge and research training in nanoscience and nanotechnology. (ucf.edu)
  • NIOSH, through its Nanotechnology Research Center (NTRC) , conducts research and provides guidance on the occupational safety and health implications and applications of advanced materials and nanotechnology. (cdc.gov)
  • Also in 1986, Drexler co-founded The Foresight Institute (with which he is no longer affiliated) to help increase public awareness and understanding of nanotechnology concepts and implications. (wikipedia.org)
  • Christine Peterson, president of the Foresight Institute, a nonprofit organization that focuses on nanotechnology, finds the research of these companies and nanotechnology's future encouraging but says that "the challenges are still huge. (cio.com)
  • Training includes many nanotechnology resources including NU's International Institute for Nanotechnology, the Institute for BioNanotechnology, and the NU CCNE. (cancer.gov)
  • The definition of nanotechnology is inclusive of all types of research and technologies that deal with these special properties. (wikipedia.org)
  • If a size definition of nanotechnology could just be agreed upon, all the controversy would be settled. (ieee.org)
  • The course is designed to evolve with the recent developments in nanotechnology, and the modules and their contents will be continuously updated and expanded. (aiche.org)
  • Researchers hope a new nanotechnology technique will extend the fillings' longevity. (sciencedaily.com)
  • Princeton researchers have used their expertise in nanotechnology to develop an economical new system that markedly increases the brightness, efficiency and clarity of LEDs, which are widely used in smartphones and other electronics. (princeton.edu)
  • However, nanotechnology researchers at Lund University are on the track of a solution. (lu.se)
  • Nanotechnology may be able to create many new materials and devices with a vast range of applications , such as in nanomedicine , nanoelectronics , biomaterials energy production, and consumer products. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dexter Johnson is a contributing editor at IEEE Spectrum , with a focus on nanotechnology. (ieee.org)
  • [1] [2] A more generalized description of nanotechnology was subsequently established by the National Nanotechnology Initiative , which defined nanotechnology as the manipulation of matter with at least one dimension sized from 1 to 100 nanometers (nm). (wikipedia.org)
  • The Education Center of the national nanotechnology initiative which provides a list of university programs . (wikiversity.org)
  • Nanotechnology is the manipulation of matter on a near-atomic scale to produce new structures, materials and devices. (cdc.gov)
  • The emergence of nanotechnology as a field in the 1980s occurred through convergence of Drexler's theoretical and public work, which developed and popularized a conceptual framework for nanotechnology, and high-visibility experimental advances that drew additional wide-scale attention to the prospects of atomic control of matter. (wikipedia.org)
  • Challenges were raised regarding the feasibility of applications envisioned by advocates of molecular nanotechnology, which culminated in a public debate between Drexler and Smalley in 2001 and 2003. (wikipedia.org)
  • The NNI Interagency Workshop on Instrumentation and Metrology for Nanotechnology Grand Challenges was held on January 27-29, 2004 in Gaithersburg, Maryland, and was cosponsored by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), an agency of the U.S. Department of Commerce s Technology Administration, and the NSET. (nist.gov)
  • Wiek A, Guston DH, van der Leeuw S, Selin C, Shapira P (2013) Nanotechnology in the city: sustainability challenges and anticipatory governance. (springer.com)
  • WASHINGTON, April 27, 2015 - The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced more than $3.8 million in funding to support grants focused on using nanotechnology to find solutions to societal challenges such as food security, nutrition, food safety, and environmental protection. (usda.gov)
  • Over the last decade, a diversity of approaches have been proposed and developed to engage people in the innovation process of nanotechnology much earlier than in their conventional role as consumers. (springer.com)
  • The Center for Nanotechnology in the Natural Science Department at Coppin State University is involved in innovation work on a number of fronts including dye sensitized solar cell studies, Gold nanaparticle work, and Terahertz Spectroscopy. (coppin.edu)
  • When I heard about Dan's work in the field of nanomedicine and cancer, I knew I found an innovative approach combining nanotechnology and molecular biology to tackle brain cancer. (eurekalert.org)
  • In the 1980s, two major breakthroughs sparked the growth of nanotechnology in the modern era. (wikipedia.org)
  • Though it's still early, engineers at some of America's major computer companies are making headway with nanotechnology, announcing breakthroughs in research and potential new products. (cio.com)
  • Scientists currently debate the future implications of nanotechnology . (wikipedia.org)
  • Scientists recreate and compare molecular languages at the origin of life - opening new doors for the development of novel nanotechnologies. (newswise.com)
  • Roco MC, Hersam MC, Mirkin CA (2011) Nanotechnology research directions for societal needs in 2020. (springer.com)
  • Nanotechnology underpins many emerging industries and technological innovations, such as artificial intelligence, quantum information science, and advanced manufacturing. (acs.org)
  • Nanotechnology has the potential, within the next decade or two, to sharply increase the quality, cleanliness, efficiency, and profitability of manufacturing . (typepad.com)
  • In 2020 and 2021, Nature Nanotechnology hosted several panel discussions on exciting topics in nanotechnology. (nature.com)
  • The program prepares students for seeking employment in industry and academia involved in nanotechnology research, product development, and commercialization, or to pursue advanced PhD degrees in related areas. (ucf.edu)
  • Milford R, Wetmore JM (2013) A new model for public engagement: the dialogue on nanotechnology and religion. (springer.com)
  • Selin C (2013) Futurescape City tours: incorporating the temporal, sensual and material in public engagement with nanotechnology. (springer.com)
  • To say that I am ambivalent about the usefulness --or, better put, the point--of public engagement in the development of nanotechnology would be putting it mildly. (ieee.org)
  • The earliest, widespread description of nanotechnology referred to the particular technological goal of precisely manipulating atoms and molecules for fabrication of macroscale products, also now referred to as molecular nanotechnology . (wikipedia.org)
  • New nanotechnology can change the rules of the ways we manipulate light," said Chou, who has been working in the field for 30 years. (princeton.edu)
  • This book presents the latest micro- and nanotechnologies used to manipulate stem cell behaviors, which is a critical area for regenerative medicine. (routledge.com)
  • The goal of this program is to train MD- and PhD-level investigators (up to 4 per year) in the principles and tools of nanotechnology, cancer biology, and clinical oncology with the eventual goal of applying these skills to translational research that impacts cancer patients. (cancer.gov)
  • Houston), an eight-member multidisciplinary consortium dedicated to supporting the development of nanotechnology-based medical solutions. (mddionline.com)
  • and an elective multidisciplinary and modular nanotechnology course in the senior year of these programs. (aiche.org)
  • In this presentation, the type of modules being prepared, and the contents of the multidisciplinary and modular elective nanotechnology course will be described. (aiche.org)
  • Nanotechnology deals with the production and application of processes and materials composed of structurally definable particles on a scale of about 100 nanometres (1 nm = 10-9 m) or less in at least one dimension. (umweltbundesamt.de)
  • Nanotechnology refers to engineered structures, devices, and systems. (cdc.gov)
  • Nanotechnology refers to controlling, building, and restructuring materials and devices on the scale of atoms and molecules. (isaaa.org)
  • In the future, we will be adding other features that will help this to become your choice of sites for information relating to Nanotechnology. (nanotech-now.com)
  • While there's plenty of reason to be optimistic about the future of nanotechnology, policymakers should also consider its risks. (thebulletin.org)
  • While there's plenty of reason to be optimistic about the future of nanotechnology, policymakers should also consider its risks, including terrorist use of cheap scientific tools and militaries that develop destabilizing "cloaking" technology. (thebulletin.org)
  • Is Nanotechnology The Future Of Medicine? (sitepronews.com)
  • 3.3.5 As nanotechnology is a rapidly developing field, it will be necessary to continually reassess the terms and definitions contained in this standard, for purposes of revision when necessary. (astm.org)
  • Access NIOSH nanotechnology publications, reports, and guidance. (cdc.gov)
  • With a two year, $252,497 grant from the National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research, he will investigate guided tissue remineralization, a new nanotechnology process of growing extremely small, mineral-rich crystals and guiding them into the demineralized gaps between collagen fibers. (sciencedaily.com)
  • Nanotechnology can offer various environmental opportunities, e.g. in the field of energy and resource efficiency, site remediation, or water purification. (umweltbundesamt.de)
  • Fanfare surrounding nanotechnology trumpets the field as a medical panacea. (mddionline.com)
  • 3.2.2.2 Terms and nomenclature are based on observed scientific phenomena and are descriptive, distinguishable, and have significant currency in the nanotechnology field as reflected in peer-reviewed articles and other objective sources. (astm.org)
  • 1 This idea eventually became a research field known as nanotechnology. (isaaa.org)
  • I suppose this could be behind the odd practice of tagging on what Tim Harper describes as the "dystopian angle" to stories covering nanotechnology, even when they are bought and paid for by a government attempting to promote the field . (ieee.org)
  • The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said in its citation on Tuesday the technology was "one of the first real applications of the promising field of nanotechnology," which deals with extremely small devices. (kpbs.org)
  • In this case, we get your typical false equivalencies seen regularly in the mainstream press, which may help seed division and thereby sell papers, but seems to provide some poor information on the real risks and benefits of nanotechnology. (ieee.org)
  • But at the same time, nanotechnology carries risks. (thebulletin.org)
  • Nanotechnology involves research and development, production and processing of structures and materials on a nanometre scale. (umweltbundesamt.de)
  • Past projects include a Cornell University and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute venture that led to the development of a new nanotechnology that could keep bacteria from sticking to medical equipment and food processing machinery. (usda.gov)
  • For the United States to have a leadership position in the world in nanotechnology, all the human resources need to be utilized and a diverse workforce needs to be created. (aiche.org)
  • Controversies emerged regarding the definitions and potential implications of nanotechnologies, exemplified by the Royal Society's report on nanotechnology. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the initial focus of the research is to be on nanotechnology, the alliance's potential research could also include specialty metals, thermal materials, coatings and sensors, its backers say. (industryweek.com)
  • Yet, there is still potential for other types of impacts by leveraging links between nanotechnology and people's everyday experiences. (springer.com)
  • More research is needed to understand the impact of nanotechnology on health, and to determine appropriate exposure monitoring and control strategies. (cdc.gov)
  • Research in nanotechnology may have an important positive impact on the world. (thebulletin.org)
  • For the materials science journal, see Nanotechnology (journal) . (wikipedia.org)
  • Workers within nanotechnology-related industries may be exposed to uniquely engineered materials. (cdc.gov)
  • Perhaps the Next Big Thing on the horizon, nanotechnology is the science of manipulating materials on an atomic or molecular scale. (cio.com)
  • The solution presented by Chou's team is the invention of a nanotechnology structure called PlaCSH (plasmonic cavity with subwavelength hole-array). (princeton.edu)
  • What if we could use antibodies as functional tools for nanotechnology applications? (eurekalert.org)
  • The nanotechnology center is equipped with the state-of-the-art instrumentation such as solar simulator, potentiostat, and a spin coater which are very critical to the advancement of this particular type of research. (coppin.edu)
  • This paper is a systematic review of the literature on the mechanisms of cell adhesion to bone grafts associated to nanotechnology, describing the importance and the role of those molecules in the adhesion and thus in tissue regeneration. (bvsalud.org)
  • There are two major approaches to remediate air pollutants applying nanotechnology: nano-catalysts and nano-structured membranes. (bibalex.org)
  • Chemists have successfully crafted three-dimensional molecular structures, a breakthrough that unites biotechnology and nanotechnology. (isaaa.org)
  • UBA seeks to provide information about the environmental and health aspects of nanotechnology, to narrow the gap in knowledge, and to identify further need for action. (umweltbundesamt.de)
  • A project from Harvard School of Public Health is investigating the effectiveness of a chemical-free, nanotechnology-based method for the inactivation of pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms on the surface of fruits and vegetables. (usda.gov)
  • health, environmental and safety issues associated with nanotechnology. (aiche.org)